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texasdave
02-19-2013, 12:58 PM
After their tantalizing one-off gig in 2007, Robert Plant has hinted that he's open to a Led Zeppelin reunion next year. Speaking to Australia's version of 60 Minutes, the singer deflected the notion that he's the reason for Zeppelin's dormancy. "[Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones] are Capricorns. They don't say a word. They're quite contained in their own worlds and they leave it to me," said Plant. "I'm not the bad guy . . . You need to see the Capricorns I've got nothing to do in 2014."

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/robert-plant-hints-hed-be-open-to-led-zeppelin-reunion-20130218#ixzz2LMwEU2ed
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Dom Heffner
02-19-2013, 01:30 PM
Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/robert-plant-hints-hed-be-open-to-led-zeppelin-reunion-20130218#ixzz2LMwEU2ed
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Ahh....Robert Plant is the problem...if he's playing that he's not, I suspect he is anyway.

I get it- they are already the greatest band in history and he doesn't want to taint the image. But that concert showed they are more than just Loverboy taking a tour of Holiday Inn lounge's across I-95.

It would be the greatest thing to ever happen, I would pay any amount, and I would probably cry like a baby.

But really, Plant is the problem and my hopes are going to remain low. He talks about ruinig the legacy, and then shacks up with some no name chick in Austin, Texas...and that is better than doing Zeppelin again. Whatever.

marcshoe
02-19-2013, 01:49 PM
Didn't he once use the excuse that what stood in the way of a reunion was that he hated Stairway and Page loved it?

Captain13
02-19-2013, 04:02 PM
Didn't he once use the excuse that what stood in the way of a reunion was that he hated Stairway and Page loved it?

When Page & Plant toured in the mid-90s they refused to play Stairway.

Captain13
02-19-2013, 04:05 PM
I think a Zeppelin reunion would be like watching the Big Red Machine play Red Sox again. It would be neat for a couple of innings (or four songs), but it would just leave me longing for what was instead of what is. Let's face it, Robert Plant isn't what he used to be.

cinredsfan2000
02-19-2013, 04:40 PM
To bad page couldn't get David Coverdale to do another album .If you have heard any of the clips of coverdale doing various zep songs you'd realize David Coverdale is every bit Robert Plants equal if not superior at least Coverdale don't say he cant/dosent want to do his old materiel..like in the 80's

Joseph
02-19-2013, 04:54 PM
I'm with Dom on this, hopes are low, but if....oh my if....

IF it were to happen, and IF they played a true sampling of their catalog, they could literally charge anything for tickets. Not that it would necessarily be about money because so far as I know none of them have any 'need' for cash. Literally would pay thousands to see them IF they had Jason Bonham or Dave Grohl as the drummer. Eh who am I kidding, I don't care who the drummer is, but it'd be cool if it was one of those guys.

The great thing about this band is....well everything.

Yeah they borrowed, stole, modified blues songs and riffs, but lets face it, there are only a handful of note combinations out there so its all just 'modified' stuff in a lot of cases these days.

Is there a better song than....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrVDViSlsSM

The answer is, it depends on what day of the week it is. I have verry few songs of theirs I don't absolutely marvel at.

I'm just babbling all over the place now, but put me in the category of hell yes.

Reds/Flyers Fan
02-19-2013, 05:00 PM
I'm with Dom on this, hopes are low, but if....oh my if....

IF it were to happen, and IF they played a true sampling of their catalog, they could literally charge anything for tickets. Not that it would necessarily be about money because so far as I know none of them have any 'need' for cash. Literally would pay thousands to see them IF they had Jason Bonham or Dave Grohl as the drummer. Eh who am I kidding, I don't care who the drummer is, but it'd be cool if it was one of those guys.

The great thing about this band is....well everything.

Yeah they borrowed, stole, modified blues songs and riffs, but lets face it, there are only a handful of note combinations out there so its all just 'modified' stuff in a lot of cases these days.

Is there a better song than....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrVDViSlsSM

The answer is, it depends on what day of the week it is. I have verry few songs of theirs I don't absolutely marvel at.

I'm just babbling all over the place now, but put me in the category of hell yes.

Yes ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wEi2aYmdNU

texasdave
02-19-2013, 05:01 PM
It has to be a different day down here in Texas because this is my all-time favorite Led Zeppelin song. Of course, you have to look long and hard to find a bad one. I'd trade my Dusty Baker sweat bands for a Led Zeppelin Reunion ticket.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6S9oqJRclo

Tony Cloninger
02-19-2013, 05:30 PM
I can never stop listening to Misty Mountain Hop and When the Levee Breaks....over and over again. Only songs i have ever downloaded to my phone for use as my greetings.

