PDA

View Full Version : What are you reading now?



Pages : 1 [2] 3 4 5

Gainesville Red
04-16-2007, 12:59 PM
With Jackie Robinson Day upcoming I decided to re-read "The Boys of Summer," by Roger Kahn. Finished it last night. I enjoyed it even more the second time.

zombielady
04-18-2007, 08:48 AM
The instruction manual to my new camera... it's as thick as War and Peace... well, not really... but close!

BoydsOfSummer
04-18-2007, 11:51 PM
Instuctions...we don' need no stinkin' instructions...

nycredsfan
04-20-2007, 02:46 PM
The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano. This was just recently translated into English and reads like a novel that Borges would've written.

Mutaman
04-20-2007, 04:29 PM
"The Hardcore Diaries" by Mick Foley

I just finished "Tangeled Ropes", the autobiography of Superstar Billy Graham. A great book and highly recommended. His stories of starting out with DR. Jerry Graham or his training up in Calgaery, Alberta, Canada with Stu Hartt are hilarious.

zombielady
04-20-2007, 07:14 PM
Instuctions...we don' need no stinkin' instructions...

I thought so too... but I found myself digging in the garbage hoping The Husband didn't take it out yet, just to get the gall-dang battery out... :bang: :help:

nycredsfan
05-02-2007, 10:58 AM
The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon- I'm about 100 pages in and really enjoying it. If you liked Kavalier and Clay, you should add this one to your list.

creek14
05-02-2007, 08:51 PM
Secret Agencies: U.S. Intelligence in a Hostile World

cumberlandreds
05-11-2007, 07:48 AM
Currently reading "Beyond Band of Brothers". It's the memiors of Major Dick Winters the commander of PIR 506th,Band of Brothers. It's a great read! Really shows what a leader is all about. I have read a few books on this group of men and still find it utterly amazing how much combat they went through in a short period of time. These guys were true heroes!

TeamBoone
05-11-2007, 01:19 PM
I mostly read for entertainment:

The Cold Moon (Jeffrey Deaver)... a Lincoln Rhyme novel

Red Leader
05-11-2007, 01:54 PM
I mostly read for entertainment:

The Cold Moon (Jeffrey Deaver)... a Lincoln Rhyme novel

I'm reading The Coffin Dancer right now (also a Deaver novel, and Lincoln Rhyme novel). Puffy suggested them to me. I finished up The Bone Collector a couple weeks ago. I think I like the Coffin Dancer a little more than The Bone Collector, but both are good. The Cold Moon is on my list, but down the road a little.

Hoosier Red
05-11-2007, 06:46 PM
I just finished "Tangeled Ropes", the autobiography of Superstar Billy Graham. A great book and highly recommended. His stories of starting out with DR. Jerry Graham or his training up in Calgaery, Alberta, Canada with Stu Hartt are hilarious.

When I was little I always got Superstar Billy Graham with the evangelical minister Billy Graham.

It was very confusing.

And sure enough after reading the entry on wikipedia, he created the name in recognition of Billy Graham.

sonny
05-14-2007, 05:25 AM
The Anthony Burgess Masterpiece- A Clockwork Orange. I hadn't read the extra chapter that was omitted when the book was first released in the US.

My Nadsat is a little rusty so I'll get an ache in my gulliver.

Falls City Beer
05-14-2007, 09:35 AM
The Book and the Brotherhood--Iris Murdoch

Degenerate39
05-14-2007, 02:05 PM
We just read The Great Gatsby in Honors English 11. That book made no sense to me. We've been watching the movie so now I understand a little bit better.

pedro
06-06-2007, 04:26 PM
The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon- I'm about 100 pages in and really enjoying it. If you liked Kavalier and Clay, you should add this one to your list.

I'm about halfway through it right now. I think it's great so far.

RichRed
06-06-2007, 04:37 PM
Killing Yourself to Live -- Chuck Klosterman

pedro
06-06-2007, 04:40 PM
Killing Yourself to Live -- Chuck Klosterman

I liked it, just not as much as the others ones.

UKFlounder
06-06-2007, 04:57 PM
I just finished "Grant and Sherman: The Friendship that Won the Civil War" and it was pretty good. It was certainly a different perspective than I had read before, and though I had minor quibbles with some of the author's style & repetition of some quotes, it was definitely a good one to read.

Right now I may move on to "Fundementals of Investing" for a self-study course at work, but I'm in chapter 2 and it's god-awful boring to me. I don't know if I'll keep it up or push it off again & pick up something more enjoyable.

RichRed
06-06-2007, 05:04 PM
I liked it, just not as much as the others ones.

It's the first one of his I've read (it's the one the library happened to have) and I'm enjoying it. I'm looking forward to reading his other books.

cumberlandreds
06-07-2007, 07:37 AM
I am reading Combat Reporter. It's the diary and memiors of WWII reporter Don Whitehead. He reported during WWII from North Africa, Italy and all the way across Europe after D-Day. He for whatever reason only did his diary during the North Africa portion and his memiors through the Italy campaign. He is of paticular interest to me since he is from neck of the woods in SE Ky. He also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting during the Korean War. Pretty good book as I like reading diaries. I think it gives good insight on how things were during this time.

Roy Tucker
06-07-2007, 08:17 AM
I'm going back and reading the Carl Hiassen books I missed. Currently reading "Strip Tease". I'm really liking it.

registerthis
06-07-2007, 12:07 PM
I'm going back and reading the Carl Hiassen books I missed. Currently reading "Strip Tease". I'm really liking it.

That's a good one--liked it a lot.

creek14
07-09-2007, 10:43 PM
I picked up Over The Edge: Death in Grand Canyon while I was there. I can't put the thing down.

It's about everyone who has died at the Canyon, be it by accident, murder, suicide, heat stroke, any way at all.

Falls City Beer
07-09-2007, 10:48 PM
Parade's End--Ford Madox Ford

edabbs44
07-09-2007, 10:59 PM
Just finished The Card. It's about the history of the T206 Honus Wagner baseball card. Very cool for anyone who ever had any interest in baseball cards.

MWM
07-09-2007, 11:06 PM
I'm currently rading two books (breaking a personal rule of mine). I'm reading A Good Walk Spoiled by John Feinstein about what it takes to play on a daily basis on the PGA Tour. So far, great book.

I'm also reading Killing Hitler by Roger Moorehouse about some of the plots to assasinate the Fuhrer while he was dictator. Also, so far a great read.

Betterread
07-09-2007, 11:12 PM
Summer time is great for reading - just finished Olga Grushin's "The Dream Life of Sukhanov"
and Martin Amis' "Money"
Currently reading Lydia Davis' new short story collection: Varieties of Disturbance.

Hoosier Red
07-10-2007, 12:31 AM
Just got back from vacation, read Harry Potter 2-5 last week. I'll read six shortly.

pedro
07-10-2007, 01:40 AM
I'm going back and reading the Carl Hiassen books I missed. Currently reading "Strip Tease". I'm really liking it.

I'm reading Skinny Dip right now.

Also The Fifties by David Halberstam.

UKFlounder
07-10-2007, 07:03 AM
"Lee and His Army in Confederate History," a collection of essays by Gary Gallagher.

In the past couple of weeks I finished "Jefferson Davis and His Generals: Failure of Confederate Command in the West" by Steven Woodworth and "Leaders of the Lost Cause" edited by Gallagher & Josepht Glaatthar (sp?). Those final 2 were a very nice combination to read back-to-back, as they discussed many of the same people/personalities, but provided a few differering interpretations, especially on Braxton Bragg.

Blimpie
07-10-2007, 08:28 AM
"For One More Day" by Mitch Albom.

It is a good read, but it makes you REALLY miss those who have departed this Earth.

Puffy
07-10-2007, 11:51 AM
The Bronx is Burning by Jonathan Mahler

Roy Tucker
07-10-2007, 12:09 PM
Reading "Lisey's Story" by Stephen King now. I'm pretty ambivalent about it. Good story but the prose is driving me nuts.

Recently read:
- The Road - Corman McCarthy
- I Have Lived A Thousand Years - Livia Bitton-Jackson - reading this with my daughter for school
- The Mission Song - John Le Carre

Stewie
07-10-2007, 10:53 PM
I'm currently plowing through some of Kurt Vonnegut's books that I have not read already. Right now I'm working on Timequake.

The last three books I've read:
A Man Without a Country -- Vonnegut
The Baseball Economist -- JC Bradbury
Can I Keep My Jersey? -- Paul Shirley

Not sure yet what I'll read next.

Gainesville Red
07-10-2007, 11:19 PM
The only Carl Hiassen book that I haven't been crazy about was the most recent, Nature Girl.

Other than that, just keep reading them. They're all really good. (Excluding the kids books, which I can't vouch for. I haven't read them.)

I just finished reading On the Road for the 40th time. Now I'm about half way through All the Kings Men, by Robert Penn Warren.

Red in Chicago
07-10-2007, 11:43 PM
Out of curiousity, how long do each of you sit and read at a time? I only ask because reading for me is very difficult. I transpose letters and words and often end up having to re-read the same sentence or paragraph a few times. Very time consuming and not really very relaxing. I really find it difficult to read steadily for more than 30 minutes and as you can imagine, it's at a snails pace. Anyone else have these struggles?

Gainesville Red
07-10-2007, 11:47 PM
I ride the bus onto campus every day. That means waiting at the bus stop. I read there. Then I read on the bus, which serves two purposes. 1. I like reading so that's good. 2.) I've learned that if you look like you're doing something (reading) the crazies on the bus don't try to talk to you as much. That's good too.

Then I read during breaks in my schedule.

I usually read about half an hour to an hour at a time.

MississippiRed
07-11-2007, 12:31 AM
I am about to start "How to Cheat at Baseball" which I think I know about from Redszone. I have been reading Lee Child's Jack Reacher books lately. Reacher is a modern-day John Wayne type (former military policeman). If you are at all interested in sociology, read "The Tipping Point," by Malcolm Gladwell. It's an excellent look at how trends bump along for a while and then seem to snowball. May have some implications for the Reds' fortunes since 1999.

BTW, I love this thread. I read constantly, and have found maybe 20 books mentioned which I have to add to my list.

cumberlandreds
07-11-2007, 06:56 AM
I just starting reading Clemente by David Maraniss. If this book by Maraniss is half as good as his book about Vince Lombardi then it should be an excellent read. So far it's a terrific biography.

UKFlounder
07-11-2007, 07:16 AM
I ride the bus onto campus every day. That means waiting at the bus stop. I read there. Then I read on the bus, which serves two purposes. 1. I like reading so that's good. 2.) I've learned that if you look like you're doing something (reading) the crazies on the bus don't try to talk to you as much. That's good too.

