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Chip R
03-28-2008, 01:46 PM
Breaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era by Charles Alexander
Playing for Keeps: A History of Early Baseball by Warren Goldstein
Ghost Soldiers by Hampton Sides

Spitball
04-01-2008, 07:42 PM
I recently started Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami. So far, it is excellent.

KittyDuran
04-01-2008, 08:59 PM
I know I love my reading room. Speaking of which, I need to put another can of lysol in there:cool:You mean the "ladies' room"?;) Mine's filled with magazines (usually Discover, Cosmo, Midwest Living or any interesting mag* I might pick up) and the yearly Reds Media Guide - plus a book I just have to finish.

* Just got the new Cincinnati mag with A-Gon on the front Sunday... pretty good articles plus some great photos taken at ST. One (an out-take from the mag online) is my new avatar!!!

joshnky
04-05-2008, 09:04 PM
Just finished The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum and am now a few chapters into The Bourne Supremacy.

I just finished these two books and will probably read the third shortly. These were my first taste of Ludlum's writing and I really enjoyed them. Anyone have any recommendations for some other Robert Ludlum books?

MWM
04-05-2008, 09:27 PM
I just finished these two books and will probably read the third shortly. These were my first taste of Ludlum's writing and I really enjoyed them. Anyone have any recommendations for some other Robert Ludlum books?


Save your time on the third one. It's pretty bad, IMO. I loved the first two, but the third was was pretty dumb I thought.

SunDeck
04-05-2008, 09:42 PM
Bartimaeus Trilogy

UKFlounder
04-05-2008, 10:07 PM
I just finished "Go if You Think it Your Duty" another Civil War book, of the letters between a couple.

As the war began, they were still dating, then he came home on a furlough, they got married. He went back on duty, and then their letters start talking about her pregnancy, and her health over the next several months and through her giving birth.

It's nice from a Civil War persective, as he became a captain, then became involved in raising a unit of African Americans, but they're generally a bunch of love letters, and almost a written debate of whether his primary duty was to his country and army or to his wife and daughter. Both occasionally lectured the other, but neither was willing to absolutely demand any certain resolution.

One funny line was when he wrote to her on his 27th birthday and asked "How old are you? When is your birthday? I've forgotten." I guess being a few hundred miles away from her helped spare his life after that :).

(On the other hand, he gave her free reign over managing household affairs, such as renting their farm to whoever she pleased.)

Some of the letters were quite touching, especially about the daughter he did not see for the first several months of her life and how they truly missed each other, yet he could not tear himself away from the army.

It might be a good study in gender roles as well as a look at the war itself. It's a very interesting read.

SandyD
05-11-2008, 09:50 AM
"windy city" by scott simon

The mayor of Chicago is murdered. The CPD is investigating, the alderman are preparing to select the new mayor for the unfinished term, etc, etc.

just finished:

"March" by Geraldine Brooks--a novel based upon the character of the missing father of the March girls in "little women" while he was serving as chaplain in the Union Army.

"Chasing the Devil's Tail" by David Fulmer--a mystery set in Storeyville, New Orleans in the early years of the 20th century: a serial killer is knocking off prostitutes, and leaving a black rose behind.

"Gentlemen and Players" by Joanne Harris--a child who longs to belong/fit into an exclusive boy's school (in England) returns as an adult (now teacher) to "bring the school down."

Stephenk29
05-11-2008, 08:17 PM
I just finished these two books and will probably read the third shortly. These were my first taste of Ludlum's writing and I really enjoyed them. Anyone have any recommendations for some other Robert Ludlum books?

The Matarese Circle.

I can only handle so much Ludlum, his books all start to feel the same. The Matarese Circle was excellent though.

OldRightHander
05-11-2008, 11:39 PM
The Matarese Circle.

I can only handle so much Ludlum, his books all start to feel the same. The Matarese Circle was excellent though.

Man was trained to be a natural killer by the government. Man has become jaded over the years and is sick of the killing and the deception. Man comes across a vast international conspiracy and can trust nobody, except the beautiful woman who helps him bring down said conspiracy. Man retires from government service and disappears with the beautiful woman and never touches weapons again.

I'm pretty sure that was the plotline for a few Ludlum books I've read. For a twist, and something different from anything else he ever wrote, try Road to Gandolfo. It's pretty funny and not nearly as long as his other books either.

redsfan1966
05-14-2008, 12:23 AM
Just finished "Happy Endings" by Jim Norton of Opie and Anthony fame....yes, it is a real book and it was real funny...good job lil' Jimmy...

MartyFan
05-14-2008, 12:30 AM
I just finished reading "How Starbucks Saved My Life" by Michael Gates Gill.

Gill was the former creative Director for one of the nations largest advertising companies who lost pretty much everything, including himself, only to find his way by taking a job wearing a green apron.

Tom Hanks will star in the movie which I think is being made now and due out at Christmas time.

I also just finished "You're Lucky You're Funny" by Phil Rosenthal who was the Creator and Executive Director of "Everybody Loves Raymond"...pretty good book, interesting to find out some nehind the scenes stuff and how he ran the show.

RedlegJake
05-14-2008, 01:07 AM
After posting this I'm going to fall asleep reading a couple more chapters of "Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follet. Fascinating historical fiction of the building a great gothic cathedral in medieval england.

Caveat Emperor
05-14-2008, 09:00 AM
I can only handle so much Ludlum, his books all start to feel the same. The Matarese Circle was excellent though.

Clive Cussler's books are the same way. They're fun in small doses every so often, though.

SunDeck
05-14-2008, 02:08 PM
I'm on a project- reading books for middle school boys.
My last three:

The Giver by Lois Lowry.
Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Gary Paulsen.
B is for Buster by Iain Lawrence.

westofyou
05-14-2008, 02:11 PM
Just finished Freakonomics... stats can be fun when applied to things other than money or sports

Hoosier Red
05-14-2008, 02:32 PM
I loved Freakanomics.

I'm currently reading "The Chronicles of Narnia"(trying to get through Prince Caspian before the movie comes out.

Also "The Goal" for my Operations course.
and I started but got bored by "The Pirates Lafitte"

Chip R
05-14-2008, 02:37 PM
Just started "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer. Also reading, "They Call Me Sparky" by Sparky Anderson and finishing "Fatso" by Art Donovan.

RichRed
05-14-2008, 03:01 PM
"Fatso" by Art Donovan.

That's one I've been wanting to read.

I'm reading Jim Brosnan's Pennant Race for probably the tenth time.

freestyle55
05-14-2008, 03:08 PM
The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall

Pretty weird, about a guy who is losing his memory and a "conceptual though shark" that is chasing him, trying to destroy his memories...

As I said, very strange, but kind of interesting...found it on one of those middle tables in Borders...

Roy Tucker
05-14-2008, 03:35 PM
Still reading fairly mindless novels and staying away from more serious books. Work is kicking my butt.

Just finished "The Hot Kid" by Elmore Leonard. Excellent 30's-style cop-gangster boo. Leonard is a true American treasure. That guy can *write*. I'm working my way through his catalog.

Also recently read Jefferey Deaver's "The Sleeping Doll". Deaver writes good suspense and has good characters. Kathryn Dance is a worthy successor to Lincoln Rhymes.

Reading "Circumference of Darkness" by Jack Henderson. Good near future post-9/11 spy-computer-geek-techno-whiz Clancy-esque book. A real page-turner.

Larry McMurtry's "Loop Group" is up next.

vaticanplum
05-14-2008, 05:20 PM
I'm on a project- reading books for middle school boys.
My last three:

The Giver by Lois Lowry.
Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Gary Paulsen.
B is for Buster by Iain Lawrence.

SunDeck. Read. The. Book. Thief.

Roy Tucker
05-14-2008, 06:24 PM
I'm on a project- reading books for middle school boys.
My last three:

The Giver by Lois Lowry.
Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Gary Paulsen.
B is for Buster by Iain Lawrence.

I do that a lot with my kids, read the books that they read. :thumbup:

Daughter Jen is reading Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" for English. It's on my stack. I don't think I've read it since HS.

Matt700wlw
05-14-2008, 06:24 PM
This thread

Scrap Irony
05-15-2008, 04:54 PM
Sun Deck,

I'd also recommend The Chocolate War. Great story. A bit dark, though.

deltachi8
05-15-2008, 04:58 PM
Resumes submitted by those applying for my current job.

SunDeck
05-15-2008, 06:39 PM
SunDeck. Read. The. Book. Thief.

Been meaning to for a while! I think all our copies are still checked out. Teens really do read.