Dom Heffner
02-19-2013, 06:17 PM
It's tough to pick a favorite. I think they are the greatest rock band that ever lived.

Plant is worried and I understand- but he's wrong. Nothing is going to change their stature- it's not like they did this for thirty years on end, milking this.

These are three guys who are still at the top of their game- the o2 concert was breathtaking.

I would sell anything I had to see it.

Dom Heffner
02-19-2013, 06:28 PM
I'm with Dom on this, hopes are low, but if....oh my if....

IF it were to happen, and IF they played a true sampling of their catalog, they could literally charge anything for tickets. Not that it would necessarily be about money because so far as I know none of them have any 'need' for cash. Literally would pay thousands to see them IF they had Jason Bonham or Dave Grohl as the drummer. Eh who am I kidding, I don't care who the drummer is, but it'd be cool if it was one of those guys.

The great thing about this band is....well everything.

Yeah they borrowed, stole, modified blues songs and riffs, but lets face it, there are only a handful of note combinations out there so its all just 'modified' stuff in a lot of cases these days.

Is there a better song than....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrVDViSlsSM

The answer is, it depends on what day of the week it is. I have verry few songs of theirs I don't absolutely marvel at.

I'm just babbling all over the place now, but put me in the category of hell yes.

Babble away, brother. Marvel away.

I was explaining to someone the other day why Jimmy Page is the greatest guitarist of all time: because he makes you want to sing along to guitar riffs. You can't do that to Eddie Van Halen. You don't do that to Hendrix.

I hope this happens for the sake of seeing something like this with my own eyes- just something to make me, for one night, think about how music used to be so awesome and something to look forward to. Someone convince Robert Plant that this is bigger than him. Please.

*BaseClogger*
02-20-2013, 10:59 AM
I was explaining to someone the other day why Jimmy Page is the greatest guitarist of all time: because he makes you want to sing along to guitar riffs. You can't do that to Eddie Van Halen. You don't do that to Hendrix.

:laugh: Of course that is your number one criteria!

George Anderson
02-20-2013, 11:12 AM
Im to busy to look it up but I thought Plant's voice couldn't uphold a concert tour.

I hope they do though. It's on my "bucket list".

I love Zeppelin!!

Dom Heffner
02-20-2013, 11:18 AM
:laugh: Of course that is your number one criteria!

I don't know that it is number one- it's what makes him better.

Captain13
02-20-2013, 11:29 AM
I don't know that it is number one- it's what makes him better.

My opinion on Page is he can play almost any style of blues-based (rock-n-roll) as well or better than anyone. A small sampling of Zeppelin (I Can't Quit You Baby, Rock and Roll, Over the Hills and Far Away, The Immigrant Song, Travelling Riverside Blues) leaves me wondering if there is anything that man can't do with a guitar.

Zeppelin is better than (fill in the blank) because Page is better than (fill in the blank).

SunDeck
02-20-2013, 12:51 PM
Last time they played Cincinnati a friend's dad was a Cincinnati cop on security detail at the coliseum. His description of the events sounded more like a riot than what Zeppelin has on their web site. One police motorcycle was tossed off the plaza level to the street below and there was a lot of blood and broken bones.


ZEPPELIN MELEE - CINCINNATI (UPI) — Police reported today about 70 persons were arrested Tuesday night m a melee caused by would-be gate-crashers at a Led Zeppelin rock concert. Several windows were broken and several doors smashed at Riverfront Coliseum, where several hundred persons without tickets milled about, hoping to get into the already sold-out concert. Several persons were hit by rocks and bottles, but no serious injuries were reported.

Inside the coliseum, the concert went on as scheduled. (The Journal, April 1977)

Dom Heffner
02-20-2013, 01:47 PM
My opinion on Page is he can play almost any style of blues-based (rock-n-roll) as well or better than anyone. A small sampling of Zeppelin (I Can't Quit You Baby, Rock and Roll, Over the Hills and Far Away, The Immigrant Song, Travelling Riverside Blues) leaves me wondering if there is anything that man can't do with a guitar.

Zeppelin is better than (fill in the blank) because Page is better than (fill in the blank).

Yes- and he does it without feeling the need to bloat the song with just endless guitar whining. You want to sing along with the guitar. I can't think of many bands where the guitar is just as strong as the vocals. And even the drums and bass are that way.

Honestly, the man is a riff machine and they just come at you one after the other.

I read where he did the guitar work on Tom Jones' "She's a Lady." Tough to confirm as he is pretty private on his session work but man, what a cool dude.

I'm going to steal a line from Lester Bangs (ironic because Bangs hated Zeppelin) but Led Zeppelin does in 9 songs per album what other bands can't do in 12.

They are unbelievable. And odd considering I don't like blues, I don't like the whole Viking Lord of the Rings thing, but these guys are just a religious experience for me.

Dom Heffner
02-20-2013, 01:53 PM
I often wonder if Plant doesn't want to do it for other reasons. I know when hi son died in 77 or 78, he has been quoted as saying he was done, mentally, right then and there. Bonham's death just sealed it.

I wonder if getting back together would bring back stuff he doesn't want to think about.

Funny how he complained about Stairway to Heaven- Page hated "All My Love." They ought to do both every night to get back at each other and we all win.

Captain13
02-20-2013, 02:36 PM
I agree about singing along (and I add air guitar). It's funny when I think about guitarists from the "rock god" era; Clapton was arguably the best blues guy, Iommi may have been the true riff-master, Van Halen could shred with anyone (including Hendrix), Allman could bend a string and make you cry, but Page was right there in every category. Like I said above, there seemed to be no end to his ability as a player and even as a songwriter. I would have loved to hear Page work with the likes of Jack Bruce, Ozzy Osbourne, Ian Gillan, and Freddy Mercury. The results of his work with Plant, Coverdale and to a lesser extent Paul Rogers speaks for itself.

To your point about his session work, from what I understand it isn't that he is that private it is that he did so many songs with so many people when he was a teenager, he really doesn't remember all the tracks he played. I have heard him say things like, "I was in a studio with "X" and we were playing either 'A" or "B", or maybe it was "C". Let's face it when he recorded these songs, he hadn't heard them before, noone had. And being in the studios all day he heard lots of new stuff. Now I'm just rambling on about Jimmy Page, I think I will go listen to Led Zeppelin II.

*BaseClogger*
02-20-2013, 05:39 PM
Don't know of a better place to put this article about the demise of mainstream rock music:


My decision to begin the Winners' History of Rock and Roll with Led Zeppelin is bound to be at least a little bit controversial. The Beatles have sold more albums, as has Elton John. It could be argued — wrongly, but not outrageously so — that the Stones or even the Grateful Dead have left larger footprints on culture, if those footprints are measured in cubic inches per Rolling Stone cover and/or blacklight poster. But Zeppelin truly is the right choice because it is the band that set the terms by which every other band afterward would come to classify victory in rock music.

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8821559/the-winners-history-rock-roll-part-1-led-zeppelin

Roy Tucker
02-20-2013, 07:52 PM
Last time they played Cincinnati a friend's dad was a Cincinnati cop on security detail at the coliseum. His description of the events sounded more like a riot than what Zeppelin has on their web site. One police motorcycle was tossed off the plaza level to the street below and there was a lot of blood and broken bones.

I went to this show. It's why I didn't go to see the Who a year or 2 later and missed all that mayhem. It was pure madness. I was rock n roll animal then but that crush scene outside the gates was too much even for me. I really thought I was going to die for a couple minutes.

I'd pass on seeing Zep now. They aren't anywhere close to what they used to be. Their best days are way long gone. Page may still be able to bang out the killer riffs, but Plant's Viking banshee cry is gone. And John Bonham's drumming was what really propelled that band. "How The West Was Won" truly shows that.

Raisor
02-20-2013, 08:31 PM
I gotta whole lotta love for a Zeppelin reunion.

*BaseClogger*
02-20-2013, 09:20 PM
I'd pass on seeing Zep now. They aren't anywhere close to what they used to be. Their best days are way long gone. Page may still be able to bang out the killer riffs, but Plant's Viking banshee cry is gone. And John Bonham's drumming was what really propelled that band. "How The West Was Won" truly shows that.

If I could time travel to see a great band perform in their heyday, no doubt Zep would be near the top of my list. But this is generally how I feel about reunions. if bands are no longer recording new music, they generally lack the vigor and life to make paying the inordinate prices worthwhile.

Why not go see this generation's Led Zeppelin (or at least performers in their prime)?

texasdave
02-21-2013, 02:03 AM
I don't know that it is number one- it's what makes him better.

I agree wholeheartedly.