Then I read during breaks in my schedule.

I usually read about half an hour to an hour at a time.

I take the bus to work each day, so to & from work is a few minutes (20 or so usually) of good reading time, plus I usually read for at least a few minutes during my lunch break.

If a book is especially good, or I'm close to finishing it or I'm just bored, I might read for a while around the house, but usually it's just on the bus & at work where I read. (Of course, I just returned from vacation & read quite a bit during that week, but that was more than I normally read)

Gainesville Red
07-11-2007, 07:46 AM
I just starting reading Clemente by David Maraniss. If this book by Maraniss is half as good as his book about Vince Lombardi then it should be an excellent read. So far it's a terrific biography.

I sure enjoyed it.

rude
07-20-2007, 10:46 AM
The Protector's War by S.M. Stirling

gonelong
07-20-2007, 11:07 AM
In Cold Blood - Truman Capote

redsmetz
07-20-2007, 11:12 AM
Right now I'm reading Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh.

I probably won't get to the newest Harry Potter book until the rest of my family reads it first.

RichRed
07-20-2007, 11:14 AM
Out of curiousity, how long do each of you sit and read at a time? I only ask because reading for me is very difficult. I transpose letters and words and often end up having to re-read the same sentence or paragraph a few times. Very time consuming and not really very relaxing. I really find it difficult to read steadily for more than 30 minutes and as you can imagine, it's at a snails pace. Anyone else have these struggles?

Have you been tested for dyslexia? I know a guy who's dyslexic and what you describe sounds exactly like what he experiences when reading.

registerthis
07-20-2007, 11:21 AM
Have you been tested for dyslexia? I know a guy who's dyslexic and what you describe sounds exactly like what he experiences when reading.

Dyslexia skcus.

rdiersin
07-20-2007, 11:50 AM
Just finished Straight Man by Richard Russo and am about to get started on Nobody's Fool. Thanks, Pedro for getting me into these. I had read Empire Falls and Mohawk, but got onto something else, forgetting about these books. Straight Man was good, I really liked it.

jmcclain19
07-20-2007, 12:45 PM
If you liked Hiassen - I would recommend Marshall Karp.

He has two books out - both LA based Crime Mysterys, but Karp is just hilarious. Start off with The Rabbit Factory - probably one of my favorite books I've read in some time. Bloodthirsty is the sequal to The Rabbit Factory.

Mississippi - Is there any best book in the Child Jack Reacher series to start off with? I've heard a lot about him and have debated giving him a whirl.

pedro
07-20-2007, 12:48 PM
Just finished Straight Man by Richard Russo and am about to get started on Nobody's Fool. Thanks, Pedro for getting me into these. I had read Empire Falls and Mohawk, but got onto something else, forgetting about these books. Straight Man was good, I really liked it.

glad to hear it.

jmcclain19
07-20-2007, 08:48 PM
I'll pass this along to my fellow bibliophiles here at Redszone.

I've been hooked on a reading site the last few months called LibraryThing.com

http://www.librarything.com/

It's basically an online cataloging system for any and all books you've read, borrowed, bought, sold, stole, etc etc

It's free - and I have enjoyed it. I've found myself trying to dig up and find all the books I've read over the years to help add to my catalog. I'm up to over 350 books now.

Here's my profile

http://www.librarything.com/profile/jmcclain19

Click on "See Catalog" if you want to see all my books.

Best part is - there are thousands of other members, and you can see who has the same books you do - and that's an opening to finding all sorts of unknown authors. I've found about a half dozen more authors that I truly enjoy and i'm sure I'll find more in the coming months.

I would recommend - and anyone who signs up let me know, I'd like to add you to my "friends" list on there.

SandyD
07-21-2007, 03:45 PM
This is kind of fun. I've been meaning to catalogue my books, so this is helpful. As I was looking through the old books on my shelf, I came across one I had picked up at a used book sale. There was a page with the lyrics to St James Infirmary typed out on a faded piece of typing paper.

Kind of fun to think about the former owner of used books.

BTW, it's kind of cool to check out the people who are the ONLY other people to have a particular book on their list.

There's someone on there who has over 1200 baseball books.

Falls City Beer
07-22-2007, 07:18 PM
Right now I'm reading Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh.

I probably won't get to the newest Harry Potter book until the rest of my family reads it first.

Waugh's excellent. I'd recommend The Bell by Iris Murdoch for another good mid-century British novel.

UKFlounder
07-22-2007, 09:05 PM
I'll pass this along to my fellow bibliophiles here at Redszone.

I've been hooked on a reading site the last few months called LibraryThing.com

http://www.librarything.com/

It's basically an online cataloging system for any and all books you've read, borrowed, bought, sold, stole, etc etc

It's free - and I have enjoyed it. I've found myself trying to dig up and find all the books I've read over the years to help add to my catalog. I'm up to over 350 books now.

Here's my profile

http://www.librarything.com/profile/jmcclain19

Click on "See Catalog" if you want to see all my books.

Best part is - there are thousands of other members, and you can see who has the same books you do - and that's an opening to finding all sorts of unknown authors. I've found about a half dozen more authors that I truly enjoy and i'm sure I'll find more in the coming months.

I would recommend - and anyone who signs up let me know, I'd like to add you to my "friends" list on there.

That looks really cool. I'll probably sign up for it, though I don't know when I'll get the chance to start listing all my books on it.

Thanks for the heads up (I'll let you know my user name once I'm on)

HumnHilghtFreel
07-23-2007, 11:52 AM
I'll pass this along to my fellow bibliophiles here at Redszone.

I've been hooked on a reading site the last few months called LibraryThing.com

http://www.librarything.com/

It's basically an online cataloging system for any and all books you've read, borrowed, bought, sold, stole, etc etc

It's free - and I have enjoyed it. I've found myself trying to dig up and find all the books I've read over the years to help add to my catalog. I'm up to over 350 books now.

Here's my profile

http://www.librarything.com/profile/jmcclain19

Click on "See Catalog" if you want to see all my books.

Best part is - there are thousands of other members, and you can see who has the same books you do - and that's an opening to finding all sorts of unknown authors. I've found about a half dozen more authors that I truly enjoy and i'm sure I'll find more in the coming months.

I would recommend - and anyone who signs up let me know, I'd like to add you to my "friends" list on there.

http://www.librarything.com/catalog.php?view=daburkey06 I have a small collection of books on my bookshelf, so I figured I'd add them there. Nice site, I'll have to go back and try to think of all the ones I've read and don't just have lying around.

bucksfan2
07-24-2007, 08:59 AM
I read quite a bit and last week picked up the first Harry Potter book. If there are any 24 fans out there I would highly recomend two authors. One is Vince Flynn who has gained some fame lately. He has a character named Mitch Rapp who is very similar to Jack Bauer. The second is Brad Thor who has a character named Scot Horvath who is similar to Bauer. Both authors wright books that move very quickly and lots of bad people are disposed of.

registerthis
07-24-2007, 10:09 AM
Both authors wright books that move very quickly and lots of bad people are disposed of.

Fabulous! The two qualities I look for most in a novel! :)

jmcclain19
07-24-2007, 01:55 PM
I really enjoy Flynn & Thor.

They both have a completely different writing style as well in the same style of story - espionage/terrorism thriller - which is nice. Flynn is definitely more into character development - you really get into Rapp and his nemisis and what their motivations are and their internal fights. Thor is more all about painting the scene of these amazing locations and what is happening in them. Harvath goes to all these wild places all over the globe - and Thor - who has been to all of them, just puts you there. Whether it's Switzerland or Capri, Italy or Macau - a thriller with a travel twist.

Anyway - I would also recommend both as highly entertaining novelists.

Daniel Silva & Christopher Reich is also in their same league. Silva's main character is an Israeli Assassin - And most of his plots seems to focus on the Middle East. Reich doesn't have a recurring character but rather each novel stands on it's own. Reich is a former Swiss banker so all of his plots are heavily slanted toward the financial thriller aspect. His first book - Numbered Account - is excellent and different than any other terror thriller that I've ever read.

ThatPitchIsDunn
07-24-2007, 03:26 PM
If anyone loves a good keep-you-on-your-toes mystery that has at least one huge twist towards the end, I'd highly recommend Jeffrey Deaver. Only one of his books, The Bone Collector, was made into a movie, but the two main characters - Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs - are in several more murder mysteries by Deaver. The two make up a forensics team, so a bit of the detail can be stomach-turning. It makes for page-turning as well however.

I love all his works, but The Vanished Man and Blue Nowhere get you off to a good start. Heck, Bone Collector's a great read even if you've seen it, as the movie ended completely differently than the book.

Roy Tucker
07-24-2007, 04:01 PM
If anyone loves a good keep-you-on-your-toes mystery that has at least one huge twist towards the end, I'd highly recommend Jeffrey Deaver. Only one of his books, The Bone Collector, was made into a movie, but the two main characters - Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs - are in several more murder mysteries by Deaver. The two make up a forensics team, so a bit of the detail can be stomach-turning. It makes for page-turning as well however.

I love all his works, but The Vanished Man and Blue Nowhere get you off to a good start. Heck, Bone Collector's a great read even if you've seen it, as the movie ended completely differently than the book.

:thumbup: on Jeffery Deaver.

Reading The Twelfth Card now.

Seeing that steam pipe accident in NYC reminded me of the Bone Collector.

Fil3232
07-24-2007, 05:29 PM
I'm currently reading God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens. Probably would be a great Peanut Gallery conversation starter.

UKFlounder
07-24-2007, 07:39 PM
Here's my catalog (http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ukflounder) so far at librarything. I'll add some more in the next few days, especially over the weekend.

I really like what I see of this site. Thanks again for posting it (and a bunch of phony rep points to you as well :) )

jmcclain19
07-24-2007, 11:04 PM
Here's my catalog (http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ukflounder) so far at librarything. I'll add some more in the next few days, especially over the weekend.

I really like what I see of this site. Thanks again for posting it (and a bunch of phony rep points to you as well :) )

We have two of the same books. And if you liked Lincoln by Donald & Sherman you should definitely pick up Jean Edward Smith's Grant.

Stewie
07-25-2007, 09:49 AM
Good find on the LibraryThing.com site.

This (http://www.librarything.com/catalog/todd82499) is my catalog so far. Haven't gotten around to reviewing anything yet, though.

pedro
07-25-2007, 01:58 PM
Good find on the LibraryThing.com site.

This (http://www.librarything.com/catalog/todd82499) is my catalog so far. Haven't gotten around to reviewing anything yet, though.

It is pretty cool. I'd like to do it sometime but it's a daunting task as I have several hundred books in stock and have read countless more.

WMR
07-25-2007, 02:04 PM
It is pretty cool. I'd like to do it sometime but it's a daunting task as I have several hundred books in stock and have read countless more.