SunDeck
05-15-2008, 06:41 PM
Forgot to mention...Transall Saga. Just finished it.

RedsManRick
05-15-2008, 06:45 PM
I'm reading Nudge. I'm a pop-soc/psych/econ junkie...

RedsFan75
05-16-2008, 09:37 AM
I'm reading "The Music Lesson" by Victor Wooten.

His unique take on music and how we look at learning it.

bucksfan2
05-16-2008, 09:52 AM
The Secret Servent by Daniel Silva. I have really started to enjoy his books.

joshnky
05-16-2008, 01:08 PM
The Matarese Circle.

I can only handle so much Ludlum, his books all start to feel the same. The Matarese Circle was excellent though.

I already read it and found it to be pretty good. Also, against my better judgment, I read the Bourne Ultimatum which is awful. When I finally finished I had no clue what had happened but I was pretty sure I didn't like it. I'm reading the Parsifal Mosaic by Ludlum right now. Its decent but not nearly as good as the Bourne Supremacy or Matarese Circle.

Roy Tucker
05-16-2008, 01:58 PM
I already read it and found it to be pretty good. Also, against my better judgment, I read the Bourne Ultimatum which is awful. When I finally finished I had no clue what had happened but I was pretty sure I didn't like it. I'm reading the Parsifal Mosaic by Ludlum right now. Its decent but not nearly as good as the Bourne Supremacy or Matarese Circle.

Good observations.

It's always fun for me to find a book I like and then work my way through that author's catalog of books. It's like finding a vein of gold in a mine. I'll go back to the library time and again and work my way down the shelf devouring each book.

But often times, the arc of an author's career has an ascent, a plateau, and a descent. Many times, the longer an author writes a certain kind of book, the more formulaic and paint-by-numbers the books get. And they cease to be as interesting/fun/thrilling/whatever to read to the point where you just stop reading them.

The early Ludlum books I loved to death but the later ones I finally just punted on.

KittyDuran
05-20-2008, 02:14 PM
Just finished both Lyra's Oxford and Once Upon a Time in the North both by Philip Pullman (and very short reads). Lyra's Oxford is just a short story starting just after the end of The Amber Spyglass. Once Upon a Time in the North goes into the story of how Lee Scoresby and Iorek Bymison first met.

Now I'm in the middle of The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium by Robert Lacey & Danny Danziger. It's more of a English POV with a month-by-month analysis of the lives of people at and around the year 1000.

OldRightHander
05-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Clive Cussler's books are the same way. They're fun in small doses every so often, though.

Cussler is enjoyable fluff that is pretty good when you just want some entertainment without having to think too hard. I enjoy his books for that very reason. There are times I want something great and other times I just want to be entertained for a while and forget about the real world. His books will never be confused for great literature, but they're fun anyway.

KittyDuran
07-03-2008, 08:52 PM
Just starting "The Man With The Golden Torc" by Simon Green. I found the book by accident... I receive weekly emails from Borders and they had his new novel listed "Daemons are Forever". Wellllll... (CE will appreciate this) I thought it was a book about the daemons from the Phillip Pullman books. Anyhoo, it is sort of a James Bond meets the supernatural. Simon Green has other series of books (which I know nothing of) but if this book is still good at the end I might invest in the purchase.

SandyD
07-03-2008, 10:29 PM
I'm almost finished "The Plague of Doves" by Louise Erdrich, which I found very good, and a fast read.

When I'm done, I'm going to read "The Annotated Casey at the Bat" by Martin Gardner.

OldRightHander
07-03-2008, 11:06 PM
revisiting Patrick O'Brian...for about the third time

KittyDuran
07-04-2008, 09:38 PM
Just read "In the Wake of the Plague...the Black Death & The World it Made" by Norman Cantor. I've been on a Middle Ages kick lately and started "Mysteries of the Middle Ages...and the Beginning of the Modern World" by Thomas Cahill. Then next on my reading list are something new for me... historical novels: Roma (the Novel of Ancient Rome) by Steven Saylor and "Napoleon's Pyramids" by William Dietrich.

OldRightHander
07-04-2008, 11:42 PM
Just read "In the Wake of the Plague...the Black Death & The World it Made" by Norman Cantor. I've been on a Middle Ages kick lately and started "Mysteries of the Middle Ages...and the Beginning of the Modern World" by Thomas Cahill. Then next on my reading list are something new for me... historical novels: Roma (the Novel of Ancient Rome) by Steven Saylor and "Napoleon's Pyramids" by William Dietrich.

Cahill is great. Check out How the Irish Saved Civilization by him as well. It's a fascinating look at Irish monasteries during the Dark Ages and how they compiled literary works that were otherwise being destroyed by the barbarians in Europe.

As far as good fiction based in that period, I enjoy Sharon Key Penman. I also came across a good one at the library but I think it's out of print. It's called The Golden Warrior by Hope Muntz. It's about King Harold and William the Conqueror and the events leading up to and including the Battle of Hastings. It's a wonderfully written and well researched book. It's a novel, but isn't full of fictional characters and is pretty darn accurate, no artistic liberties taken here. I checked it out from the downtown library, so I know they have a copy, if they haven't gotten rid of it since I returned it about a year ago.

pahster
07-04-2008, 11:47 PM
I'm finishing up the last Dark Tower book.

Roy Tucker
07-05-2008, 11:28 AM
I'm finishing up the last Dark Tower book.

You'll have to let me know what you think of how it all winds up.

RedsManRick
07-05-2008, 03:14 PM
I just finished reading Gang Leader for a Day. I'm a bit of a behavioral economics nut.

BillDoran
07-05-2008, 03:25 PM
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. It's a bit tedious, but the breadth and skill is incredible. I'd argue Wallace to be the contemporary American author of our generation. His work across the board is spectacular and I recommend him highly.

thatcoolguy_22
07-05-2008, 04:57 PM
The Neutronium Alchemist trilogy by Peter Hamilton

http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/nonfiction/neutalch.htm
a review

Im on the final installment of the trilogy now and the writing is spectactular. I'm not really a huge fan of the SF genre but the world that Hamilton developed is amazing at both its details and mythology.

Its everything Star Wars fans claim exist in their universe...

LouisvilleCARDS
07-05-2008, 07:23 PM
I haven't actually read a book in forever (eh, who wants to read?) but I got this Rise and Fall of ECW book from Deep Discount DVD cheap, by mistake (thought it was the DVD). Pretty interesting stuff so far in if you're into wrestling at all, I used to be a big ECW fan.

cumberlandreds
07-08-2008, 09:03 AM
I'm reading "Brothers in Battle,Best of Friends". This is the story of two of the "Band of Brothers", Bill Guarnare and Babe Heffron. They are both from South Philly and grew up just blocks from each other but didn't meet until they were in Europe. It's an interesting view from the common GI's perspective. It still amazes me at how much these guys did and how they did it with much humility.

redsmetz
07-08-2008, 03:45 PM
I just finished reading John Steinbeck's Travels with Charley, In Search of Amerca. Written in 1960, it is a travelogue about a journey Steinbeck made around the country in a truck he had outfitted with a cabin on its bed. Charley was his large French poodle. It was a fascinating snapshot at America right on the cusp of dramatic change and some of what he writes about seems to have been rather prescient. Steinbeck is such a fabulous writer and it was an engaging book.

Now I've moved on to John Irving's The World According to Garp.

Roy Tucker
07-08-2008, 04:10 PM
Just finished "Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson" by Jan Wenner. A pretty unvarnished look at Hunter S. Thompson's life.

I admired his Hells Angels and Fear and Loathing Vegas/Campaign Trail books, but I always wondered what happened to him after that. I found out. It was a lot of drugs and alcohol, playing the part of Dr. Gonzo, and failure.

joshnky
07-08-2008, 04:37 PM
I just started reading "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. I haven't read enough to tell one way or the other although I've heard positive things about it. Hopefully, I'll stick with it but the length of the book is a little daunting.

BEETTLEBUG
07-08-2008, 06:15 PM
Redzone articles.

redsmetz
07-08-2008, 06:35 PM
I just started reading "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. I haven't read enough to tell one way or the other although I've heard positive things about it. Hopefully, I'll stick with it but the length of the book is a little daunting.

My son mentioned to someone this summer that he was going to read that. They said something like read it to say you did, but forget everything about it.

SandyD
07-08-2008, 08:59 PM
Absurdistan, by Gary Shteyngart

It's ... well ... ABSURD.