SunDeck
02-21-2013, 06:43 AM
I'd pass on seeing Zep now. They aren't anywhere close to what they used to be. Their best days are way long gone. Page may still be able to bang out the killer riffs, but Plant's Viking banshee cry is gone. And John Bonham's drumming was what really propelled that band. "How The West Was Won" truly shows that.

We aren't the rockers we used to be either. It might be cool to see them in a sort of unplugged format, reinterpreting some of their classics.

RedFanAlways1966
02-21-2013, 06:46 AM
Page, Plant... Page, Plant. John Paul Jones! The most versatile musician in the band. You'd be surprised, if you did not already know, how many instruments Jones played. And his background before joining LZ was as impressive as Page (just no Yardbirds). But no fault of anyone here. It is the norm... Page, Plant. And of course Bonham gets lots of mention for his great drumming and untimely death. As we say in sports... I'd build my band around JPJ.

SunDeck
02-21-2013, 09:08 AM
Page, Plant... Page, Plant. John Paul Jones! The most versatile musician in the band. You'd be surprised, if you did not already know, how many instruments Jones played. And his background before joining LZ was as impressive as Page (just no Yardbirds). But no fault of anyone here. It is the norm... Page, Plant. And of course Bonham gets lots of mention for his great drumming and untimely death. As we say in sports... I'd build my band around JPJ.

Page gave Jones a lot of credit in the Rolling Stone interview. I like Bonham's drumming a lot; it seems he's always on the verge of falling behind and it creates a tension that can be almost unbearable to listen to. Yet, he keeps the songs moving.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 01:57 PM
Page, Plant... Page, Plant. John Paul Jones! The most versatile musician in the band. You'd be surprised, if you did not already know, how many instruments Jones played. And his background before joining LZ was as impressive as Page (just no Yardbirds). But no fault of anyone here. It is the norm... Page, Plant. And of course Bonham gets lots of mention for his great drumming and untimely death. As we say in sports... I'd build my band around JPJ.

Bass players are the offensive tackles of music.

John Paul Jones wrote a bunch of great Zeppelin riffs- his keyboard work on All My Love is awesome....

They just don't rank bass guitar players.

RedFanAlways1966
02-21-2013, 07:39 PM
So true, Dom. The reason there are about 20 guitar player mags to every 1 bass player mag (or sites... showing my age). I have always said if you want to get in a band, then learn the bass. Everyone plays guitar and of course most professional bass players started on the guitar (not Jones though). Even Page played bass (switched to bass lol) when he first joined the Yardbirds.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 08:14 PM
If I could time travel to see a great band perform in their heyday, no doubt Zep would be near the top of my list. But this is generally how I feel about reunions. if bands are no longer recording new music, they generally lack the vigor and life to make paying the inordinate prices worthwhile.

Why not go see this generation's Led Zeppelin (or at least performers in their prime)?

The problem with reunions is that they normally aren't really reunions. Journey getting back together after 7 years isn't really a reunion.

The difference here for me is that Zeppelin is the greatest rock and roll band ever, the material has not only aged well it's even better in some regards, and they can still play. I was blown away by the O2- just magical.

And not to sound snobbish but there is no this generation's Zeppelin. That's never going to happen again.

Music is in such a pathetic state, I finds self going backwards to get new music. I like to rediscover or find things I've never spent much time with before.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 08:19 PM
So true, Dom. The reason there are about 20 guitar player mags to every 1 bass player mag (or sites... showing my age). I have always said if you want to get in a band, then learn the bass. Everyone plays guitar and of course most professional bass players started on the guitar (not Jones though). Even Page played bass (switched to bass lol) when he first joined the Yardbirds.

Not going to lie- I was surprised to see Jones' influence. I was always told it was pretty much Page's baby but all of them contributed and JPJ was key on some of their best riffs. Talented man- great bassist and keyboards as well.

I could go on and on about Zeppelin. Just the best.

And to see Jason Bonham with so much respect for the legacy and his father- he wears it on his sleeve. I read where he quit Foreigner in hopes of a Zeppelin tour only to be told Plant wasn't going along.

Revering4Blue
02-21-2013, 08:43 PM
Don't know of a better place to put this article about the demise of mainstream rock music:



http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8821559/the-winners-history-rock-roll-part-1-led-zeppelin

Not that it really matters, but there is one simple reason why Led Zeppelin, in some cases, appears to lack the Universal appeal of the Beatles and/or The Rolling Stones: The Beatles and Stones were always a much bigger presence (no pun intended) on Pop Radio than Led Zeppelin, whose music - for the most part - was/is too sophisticated for the average Pop/non Rock listener.

As for the purported demise of Mainstream Rock music, it very much is alive and well. As we've all pointed out in other threads, it is Mainstream Rock as a terrestrial radio format that is disappearing.

Revering4Blue
02-21-2013, 08:47 PM
If I could time travel to see a great band perform in their heyday, no doubt Zep would be near the top of my list. But this is generally how I feel about reunions. if bands are no longer recording new music, they generally lack the vigor and life to make paying the inordinate prices worthwhile.

Why not go see this generation's Led Zeppelin (or at least performers in their prime)?

This.

Maybe it is just me, but I'd like to see some new material - not necessarily an entire album.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 08:51 PM
Some of the biggest grossing acts are ones that have not put out anything in years.

For me, I'd rather pay $500 to hear Zeppelin rehash songs 40 years old than see Mumford and Sons play ten new ones for $75.

I see the point and it applies to some acts- No amount of new material is going to make Night Ranger sound fresh.

Revering4Blue
02-21-2013, 08:56 PM
The problem with reunions is that they normally aren't really reunions. Journey getting back together after 7 years isn't really a reunion.

The difference here for me is that Zeppelin is the greatest rock and roll band ever, the material has not only aged well it's even better in some regards, and they can still play. I was blown away by the O2- just magical.

Fair enough.

But, far more often than not, at least from my experiences, band reunions following a considerable time apart usually wind up akin to a group of middle aged adults spending the evening tee-peeing every house on the block - having a good time while looking extremely foolish in the process.


And not to sound snobbish but there is no this generation's Zeppelin. That's never going to happen again.

No truer words were spoken.

Raisor
02-21-2013, 09:08 PM
. He talks about ruinig the legacy, and then shacks up with some no name chick in Austin, Texas...and that is better than doing Zeppelin again. Whatever.

Wait, you aren't talking about Alison Krauss are you? She's awesome.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 09:09 PM
But, far more often than not, at least from my experiences, band reunions following a considerable time apart usually wind up akin to a group of middle aged adults spending the evening tee-peeing every house on the block - having a good time while looking extremely foolish in the process.

And this is what Robert Plant is afraid of. He's said it. You are spot on. He is spot on.

A 70 year old man singing the opening line of Black Dog...in lesser hands could be tacky.

But if I had ten minutes with Mr. Plant I would tell him he has nothing to fear. He isn't a 300 pound Mike Reno singing Lovin' Every Minute of it. These are fine musicians of enormous talent playing songs that were compositions as much as they were great rock and roll songs.

Dom Heffner
02-21-2013, 09:10 PM
Wait, you aren't talking about Alison Krauss are you? She's awesome.

No- he's living with a different female musician.

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 09:18 AM
And not to sound snobbish but there is no this generation's Zeppelin. That's never going to happen again.

Music is in such a pathetic state, I finds self going backwards to get new music. I like to rediscover or find things I've never spent much time with before.

You always have the snobbery covered ;)

Do you mean current rock music, or music in general?

I think music as a whole is in a Golden Era right now...

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 09:23 AM
Some of the biggest grossing acts are ones that have not put out anything in years.

That has nothing to do with the quality of the show. It just means plenty of middle-aged folks (the people with the money) pay high prices to try to relive their glory years.


For me, I'd rather pay $500 to hear Zeppelin rehash songs 40 years old than see Mumford and Sons play ten new ones for $75.

I see the point and it applies to some acts- No amount of new material is going to make Night Ranger sound fresh.

Dunno who Night Ranger is.

I'd rather pay $20 25 times to watch some of the brightest acts in modern music than pay $500 to watch a past-their-prime 3/4 Zep go through the motions...

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 09:26 AM
As for the purported demise of Mainstream Rock music, it very much is alive and well. As we've all pointed out in other threads, it is Mainstream Rock as a terrestrial radio format that is disappearing.

Huh? It's not just the radio. Rock music doesn't chart anymore. It isn't on TV. You can make a case that there is still lots of great rock music out there, but *mainstream* rock music was buried 10 years ago...

Dom Heffner
02-22-2013, 11:22 AM
That has nothing to do with the quality of the show. It just means plenty of middle-aged folks (the people with the money) pay high prices to try to relive their glory years.



Dunno who Night Ranger is.

I'd rather pay $20 25 times to watch some of the brightest acts in modern music than pay $500 to watch a past-their-prime 3/4 Zep go through the motions...