Barnes & Pedro? :p:

pedro
07-25-2007, 02:06 PM
Barnes & Pedro? :p:

my mark up's not as high. :)

paintmered
07-25-2007, 09:00 PM
Read "Tipping Point" this past weekend.

That was a fun read.

SandyD
07-25-2007, 10:53 PM
It is pretty cool. I'd like to do it sometime but it's a daunting task as I have several hundred books in stock and have read countless more.

It's not as hard as you might think.

I started by sitting down and entering books I remembered, not really worrying about what edition I had. I'm close to 300 since Saturday, and I'm not close to finished. I've edited a couple to correct which "edition" I have, and played around with the tags.

I've wanted to so something like this for a long time.

Now, I'm going to slow down on adding more, and spend more time reviewing/rating/tagging/exploring other libraries/etc.

Here's mine: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ciridan

jmcclain19
07-26-2007, 02:45 AM
I added Sandy, Stewie & UK all as friends over on LibraryThing

Stewie - I see you read Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer - did you enjoy it?

I got the chance to meet the author two years ago, I used to write for a college football blog and he did a promo with us for the book - that is an absolutely hilarious college football book and he is a pretty funny guy.

Chip R
07-26-2007, 09:16 AM
It's not as hard as you might think.

I started by sitting down and entering books I remembered, not really worrying about what edition I had. I'm close to 300 since Saturday, and I'm not close to finished. I've edited a couple to correct which "edition" I have, and played around with the tags.

I've wanted to so something like this for a long time.

Now, I'm going to slow down on adding more, and spend more time reviewing/rating/tagging/exploring other libraries/etc.

Here's mine: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ciridan

Damn you people. Now I'm addicted to this thing and signed up for the lifetime membership. :bang::bang::bang:

Oh, and here's mine. It's still a work in progress.
http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ChipR

cumberlandreds
07-26-2007, 10:11 AM
Damn you people. Now I'm addicted to this thing and signed up for the lifetime membership. :bang::bang::bang:

Oh, and here's mine. It's still a work in progress.
http://www.librarything.com/catalog/ChipR

Darn it! I'm hooked too! :D Mine is also a work in progress. I have only put in what I could recall from memory. I'll be adding more as I go along. Thanks to whoever brought this up. It is a fine website.

http://www.librarything.com/catalog/hallrk

Stewie
07-26-2007, 09:42 PM
I added Sandy, Stewie & UK all as friends over on LibraryThing

Stewie - I see you read Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer - did you enjoy it?

I got the chance to meet the author two years ago, I used to write for a college football blog and he did a promo with us for the book - that is an absolutely hilarious college football book and he is a pretty funny guy.

I dug it. I had absolutely no expectations heading in, as I hadn't even heard of it before I bought it on a whim at Half-Price Books one day. But it was a fun read, and provided an entertaining glimpse at the insanity (or dedication if you want to look at it that way) of some of those Alabama (and SEC, in general) football fans.

VR
07-27-2007, 07:38 PM
Guns of August
Love and Respect

jmcclain19
08-06-2007, 05:36 PM
Anyone else a fan of Michael Connelly?

I've now read four straight books of his - I started with Lincoln Lawyer, and the first three of his Harry Bosch Series (Black Echo, Black Ice, Concrete Blonde) and I have become a big fan.

I just started Lost Coyote last night - seems like I'm just flying thru the novels in no time. Never been a big cop/crime novel type because they seem so typical and you can see the ending coming a mile away. Connelly seems different - and his characters have excellent depth.

SandyD
08-06-2007, 09:17 PM
Just finished:

Jude the Obscure -- Thomas Hardy

Took me a long time to get started on that one. But after I got thru the first section, it was easier.

Currently reading:

The Poe Shadow -- Matthew Pearl
Just started, but it's good so far.

Alfred and I are reading:

Blind Ambition -- Margaret Atwood
Take the Cannoli -- Sarah Vowell

Reading aloud, chapter by chapter.

MWM
08-06-2007, 09:29 PM
Just finished The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum and am now a few chapters into The Bourne Supremacy. Loved the first book, but the plot isn't anything like the movie. The story lines are completely separate. I like the book better, but I also enjoyed all 3 Bourne movies (saw the third one this past weekend).

jmcclain19
09-17-2007, 01:47 AM
I've been going a little off the deep end with the LibraryThing website - I've got over 750 books now listed.

I've also been reading like crazy lately. Been trying to get all my reading in before my son arrives at the end of Nov.

I'm currently reading Tyrannosaur Canyon by Douglas Preston.

Odd twist - I've been a mostly non-fiction reader for the longest time, with an occasional fiction book mixed in, but in the last six months that's been flipped. Don't really know why but I can't get enough fiction lately. Not that I'm complaining.

Here's the list from the last six to eight weeks
Non-Fiction
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
Blind Side by Michael Lewis
Bowls, Polls & Tattered Souls by Stewart Mandel
Sleeping with the Devil by Robert Baer
Space Race by Deborah Cadbury
Leviathan by Eric Jay Dolin
Fantasyland: A Season by Sam Walker

Fiction
Brimstone by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child
Trunk Music by Michael Connelly
Angels Flight by Michael Connelly
A Darkness More than Night by Michael Connelly
State of the Union by Brad Thor
Blowback by Brad Thor
Takedown by Brad Thor
First Commandment by Brad Thor
The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly
The Tenth Justice by Brad Meltzer
Void Moon by Michael Connelly

I'd recommend every book on that list save for the last two on my fiction list - The Tenth Justice & Void Moon. Void Moon just couldn't get me engaged whatsoever - and I really like Michael Connelly so that surprised me. Meltzer's 10th Justice was just awful - his first novel and it showed. Juvenile writing, characters with no redeeming qualities, kids with silver spoons in their mouths who are whiners but somehow are the most powerful cogs in the judicial system - yeah I want the time spent reading that book back.

vaticanplum
10-28-2007, 10:08 PM
I'm bumping this thread, I miss it.

I've been on a strict play-a-day program for about three months now, although I recently switched to a play every other day because it was monopolizing all my reading time and I missed reading other things. This week was The Miser, The Misanthrope, Ondine and Richard II (Shakespeare plays get two days for proper digestion and note-taking). Ondine is one of the best plays I've ever read, just blew me away. I can't believe I was never made to read it in school. I understand why it's not produced more often than it is (which is almost never), it walks a lot of fine lines that would be tough to manage on stage, but man it would be something. I already have it half designed in my head; I'd like to play some role in getting it onstage someday.

It's been mostly plays and nonfiction for several months for me. I'm starting to really miss book books, storybooks, I have to get back on that so I'm looking for suggestions. Although I have had that nonfiction mole people book sitting on my dining room table staring up on me for quite a while.

Degenerate39
10-28-2007, 10:22 PM
I am now reading The Natural for English 12. Very good book

nycredsfan
10-29-2007, 08:18 AM
I just finished the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz. I highly recommend it.
I am now reading Tree of Smoke by Denis Johnson, which is also fantastic.

hebroncougar
10-29-2007, 08:42 AM
Anyone else a fan of Michael Connelly?

I've now read four straight books of his - I started with Lincoln Lawyer, and the first three of his Harry Bosch Series (Black Echo, Black Ice, Concrete Blonde) and I have become a big fan.

I just started Lost Coyote last night - seems like I'm just flying thru the novels in no time. Never been a big cop/crime novel type because they seem so typical and you can see the ending coming a mile away. Connelly seems different - and his characters have excellent depth.

Bought all of his books off of Ebay about 6 months ago for something like $31. Great buy.

Falls City Beer
10-29-2007, 09:18 AM
The American Language by H.L. Mencken.

Great stuff--a big, sloppy, unscientific look at the evolution and branching of American English from "British" English. Thoroughly enjoyable and very well-written.

Roy Tucker
10-29-2007, 09:34 AM
"Falling Man" by Dom Dellilo - Ambivalent on this one. 9/11 and afterwards. Great writing, subject matter left me considering slitting my wrists.

"A Thousand Splendid Suns" by Khalid Hosseini - Excellent book, highly recommend it.

"Oh Pure and Radiant Heart" by Lydia Millett - the 3 physicists from the Manhattan Project travel through time and reconsider The Bomb. Interesting premise, execution was just OK.

"A Good Walk Spoiled" and "The Majors" by John Feinstein - I'm a sucker for Feinstein and these books are excellent. Unlike the critics, I liked "The Majors" better.

RichRed
10-29-2007, 09:52 AM
The American Language by H.L. Mencken.

Great stuff--a big, sloppy, unscientific look at the evolution and branching of American English from "British" English. Thoroughly enjoyable and very well-written.

I've been wanting to read Mencken for some time but just haven't, for some reason. I'll check that one out.

I recently finished Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and am now reading Dandelion Wine, also by Bradbury.

westofyou
10-29-2007, 10:12 AM
Just finished Daniel Okrent's "Nine Innings" and The Kite Runner (coming to the theaters had to read it before I saw it)

Falls City Beer
10-29-2007, 10:33 AM
I've been wanting to read Mencken for some time but just haven't, for some reason. I'll check that one out.

I recommend it. It's massive, but it's something you can put down for a while without losing the thread, so when you pick it up again you can quickly re-engage it. For fact lovers and philologists alike, it's a great resource.

WebScorpion
10-29-2007, 01:57 PM
I've gotten some really good recommendations from this thread (and maybe its predecessors) over the years. 'A Confederacy Of Dunces' and 'A Short History Of Nearly Everything' immediately spring to mind. My tastes in reading vary according to my mood, so you'll find a recommendation for a book by me is not always what you'd expect. Anyway, I recently enjoyed reading the following book:

Vernon God Little by DBC Pierre

I wouldn't put this anywhere in my Top 100 all time books, but it was an entertaining and thought provoking read for me. The subject matter (the aftermath of a school shooting) is a little touchy for some people, and once you get beyond the continual cursing that is the language of the lead character and narrator of the tale, it is an interesting viewpoint. There were a few parts that made me laugh out loud and others that completely saddened me, but in the end it was a book I was happy to have read and would recommend to others.

next up for me are these:

The Declaration by Gemma Malley (Sci-Fi)

Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen

Roy Tucker
10-29-2007, 02:02 PM
My wife read Water For Elephants. She really liked it.

OldRightHander
10-29-2007, 03:00 PM
I've been wanting to read Mencken for some time but just haven't, for some reason. I'll check that one out.

I recently finished Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and am now reading Dandelion Wine, also by Bradbury.

I plowed through everything I could get by those two in my teens. I probably don't read as much now as I did then.