Kind of crude, but I read a review calling it a Russian's Confederacy of Dunces, so that's to be expected. We'll see how it goes.

pahster
07-08-2008, 09:24 PM
You'll have to let me know what you think of how it all winds up.

Finished it up today. I really liked the series. It was plodding at times, but worth it in the end. I didn't much care for King writing himself into the story; the idea of the writer as a character was fine, but I found his inclusion of himself distracting. Other than that, I thought it was great. I'm not sure if the coda should have been included or not, but I don't think it weakens the story. I kinda saw the whole endless cycle thing coming ("ka is a wheel" and whatnot) and was pleasantly surprised that Roland was given a possible way out.

I think I enjoyed Wizard and Glass more than the rest of the books.

Redsfaithful
07-10-2008, 08:34 PM
I just started reading "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. I haven't read enough to tell one way or the other although I've heard positive things about it. Hopefully, I'll stick with it but the length of the book is a little daunting.

If you have an Xbox360 just play BioShock instead. You'll get the gist of it and have a far better time.

Stewie
07-12-2008, 11:56 AM
Currently about halfway through "Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes From the American Indie Underground 1981-1991."

No complaints so far.

RichRed
07-12-2008, 12:39 PM
Kings of Infinite Space by James Hynes

PTI (pti)
07-12-2008, 08:55 PM
Bowerman and the men of Oregon: The story of Oregon's legendary coach and Nike's co-founder



Title pretty much explains it all. Been getting into running more and more lately, and needed a little inspiration.

KittyDuran
07-13-2008, 11:25 AM
Added two more novels by William Dietrich..."The Scourge of God" (Roman Empire) and "Hadrian's Wall" (Roman England). Purchased yesterday "The Atlantis Prophecy" by Thomas Greanias.

jmcclain19
07-14-2008, 04:05 PM
I just bought the newest Brad Thor book - The Last Patriot and cracked it open last night.

So far so good.

westofyou
07-14-2008, 04:36 PM
Straight Man - Richard Russo

American Baseball - David Voight

The Summer Game - Roger Angell

OldRightHander
07-14-2008, 05:21 PM
I just bought the newest Brad Thor book - The Last Patriot and cracked it open last night.

So far so good.

I just finished the one before that. I've kind of enjoyed his books so far. I'll have to check that one out, but I've been waiting for the paperbacks lately.

jmcclain19
07-15-2008, 05:03 AM
I just finished the one before that. I've kind of enjoyed his books so far. I'll have to check that one out, but I've been waiting for the paperbacks lately.

If you haven't before, check out Vince Flynn's books too.

Thor and Flynn are nearly identical twins in terms of writing style and I enjoy them both.

OldRightHander
07-15-2008, 10:55 AM
If you haven't before, check out Vince Flynn's books too.

Thor and Flynn are nearly identical twins in terms of writing style and I enjoy them both.

I'm reading him too. I started reading both authors after hearing them interviewed by Glenn Beck.

joshnky
07-15-2008, 12:47 PM
If you haven't before, check out Vince Flynn's books too.

Thor and Flynn are nearly identical twins in terms of writing style and I enjoy them both.

Agree on Flynn although his last book was awful.

yab1112
07-15-2008, 01:15 PM
Been reading some alternative history books by Harry Turtledove. Not the greatest writer, but his topics are interesting. Stuff like, WWII if the South had won the Civil War. It's only worth a read if you're into that stuff. If not, his writing is too hard to take.

Looking for a new author to get into if anyone has any suggestions. :)

Roy Tucker
07-15-2008, 01:55 PM
Was it Turtledove that had modern day white supremacists time travelers take AK-47's back to the Civil War to turn the tide?

Philip K. Dick's "The Man in the High Castle" is my favorite alternative history book.

RichRed
07-15-2008, 02:57 PM
Just about to start The Soul of Baseball: A Road Trip Through Buck O'Neil's America by Joe Posnanski.

yab1112
07-15-2008, 05:05 PM
Was it Turtledove that had modern day white supremacists time travelers take AK-47's back to the Civil War to turn the tide?

Philip K. Dick's "The Man in the High Castle" is my favorite alternative history book.


lol no time travel in this one. As for "The Man in the High Castle" thanks for the recomend, i'm gonna go get it from the library tomorrow.

RedsManRick
07-15-2008, 07:52 PM
Was it Turtledove that had modern day white supremacists time travelers take AK-47's back to the Civil War to turn the tide?

Philip K. Dick's "The Man in the High Castle" is my favorite alternative history book.

I think you're referring to Guns for the South. I've heard really good things about the book, but similarly had heard that the premise saved the writing.

schmidty622
07-15-2008, 11:02 PM
Probably been mentioned numerous times on here but all of the Cormac McCarthy that I have read so far has been excellent.

AFalcon10
07-19-2008, 01:18 AM
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison.. Powerful,powerful novel... a real classic

Gainesville Red
07-19-2008, 01:43 AM
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison.. Powerful,powerful novel... a real classic

Agreed. A great book.

SandyD
07-19-2008, 07:41 AM
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison.. Powerful,powerful novel... a real classic

conversation starter too.

I was reading that book while waiting for a table in a restaurant. There was a woman sitting next to me who said she knew Ellison, lived in the same building with him. Also, she said he was working on another novel which he never finished because of a featured character similar to one in Toni Morrison's Jazz.

joshnky
07-26-2008, 06:51 PM
I just started reading "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand. I haven't read enough to tell one way or the other although I've heard positive things about it. Hopefully, I'll stick with it but the length of the book is a little daunting.

Just finished this and despite some comments to the contrary it was a terrific book. A little wordy at times and I didn't agree with all of it but it was an interesting read nonetheless.

redsmetz
07-26-2008, 06:54 PM
I'm currently reading The World According to Garp by John Irving. I'd never read the book, nor have I see the movie, but as I'm reading it, I can see Robin Williams was perfectly cast in his role. I'm anxious to finish it and then see the movie.

jmcclain19
08-01-2008, 06:11 AM
Agree on Flynn although his last book was awful.

Flynn's writing has always been so up and down for me. He could have my peak interest then lose me 50 pages from the end. His 4th book completely lost me but I thought the later ones were much better.

I actually haven't read his latest yet - I'll have to put that next on my list and see if I feel the same. I bought it last year but I have an infant at home and I bought an Xbox - so I haven't been reading much at all the last 6 months beyond baby books and home improvement books.

I recommended to a friend that he read Flynn & Thor's books and he gave me the greatest quote I've heard yet.

"These are like grocery store romance novels for dudes. Which is absolutely awesome."

cumberlandreds
08-01-2008, 08:33 AM
Currently reading Crazy '08. It's about the 1908 MLB season and mainly about the Cubs and Giants. Things were a lot different back in those days,baseball and socially.

OldRightHander
08-01-2008, 11:28 AM
I recommended to a friend that he read Flynn & Thor's books and he gave me the greatest quote I've heard yet.

"These are like grocery store romance novels for dudes. Which is absolutely awesome."

That pretty much sums it up. It's guy stuff, a man's man for a hero who kicks the @#%$ out of terrorists. It's appealing on a certain level, the level that doesn't want to think too much right before bedtime. Then again, I've always been a sucker for over the top patriotic stuff. Wave the flag a few times and you have my attention. I've been enjoying these books the last few months; not on the level of Patrick O'Brian, but a fun read.

Northern Dancer
08-01-2008, 06:30 PM
'Ball Four' by some guy named Bouton. Apparently he was a former ballplayer. ;)

forfreelin04
08-01-2008, 06:44 PM
Probably been mentioned numerous times on here but all of the Cormac McCarthy that I have read so far has been excellent.

I about 25 pages away from finishing "The Road." I love it.

RichRed
08-01-2008, 06:50 PM
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon.

It's a novel told from the first-person perspective of a 15-year-old autistic boy who sets out to solve the murder of a neighbor's dog. Just started it but it's pretty interesting so far.

thatcoolguy_22
08-02-2008, 08:15 PM
The Naked God by Peter Hamilton

Hoosier Red
08-04-2008, 12:09 PM
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon.

It's a novel told from the first-person perspective of a 15-year-old autistic boy who sets out to solve the murder of a neighbor's dog. Just started it but it's pretty interesting so far.

My wife read that and absolutely loved it.

