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View Full Version : Reason #1002 to NOT own a cat



Red Heeler
12-23-2004, 02:21 PM
Mrs. Heeler (I won't claim him) has a white cat that she says has lots of personality. I say he's a pain in the :allovrjr: .

Today, I heard a loud crash in the living room. Above said cat comes flying out of the room with an "I didn't do it!" look on his face. I walked into the living room to find our joyous Christmas tree lying in the middle of the floor surrounded by an explosion of broken ornaments and pine needles. As I stood the tree back up, I realized that the lights had become a Gordian Knot of cords. The water from the base had also spilled out, nearly drowning 3 shirts and 2 nightgowns.

Yarggghhhh!!! What a mess. This was definately not on my list of things to do today.

GoReds
12-23-2004, 02:24 PM
The obvious answer is to electrify the tree. You're looking for results similar to National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation.

Kidding, obviously, as we have two cats of our own who love to sleep under the tree.

Roy Tucker
12-23-2004, 02:28 PM
When we had a live tree, I put a hefty hook in the ceiling to help hold the tree up.

Our cats would often get a wild hair and go climbing.

westofyou
12-23-2004, 02:40 PM
My cat as a kid was in the tree when we came home once, he freaked and it fell.

Knowing my mom she cried and gave the poor guy away a week later (she once took a dog to the pond because it peed on her nice sofa)

My cats love our tree, play under and all that, but since they're 1/2 maine coon and 1/4 persian they're more land based and water enthuesd.

Thank god.

Red Heeler
12-23-2004, 02:57 PM
(she once took a dog to the pond because it peed on her nice sofa)


I hope you meant "pound" like "dog pound" rather than "pond" like "drowned the little sucker."

I'm actually suprised that this cat decided to climb the tree. It's not usually his style to go climbing. Exploring holes and such is usually his cup of tea. Our other cat is the climber, but she hasn't been in the tree, yet.

westofyou
12-23-2004, 03:00 PM
I hope you meant "pound" like "dog pound" rather than "pond" like "drowned the little sucker."

I'm actually suprised that this cat decided to climb the tree. It's not usually his style to go climbing. Exploring holes and such is usually his cup of tea. Our other cat is the climber, but she hasn't been in the tree, yet.

Yeah Pound.... not pond.

My sister still hasn't forgave her, though rabbits are smarter than that dog was.

pedro
12-23-2004, 03:47 PM
Mrs. Heeler (I won't claim him) has a white cat that she says has lots of personality. I say he's a pain in the :allovrjr: .

Today, I heard a loud crash in the living room. Above said cat comes flying out of the room with an "I didn't do it!" look on his face. I walked into the living room to find our joyous Christmas tree lying in the middle of the floor surrounded by an explosion of broken ornaments and pine needles. As I stood the tree back up, I realized that the lights had become a Gordian Knot of cords. The water from the base had also spilled out, nearly drowning 3 shirts and 2 nightgowns.

Yarggghhhh!!! What a mess. This was definately not on my list of things to do today.

sound like a good reason to not have a christmas tree to me ;)

TeamCasey
12-23-2004, 08:06 PM
We're lucky. These two just curl up and sleep under there. Kitty (R.I.P. after 18 years) used to swat the balls off.

Apparently one of the current cats takes the garland off TeamMorris' tree ..... but TB and I don't see it, so the cat gets the benefit of the doubt. ;)

Super_Barry11
12-23-2004, 08:11 PM
We're lucky. These two just curl up and sleep under there.

That's how my kitties are. Larkin and Hershey love to nap under the tree, especially when the gifts are under there. It's so cute!! :) Hershey is a really old, calm cat, so he's good every day. Larkin, despite her usual wild and crazy personality, is such a good girl around the Christmas tree, except for the occasional swiping at ornaments on the lower branches. :thumbup:

KittyDuran
12-23-2004, 08:41 PM
Well, my Dad (who HATES cats) started to feed a kitten about a month ago. Said he didn't want to see it starve. Now she's adopted us - and is a real cutie... Has only climbed the Xmas tree once but another tree in the living room has been climbed more than a few times. Does anyone know when you can spade and declaw a kitten?

westofyou
12-23-2004, 08:49 PM
Well, my Dad (who HATES cats) started to feed a kitten about a month ago. Said he didn't want to see it starve. Now she's adopted us - and is a real cutie... Has only climbed the Xmas tree once but another tree in the living room has been climbed more than a few times. Does anyone know when you can spade and declaw a kitten?


Don't declaw.. please.... give me the jeebs.


Spay at 6 months or first sign of heat, the younger the better (since they have to cut inside)

pedro
12-23-2004, 08:52 PM
Well, my Dad (who HATES cats) started to feed a kitten about a month ago. Said he didn't want to see it starve. Now she's adopted us - and is a real cutie... Has only climbed the Xmas tree once but another tree in the living room has been climbed more than a few times. Does anyone know when you can spade and declaw a kitten?

You can spay a cat after 3 months I think. The longer you wait, the more it hurts them and the longer it takes to recover.

There is really no reason to de-claw, you just need to start trimming their nails when they are young (do it when they are sleepy) and make sure they have a scratching post. I haven't had any problems with my cats shredding stuff. If they scratch inappropriate place, just pick them up and take them to the scratching post. they'll get the idea.