There were over a million ticket requests for the O2 show.

I doubt if _____________ (insert any living band) could generate that type of interest.

I do see the point of reliving glory years, though Zeppelin hasn't done it ever, so it;s not like they are just beating a dead horse. They aren't the Beach Boys touring every year....

For me, this is a completely different situation. To each his own! :)

Dom Heffner
02-22-2013, 11:26 AM
Huh? It's not just the radio. Rock music doesn't chart anymore. It isn't on TV. You can make a case that there is still lots of great rock music out there, but *mainstream* rock music was buried 10 years ago...

Don't Stop Believin' outsells most current stuff. I dunno...how golden is it if nobody is listening?

And I know someone is going to point out that sales don't mean anything, but they do to a certain degree because it measures audience.

It's the Dinsoaur, Jr thing: it's supposedly awesome, nobody knows who they are (I quite like them, incidentally).

Dom Heffner
02-22-2013, 11:29 AM
Sorry to respond so many times, I didn't see this:


That has nothing to do with the quality of the show. It just means plenty of middle-aged folks (the people with the money) pay high prices to try to relive their glory years.

If you haven't seen the O2 show, go get it. If I paid top dollar for that, I would have thought I ripped them off. It was that good.

redsfanmia
02-22-2013, 04:51 PM
No- he's living with a different female musician.

Patty Griffen

westofyou
02-22-2013, 05:04 PM
Patty Griffen

She's awesome

Revering4Blue
02-22-2013, 05:45 PM
Rock music doesn't chart anymore.

Au contraire.

http://www.americasmusiccharts.com/index.cgi?fmt=R5

http://www.billboard.com/charts/rock-songs


*mainstream* rock music was buried 10 years ago

If by *Mainstream Rock* you mean Rage Against The Machine, Limp Bizkit and the like, you're correct. And it couldn't have died soon enough for me.:D

All kidding aside, my definition of *Mainstream Rock* - and most, if not all, Generation Xrs seem to agree with me - encompasses what is today four rock radio formats: alternative rock, mainstream rock and (Adult Album Alternative) triple A and, of course classic rock. You rarely, if ever, get them all today on one terrestrial radio station.

But I do agree with your point that there is still a lot of great Rock music out there, including much of the same type of Rock that Dom and I grew up with. But the methods of locating it all have changed.

In short, you're assertion of a Golden Age of music - even confining it to Rock - has merit, IMO. There is literally something for every sub-genred Rock taste. I'm certainly not going to turn up my nose at Modern Rock. Plus, many Rock bands are staging recording comebacks. No reason Led Zeppelin shouldn't be one of them.

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 05:58 PM
Don't Stop Believin' outsells most current stuff. I dunno...how golden is it if nobody is listening?

And I know someone is going to point out that sales don't mean anything, but they do to a certain degree because it measures audience.

It's the Dinsoaur, Jr thing: it's supposedly awesome, nobody knows who they are (I quite like them, incidentally).

I've been reading that Grantland series I linked to earlier in the thread, and the fifth part on Metallica had a fact that just blew me away:


The Black Album sold 110,000 copies in 2012 alone, which is better than all but a handful of contemporary rock bands.

It's not unfair to point out that sales don't mean anything anymore though, Dom. People don't consume music in the same format as they did 20 years ago. Album sales as a whole are significantly down. If the music industry is lucky, people buy songs one at a time online. Most of them are pirated. Others are like me, and consume 90% of their music through online streaming services like Spotify (those don't show up in record sales).

So why is it a Golden Age? Because for $10 per month, I have at my fingertips all music that was ever recorded, including from your beloved 1960s and 1970s, in addition to an infinite amount of music being recorded today. Anybody can record their music. There are no barriers. How awesome is that?

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 06:02 PM
I do see the point of reliving glory years, though Zeppelin hasn't done it ever, so it;s not like they are just beating a dead horse. They aren't the Beach Boys touring every year....

For me, this is a completely different situation. To each his own! :)

That's fair enough. I like Zep and would love to see them perform! :rockband:

Dom Heffner
02-22-2013, 06:27 PM
I've been reading that Grantland series I linked to earlier in the thread, and the fifth part on Metallica had a fact that just blew me away:



It's not unfair to point out that sales don't mean anything anymore though, Dom. People don't consume music in the same format as they did 20 years ago. Album sales as a whole are significantly down. If the music industry is lucky, people buy songs one at a time online. Most of them are pirated. Others are like me, and consume 90% of their music through online streaming services like Spotify (those don't show up in record sales).