Redsfaithful
08-05-2008, 09:25 PM
Just finished this and despite some comments to the contrary it was a terrific book. A little wordy at times and I didn't agree with all of it but it was an interesting read nonetheless.

http://www.angryflower.com/atlass.gif

http://media.tumblr.com/IxbHdO34Dc8zh20hCQvZoWVf_500.jpg

I read Atlas Shrugged when I was a teenager and didn't really know any better, and I only finished it because I had a policy of not abandoning books at the time. Ayn Rand struck me, even then, as an incredibly humorless and robotic human being. Objectivism might work if everyone was just like her, but most people are just too human. Even reading it without the political overtones the book is incredibly dry and long winded.

joshnky
08-06-2008, 09:56 AM
I read Atlas Shrugged when I was a teenager and didn't really know any better, and I only finished it because I had a policy of not abandoning books at the time. Ayn Rand struck me, even then, as an incredibly humorless and robotic human being. Objectivism might work if everyone was just like her, but most people are just too human. Even reading it without the political overtones the book is incredibly dry and long winded.

Your opinion. I was just expressing mine. I have a feeling that one's political leanings might effect their view of the book and the philosophy.

registerthis
08-06-2008, 10:54 AM
I'm trying to juggle four books at the moment, some I'm plowing through a bit faster than others:

"The Emperor of Ocean Park" by Stephen L. Carter

"Between Justice and Beauty: The Failure of Urban Planning in Washington, DC" by Howard Gillette Jr.

"The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule" by Thomas Frank

"This Is Your Brain on Music" by Daniel Levitin PhD

gonelong
08-06-2008, 12:11 PM
I just finished Freakonomics, it was interesting, though not as much as I expected it to be.

Also finished up Lost Lake, pretty decent.

I really enjoyed, "The Things They Carried".

GL

OldRightHander
08-06-2008, 12:13 PM
Just started the latest Brad Thor last night. I'm not that far into it yet.

registerthis
08-06-2008, 12:26 PM
I really enjoyed, "The Things They Carried".

GL

That's a real upper.

gonelong
08-06-2008, 12:33 PM
That's a real upper.

Yeah, probably not for everyone. It did, however, give me another lens to view some things through and maybe another reminder to value just how good I have it.

GL

*BaseClogger*
10-02-2008, 05:34 PM
I'm working on "The Book" right now by Tom Tango. What is the next baseball book I should read?

westofyou
10-02-2008, 05:37 PM
I'm working on "The Book" right now by Tom Tango. What is the next baseball book I should read?


Can't lose with any of these



"Diamonds in the Rough" Zoss & Bowman

"Past Time" Jules Tygial

"lords of the realm" Heyler

"dollar sign on the muscle" Kerrane

"nine Innings" Okrent

freestyle55
10-02-2008, 05:38 PM
Just started the latest Brad Thor last night. I'm not that far into it yet.

Which one was the latest one? I just started Lions of Lucerne, which I think is the first one, but had read First Commandement first...

westofyou
10-02-2008, 05:39 PM
Just finished "Confederates in the Attic" and am currently picking through 60's era baseball books by Angell and the Sporting News

SunDeck
10-02-2008, 05:47 PM
Lirael- Garth Nix

Hoosier Red
10-02-2008, 10:46 PM
I'm reading "The Keep" by Jennifer Egan

I actually really like it. I haven't read a whole lot of fiction, but I do like this.

bucksfan2
10-03-2008, 09:14 AM
Which one was the latest one? I just started Lions of Lucerne, which I think is the first one, but had read First Commandement first...

If you are a Thor fan The Patriot was a disappointment. It is an interesting read, but it isn't Thor. It is more of a Steve Berry book in that the action isn't so much action but figuring out puzzles.

Chip R
10-03-2008, 10:00 AM
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas - HST
Burying the Black Sox - Gene Carney
The Cincinnati Reds - Lee Allen

RichRed
10-03-2008, 10:54 AM
Just finished Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman and Hail Victory: An Oral History of the Washington Redskins by Thom Loverro.

Now reading The Cider House Rules by John Irving.

westofyou
10-03-2008, 10:56 AM
Now reading The Cider House Rules by John Irving.

Awesome book.. almost as good as Owen Meany, Irving is one of my faves of all time.

RichRed
10-03-2008, 11:00 AM
Awesome book.. almost as good as Owen Meany, Irving is one of my faves of all time.

It's the first Irving book I've read but after this, I'll definitely be reading more. I'll check out Owen Meany. Did you like Garp? Thinking about getting that one too.

bucksfan
10-03-2008, 11:17 AM
"Loose Balls - the Short, Wild Life of the American Basketball Association" - by Terry Pluto

Definitely amusing and a fun, informative read, especially as I vividly recall collecting basketball cards in this time period and so many of these names jump right out at me from those cards.

westofyou
10-03-2008, 11:31 AM
It's the first Irving book I've read but after this, I'll definitely be reading more. I'll check out Owen Meany. Did you like Garp? Thinking about getting that one too.

I liked them all except for the last one, but up until that you can't miss... Garp is fantastic, funny and odd.

cumberlandreds
10-03-2008, 12:01 PM
"Loose Balls - the Short, Wild Life of the American Basketball Association" - by Terry Pluto

Definitely amusing and a fun, informative read, especially as I vividly recall collecting basketball cards in this time period and so many of these names jump right out at me from those cards.

Very good book. I followed the Kentucky Colonels back in those days and they, like other teams had their own set of characters.

Highlifeman21
10-03-2008, 12:15 PM
The answers to my Finance exam, as I argue with my Finance professor about the only question I missed on my exam.

Question: The primary operating goal of a publicly-owned firm interested in serving its stockholders should be to

1. Minimize the chances of losses.
2. Maximize the stock price on a specific target date.
3. Maximize its expected EPS.
4. Maximize its expected total corporate income.
5. Maximize the stock price per share over the long run, which is the stock's intrinsic value.

I said it was #3, she says it's #5.

My argument is we're both right, therefore I should get credit. Her argument is that her answer is more right than mine...

gonelong
10-03-2008, 03:03 PM
Finished up the first "Odd Thomas" book and headed off to the next in the series.

A nice change of pace.

GL

BillDoran
10-03-2008, 03:30 PM
It's the first Irving book I've read but after this, I'll definitely be reading more. I'll check out Owen Meany. Did you like Garp? Thinking about getting that one too.

I think I prefer Garp over Meany, but both are excellent books. Meany is a wee bit more sentimental in my opinion.

Just finishing Burrough's Naked Lunch. An odd, sometimes difficult, read that is shaping up to be a personal favorite. A bit too explicit in sexuality in parts, but some sharp social criticism along with some zany, hilarious vignettes. The chapter "Islam Incorporated and the Parties of Interzone" was one of the most enjoyable reads I've had in a year or so.

The Baumer
10-04-2008, 06:11 PM
I just finished reading Live from New York. MUST READ for anyone into entertainment, comedy, or behind-the-scenes drama.

*BaseClogger*
10-06-2008, 12:58 AM
wrong thread

RichRed
10-09-2008, 11:58 AM
Also recently finished The Wanderers by Richard Price. Anyone else read any of Price's work?

Mario-Rijo
10-10-2008, 08:56 AM
I just finished reading Live from New York. MUST READ for anyone into entertainment, comedy, or behind-the-scenes drama.

Sounds intriguing, I may try that next.

westofyou
10-10-2008, 11:22 AM
The Game by Ken Dryden

The preeminent hockey book written by a player.

The best player books in each major sport.

Instant Reply - Jerry Kramer
Ball Four - Jim Bouton
Life on the Run - Bill Bradley
The Game - Ken Dryden

BoydsOfSummer
10-10-2008, 03:28 PM
I picked up "Babe" by Robert Creamer at Half Price Books yesterday for $6. I hear it's one of the classics.

westofyou
10-10-2008, 03:53 PM
I picked up "Babe" by Robert Creamer at Half Price Books yesterday for $6. I hear it's one of the classics.


Babe is a fantastic in depth piece of work, I recently found The Big Bam (The life and times of Babe Ruth) a piece that is more an attempt to embrace and describe the sociological times of Babes emergence as opposed to a deep biography of one mans life.

OldRightHander
10-10-2008, 05:00 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51l6xpvA-kL._SL500_BO2,204,203,200_AA219_PIsitb-sticker-dp-arrow,TopRight,-24,-23_SH20_OU01_.jpg

Excellent so far, if you like non fiction historical stuff.

Hap
10-10-2008, 08:14 PM
http://www.whsmith.co.uk/Images/Products%5C393%5C311%5C9780393311389_m_f.jpg

UKFlounder
10-10-2008, 10:08 PM
Taking a break from my usual Civil War theme, and am reading Robinson Crusoe again. Some of the writing is not really what I like, but I enjoy the story and seem to go back to it every few years. There's no other book I've read that often, and no other fiction I've read for quite a while.