I am currently reading The Afghan by Frederick Forsyth and Sea of Thunder by Evan Thomas. Sea of Thunder is a look at the four commanders, two Japanese and two American, who were involved in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. I like to have a couple books going at the same time, usually something non fiction and fairly educational, and some sort of entertaining novel for when I want to escape the real world for a while.

Puffy
10-29-2007, 03:21 PM
Merle's Door - kinda like Marley and Me. Its very good and informative.

Gainesville Red
10-29-2007, 05:55 PM
Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder.

I really like it.

SunDeck
10-29-2007, 07:56 PM
Golden Compass.
I have decided to dedicate the next year to Young Adult Fiction. Figured I'd start with one of the finest examples.

MWM
10-29-2007, 08:11 PM
""A Good Walk Spoiled" and "The Majors" by John Feinstein - I'm a sucker for Feinstein and these books are excellent. Unlike the critics, I liked "The Majors" better.


I read "A Good Walk Spoiled" earlier this year and loved it. But I'm a golf fanatic and follow the PGA very closely.

Rojo
10-29-2007, 08:35 PM
Just finished In Praise of Barbarians by Mike Davis, starting Marx's Revenge by Meghnad Desai. Desai's basic message -- stay tuned.

I've really got to make myself read some fiction but there's just so much backlogged politics, economics and history.

pedro
10-29-2007, 10:18 PM
I
Vernon God Little by DBC Pierre

I wouldn't put this anywhere in my Top 100 all time books, but it was an entertaining and thought provoking read for me. The subject matter (the aftermath of a school shooting) is a little touchy for some people, and once you get beyond the continual cursing that is the language of the lead character and narrator of the tale, it is an interesting viewpoint. There were a few parts that made me laugh out loud and others that completely saddened me, but in the end it was a book I was happy to have read and would recommend to others.



I'd recommend it too. I thought it was very inventive.

I'm reading "Bridge of Sighs" by Richard Russo right now. It's pretty good.

WebScorpion
10-30-2007, 09:26 AM
I'd recommend it too. I thought it was very inventive.

I'm reading "Bridge of Sighs" by Richard Russo right now. It's pretty good.

I've read Empire Falls, Nobody's Fool, and Straight Man, all by Russo. I love many of his supporting characters and at some point in the story he always makes me laugh. I think Empire Falls won a Pulitzer, but I prefer Straight Man...the formar has a working class hero and the latter is a light-hearted look at the world of academia. I'm sure I'll read Bridge of Sighs soon.

pedro
10-30-2007, 12:47 PM
I've read Empire Falls, Nobody's Fool, and Straight Man, all by Russo. I love many of his supporting characters and at some point in the story he always makes me laugh. I think Empire Falls won a Pulitzer, but I prefer Straight Man...the formar has a working class hero and the latter is a light-hearted look at the world of academia. I'm sure I'll read Bridge of Sighs soon.

I've read them all. Straight Man and Nobody's Fool are my favs.

rdiersin
10-30-2007, 03:07 PM
I've read Empire Falls, Nobody's Fool, and Straight Man, all by Russo. I love many of his supporting characters and at some point in the story he always makes me laugh. I think Empire Falls won a Pulitzer, but I prefer Straight Man...the formar has a working class hero and the latter is a light-hearted look at the world of academia. I'm sure I'll read Bridge of Sighs soon.

I bought Bridge of Sighs a couple of weeks ago, but I told myself that I have to finish the Omnivore's Dilemma before I can
start it. I can't wait to get to it.

WebScorpion
10-31-2007, 02:54 PM
I bought Bridge of Sighs a couple of weeks ago, but I told myself that I have to finish the Omnivore's Dilemma before I can
start it. I can't wait to get to it.

What ARE you having for dinner? ;)

I haven't read The Omnivore's Dilemma, but I've heard of it. It is on my list though. :thumbup: Interesting subject matter and Pollan has a good reputation in the scientific community.

Chip R
10-31-2007, 03:25 PM
John F. Kennedy A Biography by Michael O'Brien

Larceny & Old Leather: The Mischievous Legacy Of Major League Baseball by Eldon Ham

Baseball: The People's Game by Harold Seymour

westofyou
10-31-2007, 03:29 PM
Baseball: The People's Game by Harold Seymour

Great Series... has a history in itself as well.

http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/nine/v011/11.1mills.html


Ghost Writing for Baseball Historian Harold Seymour* Dorothy Jane Mills (a.k.a. Dorothy Z. Seymour) At once glorious and ignominious: that characterizes my work with Dr. Harold Seymour, "The Gibbon of Baseball," the man who made the American national game a respectable subject for formal study by historians, the author of the first scholarly history of baseball. Glorious because I learned how to perform (and love) research; ignominious because my contribution to the work remained unrecognized until after his passing in 1992, although I spent forty-six years working closely with him, first on his dissertation and then on his three-volume series for Oxford University Press, now the standard reference on the subject. Dr. Harold Seymour, a professor of history as well as a lover of the game, has a well-deserved reputation as an innovator. He boldly opened the field of baseball as a subject for serious study. Before him, no other historian had dared to suggest that the word baseball might be uttered in the same phrase as the word history. Only sportswriters had ever tried their hand at writing baseball history, and the journalistic accounts they produced were so flawed that they earned no standing in the eyes of professional historians.

Stewie
11-04-2007, 09:39 AM
Finally got around to reading The Blind Side by Michael Lewis. I dug it. Thought it was an interesting enough look at not only the story of Michael Oher, but also how the left tackle position came into such high regard (and ultimately, among the highest paid) in the NFL.

Has anyone read the new one from BP, "It Ain't Over...." ? Just wondering how that was.

Blimpie
11-05-2007, 10:54 AM
"Shanks for Nothing" by Rick Reilly

registerthis
11-05-2007, 11:24 AM
"Grand Avenues: The Story of the French Visionary Who Designed Washington, DC" by Scott Berg.

More interesting than it sounds.

Gainesville Red
11-06-2007, 03:42 PM
"The Naked and the Dead," by Norman Mailer.

westofyou
11-06-2007, 03:45 PM
"The Naked and the Dead," by Norman Mailer.

Great novel isn't it? Fug is the word of the day in that piece.

Gainesville Red
11-06-2007, 04:43 PM
Great novel isn't it? Fug is the word of the day in that piece.

Indeed it is. A great book. (So Far.)

Roy Tucker
11-06-2007, 04:45 PM
Great novel isn't it? Fug is the word of the day in that piece.

http://www.pdngallery.com/legends/legends9/images/fugs.jpg

BoydsOfSummer
11-10-2007, 05:12 PM
Under and Alone--William Queen

Undercover agent Bill Queen infiltrates outlaw bike gang, the Mongols.Reputed to be the worst of the worst. I love me some Mob reading, and this is right up that alley.

Rojo
11-12-2007, 04:41 PM
"The Naked and the Dead," by Norman Mailer.


Great timing.

pedro
11-21-2007, 03:29 PM
I just read "Diary" by Chuck Palahniuk.

I liked it.

Gainesville Red
11-21-2007, 05:46 PM
Just got done reading "Thank You For Smoking" by Christopher Buckley.

Now I'm reading "The Teammates" by Halberstam.

jmcclain19
11-21-2007, 06:59 PM
I've been on a Joesph Finder kick - corporate thrillers.

I just finished up Paranoia, Killer Instinct and Company Man and have moved on now to Power Play.

Paranoia is by far the best. Completely devoid of explosions, car chases, dead bodies or terrorists, yet its one of the best thrillers I've read this year.

RichRed
11-22-2007, 10:22 AM
Loose Balls: The Short, Wild Life of the American Basketball Association... by Terry Pluto

cumberlandreds
11-26-2007, 09:30 AM
Loose Balls: The Short, Wild Life of the American Basketball Association... by Terry Pluto

Very good book on the crazy history of the ABA! :thumbup:

westofyou
11-26-2007, 09:59 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/25/weekinreview/25rich.html?_r=1&oref=slogin


November 25, 2007
Page Turner
A Good Mystery: Why We Read
By MOTOKO RICH

PERHAPS the most fantastical story of the year was not “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” but “The Uncommon Reader,” a novella by Alan Bennett that imagines the queen of England suddenly becoming a voracious reader late in life.

At a time when books appear to be waging a Sisyphean battle against the forces of MySpace, YouTube and “American Idol,” the notion that someone could move so quickly from literary indifference to devouring passion seems, sadly, far-fetched.

The problem was underscored last week when the National Endowment for the Arts delivered the sobering news that Americans — particularly teenagers and young adults — are reading less for fun. At the same time, reading scores among those who read less are declining, and employers are proclaiming workers deficient in basic reading comprehension skills.

So that’s the bad news. But is all hope gone, or will people still be drawn to the literary landscape? And what is it, exactly, that turns someone into a book lover who keeps coming back for more?

There is no empirical answer. If there were, more books would sell as well as the “Harry Potter” series or “The Da Vinci Code.” The gestation of a true, committed reader is in some ways a magical process, shaped in part by external forces but also by a spark within the imagination. Having parents who read a lot helps, but is no guarantee. Devoted teachers and librarians can also be influential. But despite the proliferation of book groups and literary blogs, reading is ultimately a private act. “Why people read what they read is a great unknown and personal thing,” said Sara Nelson, editor in chief of the trade magazine Publishers Weekly.

In some cases, asking someone to explain why they read is to invite an elegant rationalization. Junot Díaz, the author of “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao,” vividly recalls stumbling into a mobile library shortly after his family emigrated from the Dominican Republic to New Jersey when he was 6 years old. He checked out a Richard Scarry picture book, a collection of 19th-century American wilderness paintings and a bowdlerized version of Arthur Conan Doyle’s “Sign of Four.”

So what about those three titles turned him into someone who is crazy for books? “I could create a narrative explaining the creation myth of my reading frenzy,” Mr. Díaz said. “But in some ways it’s just provisional. I feel like it’s a mystery what makes us vulnerable to certain practices and not to others.”

Such caveats aside, there are some clues as to what might transform someone into an enduring reader.

“The Uncommon Reader” posits the theory that the right book at the right time can ignite a lifelong habit. (For the fictional queen, it’s Nancy Mitford’s “Pursuit of Love.”) This is a romantic ideal that persists among many a bibliophile.

“It can be like a drug in a positive way,” said Daniel Goldin, general manager of the Harry W. Schwartz Bookshops in Milwaukee. “If you get the book that makes the person fall in love with reading, they want another one.”

Most often, that experience occurs in childhood. In “The Child That Books Built,” Francis Spufford, a British journalist and critic, writes of how “the furze of black marks between ‘The Hobbit’ grew lucid, and released a dragon,” turning him into “an addict.”