So why is it a Golden Age? Because for $10 per month, I have at my fingertips all music that was ever recorded, including from your beloved 1960s and 1970s, in addition to an infinite amount of music being recorded today. Anybody can record their music. There are no barriers. How awesome is that?

Without question, the manner in which we consume music has its advantages.

The fact remains that much of the older stuff sells just as much as the newer stuff. Go to iTunes, click charts, click rock. People buy the older stuff. And I'm not sure we can say that newer music is consumed differently so this is not a significant point.

By no means do I want to get into a taste contest with you- if this is golden for you, it's golden for you.

And for the record- Zeppelin was just a tad before me. Hated them.

I say this only to point out that they played very little role in my glory days. Duran Duran would have fit that bill for me.

But really listening to Zeppelin has convinced me the golden age was just before I was born. That's my taste, of course. It took getting older to realize Peter Cetera really did ruin Chicago.

Having said that, today's music may be all that and a toaster for you, and I am not trying to take that away from anyone.

I remember in my younger days arguing the hair bands were better than AC/DC. They aren't, of course, but they were for me then.

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 07:09 PM
I spend every eight hour workday listening to Spotify, and typically I will hear five to ten new bands each of those days. I start with my favorites and dig more and more into obscurity. Sometimes, I find something in this pile that I am absolutely blown away by. For instance, a couple weeks ago I discovered this band:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctUsCIrIsq4

How much fun does that look?

My question then is, really, how would I have discovered this song in the supposed Golden Era for rock music, the 1960s and 1970s? I wouldn't have. This band, from Scranton, PA, would have played a few of these awesome gigs in their hometown, never gotten the publicity necessary for me to become aware of their existence, and dissolved. There's no way they would have gotten a record deal because, as I'm fully aware, they don't have mass appeal. Hell, you can say that song sucked and I wouldn't be offended. It just happens to perfectly match *my* tastes. And that's what is so cool about this era--I can find as much music as I desire that matches my specific tastes...

westofyou
02-22-2013, 07:18 PM
I spend every eight hour workday listening to Spotify, and typically I will hear five to ten new bands each of those days. I start with my favorites and dig more and more into obscurity. Sometimes, I find something in this pile that I am absolutely blown away by. For instance, a couple weeks ago I discovered this band:


My question then is, really, how would I have discovered this song in the supposed Golden Era for rock music, the 1960s and 1970s? I wouldn't have. This band, from Scranton, PA, would have played a few of these awesome gigs in their hometown, never gotten the publicity necessary for me to become aware of their existence, and dissolved. There's no way they would have gotten a record deal because, as I'm fully aware, they don't have mass appeal. Hell, you can say that song sucked and I wouldn't be offended. It just happens to perfectly match *my* tastes. And that's what is so cool about this era--I can find as much music as I desire that matches my specific tastes...

Radio used to be a much more vibrant and diversified format on the FM dial, much, much, much more.

Once upon a time playlists were unique to each DJ and suits didn't own the turntable

*BaseClogger*
02-22-2013, 07:35 PM
Radio used to be a much more vibrant and diversified format on the FM dial, much, much, much more.

Once upon a time playlists were unique to each DJ and suits didn't own the turntable

I don't disagree with any of that. But taking it one step further: how would they have gotten recorded and distributed?

marcshoe
02-22-2013, 09:30 PM
Patty Griffen

Seriously? I love Patty Griffin.

GAC
02-23-2013, 04:36 AM
Next to the Beatles, they're my 2nd All-time favorite rock band. But that's in pretty good company I'd say.

I've not only got every one of their albums, including various bootlegs, but about a year ago got on youtube and downloaded, transferred the audio to CD, a lot of old live stuff I've never heard.

Led Zeppelin I is simply one of the greatest rock n roll blues albums ever released, and it should be in everyone's collection. Dazed and Confused! Wow!


I was explaining to someone the other day why Jimmy Page is the greatest guitarist of all time: because he makes you want to sing along to guitar riffs. You can't do that to Eddie Van Halen. You don't do that to Hendrix.

If Chip is reading this thread he'll verify a situation a few years ago in a local Cincy bar, after a Red's game, where I got in a lively discussion with a bartender over who is the greatest rock guitarist. He was a Hendrix guy, I'm Page. I guess it always boils down to personal preference, Everyone has that one who really grabbed hold of them, knocked them over the head when they heard them. And with me it has always been Page.