The Baumer
10-11-2008, 02:59 AM
Sounds intriguing, I may try that next.

Live from New York is going for less than $6 on Amazon.com right now. Brand new copies, over 600 pages. Pretty great deal!

http://www.amazon.com/Live-New-York-Uncensored-Saturday/dp/B0007XAWS0/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223705077&sr=8-1

jmcclain19
10-11-2008, 05:54 PM
I just recently finished Marcus Luttrell's Lone Survivor - great book with some interesting choices in it he had to face.

I finally decided to read a Jeff Shaara novel, starting with the Rising Tide, his first WWII novel. Pretty good so far, like the best of both worlds fiction and non-fiction, history with strong character development and story movement.

Michael Connelly is going to be in my town this week at a book signing, so I plan on picking up his latest - need to finish up that Shaara book before Wednesday.

Stephenk29
02-21-2009, 06:27 PM
Just finished Obsessed by Ted Dekker and Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowen.

Black Hawk Down is exceptional. The movie was actually a very good portrayal except for one major detail.

Getting ready to start Moneyball. Where have I been with this one?

westofyou
02-21-2009, 06:36 PM
In various stages I have going:

DiMaggio - Cramer (By my Bed)
Life on the Run - Bill Bradley (in my car)
October 64 - Halbersam (in the kitchen)
BP 2009 - BP (In my office)
The Watchmen (floating)

I've read 1964 and the Watchmen before, but when both came out so it's been awhile.

UKFlounder
02-21-2009, 07:07 PM
Just today finished "Lincoln: President Elect" by Harold Holzer - very good and readable book.

I have a bunch of choices for my next one, but "The Rifled Musket in Civil War Combat" seems to be the likely one.

missionhockey21
02-21-2009, 09:40 PM
I just finished Kitchen Confidential and I am re-reading Watchmen before the movie comes out.

It's funny how much more able I am to appreciate Watchmen with each read (I read it at about 14/15 the first time, then 19 and now again.)

smith288
02-21-2009, 10:29 PM
The Fountainhead (audio - i hate reading)

BoydsOfSummer
02-22-2009, 01:50 AM
Prospect books. :D

DTCromer
02-22-2009, 02:35 AM
The Fountainhead (audio - i hate reading)

Wow, good luck. I read Atlas Shrugged in Oct/Nov. Took me forever, but enjoyable.

SandyD
02-22-2009, 12:05 PM
Recently finished:
House of Wits: an Intimate Portrait of the James Family by Paul Fisher (I became interested in the James family many years ago, and this book covers most of it. I haven't read much written BY the Jameses. I was more interested in the family dynamics.)

Primitive Baseball by Harvey Frommer (there are better sources for the history of the early game)

Currently:
Moby Dick (hope the finish next week)
Wait till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin (I'll finish today)
Bicycles: Love Poems by Nikki Giovanni (I'll likely finish this week)
The Varieties of Religious Experience by William James

Scrap Irony
02-23-2009, 04:33 PM
Just finished:
The Watchmen-- Might make it a reading requirement in humanities. Assuming, of course, the language and nudity doesn't bother the school board too much.

To Kill a Mockingbird-- Read it with my sophomore classes. Again. Atticus Finch is the greatest character ever created. The best novel. Ever.

Othello-- Read with my college-prep seniors. Iago. Awesome-ness.

Romantic Era Poets-- Focused on the biggies (Keats, Shelley, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge), but enjoyed Burns more than any of them. Pre-Romantic Romantic, if you can get through the Scottish brougue.

Now reading:
Stephen King's short story collection-- The name of it escapes me. As does the modern-King. Every post-cocaine-- aside from Insomnia and Bag of Bones-- has left me cold. Hoping he has another The Stand or It in him.

IslandRed
02-23-2009, 05:36 PM
I'm reading the new Baseball Prospectus and re-reading April 1865.

pedro
02-23-2009, 06:20 PM
just finished "Fool" by Christopher Moore

Scrap Irony
02-23-2009, 11:14 PM
I thought about picking that up. A re-telling of Lear, yes?

Recommended?

Redsfaithful
02-24-2009, 05:27 AM
Now reading:
Stephen King's short story collection-- The name of it escapes me. As does the modern-King. Every post-cocaine-- aside from Insomnia and Bag of Bones-- has left me cold. Hoping he has another The Stand or It in him.

His short stories are about all I like anymore. Although Duma Key really wasn't too bad until the last 100 pages or so I thought.

BEETTLEBUG
02-24-2009, 06:59 AM
ONCE A WLIDCAT ALWAYS A WILDCATS by Jeff Kirby

LoganBuck
02-24-2009, 08:30 AM
Just finished "The Blind Side" by Michael Lewis. As it pertained to Michael Oher who is a top draft prospect. Interesting perspective into the life of a college football recruit, but also peek into the world that Michael Oher came from, which needless to say was very scary. It has the same voice as "Moneyball" and was a good read. I bought it new from Amazon for $2.50.

Starting Bill James' "Historical Baseball Abstract". Got it on Amazon for $4 new.

Roy Tucker
02-24-2009, 08:54 AM
His short stories are about all I like anymore. Although Duma Key really wasn't too bad until the last 100 pages or so I thought.

Exactly what I thought. The first 2/3 of the book stands up to anything else he's done. The last 1/3 was "huh?".

cumberlandreds
02-24-2009, 11:36 AM
Shadows in the Jungle by Larry Alexander. It's an account of the Alamo Scouts in the Pacific Theater of WWII. They were a recon unit in the Pacific that had to go behind enemy lines to get an idea of troop strength,moral and positions the Japanese had on many different islands. They also did some rescue missions too of hostages being held by the Japanese on these remote islands. Most of what they did had been classified until the last few years. Very interesting book about things I never heard about before now.

pedro
02-24-2009, 02:35 PM
I thought about picking that up. A re-telling of Lear, yes?

Recommended?

I liked it... but I'm a fan, I'd recommend any of his books.

Redsfaithful
02-25-2009, 04:51 PM
Exactly what I thought. The first 2/3 of the book stands up to anything else he's done. The last 1/3 was "huh?".

It's a shame everything has to be supernatural with him, if the book had just been about a guy who goes through a horrific accident and then becomes a jackson pollack style late in life painter it would have really been amazing.

Stephenk29
02-27-2009, 10:03 PM
Cobb - Al Stump

Always wanted to read this one.

missionhockey21
02-27-2009, 10:19 PM
Cobb - Al Stump

Always wanted to read this one.

Let me know how that is Stephen, I was thinking of adding it to my cart last time I was on Amazon. After I get to Torre's book, I'll need to pick up a new baseball book to read.

redsmetz
02-27-2009, 10:24 PM
Grabbed a book on my bookshelf to start reading when I'm dong the treadmill, so I'm rereading "If I Never Get Back" by Darryl Brock about a guy who finds himself back in 1869 and travels around with the Red Stockings as they barnstorm across the country. Fun book.

SandyD
02-27-2009, 10:40 PM
Grabbed a book on my bookshelf to start reading when I'm dong the treadmill, so I'm rereading "If I Never Get Back" by Darryl Brock about a guy who finds himself back in 1869 and travels around with the Red Stockings as they barnstorm across the country. Fun book.

I LOVED "If I Never Get Back" by Darryl Brock.

I'm STILL reading Moby Dick, but getting closer to the end. Hope to finish this weekend, but it will likely carry over into next week.
Hearsay from Heaven and Hades: New Orleans Secrets of Sinners and Saints
Peverlly's National Game ed by John Freyer and Mark Rucker
The Varieties of Religious Experience by William James
New Orleans as it Was by Henry Castellanos

BoydsOfSummer
02-27-2009, 11:08 PM
Let me know how that is Stephen, I was thinking of adding it to my cart last time I was on Amazon. After I get to Torre's book, I'll need to pick up a new baseball book to read.


Cobb is an outstanding read. Confirmed by several others here as well. You'll love it.

missionhockey21
02-28-2009, 12:28 AM
Cobb is an outstanding read. Confirmed by several others here as well. You'll love it.

Thanks for the info Boyd. At $10 on Amazon, it'll definitely be among my next book purchases. I'm rather looking forward to it actually as I've always wanted to learn more about Cobb.

smith288
02-28-2009, 10:40 AM
Wow, good luck. I read Atlas Shrugged in Oct/Nov. Took me forever, but enjoyable.
Fountainhead was an excellent read. I went ahead and watched the film and pretty much laughed all the way through.