But what makes that one book a trigger for continuous reading? For some, it’s the discovery that a book’s character is like you, or thinks and feels like you. In accepting the National Book Award for young people’s literature for “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” earlier this month, Sherman Alexie thanked Ezra Jack Keats, author of “The Snowy Day,” a classic picture book. “It was the first time I looked at a book and saw a brown, black, beige character — a character who resembled me physically and resembled me spiritually, in all his gorgeous loneliness and splendid isolation,” Mr. Alexie, a Spokane Indian who grew up on a reservation, told the audience.

In an interview, Mr. Alexie said “The Snowy Day” transformed him from someone who read regularly into a true bookhound. “I really think it’s the age at which you find that book that you really identify with that determines the rest of your reading life,” Mr. Alexie said. “The younger you are when you do that, the more likely you’re going to be a serious reader. It really is about finding yourself in a book.”

Of course that doesn’t account for reading for information, enlightenment or practical advice. And for others, it’s not so much identification as the embrace of the Other that draws them into reading. “It’s that excitement of trying to discover that unknown world,” said Azar Nafisi, the author of “Reading Lolita in Tehran,” the best-selling memoir about a book group she led in Iran.

Sometimes the world of reading is opened up by a book that goes down easy. Mr. Bennett said he chose “The Pursuit of Love” for his fictional queen because it happened to be the first adult novel that he read for pleasure. He said that for him, as with the queen’s character, the book was a stepping off point into more heavyweight literature. “There are all sorts of entrances that you can get into reading by reading what might at first seem trash,” Mr. Bennett said.

And certain books that become phenomena — like those in the Harry Potter series or “The Da Vinci Code” or, to a slightly lesser extent most books recommended for Oprah Winfrey’s book club — can, in tempting people to read in the first place, create habitual readers. Perhaps more often, however, those readers just wait for the next “hot” book.

Indeed, even after Ms. Winfrey recommends a title, sales of other books by the same author don’t necessarily match those of the book that bears her imprimatur. “What I find with readers today is they don’t go off on their own to another book,” said Jonathan Galassi, publisher of Farrar, Straus and Giroux. “They wait for the next recommendation.”

It may also be that for some, reading is a pursuit that, like ballet or baseball, simply requires practice. “I think for a lot of people, reading is just something you do,” said Paula Brehm Heeger, president of the Young Adult Library Services Association. “And you eventually realize that you really like it.”

Book sales in general are growing only slightly: According to the Book Industry Study Group, a publishing trade association, the number of books sold last year, 3.1 billion, was up just 0.5 percent from a year earlier.

The question of whether reading, or reading books in particular, is essential is complicated by the fact that part of what draws people to books can now be found elsewhere — and there is only so much time to consume it all.

Readers who want to know they are not alone are finding reflections of themselves in the confessional blogs sprouting across the Internet. And television shows like “The Sopranos” or “Lost” can satisfy the hunger for narrative and richly textured characters in a way that only books could in a previous age.

But books have outlived many death knells, and are likely to keep doing so. “I’m much more optimistic than I think most people are,” Mr. Díaz said. Reading suffers, he said, because it has to compete unfairly with movies, television shows and electronic gadgets whose marketing budgets far outstrip those of publishers. “Books don’t have billion-dollar publicity behind them,” Mr. Díaz said. “Given the fact that books don’t have that, they’re not doing a bad job.”

Roy Tucker
11-26-2007, 10:11 AM
"A False Spring" by Pat Jordan.

I'd always thought I read this. But browsing it in the library, I realized I didn't.

Good chronicle of a bonus baby trying (and failing) to make it in baseball.

Betterread
11-27-2007, 06:28 PM
Just finished "tree of smoke" by Denis Johnson - a fantastically written, sweeping Vietnam War novel with some derivative characters but a moving, very spiritual coda. Recommended.
Now I'm reading Andre Schwartz-Bart's "last of the just" and
Jim Shepard's short story collection "Like you'd understand, anyway"

vaticanplum
12-05-2007, 03:49 PM
I'm not reading anything at the moment, but I had to bump this thread. I've gotten used to one hundred million football threads greeting me every time I opened this forum and today when I clicked the first thread was about golf. This kind of spoke to me of a need for spice.

Roy Tucker
12-05-2007, 04:07 PM
Let's see, last 4 books from the library...

"A False Spring" whoops, review above.

"The Simple Truth" David Baldacci - eh, I haven't made up my mind yet but this may be the first and last book of his I read. His dialogue is unbelievably painful, but the potboiler aspect of the story makes it nice mindless reading when one is in the mood.

"Basket Case" - Carl Hiaasen - next on the stack.

and I forget what else I got.

Also going to read "The Sparrow" by Mary Doria Russell on recommendation from the spousal unit - a Jesuit-based SF first contact novel, hmmm.

And the Barbara Kingsolver book about food is after that.

pedro
12-05-2007, 04:11 PM
"Basket Case" - Carl Hiaasen - next on the stack.



Liked it.

I'm reading "Native Tongue" right now. Hiaasen's a good fun read.

SunDeck
12-05-2007, 04:37 PM
Sea of Trolls

nycredsfan
12-05-2007, 04:42 PM
I've recently read and enjoyed King Dork by Frank Portman and No One Belongs Here More Than You by Miranda July. I'm currently reading The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano.

westofyou
12-05-2007, 04:46 PM
I just finished

Salt: A World History

Currently reading Family - Ian Frazier and Shakey - THE Neil Young Bio.

Gainesville Red
12-05-2007, 05:48 PM
Everything by Hiaasen is gold.

Right now I'm reading "The Last King of Scotland"

BoydsOfSummer
12-05-2007, 06:34 PM
Neyers' Big Book of Baseball Blunders

Stewie
12-05-2007, 07:20 PM
In the process of finally finishing Devil in the White City. No clue what I'll read next, though.

Razor Shines
12-05-2007, 07:32 PM
Lone Survivor - Marcus Luttrell

I really, really like it.

Caveat Emperor
12-05-2007, 09:07 PM
About to finish Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell - Susanna Clarke -- it's interesting, the characters are all very well drawn out, but thus far never really managed to pick up steam.

We'll see how the last bits play out.

Chip R
12-05-2007, 09:12 PM
Still reading the JFK book. Don't tell me how it comes out. ;)

Just started "When the Giants Were Giants - Bill Terry and the Golden Age of New York Baseball" by Peter Williams whose father was a sportswriter who covered Terry and was somewhat of a thorn in Terry's side.

Also reading "Grant and Sherman the Friendship that won the Civil War" by Charles Bracelen Flood

Hap
12-05-2007, 09:27 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51E651RV8KL._SS500_.jpg

RichRed
12-06-2007, 09:31 AM
About to finish Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell - Susanna Clarke -- it's interesting, the characters are all very well drawn out, but thus far never really managed to pick up steam.

We'll see how the last bits play out.

I started to read that one but just couldn't get into it after the first few chapters. It just seemed to drag for me and I gave up on it.

Jpup
12-06-2007, 02:36 PM
Joel Osteen

bucksfan2
12-06-2007, 02:52 PM
Lone Survivor - Marcus Luttrell

I really, really like it.

Same here. About 180 pages into it.

Crash Davis
12-08-2007, 06:55 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51E651RV8KL._SS500_.jpg

:thumbup:

Probably my favorite baseball book ever...up there with "Ball Four" and "Shoeless Joe" anyway, but great in a different way.

Great read.

jmcclain19
12-11-2007, 03:42 AM
This kind of spoke to me of a need for spice.

Mmmm spice.

In the hospital this past week I actually polished off several books.

It's not News It's Fark - After working in the media for several years myself, there were quite a few chapters that hit close to home and brought back memories.

The Expectant Father & The New Father by Armin Brott - 100% recommend all of Brott's books for anyone expecting their first child. Best books I saw that was written aimed at Dads specifically. My wife even read Expectant Father and was impressed. I re-read The Expectant Father after reading it first months ago, and I can't tell you how many things helped ease my brain as I went thru having a child for the first time. I just bought his next two Fathering your Toddler & Fathering your School age child tonight to add to my collection.

Power Play by Joe Finder- Not as good as Finder's other stuff by it's entertaining. And he's my friend on MySpace - so that counts for something.

And I just started the Templar Legacy by Steve Berry. I read The Alexandria Link by him and thought it was a mix between the movie National Treasure & the book The Da Vinci Code. This one seems to be in the same vein.

Caveat Emperor
12-11-2007, 01:39 PM
I started to read that one but just couldn't get into it after the first few chapters. It just seemed to drag for me and I gave up on it.

Finished it last week -- not a fan, all things considered.

Just started reading Phillip Pullman's The Golden Compass this past weekend, after hearing all the anti-religion hoopla.

So far a really entertaining and easy read.

marcshoe
12-25-2007, 07:21 PM
Got Team of Rivals for Christmas, and will likely start on it tonight.

Hoosier Red
12-25-2007, 11:32 PM
Received a couple of books for Christmas.

I've been reading Lamb by Christopher Moore during my lunch breaks at Borders.

The book is really interesting, a fictional(obviously) gospel told by Jesus' best friend from child hood.

I'll avoid further discussion in order to not have this thread moved to the peanut gallery.

pedro
12-26-2007, 12:18 AM
Received a couple of books for Christmas.

I've been reading Lamb by Christopher Moore during my lunch breaks at Borders.

The book is really interesting, a fictional(obviously) gospel told by Jesus' best friend from child hood.

I'll avoid further discussion in order to not have this thread moved to the peanut gallery.

Good book. Honestly though, I think I liked almost every one of his other books better. Really fun author.

Stephenk29
12-26-2007, 01:12 AM
Just finished a book about Moe Berg, and have about 7 to get started on.

Currently reading a Robert Ludlum and the Count of Monte Cristo

919191
12-26-2007, 01:43 AM
Received a couple of books for Christmas.

I've been reading Lamb by Christopher Moore during my lunch breaks at Borders.

The book is really interesting, a fictional(obviously) gospel told by Jesus' best friend from child hood.

I'll avoid further discussion in order to not have this thread moved to the peanut gallery.

I've been reading Bloodsucking Friends (for about 2 months, actually-alot of distractions). After that I am gonna read You Suck. It's been collecting alot of dust on my shelf.

gonelong
12-26-2007, 12:18 PM
Last week I read:
- Game of Shadows (interesting)
- Digital Fortress (Dan Brown, - don't bother if you've read any of his other stuff)
- Riding Fence (worst book I have ever read)

Mrs. Gonelong picked up "I am Legend" for me. I hear its a fantastic book.