Over these many years I've had friends who were musicians, played in bands, and I'd always bring that question up. And pretty much every one of them told me that Page was a GOOD guitarist, but a better producer (one of the best). Several would say he was too "undisciplined", sloppy playing live. I saw it as shear rawness. His playing captivated me.


I hope this happens for the sake of seeing something like this with my own eyes- just something to make me, for one night, think about how music used to be so awesome and something to look forward to. Someone convince Robert Plant that this is bigger than him. Please.

Did you happen to see them on Letterman abut a month ago? Pretty neat.

Looks like Page is going on tour this year...... http://ultimateclassicrock.com/jimmy-page-announces-plans-for-2013-solo-tour/

If he comes anywhere near here I'll be there!

Has anyone ever heard is 1988 solo album Outrider? I never have, and need to find it.

GAC
02-23-2013, 04:50 AM
I read where he did the guitar work on Tom Jones' "She's a Lady." Tough to confirm as he is pretty private on his session work but man, what a cool dude.

That's true. He also played on Tom Jones' "It's Not Unusual" too, as well as the Who's "I Can't Explain", and a few Kink songs. He was a very sought-after studio guitarist in the early-mid 1960's. My brother bought me two CDs where he was the session guitarist on various early (and forgettable) 60's bands....

Jimmy Page In-Session: A Look at the Guitar Legend’s Pre-Zeppelin Studio Work

http://www2.gibson.com/News-Lifestyle/Features/en-us/jimmy-page-0511.aspx

Led Zeppelin trivia: A few hit songs you never knew Jimmy Page played on .... http://www.examiner.com/article/led-zeppelin-trivia-a-few-hit-songs-you-never-knew-jimmy-page-played-on#CID=SG-Survey-Close

Dom - you might enjoy the Yardbird's performing "Dazed and Confused" (with Page) at the bottom of the article. ;)

GAC
02-23-2013, 05:22 AM
Music is generational. What I mean by that is not that one generation can't enjoy another generation's music; but that each generation's likes to have something that's"theirs", that identifies them. My Dad was a HUGE Big Band Era freak. Loved Glenn Miller. With me, I'm still trapped in the 60s/70s. And that's fine with me. I really can't identify at all with any of "today's" music, and really don't know a majority of what's out there, other then what I hear my kids listening to. And I'm not impressed, but again - it's their generation.

But my kids, love my music. They've been exposed to it because I play CDs whenever we're in the car. I'm not a big radio listener. They especially love the Beatles. My oldest boy is currently captivated with "I Am The Walrus" to the point I'm about ready to Goo Goo Ga Joob him upside the head because he plays it constantly.

Yesterday I had my youngest boy in the car and I was listening to some old Alice Cooper.... Ballad of Dwight Frye, Halo of Flies, Generation Landslide, etc.... but when it got to No More Mr Nice guy he flipped out - "Dad, Is this a new band? Did you just buy this?".... "Uh, no son, it's only about 40 years old." LOL

I might be wrong as rain and just getting old, but I can't see my kids, when they're my age, wanting to share Lady Gaga, and some of the stuff they listen to today, with their kids.

GAC
02-23-2013, 05:26 AM
Radio used to be a much more vibrant and diversified format on the FM dial, much, much, much more.

Once upon a time playlists were unique to each DJ and suits didn't own the turntable

I remember when there was only AM radio, and Hey Jude, which was 8 minutes long, broke the barrier. LOL

Razor Shines
02-23-2013, 12:29 PM
If I could time travel to see a great band perform in their heyday, no doubt Zep would be near the top of my list. But this is generally how I feel about reunions. if bands are no longer recording new music, they generally lack the vigor and life to make paying the inordinate prices worthwhile.

Why not go see this generation's Led Zeppelin (or at least performers in their prime)?

You mean The Airborne Toxic Event? Hey everybody he's talking about The Airborne Toxic Event.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Revering4Blue
02-24-2013, 10:38 AM
Has anyone ever heard is 1988 solo album Outrider? I never have, and need to find it.

It's well worth checking out and you can listen to the entire album here - and it won't cost you a dime.

http://grooveshark.com/#!/search?q=jimmy+page+outrider

It is an interesting mix of instrumentals and tracks with various vocalists - Robert Plant and John Miles ( The voice of the Alan Parsons Project track "Stereotomy") among others.

You may recall the tracks "Wasting My Time", "The Only One" and "Prison Blues", as they were all over rock radio at the time.