Horrible acting and skipped, what I thought, important character construction of Rourk and Keating. Im suprised Ayn Rand let that crap have a light shown through it but movies back then weren't exactly top notch in my opinion. Older movies suck on the whole.

Razor Shines
03-04-2009, 03:52 AM
Currently three books:
Tsar - Ted Bell,
The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression - Amity Shlaes
The Ice Diaries: The Untold Story of the Cold War’s Most Daring Mission - Capt. William Anderson.

I'm enjoying all three very much, I'm running into the difficulty of giving all three equal time.

Rojo
03-04-2009, 03:13 PM
Secrets of the Temple - William Grieder (about the Federal Reserve)

Invention of the White Race - Theodore Allen

bucksfan2
03-04-2009, 03:26 PM
I recently finished Shanks For Nothing by Rick Reilly. It was one of the funniest things I have ever read. There were times when I was laughing out loud. I recommend it to anyone who plays golf.

joshnky
03-04-2009, 04:05 PM
The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression - Amity Shlaes

Let me know what you think of this. It's been on my wish list for a long time but I keep putting it off because I'm not sure if I want to read a history book of that length.

missionhockey21
03-04-2009, 04:45 PM
I am now reading Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk, about a third in now.

smith288
03-04-2009, 06:07 PM
Listening to Atlas Shrugged audiobook. One of the top selling books recently.

Eric_the_Red
03-04-2009, 11:29 PM
"The Jesus I Never Knew". So far a great read on the examination of Jesus' life as a man and Son of God.

AccordinglyReds
03-04-2009, 11:33 PM
Just finished: The Turban for the Crown by Said Amir Arjomand

Pretty good book about Iran's Islamic Revolution.

Still reading: Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

Stephenk29
03-18-2009, 08:50 PM
The Rainmaker, John Grisham.

This guys a stud.

deltachi8
03-18-2009, 10:03 PM
The First 48 by Tim Green

SunDeck
03-18-2009, 10:07 PM
Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night

Roy Tucker
03-19-2009, 10:10 AM
Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night

I read this Mark Haddon book a couple years ago and thought it was quirky good.

Just finished reading his "A Spot of Bother" about a dysfunctional English family and the dad is going slowly mad. I thought the first 3/4 was very good, but then the author shot for a happy ending and, while I was happy for the characters, it turned formulaic.

Also just finished John Le Carre's "A Most Wanted Man" (just OK), Charles Frazier's "Thirteen Moons" (I liked it), and John Feinstein's "Tales from Q School" (entertaining but not as good as his other golf books, I always read a golf book in the spring).

RichRed
03-19-2009, 10:40 AM
I read this Mark Haddon book a couple years ago and thought it was quirky good.


I enjoyed that one too.

Gainesville Red
03-19-2009, 12:44 PM
Over the last three or four weeks I've read To Kill A Mocking Bird and The Yearling.

I've gotten on a little kick where I'm reading the books I was supposed to "enjoy" in middle school/high school.

Both were very, very enjoyable. Really, really good. Maybe a couple of the best. Wish I would have paid more attention at a younger age. Better late than never I guess.

Currently, I'm about 200 pages into Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace.

I don't really know what the hell's going on yet, but I think I like it.

SunDeck
03-19-2009, 01:03 PM
I've gotten on a little kick where I'm reading the books I was supposed to "enjoy" in middle school/high school.


You weren't supposed to enjoy them, you were suppose to "appreciate" them. :p:

westofyou
03-19-2009, 02:07 PM
You weren't supposed to enjoy them, you were suppose to "appreciate" them. :p:

I can honestly say that To Kill a Mockingbird changed my life.

redsmetz
03-19-2009, 03:00 PM
At night I've been reading Soul Searching: The Journey of Thomas Merton by Morgan Atkinson, the companion book to a documentary of the same name. It's an easy read in bed because each part is a different person's reflection on Merton and different aspects of his life and writing.

I also get together with a couple of buddies to read a book and we're just starting The Lemon Tree: A Jew, An Arab, and the Heart of the Middle East by Sandy Tolan. Looks very interesting.

AccordinglyReds
03-19-2009, 03:58 PM
Currently reading:

The Eagle and The Lion: The Tragedy of American-Iranian Relations

elfmanvt07
03-19-2009, 05:41 PM
I just bought The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It's great so far.

Crash Davis
03-25-2009, 02:51 AM
Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods"

John Steinbeck's "Travels with Charley"

SandyD
03-25-2009, 08:20 AM
Just finished Death a La Fenice by Donna Leon

Currently reading:

"Fathers and Sons" by Turgenev
"My Sister, My Love" by Joyce Carol Oates
"1 Dead in the Attic" by Chris Rose

I still have a couple of other non-fiction books going, but I'm not too focused on them.

For Example: "New Orleans As It Was" by Castellanos is a collection of sketches that are relatively independent. It was written by a judge late in his life, and published in 1895. Picking it up and reading a sketch now and then works, and that's what I'm doing.

RichRed
03-25-2009, 11:30 AM
Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods"


Just read that recently. Love Bryson's work. After "Walk," I read "The Adventures of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir" and I'm now reading "In a Sunburned Country" about his travels through Australia.

Can't remember the last time an author made me laugh out loud but he manages to do it on a regular basis.

cumberlandreds
03-25-2009, 02:21 PM
Reading "Call of Duty" by Buck Compton. He's one of the Band of Brothers from the 506th paratroopers. A good read. He's very forthcoming about his experiences in WWII and the things he did. He also points out a lot of things from the HBO series that were inaccurate. Nothing major but a lot of little things HBO did to make it better for TV purposes. He was also a prosecutor for LA county for a long time and has some interesting stories about that.

cumberlandreds
03-25-2009, 02:22 PM
Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods"




Very funny book. I read it many years ago now. Not many things make me laugh out loud but that book did.

Roy Tucker
03-25-2009, 04:33 PM
Echo the comments about Bryson. Love his books and they make me do the proverbial LOL. If you liked Thunderbolt Kid, you should read "A Girl Named Zippy" by Haven Kimmel. Highly recommended...

On the flip side, "Fathers and Sons" by Ivan Turgenev made me want to slash my wrists. Russians have to be the gloomiest writers in the world.

Hoosier Red
03-25-2009, 04:48 PM
Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science, and Art from the Cults of Catholic Europe by Thomas Cahill

There's something I really like about his books, though with my schedule it can take about 4 months to get through one.

redsmetz
03-25-2009, 04:49 PM
Besides the two other books I said I'm reading, I also started this week The Soloist by Steve Lopez, a writer for the LA Times about his relationship with a homeless man he met who was a one time student at Julliard. It's coming out as a movie soon with Robert Downey Jr. and Jamie Foxx.

freestyle55
03-25-2009, 04:51 PM
Just finished "The Dangerous Days of Daniel X" by James Patterson, pretty good, hopefully more books will come out to tell more of the story...

BillDoran
03-25-2009, 05:41 PM
I know this goes against the current of the thread, but I was curious to hear if any other posters had read any Robert Massie, in particular Peter the Great. It's highly reviewed and Massie is considered nearly unparalelled as a biographer, but I was wondering in any had personal insights or opinions regarding his writing.

The reason I inquire is due to length, his books are literally heavy, and I loathe to begin a book and not finish.

westofyou
03-25-2009, 05:58 PM
Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods"

John Steinbeck's "Travels with Charley"

Good to see ya round here Crash

SandyD
03-25-2009, 09:36 PM
On the flip side, "Fathers and Sons" by Ivan Turgenev made me want to slash my wrists. Russians have to be the gloomiest writers in the world.

I must not be to that part yet. So far, I find it surprisingly sweet. Just curious. Did you read "Fathers and Sons" in college, or more recently?

I ask because I sort of relate best with Nikolai. I dislike his brother Pavel, and also the nihilist Bazarov, and feel he's a bad influence on young Arkady who seems at least to have a little compassion for/understanding of his father ... so far. I wonder if I would feel differently if I were 20 rather than 50 (soon to be 51:eek:). As a woman, I feel sorry for ALL the women I've "met" so far. I wonder if I would have noticed if I were a man.

I'm not sure I'm ready for 1 Dead in the Attic. It's a collection of post Katrina newspaper columns by Chris Rose. It might be too soon. I've only just started, but I can't seem to read one without getting kind of choked up.

So, I might need to find something lighter to throw in before too long.

redsmetz
03-26-2009, 05:36 PM
The reason I inquire is due to length, his books are literally heavy, and I loathe to begin a book and not finish.