Super_Barry11
12-23-2004, 08:57 PM
My mom insisted on declawing Larkin when she was really little... It just broke my heart. She was in so much pain when she came home. I apologized to her profusely, but I still feel guilty about hurting her. :(

(That was about 3 years ago, so I'm sure she's forgiven us by now, but still...) :)

Red Heeler
12-23-2004, 09:49 PM
Well, my Dad (who HATES cats) started to feed a kitten about a month ago. Said he didn't want to see it starve. Now she's adopted us - and is a real cutie... Has only climbed the Xmas tree once but another tree in the living room has been climbed more than a few times. Does anyone know when you can spade and declaw a kitten?

Some advice from your friendly neighborhood vet student. Traditional age for spaying is 6-8 months of age. You can have it done as early as 6-8 weeks. It can be done when they are in heat, but it does bleed more.

Some people are really against declawing...some are not. I have two declawed cats. It seems as though the northwest (WOY's territory) really seems to be against it. If there is any chance that the cat will be an indoor/outdoor cat, the claws must stay in. If she is to be an indoor only, it is up to you. If you do have her declawed, find somebody that uses a laser. It is a much less painful surgery with less risk of complications.

Vaccinations should start at 6-8 weeks with boosters every 4 months for a total of three series. After that, you should booster every 3 years. Heartworm preventative is a must if your cat will go outdoors. I would recommend it even if she stays inside. Mosquitos come in the house, too.

Good luck!!!

TeamMorris
12-23-2004, 10:33 PM
Don't declaw...PLEEEEASE :cry:

I am guessing because of the thought of declawing that he/she will be an inside cat. The do happen to get out every now and then and will have no way to defend his/herself! Get a few squirt guns, and spray the little one when caucht scratching. They do learn! Our cats like the cheap cardboard scratch boxed you can pick up at pet stores and some grocery stores.

TeamCasey
12-23-2004, 11:35 PM
As much as I catch TeamMorris' cat being naughty, I agree with her.

I'm not a fan of declawing, but I've always had indoor/outdoor pets. Our neighborhood has a hierarchy. The neighbor's cats used to rule before they moved. Our new neighbors have 4 dogs. A few swiped noses redefines the hierarchy. You gotta give them a chance, or keep them in the house.

I'd hate to keep ours in the house. They LOVE to walk in the woods with me. I wouldn't get a big dog without a big yard. I wouldn't get a cat or a dog unless I had a yard they could enjoy.

Red Thunder
12-23-2004, 11:54 PM
We have a cat, too, and I have never heard of declawing a cat before. That sounds horrible ... in my opinion you shouldn't choose a cat as a pet if you are afraid that it could scratch something in your home. We never had that problem, as our cat since the beginning only used the scraching spots made up for him as well as a tree in the garden.

OldCat
12-25-2004, 04:16 PM
On the declawing issue -- at the vet you can get little plastic caps that fit over the tips of the claws and are glued on. This should help reduce any clawing damage while you post train the cat.

You can even get them in nail-poilsh like colors

tom browning
12-25-2004, 04:37 PM
Dogs are so much better then cats. Just thought Id throw that out there.

KronoRed
12-25-2004, 07:16 PM
In your opinion, I have 2 cats and I wouldn't trade em for the world :D

Ravenlord
12-25-2004, 07:32 PM
declawing=bad. cut off your finger tips at the knuckles. that's about what declawing is.

my cat is usually scared of the tree. sometimes he gets brave and sniffs at it, then runs away very quickly. i guess it bothers him because it's not real.

pedro
12-26-2004, 12:37 AM
In your opinion, I have 2 cats and I wouldn't trade em for the world :D

me too! If you have cats and they're your buddies it's totally different. Other people's cats aren't like other people's dogs. Cats usually only dig they're keepers.

KittyDuran
01-01-2005, 08:41 PM
Just a little update on THE cat - named KC (kittycat) by my Mom. Convinced my parents not to declaw but it was up to me to clip the nails. It was a lot easier that I thought - I waited until she was almost asleep and just took off the tops. A BIG difference! Should I also trim her back claws? Thanks!

TeamCasey
01-01-2005, 09:02 PM
Her front claws will probably be enough. You just need to do a tiny tiny bit off the tips every few weeks.

I had an old SPCA cat that I used to clip. He didn't seem to wear them down on his own enough.

The cats here go outside. They have some favorite trees that they've debarked from clawing them. They also do it on the railroad ties. I never have to clip them. (They're trained not to claw indoors. Squirt guns are an awesome tool for that when they're young.)

Red Heeler
01-02-2005, 12:04 AM
A couple of things:

1) I just re-read my earlier post and noticed an error. It should read vaccinate at 6-8 weeks old with boosters every 3-4 WEEKS (not months).

2) Trimming the back nails is only necessary if they start to get long. Wrapping the cat up in a towel is a good way to restrain them while you do the trimming.

3) It is a good idea to have a scratching post indoors for the cat, especially if she won't get outside much. As TC said, squirt-guns are good for discouraging scratching on furniture.

Good luck!

KittyDuran
01-09-2005, 08:30 PM
KC is better than an alarm clock! Which is good for workdays but bad for weekends. :p: Yesterday morning I didn't want to get up and she started to play around my face - Unfortunately I open my right eye and she scratches it! :eek: It only hurt for awhile - hurt more when I put the eye drops in. I go to an Urgent Care ($50 co-pay) and get a tentunus (sp?) shot. Then get a antibiotic for my eye ($20) which is a gel that I have to put in twice a day for 3 days. So I'm looking at Redszone with one eye. Thank goodness for the flexplan - getting all that money back! Still have to call the vet for the price for fixing her up... :devil: