PDA

View Full Version : Drafting pitching vs. hitting?



Drugs Delaney
06-07-2013, 11:22 PM
By my unofficial count, it looks like the Reds grabbed 8 pitchers and only 3 position players in the first 10 rounds. And one of the 3 position players could end up switching to pitcher, which would make it 9 to 2 in favor of pitchers.

Is this an abnormally heavy emphasis on pitching?

If so, does it indicate that the Reds view the organizational depth as weaker in pitching than in hitting?

Does being a mid-sized market with a lot of future salary tied up in a few position players mean the organization has to focus on drafting and developing pitchers even more so than normal?

Or is it more likely just a random occurrence based on the Reds drafting BPA regardless of position?

dougdirt
06-07-2013, 11:23 PM
Usually it is about 50-50 for hitting/pitching. At this point it is just a bit of a random thing.

Drugs Delaney
06-07-2013, 11:32 PM
Usually it is about 50-50 for hitting/pitching. At this point it is just a bit of a random thing.


I was just curious. Looked like they rattled off something like 6 straight picks on pitchers.

And it seems like the organization is slightly stronger in pitching depth than position guys, so if anything, the lean would be in the other direction.

icehole3
06-08-2013, 05:23 AM
Im in hog heaven right now, here's to hoping they go 15 out of 20 pitchers :)

mth123
06-08-2013, 07:55 AM
In looking at the Reds three most recent major transactions, it takes multiple top end prospects to get a good pitcher (Alonso, Grandal, Boxberger, Volquez for Latos). Even a good reliever requires surrendering a lot of organizational depth (Wood, Sappelt, Torreyes for Marshall). A top hitter took just one second line prospect and a negative value throw-in (Gregorious and Stubbs for Choo).

One advantage the Cardinals have had on the Reds this year is lots of organizational depth. The Reds basically had to empty the cupboard to get Latos and Marshall and have had to rush guys who just aren't ready when the injury bug hit.

Keep drafting and developing pitchers and this will be a strong team. They can always deal an arm or two to fill holes as long as there are more in the pipeline.

icehole3
06-08-2013, 08:24 AM
In looking at the Reds three most recent major transactions, it takes multiple top end prospects to get a good pitcher (Alonso, Grandal, Boxberger, Volquez for Latos). Even a good reliever requires surrendering a lot of organizational depth (Wood, Sappelt, Torreyes for Marshall). A top hitter took just one second line prospect and a negative value throw-in (Gregorious and Stubbs for Choo).

One advantage the Cardinals have had on the Reds this year is lots of organizational depth. The Reds basically had to empty the cupboard to get Latos and Marshall and have had to rush guys who just aren't ready when the injury bug hit.

Keep drafting and developing pitchers and this will be a strong team. They can always deal an arm or two to fill holes as long as there are more in the pipeline.

preach brother :)

Benihana
06-08-2013, 09:29 AM
In looking at the Reds three most recent major transactions, it takes multiple top end prospects to get a good pitcher (Alonso, Grandal, Boxberger, Volquez for Latos). Even a good reliever requires surrendering a lot of organizational depth (Wood, Sappelt, Torreyes for Marshall). A top hitter took just one second line prospect and a negative value throw-in (Gregorious and Stubbs for Choo).

One advantage the Cardinals have had on the Reds this year is lots of organizational depth. The Reds basically had to empty the cupboard to get Latos and Marshall and have had to rush guys who just aren't ready when the injury bug hit.

Keep drafting and developing pitchers and this will be a strong team. They can always deal an arm or two to fill holes as long as there are more in the pipeline.

Your examples are a little misleading. You have to consider their contract situations as well. Choo was considerably cheaper in prospects because he was only signed for one year while Latos makes league minimum and was controlled for four more years. The D'backs had to trade Bauer just to get DiDi. Imagine how many pieces the Reds would have to trade to get Stanton, who is more comparable at this point to what Latos was when we acquired him. Look at the Texeira trade to Atlanta as another comp. Big hitters command the same kind of packages as big pitchers when the contract situations are similar- sometimes more.