I've never read him. Since I do much of my reading as I'm going to bed, I'm always afraid to read a book like that. If I fall asleep, it might crush my head.

Roy Tucker
03-26-2009, 06:10 PM
I must not be to that part yet. So far, I find it surprisingly sweet. Just curious. Did you read "Fathers and Sons" in college, or more recently?



Actually, I read it in high school as part of a German and Russian Lit class.

And I take my comment back a bit since I went home and dug it out of a basement box and remembered the book. It was pretty good. Most of the other Russian stuff I read was gloomy though.

GAC
03-26-2009, 08:01 PM
Just purchased Meacham's American Lion: Andrew Jackson In The White House. Very interesting read.

vaticanplum
03-27-2009, 11:27 AM
I know this goes against the current of the thread, but I was curious to hear if any other posters had read any Robert Massie, in particular Peter the Great. It's highly reviewed and Massie is considered nearly unparalelled as a biographer, but I was wondering in any had personal insights or opinions regarding his writing.

The reason I inquire is due to length, his books are literally heavy, and I loathe to begin a book and not finish.

I read Nicholas and Alexandra like five times as a kid. It was so long ago that I couldn't give you a coherent review, but if I could rip through that thing at 11 or 12 years old and still want to read it over and over, that has to say something. I do remember it reading much more like a novel than a history book.

I just started reading Old School by Tobias Wolff. Don't remember why I picked it out.

redsmetz
03-30-2009, 02:00 PM
Besides the two other books I said I'm reading, I also started this week The Soloist by Steve Lopez, a writer for the LA Times about his relationship with a homeless man he met who was a one time student at Julliard. It's coming out as a movie soon with Robert Downey Jr. and Jamie Foxx.

I finished this over the weekend. Fast read and a fabulous story. I handed off the library copy to my son who was ending his spring break. He read the first 100 pages yesterday and plans on finishing it before he comes home on Sunday night for Opening Day.

Crash Davis
04-01-2009, 05:21 PM
Good to see ya round here Crash

Thanks, woy. Great to hear from you.

Baseball and I have grown apart a bit over the past few years, but I always come back in the spring. I guess I'm just not as fanatical about it anymore . . .

Redsfaithful
04-01-2009, 11:07 PM
Just read Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, I've only ever read The Handmaid's Tale by her, but I think I'm going to make my way through her back catalog now, she's a great writer.

Roy Tucker
04-01-2009, 11:24 PM
Just read Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, I've only ever read The Handmaid's Tale by her, but I think I'm going to make my way through her back catalog now, she's a great writer.

Like her writing too. I recommend The Blind Assassin.

edabbs44
04-01-2009, 11:51 PM
House of Cards

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0385528264/bookstorenow89-20

AccordinglyReds
04-03-2009, 07:37 PM
^ edabbs, that's on my list. Hopefully it's as good as When Genius Failed

Right now...I just picked up this book for history class. It's a different kind of read than what I've read for the last books for the class; but that's fine with me. :)

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America and American in Iran by Azadeh Moaveni

marcshoe
04-03-2009, 10:11 PM
Maps and Legends by Michael Chabon, in which he makes the argument for popular literature as actual literature. I picked it up because it contains a chapter on my all-time favorite short story, M.R. James' Oh, Whistle and I'll Come to You, My Lad.

pedro
04-03-2009, 10:36 PM
Maps and Legends by Michael Chabon, in which he makes the argument for popular literature as actual literature. I picked it up because it contains a chapter on my all-time favorite short story, M.R. James' Oh, Whistle and I'll Come to You, My Lad.

Great writer.

marcshoe
04-04-2009, 12:42 AM
Yes. I'm using a Norse Mythology book in the class I teach that he wrote the intro to, and I've been wanting to read more of his stuff for years, so I picked this up to browse through it, and the James chapter convinced me to buy it.

btw, the hardback's worth the extra money for the cover alone, which features layers illustrating different stories.

leakbrewergator
04-07-2009, 05:19 PM
Japan's Medieval Population: Famine, Fertility and Warfare in a Transformative Age by William Wayne Farris.

This is a great study on Japan's demographics from 700 to around 1600. I wouldn't really recommend it for the casual reader though.

westofyou
04-13-2009, 11:36 AM
http://baseballminutia.com/images/sleepy.jpg

jmcclain19
04-19-2009, 02:22 PM
I just finished Flipping out By Marshall Karp. Great light mystery read, Karp's pretty funny and it's a quick page turner. Nice space out read for the weekend.

I tried to start Robert Parker's Appaloosa in preparation for watching the movie later this week, and I didn't get 30 pages before I abandoned it. Parker's writing style is like fingernails on a chalk board to me and I just couldn't stand it any longer.

He's actually like Carl Hiaasen in that regard - Both sell books by the truckload and I can't get passed the 2nd chapter in either author's books.

Orenda
04-20-2009, 02:52 AM
I'm looking for a good book on how the federal reserve is set up and operates and was wondering if anybody had any suggestions.

Roy Tucker
04-20-2009, 08:56 AM
I tried to start Robert Parker's Appaloosa in preparation for watching the movie later this week, and I didn't get 30 pages before I abandoned it. Parker's writing style is like fingernails on a chalk board to me and I just couldn't stand it any longer.

He's actually like Carl Hiaasen in that regard - Both sell books by the truckload and I can't get passed the 2nd chapter in either author's books.

I tried Robert Parker about a year ago too and had the same result. I saw he had a long shelf of books at the library and figured he must have something going. I couldn't figure out what. Same with David Balducci. Who are all these people that like these guys?

Just finished "A Few Seconds of Panic" by Stefan Fatsis. A sportswriter who tried out as a kicker for the 2006 Denver Broncos. A very insightful look at what the NFL really is these days. A couple notches above the usual gee-whiz sports book.

thatcoolguy_22
04-20-2009, 09:29 AM
I just picked up The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell.

RichRed
04-20-2009, 10:33 AM
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy by Jane Leavy

AccordinglyReds
04-20-2009, 10:41 AM
I'm looking for a good book on how the federal reserve is set up and operates and was wondering if anybody had any suggestions.

I'd have to say most of the books on the Fed are more than likely going to be making a case against it (at least popular ones). While I haven't read Rothbard's The Case Against the Fed, I've enjoyed other works by him. [He's an Austrian economist so it should be interesting.]

I'd check Amazon and see what appeals to what you're looking for the most. Good luck. :thumbup:

TRF
04-20-2009, 12:48 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51DAKV2828L._SL160_AA115_.jpg

for the umpteenth time

Stephenk29
04-20-2009, 09:00 PM
Just finished up a couple of Michael Crichton's: Jurrasic Park and Eaters of the Dead. The Summons by Grisham too.

Right now I'm reading The Collectors by Baldacci.

pedro
04-20-2009, 09:11 PM
Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides

UKFlounder
04-20-2009, 09:20 PM
Just started:

http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/images/full13/9780300084610.jpg

SandyD
04-20-2009, 09:37 PM
Just finished

"An Invisible Sign of Her Own" by Aimee Bender
The story of a young woman who counts everything, sees numbers everywhere, etc. Her mom kicks her out of the house when she turns 19. She finds an apartment and a job as an elementary school teacher, starts something called "Numbers and Materials" which has bizarre results. Dark and absurd, but a quick read and interesting.

"The Uncommon Reader" by Alan Bennett
The Queen (E-2) is chasing her corgis who are making more noise than usual when she comes across a "mobile library" on the palace grounds that she had never seen before. She enters to apologize for the noise, and feels it her duty to borrow a book. She becomes a voracious reader as if making up for lost time. It was a nice quick read, but the ending was a bit of a let down.

Should add: I have just started "Isaac's Storm" by Erik Larson the history of meteorology up to the Galveston Hurricane (1900), along with the life and education of Isaac Cline, who was the national weather service rep at Galveston at the time of the Hurricane. Very interesting. Larson has a talent for weaving history, science, and a human story into an engaging narrative. IMHO of course.

I'm looking for fiction to add to my list, but I haven't decided between picking up "My Sister, My Love" again, or "Dear Husband" (both Joyce Carol Oates), or "A Mercy" (Toni Morrison) or "Paris to the Moon" (Adam Gopnik) or a mystery I have in a sack of books that was recently published, but I don't remember the title or the author.

Still reading "1 Dead in Attic" by Chris Rose, and "New Orleans As is Was."

BillDoran
04-21-2009, 12:56 AM
Middlesex - Jeffrey Eugenides

An excellent book the delves into some "unique" matters.