GL

SunDeck
12-26-2007, 01:17 PM
Eldest

vaticanplum
12-26-2007, 02:03 PM
I am reading cookbooks, and I am also trying to read Heart of Darkness for the hundred millionth time. I swear I've devoted about a year of my life to reading this book, and it's only about 20 pages long. Why I'm so determined to finish it is the real mystery here.

pedro
12-26-2007, 02:06 PM
I had to laugh because I was out at my parents house and my mom's book club is trying to read "Sometimes a great notion" by Ken Kesey. I've tried to read that book at least 5 times with no success. She was happy to hear that I thought it was somewhat hard to follow. Apparently no one got past the first 10 pages.

Chip R
12-26-2007, 02:45 PM
I am reading cookbooks, and I am also trying to read Heart of Darkness for the hundred millionth time. I swear I've devoted about a year of my life to reading this book, and it's only about 20 pages long. Why I'm so determined to finish it is the real mystery here.


Cookbooks? Are you getting domesticated on us?

Betterread
12-26-2007, 03:58 PM
I am reading cookbooks, and I am also trying to read Heart of Darkness for the hundred millionth time. I swear I've devoted about a year of my life to reading this book, and it's only about 20 pages long. Why I'm so determined to finish it is the real mystery here.
HOD, and most of the Conrad's writing, is worth the effort. An excellent example of the ways that a non-english native writing in English can show us new ways to see our language and writing.

vaticanplum
12-26-2007, 04:10 PM
HOD, and most of the Conrad's writing, is worth the effort. An excellent example of the ways that a non-english native writing in English can show us new ways to see our language and writing.

I think I may have to stick to Nabokov :) I find his butterfly science crap more entertaining than this story. But I am trying to plow through.

Roy Tucker
12-26-2007, 04:47 PM
Water For Elephants - Sara Gruen - very good

The Handmaiden and the Carpenter - Elizabeth Berg - always wondered what the heck Joseph thought about all this immaculate conception stuff. well-told.

Red Ranger Came Calling -Berkeley Breathed - just for the heck of it.

A Thousand Splendid Suns - Khaled Hosseini - just started it today.

Roy Tucker
12-26-2007, 04:52 PM
I am reading cookbooks, and I am also trying to read Heart of Darkness for the hundred millionth time. I swear I've devoted about a year of my life to reading this book, and it's only about 20 pages long. Why I'm so determined to finish it is the real mystery here.

For me, it's Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. I've tried reading it about 5 times and never got past pg. 75. All the reviews raved about it and it was like reading Greek for me. I thought there was something wrong with me.

pedro
12-26-2007, 05:07 PM
For me, it's Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. I've tried reading it about 5 times and never got past pg. 75. All the reviews raved about it and it was like reading Greek for me. I thought there was something wrong with me.

I'm right there with you roy.

I did make it through Pynchon's "Vineland" but I read the entire thing in one 12 hour sitting.

Betterread
12-26-2007, 05:16 PM
I think I may have to stick to Nabokov :) I find his butterfly science crap more entertaining than this story. But I am trying to plow through.
My reading obstacle is Plutarch's Lives - 1400 pages (the Dryden Translation) - comparisons of Greek and Roman heroes. I got through Camillus a few years ago (199 pages). We'll see how far I get this year before I move on to something else. Its not hard to read, just so packed with anecdotal information that inevitably leads me to pursue the reference and abandon Plutarch's biography.

Betterread
12-26-2007, 05:41 PM
For me, it's Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. I've tried reading it about 5 times and never got past pg. 75. All the reviews raved about it and it was like reading Greek for me. I thought there was something wrong with me.
Reading his material is quite an ordeal for me too.
Pynchon presents interesting views in each of his works, but I definitely think he needs more structure and context for his ideas.

UKFlounder
12-26-2007, 07:56 PM
Just finished "What This Cruel War Was Over" and have started "Lincoln's Rise to the Presidency" by William C. Harris.

Both are pretty solid, enjoyable books.

edabbs44
12-26-2007, 09:43 PM
Just started The Wolf of Wall Street. Should be entertaining.

WebScorpion
12-27-2007, 11:08 AM
Hey Roy, I'm right in the middle of 'Water For Elephants' and so far it's a very good read. :thumbup:

I'm also re-reading Dale Carnegie's 'How To Win Friends And Influence People', which I recommend to anyone who has a pulse. To me, much of Carnegie's stuff seems like common sense, but I find it helpful to keep it fresh in my mind while I go through my day. This, and 'Lord Of The Rings' are the only books I've read more than twice.

I received the Pullman boxed set, (His Dark Materials Trilogy,) which contains 'The Golden Compass' and Thomas L. Friedman's "The World Is Flat: A Brief History Of The Twenty-First Century" for Xmas, so those are next on my reading list.

Benihana
12-27-2007, 11:22 AM
Anybody here read Jerry Crasnick's "License to Deal"?

Caveat Emperor
12-27-2007, 11:25 AM
I received the Pullman boxed set, (His Dark Materials Trilogy,) which contains 'The Golden Compass' and Thomas L. Friedman's "The World Is Flat: A Brief History Of The Twenty-First Century" for Xmas, so those are next on my reading list.

I finished "The Golden Compass" last weekend, and I just finished "The Subtle Knife" yesterday. I'll probably start on "The Amber Spyglass" tonight.

Two of the best books I've read in recent memory. It was literally only my desire not to fly through all three books in a week that his kept me at a normal reading pace.

Definately my highest recommendation on these.

Yachtzee
12-27-2007, 09:10 PM
I am reading cookbooks, and I am also trying to read Heart of Darkness for the hundred millionth time. I swear I've devoted about a year of my life to reading this book, and it's only about 20 pages long. Why I'm so determined to finish it is the real mystery here.

I've been having that same problem with Heart of Darkness.

marcshoe
12-27-2007, 09:12 PM
I loved "Heart of Darkness". I thought Conrad's use of language was wonderful.

SandyD
12-28-2007, 09:25 PM
I read Heart of Darkness in a Modern Novel class in college. Came right after To the Lighthouse. Pressure of having to discuss/write about the book and having a deadline helped. But I found it worthwhile.

Currently reading Snow by Orhan Pamuk. Really interesting. Not much time for reading with the holidays.

nycredsfan
12-28-2007, 10:12 PM
Foreskin's Lament by Shalom Auslander- probably the most entertaining book I've read this year.

HumnHilghtFreel
12-28-2007, 10:20 PM
Anybody here read Jerry Crasnick's "License to Deal"?

I got this for myself for Christmas and am a few chapters in.

Mario-Rijo
12-28-2007, 10:40 PM
Finally p/u Moneyball and am about 4 chapters in. A very fast and good read. But I guess if it wasn't any good it wouldn't be fast, just need to set aside more time to read more than a message board. ;)

Yachtzee
01-10-2008, 03:48 PM
Just got two soccer books in the mail. "How Soccer Explains The World" and "The Ball is Round: A Global History of Soccer."

*BaseClogger*
01-10-2008, 03:51 PM
anybody read Colbert's book?

RichRed
01-10-2008, 06:57 PM
Finally getting around to reading Catch-22 by Joseph Heller.

BoydsOfSummer
01-10-2008, 07:02 PM
Finally p/u Moneyball and am about 4 chapters in. A very fast and good read. But I guess if it wasn't any good it wouldn't be fast, just need to set aside more time to read more than a message board. ;)

I think I read it in one sitting. Couldn't put it down.


Just started 'Three Nights in August' and 'Underboss' about Sammy Bull. Baseball and Mob stuff, it doesn't get any better for me.

pedro
01-10-2008, 07:09 PM
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man - John Perkins

Redsfaithful
01-10-2008, 07:17 PM
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man - John Perkins

I was depressed for a couple of days after reading that one. Not sure I've ever read anything that made me feel more powerless.

pedro
01-10-2008, 07:44 PM
I was depressed for a couple of days after reading that one. Not sure I've ever read anything that made me feel more powerless.

Yup.

Dom Heffner
01-10-2008, 08:16 PM
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man - John Perkins


That one is sitting on my book shelf right now.

My friend recommended it to me, but it just sounds like one of those books where I already know awful things go on in the world and I don't feel like being any more angry and powerless than I already do, so I'm going to skip it.

pedro
01-10-2008, 08:17 PM
That one is sitting on my book shelf right now.

My friend recommended it to me, but it just sounds like one of those books where I already know awful things go on in the world and I don't feel like being any more angry and powerless than I already do, so I'm going to skip it.

I sat on it for over a year before I did. It's nothing groundbreaking if you know about that kind of stuff already but it is a good read.

Dom Heffner
01-10-2008, 08:25 PM
I'll stick to my Adams-Jefferson letters. Best 12 bucks I ever spent. :)

GAC
01-10-2008, 08:35 PM
My 12 yr old is actually reading War and Peace. I told him Tolstoy's mistress originally titled it "War, What Is It Good For?" Absolutely Nothing!

[gotta quit watching Seinfeld]

SunDeck
01-10-2008, 09:57 PM
Crispin: the Cross of Lead
Crispin: the Edge of the World

Yep, I'm still reading young adult books.

AccordinglyReds
01-10-2008, 10:04 PM
The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman


Confessions of an Economic Hit Man - John Perkins

That was a good one. Chose to read it for Global Issues class senior year. :)

WebScorpion
01-11-2008, 10:19 AM
The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman


That's next on my list.

Water for Elephants was a fantastic read. Great story, great characters, and it involved a subject that interests me, but I've never known a lot about...life in a traveling circus. :thumbup:

The 'His Dark Materials' trilogy by Philip Pullman has been good so far. I'm just beginning the second book. It took me a while to get into the first book (The Golden Compass), but once the characters were developed and the plot got moving it did a good job of keeping a few plot lines going with an unanswered question or two always looming to keep me hooked. It took me a few days to get through the first 100 pages, but one night for the last 300 or so. The second book (The Subtle Knife) introduces some new characters (and worlds) so it's beginning a little slowly too...I'm certain it will pick up. Definitely young adult oriented...a very easy enjoyable read. :thumbup:

SunDeck
01-11-2008, 10:43 AM
The 'His Dark Materials' trilogy by Philip Pullman has been good so far. I'm just beginning the second book. It took me a while to get into the first book (The Golden Compass), but once the characters were developed and the plot got moving it did a good job of keeping a few plot lines going with an unanswered question or two always looming to keep me hooked. It took me a few days to get through the first 100 pages, but one night for the last 300 or so. The second book (The Subtle Knife) introduces some new characters (and worlds) so it's beginning a little slowly too...I'm certain it will pick up. Definitely young adult oriented...a very easy enjoyable read. :thumbup:

I thought the Golden Compass was the best of the three and I wonder if you will think the same. There is a depth and foreboding to the writing that is beyond most YA literature. But like Rowling, Lewis and Dahl, Pullman is just flat out talented, with makes a huge difference and keeps it accessible. Speaking of which, I am not a real snob, but I do have trouble sticking with something if it is not well written. Here is a fantastic, biting criticism (http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000844.html) of some of the worst writing I have ever read.

Roy Tucker
01-11-2008, 11:03 AM
That's next on my list.

Water for Elephants was a fantastic read. Great story, great characters, and it involved a subject that interests me, but I've never known a lot about...life in a traveling circus. :thumbup:



I liked Friedman's The World is Flat. If you want to understand the true impact and ramifications of the internet, I recommend it. Reads as a series of extended editorials, but very thought-provoking.

Yep, it's been a while since I enjoyed a book as much as Water For Elephants. :thumbup: I just wanted to know more about Jacob and Marlena's life post-circus (and if they stayed together, I have a theory) and how things went for a 93-year old Jacob in the circus.

Blimpie
01-11-2008, 03:43 PM
The Art of the Start by Guy Kawasaki

Caveat Emperor
01-11-2008, 03:48 PM
I thought the Golden Compass was the best of the three and I wonder if you will think the same. There is a depth and foreboding to the writing that is beyond most YA literature.

I'd have a tough time picking my favorite of the three. I finished the series a couple weeks ago -- I'd rate it (collectively) among my top favorites for books.

The last half "The Amber Spyglass" was about as compelling as reading gets, IMO.

gonelong
01-11-2008, 03:51 PM
I just finished "I Am Legend". - Meh.

I suspect the movie will be better than the book.

GL

dabvu2498
01-11-2008, 03:55 PM
I just finished "I Am Legend". - Meh.

I suspect the movie will be better than the book.

GL

Don't count on it. Wait for the DVD, if you even bother.

I got It Never Rains in Tiger Stadium by John Ed Bradley for Christmas. Really good.

The new Grisham book, Playing for Pizza, sucks something awful though.

bucksfan2
01-11-2008, 03:58 PM
The new Grisham book, Playing for Pizza, sucks something awful though.

I thought it was interesting. Not up to Grisham's standard but I would suggest reading it.

cincrazy
01-11-2008, 07:00 PM
I'm currently reading "Marge Schott Unleashed" by Mike Bass, although I'm not very far into it. In the last month/month and a half I've read October Men by Roger Kahn, about the 78 Yanks, Moneyball, Juiced, Paths to Glory: How Great Baseball Teams Got That Way by Mark Armour and Daniel Levitt, and The Bad Guys Won! about the 86 Mets.

I've dedicated this winter to throwing myself into baseball literature like I never have before, and I've always been a big reader. The more I can learn about the history of the game from every conceivable angle, the better!

Redsfaithful
01-11-2008, 11:37 PM
I just finished "I Am Legend". - Meh.

I suspect the movie will be better than the book.

GL

I actually enjoyed that one, thought it had aged pretty well. I had low expectations going in though, that probably helped.

jmcclain19
01-12-2008, 02:50 AM
I picked up three books this week with some Christmas Barnes & Noble Gift cards

Venetian Betrayal by Steve Berry
http://www.amazon.com/Venetian-Betrayal-Novel-Steve-Berry/dp/0345485777/
Big fan of his techno thrillers

Devil's Teeth by Susan Casey
http://www.amazon.com/Devils-Teeth-Obsession-Survival-Americas/dp/B000FTWAZO/
Can't go wrong with a non-fiction about shark chasing. Everyone likes sharks

Mind Performance Hacks by Ron Hale Evans
http://www.amazon.com/Mind-Performance-Hacks-Tools-Overclocking/dp/0596101538
Much much cooler and more useful than I even imagined when buying. I read the whole thing cover to cover and have started implementing some of the brain strategies they lay out. Extremely Cool stuff.

Hardball Times 2008
http://www.amazon.com/Hardball-Times-Baseball-Annual-2008/dp/0879463414
Gotta love it when Baseball Annual season comes around. Next up will be Baseball America's Prospect Handbook and BP 2008.

I've been thumbing thru the Hardball Times annual, and I think I'll flip a coin as to which book, Berry's or Casey's, I'll crack open first.

GAC
01-12-2008, 06:22 AM
McCartney by Christopher Sanford

Luckiest Man by Jonathan Eig

Redsfaithful
01-13-2008, 01:28 AM
Fast Food Nation Eric Schlosser (not a fun read, even though I think it's well written and interesting)

The Dexter series by Jeff Lindsay (really different from the show, which my wife and I really like)

RichRed
01-31-2008, 11:13 AM
Just finished reading Catch-22. Has anyone read Heller's sequel to that novel, Closing Time? Would you recommend it?

pedro
01-31-2008, 11:18 AM
"Suttree" by Cormac Mccarthy

Roy Tucker
01-31-2008, 11:32 AM
Just finished reading Catch-22. Has anyone read Heller's sequel to that novel, Closing Time? Would you recommend it?

This is the one about Yossarian in his old age? IIRC, it was a little odd but pretty good. Nothing like the brilliance of Catch-22 but interesting and readable. I love Heller's prose if for nothing else.

Just finished "The Evening Star" by Larry McMurtry. I liked this more than I expected. It's the sequel to "Terms of Endearment". Aurora Greenway is a great character.

pedro
01-31-2008, 11:36 AM
Just finished "The Evening Star" by Larry McMurtry. I liked this more than I expected. It's the sequel to "Terms of Endearment". Aurora Greenway is a great character.

I recently finished "Loop Group" by McMurtry which I liked, despite the insipid, almost embarrassing, airport bookstore style cover.

Mccmurty does a much better job with female characters than most male writers.

wolfboy
01-31-2008, 03:49 PM
Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization by Lester Brown

http://www.amazon.com/Plan-3-0-Mobilizing-Civilization-Third/dp/0393330877/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1201812486&sr=8-1

Gainesville Red
01-31-2008, 04:32 PM
Finally getting around to reading Catch-22 by Joseph Heller.

Next on my list.

Currently, I've got 20 pages left of Norman Mailer's The Executioner's Song.

Stewie
02-01-2008, 08:05 AM
Simultaneously reading Naked Economics by Charles Wheelan and God Save the Fan by Deadspin's Will Leitch.

minus5
02-01-2008, 08:50 AM
Just finished The Rat Pack Confidential by Shawn Levy...not a bad read.

Redleg39
02-01-2008, 09:15 AM
I am reading "Lone Survivor" by Marcus Lutrell. Great story of Lutrell's experiance in Iraq. Provides a lot of insight to the behind the scenes of the military. Lutrell is very much a conservative, and the book is written from a conservative view point.

RichRed
02-01-2008, 10:09 AM
Just started Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin.

UKFlounder
02-17-2008, 06:35 PM
The Story the Soldiers Wouldn't Tell: Sex in the Civil War.

Pretty bawdy stuff - interesting to see that they used some of the same cuss words for the same meanings back then, and I'm surprised they were able to publish a couple of the pictures/sketches they did.

Definitely not a normal non-fiction book, but interesting.

Jack Burton
02-17-2008, 06:44 PM
About half way through "The Plague" by Albert Camus.

vaticanplum
02-17-2008, 09:02 PM
I am reading My Mistress's Sparrow is Dead, a collection of largely depressing or at least complex love stories. They are reaalllly good and I reaaaallly like them, but they are actually messing me up more than I expected. Last night I read a story called "Natasha" by David Bezmozgis before I went to bed and I had a lot of trouble sleeping.

Chip R
02-17-2008, 09:29 PM
"Into Hot Air" a novel by Chris Elliott.

HumnHilghtFreel
02-18-2008, 03:04 AM
Just bought a copy of Baseball Between The Numbers to kick off the new season. Gotta love Amazon, like new copy for $2.35

Strikes Out Looking
02-18-2008, 02:53 PM
Andersonville by McKinley Cantor. It won the Pulitizer Prize in 1956 for fiction. It is about the Civil War Prison Camp in Georgia that was called Andersonville. It is really a well written story.

Chip R
02-18-2008, 03:05 PM
Andersonville by McKinley Cantor. It won the Pulitizer Prize in 1956 for fiction. It is about the Civil War Prison Camp in Georgia that was called Andersonville. It is really a well written story.

I didn't like that book very much.

Spitball
02-18-2008, 03:35 PM
I'm currently reading "Reading Don't Fix No Chevys" : Literacy in the Lives of Young Men by Michael Smith and Jeffrey Wilhelm.

I recently finished Low & Outside:The True Confessions of a Minor League Baseball Player. I found it on e-bay after a thirty-something year hunt. Back in about 1965, I read an excerpt from the book in an issue of Sport magazine, but I was never able to get my hands on the book. It is not bad, but it is not nearly as entertaining as I remembered as a twelve year old.

Next, I hope to read Blink by a guy named Gladwell.

pedro
02-18-2008, 04:14 PM
"Suttree" by Cormac Mccarthy

I gave up on this though I might pick it up again later. It's use of language is absolutely beautiful but the story doesn't really seem to have a point as far as I can tell. It just meanders along.

pedro
02-18-2008, 04:16 PM
In the meantime, I just finished "Tourist Season" by Carl Hiaassen and am planning on reading "The Lesser Blessed" by Richard Van Camp next.

Roy Tucker
02-18-2008, 04:23 PM
Just finished "Strike Force" by Dale Brown.

Pretty decent, if you like Dale Brown and techno-geopolitical thrillers. It's one of my guilty pleasures. Space planes, killer lasers, robots, space stations, etc etc. Brings out the 12 year old geek who liked books about rockets to Venus in me.

TeamCasey
02-18-2008, 04:37 PM
Just finished Steve and Me by Terri Irwin.

Reading The Tender Bar by J.R. Moehringer and a Lorenzo Carcaterra now. The title escapes me at the moment.

vaticanplum
02-18-2008, 10:01 PM
Crispin: the Cross of Lead
Crispin: the Edge of the World

Yep, I'm still reading young adult books.

Sundeck, have you read The Book Thief?

Stephenk29
02-18-2008, 11:24 PM
Luckiest Man by Jonathan Eig

What did you think of that one? I put it among my favorites.

*BaseClogger*
02-18-2008, 11:40 PM
Just bought a copy of Baseball Between The Numbers to kick off the new season. Gotta love Amazon, like new copy for $2.35

That book is what got me interested into SABR stuff. I think it might be kinda outdated now...

Ravenlord
02-19-2008, 03:48 AM
Bets Known Works of Oscar Wilde, specifically, "The Picture of Dorian Gray" is where I'm at now.

Popular Tales From Norse Mythology, specifically, "Such Women Are" which is about the value of a woman who truly gets you, and what her worth is. not a bad piece of work for a society that had almost equal rights about a 1,000 years before us.

and

The Silmarillion by Tolkien

BoydsOfSummer
02-19-2008, 02:59 PM
I didn't like that book very much.

I'd like to read that one. What didn't you like about it,Chip?

*BaseClogger*
02-19-2008, 03:58 PM
Okay just finished it for a school assignment... has anyone read Affluenza?

Chip R
02-19-2008, 03:59 PM
I'd like to read that one. What didn't you like about it,Chip?


I thought it was too long and boring. Not a real pleasant subject either. But different strokes and all that.

Redsfaithful
02-20-2008, 06:03 PM
I'm currently reading "Reading Don't Fix No Chevys" : Literacy in the Lives of Young Men by Michael Smith and Jeffrey Wilhelm.

I recently finished Low & Outside:The True Confessions of a Minor League Baseball Player. I found it on e-bay after a thirty-something year hunt. Back in about 1965, I read an excerpt from the book in an issue of Sport magazine, but I was never able to get my hands on the book. It is not bad, but it is not nearly as entertaining as I remembered as a twelve year old.

Next, I hope to read Blink by a guy named Gladwell.

Blink is great, so is The Tipping Point. Gladwell is a pretty interesting writer.

HumnHilghtFreel
02-20-2008, 06:27 PM
Just tacked on "Pistol: The Life of Pete Maravich" to my to-do list. Anyone else have a problem with reading like 8 different things at once?

vaticanplum
02-20-2008, 06:43 PM
Anyone else have a problem with reading like 8 different things at once?

You know, I've only just started to do this. I used to be such a monogamous book girl but recently I've gone off the rails. I'm reading three books right now and there's a fourth I suspect I will take on very soon, before any of the rest are finished. I don't know what's gotten into me and I don't particularly like myself for it because I feel like I'm not giving any of them my full attention, but at the same time, I don't know which one to give up. I'm afraid that whichever one I pick to stop reading will never forgive me and I'll never be able to go back to where I left off.

Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?

paintmered
02-20-2008, 06:46 PM
Blink is great, so is The Tipping Point. Gladwell is a pretty interesting writer.

I'm a big fan of both those books. :thumbup:

Chip R
02-20-2008, 07:05 PM
Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?


I usually read about 3 at a time. One I read during lunch at work, one I fall asleep reading so I only read a few pages at a time every night and the 3rd I read in the "reading room". I used to read another one at my other job until they put the kibosh on that awhile back.

HumnHilghtFreel
02-20-2008, 07:09 PM
You know, I've only just started to do this. I used to be such a monogamous book girl but recently I've gone off the rails. I'm reading three books right now and there's a fourth I suspect I will take on very soon, before any of the rest are finished. I don't know what's gotten into me and I don't particularly like myself for it because I feel like I'm not giving any of them my full attention, but at the same time, I don't know which one to give up. I'm afraid that whichever one I pick to stop reading will never forgive me and I'll never be able to go back to where I left off.

Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?


:laugh: monogamous book girl, I like that. I guess maybe I find myself doing it just to spice up the relationship with the other book. "War and Peace, you offer so much more to me. I admit it... I read the Sunday comic strips, but it didn't mean anything!"

vaticanplum
02-20-2008, 07:32 PM
I usually read about 3 at a time. One I read during lunch at work, one I fall asleep reading so I only read a few pages at a time every night and the 3rd I read in the "reading room". I used to read another one at my other job until they put the kibosh on that awhile back.

But why? Are they hot-glued to their respective locations?

Chip R
02-20-2008, 09:41 PM
But why? Are they hot-glued to their respective locations?


Come again? :confused:

OldRightHander
02-20-2008, 10:18 PM
Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?

I usually do two at a time, one non-fiction that I read to learn something, and a novel just for entertainment purposes.

vaticanplum
02-20-2008, 11:44 PM
Come again? :confused:

Your answer implied that you read specific books in specific locations. I'm just wondering why they don't move :)

Chip R
02-21-2008, 01:03 AM
Your answer implied that you read specific books in specific locations. I'm just wondering why they don't move :)


Gotcha. I do carry my book at work with me to the lunch room and then to the library and then back to my desk so it isn't exactly "hot glued" there. As for the other two, I guess it's for convenience sake more than anything. You know how us guys enjoy reading in our "reading rooms". :p:

HumnHilghtFreel
02-21-2008, 01:14 AM
Gotcha. I do carry my book at work with me to the lunch room and then to the library and then back to my desk so it isn't exactly "hot glued" there. As for the other two, I guess it's for convenience sake more than anything. You know how us guys enjoy reading in our "reading rooms". :p:

I know I love my reading room. Speaking of which, I need to put another can of lysol in there:cool:

Roy Tucker
02-21-2008, 08:19 AM
I'm a serial one book at a time guy. Sometimes I'll stop reading one book, read another, and then come back to the first book. But usually read books end to end, not parallel. My brain can't take keeping multiple threads straight.

I augment and fill in my book reading with newspapers and magazines.

SunDeck
02-21-2008, 08:27 AM
Airman, by Eoin Colfer
Escape from Home, by Avi.
Finished last week- Book with no Words, by Avi.

Roy Tucker
02-21-2008, 09:29 AM
Airman, by Eoin Colfer
Escape from Home, by Avi.
Finished last week- Book with no Words, by Avi.

I don't recall if they were those books, but I remember reading Avi books with my daughter. Great tales.

I always enjoy reading the same books as my kids. Just read Kerouac's "On The Road" with the same but now 17 yr. old daughter. She's reading "Cat's Cradle" now so I may re-read that.

westofyou
02-21-2008, 09:59 AM
She's reading "Cat's Cradle" now so I may re-read that.

Hi Ho... I would.

I'm reading the Reckoning by Halberstam and Neil Young's Biography

Jack Burton
02-21-2008, 11:52 AM
Finished 'The Plague' by Albert Camus. I wasn't the biggest fan, moved slow...tough read. Moved on to 'Of Mice and Men' and finished it in a day (only about 110 pages). Now that's a fast read, excellent book.

Next up is 'Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test' by Tom Wolfe.

westofyou
02-21-2008, 11:53 AM
Next up is 'Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test' by Tom Wolfe.

I've know some Pranksters in my day.

SunDeck
02-21-2008, 12:37 PM
I don't recall if they were those books, but I remember reading Avi books with my daughter. Great tales.

I always enjoy reading the same books as my kids. Just read Kerouac's "On The Road" with the same but now 17 yr. old daughter. She's reading "Cat's Cradle" now so I may re-read that.

The Crispin books, maybe? He won a Newberry with the first one, but both were really wonderful reads if you ask me. I think it's hard for a writer to put real gravity in a book for kids, but Avi does a great job of it.

Rojo
02-21-2008, 12:46 PM
Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. Its about his exploits as a busboy in Paris and a tramp in London during the 30's. Supposedly he drew his inspiration from The Road by Jack London, which is next up. He documents a pretty miserable existence.

BoydsOfSummer
02-21-2008, 05:16 PM
Next up is 'Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test' by Tom Wolfe.

Back in the day when wine coolers were new, we would disolve hits of acid in the two liter bottles. Then we would play quarters with the concoction. We called it "electric koolaid".

No wonder I'm 3/4 retarded.

jmcclain19
02-23-2008, 02:48 AM
It's February, so I've been picking up and plowing thru baseball books Hardball Times & Baseball America's 2008 handbooks are already down.

I've also cracked open James Rollins Sandstorm. I was told it was very Indiana Jones-esq, and being the big Indy fan I am it sounded right up my alley. So far - it's interesting, but not quite what I expected - not in a bad way though.

improbus
02-23-2008, 08:09 AM
I'm nearly finished with Loose Balls by Terry Pluto. It is a great book about the ABA, with interviews about different topics, teams, and players. Good times.

WebScorpion
02-25-2008, 10:52 AM
Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?

My multiple books usually serve different purposes. They are usually different types of reading; So if I'm in the mood for entertainment, I'll pick up the fiction novel, and if I'm in a more serious, curious mood I'll pick up the 'educational' book. Also, I'm almost always trying to wade through a 'professional' book, which is the only one I can get away with reading at work. Occasionally I'll get two works of fiction (entertainment) started at the same time and try to read them simultaneously, but it's very rare.

Ravenlord
02-25-2008, 10:58 AM
Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?

mostly it's the only i can manage the ADD while reading. it also gives me the added advantage of absorbing a book in small chunks and having a greater amount of time to think about what i just read before continuing.

reds2221
02-27-2008, 08:37 AM
right now i'm reading "the glass castle" for my AP class, its good, kinda depressing, but good. I'm reading the Bill James New Historical Baseball Abstract for myself though. I love that book!

KittyDuran
03-27-2008, 09:48 PM
I thought the Golden Compass was the best of the three and I wonder if you will think the same. There is a depth and foreboding to the writing that is beyond most YA literature. But like Rowling, Lewis and Dahl, Pullman is just flat out talented, with makes a huge difference and keeps it accessible. Speaking of which, I am not a real snob, but I do have trouble sticking with something if it is not well written. Here is a fantastic, biting criticism (http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000844.html) of some of the worst writing I have ever read.Bumping this thread up... I read in stages - and always try to get some good paperbacks for vacation to read at night or when I'm out on the road. Got the HDM trilogy for Spring Training. When I went to Borders I couldn't find it in the regular Sci-fi and had to ask where it was. Agree that it's beyond YA and an engrossing read. I flew through the last two books but I first lingered over The Golden Compass namely to get the feel for the main characters and the story. I even resisted renting the movie at the hotel (I even got a free pass) the first night on the road. Hopefully, (tho' I doubt it) there will be a director's cut for The Golden Compass on DVD to show the right ending.

Right now I'm finishing The Little Ice Age by Brian Fagan. It's almost the companion book for the show IIRC on the History Channel. Most of the book is speculation but the evidence is presented in the very convincing way to show that the weather might have affected history between 1300 - 1850.

smoke6
03-28-2008, 11:14 AM
JOE, biography of Joe Nuxhall.

Falls City Beer
03-28-2008, 11:34 AM
You know, I've only just started to do this. I used to be such a monogamous book girl but recently I've gone off the rails. I'm reading three books right now and there's a fourth I suspect I will take on very soon, before any of the rest are finished. I don't know what's gotten into me and I don't particularly like myself for it because I feel like I'm not giving any of them my full attention, but at the same time, I don't know which one to give up. I'm afraid that whichever one I pick to stop reading will never forgive me and I'll never be able to go back to where I left off.

Multiple book readers, how do you do it? Do you just like to have your mind in many places at one time?

I read "hard" stuff in the morning when I'm heavily caffeinated and focused. Lighter stuff like histories or novels in the evening and bed time.

I annotate constantly--but seldom in the book; I keep a dedicated set of commonplace books for reading I do outside of bed. The smaller Moleskines you can get at Borders or whatever work perfectly. I buy them or ones like them in bulk. I'm completely tree-unfriendly.