Eugenides, in my humble opinion, is one of the best contemporary English writers. I don't believe I've read a short story by him that didn't leave me astonished at the end.

edabbs44
04-21-2009, 07:37 AM
^ edabbs, that's on my list. Hopefully it's as good as When Genius Failed

Right now...I just picked up this book for history class. It's a different kind of read than what I've read for the last books for the class; but that's fine with me. :)

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America and American in Iran by Azadeh Moaveni

Jusr finished House of Cards...very cool book.

Roy Tucker
04-21-2009, 09:02 AM
An excellent book the delves into some "unique" matters.

Eugenides, in my humble opinion, is one of the best contemporary English writers. I don't believe I've read a short story by him that didn't leave me astonished at the end.

Yep. I liked his latest in a recent New Yorker.

The Virgin Suicides is excellent too.

SunDeck
04-21-2009, 09:32 AM
Just started:
The Miracle of Castel di Sangro: A Tale of Passion and Folly in the Heart of Italy

Great read so far. Dry humor.

Stephenk29
04-27-2009, 12:52 AM
Choke, Chuck Palahniuk

Insane isn't the right word, but its the first word that comes to mind.

HumnHilghtFreel
04-28-2009, 04:55 AM
Troy: Lord of the Silver Bow by David Gemmel. First of a three part series on the trojan war. Love me a good historical fiction.

AccordinglyReds
05-02-2009, 05:05 PM
The Black Swan

Stephenk29
05-05-2009, 12:00 AM
Just finished A Farewell To Arms (Hemingway) and The Whole Truth (Baldacci). Probably the best I've read of Badalcci in awhile, if that says much.

Next up: Snuff, Chuck Palahniuk. East of Eden, Steinbeck. and Total Control, Baldacci.

westofyou
05-05-2009, 10:43 AM
The Black Prince of Baseball - the Hal Chase Story

Hoosier Red
05-05-2009, 10:49 AM
Just finished up a couple of Michael Crichton's: Jurrasic Park and Eaters of the Dead. The Summons by Grisham too.

Right now I'm reading The Collectors by Baldacci.

I read a book by Grisham last summer for the first time in probably 10 years, I had forgotten how much fun his books are.

Right now I'm reading Young Patriots. It's about James Madison and Alexander Hamilton organizing the Constitutional convention.

pedro
05-05-2009, 07:48 PM
Yep. I liked his latest in a recent New Yorker.

The Virgin Suicides is excellent too.

Just picked up The Virgin Suicides

cumberlandreds
05-06-2009, 08:48 AM
Worst Hard Times by Timothy Egan I checked this out from the library after watching a show on the History Channel called The Black Blizzard. It was about the Dust Bowl era in the Great Plains. I never realized how bad those dust storms were back then. Its amazing how people kept on going through those storms! The book seems very good and detailed about what took place and why it all happened.

Chip R
05-06-2009, 10:52 AM
Worst Hard Times by Timothy Egan I checked this out from the library after watching a show on the History Channel called The Black Blizzard. It was about the Dust Bowl era in the Great Plains. I never realized how bad those dust storms were back then. Its amazing how people kept on going through those storms! The book seems very good and detailed about what took place and why it all happened.


I watched that show too - at least part of it. Fascinating stuff.

BillDoran
05-06-2009, 01:37 PM
Ada; or Ardor by Nabokov. He's without a doubt my favorite author, but this reoccuring theme of sexually explicit juvenile girls has me wondering. He also imbeds a large amounts of French and Russian expressions which sail right over my head.

It's been said he considered this his magnum opus, which seems plausable as it's his longest and most intricate work. There's vintage Nabokov wordplay, beautifully descriptive passages, and endearing characters.

Nabokov, as a whole, is almost intimidatingly intellectual. His vocabulary and deftness of prose are awe-inspiring and in Ada he infuses his knowledge of entomology (he was responsible for the Harvard lepidoptry collection in addition to his many other pursuits). So, probably not a good entry point into Nabokov, but certainly an author worth pursuing.

Anybody else a big Nabokovite?

vaticanplum
05-07-2009, 12:24 PM
Ada; or Ardor by Nabokov. He's without a doubt my favorite author, but this reoccuring theme of sexually explicit juvenile girls has me wondering. He also imbeds a large amounts of French and Russian expressions which sail right over my head.

It's been said he considered this his magnum opus, which seems plausable as it's his longest and most intricate work. There's vintage Nabokov wordplay, beautifully descriptive passages, and endearing characters.

Nabokov, as a whole, is almost intimidatingly intellectual. His vocabulary and deftness of prose are awe-inspiring and in Ada he infuses his knowledge of entomology (he was responsible for the Harvard lepidoptry collection in addition to his many other pursuits). So, probably not a good entry point into Nabokov, but certainly an author worth pursuing.

Anybody else a big Nabokovite?

I would not consider myself a Nabokovite, but that's one of my very favorite books. I re-read it not too long ago for the first time in years. Thought I'd pick it up, breeze through it since I've read it already...no. It took me about two months to get through it.

It is disturbing, and difficult, and frustrating at times. I've never thought that the ending tied up everything leading up to it satisfactorily. The fantasical elements of time and place are confusing and sometimes seem unnecessary, and they require a real use of a three-year-old's imagination. But it's just. so. beautiful. Like you say, the language and the content is extraordinary; I have to read it with two enormous dictionaries next to it and I barely go a couple of pages without needing them. But I like books that take a lot of work like that, even though I'm sure a lot of the references still sail over my head. And it has the gall to be a love story -- a real, genuine, believable love story -- in a totally inappropriate context. There are huge sections which I actually find offensive and misogynistic, but he gets away with it.

The older I get, the less I go for flowery prose, possibly because I find it so hard to avoid myself. You have to be really, really good, really in charge of your language careful with your plot, to pull it off, and he's one of the very few who does it that well. And I agree that the characters are amazing. They don't get lost in all those words, which is an accomplishment in itself.

Nabokov's mind just slays me. That he was able write a book like this, which is such a mastery of language and thought, and that he was able to do so in a language that wasn't his first, all while keeping up his pursuits as a scientific butterfly expert and a teacher and whatever the heck else he did, is almost incomprehensible.

RichRed
05-13-2009, 10:51 AM
Choke, Chuck Palahniuk

Insane isn't the right word, but its the first word that comes to mind.

Now that I just started reading Choke, I get this comment. Good one. :)

I'm enjoying it so far but I feel like I need a shower every time I finish a chapter.

traderumor
05-13-2009, 11:12 AM
A Patriot's View of American History by Larry Schweikart, UD History Professor

pedro
05-13-2009, 01:03 PM
Now that I just started reading Choke, I get this comment. Good one. :)

I'm enjoying it so far but I feel like I need a shower every time I finish a chapter.

I liked Choke.

I probably liked Diary best of all his books that I've read.

paintmered
05-13-2009, 07:34 PM
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

Stephenk29
05-14-2009, 12:21 AM
I thought Choke was pretty out there. Then I started reading Snuff by Chuck.....wow. This is one odd guy haha. Chocke was pretty good I thought though.

LvJ
05-14-2009, 03:58 PM
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.:beerme:

Rojo
05-14-2009, 06:54 PM
I'm looking for a good book on how the federal reserve is set up and operates and was wondering if anybody had any suggestions.

I finally started Secrets of the Temple by William Grieder. Its phone-book sized, but not an overly dense read.

Grieder, who writes (or wrote anyhow) for Rolling Stone, is pretty left-wing but the book isn't polemical.

Gainesville Red
05-14-2009, 09:00 PM
I just noticed that there's a movie trailer up for The Road on Yahoo.

http://movies.yahoo.com/premieres/13468916/standardformat/

SunDeck
05-15-2009, 10:59 AM
Everything is Illuminated

Roy Tucker
05-18-2009, 03:26 PM
Just finished "Contagious" by Scott Sigler.

Stephen King-like horror with Stephen Hunter-like snappy dialogue. Great grisly and graphic horror with enough geeky science to make it believable about some really nasty alien invaders. Roy give it 5 stars.

pedro
05-18-2009, 03:28 PM
Geek Love

durl
05-18-2009, 03:35 PM
Desiring God by John Piper

SandyD
05-18-2009, 08:52 PM
Bleeding Heart Square by Andrew Taylor

Gainesville Red
05-18-2009, 08:58 PM
Truman by McCullough

freestyle55
05-22-2009, 10:01 AM
Just finished Cemetery Dance by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child...latest in the Pendergast series...quite good, about voodoo and zombies...

Next up at the library is the latest Jack Reacher novel, Gone Tomorrow by Lee Child.

Redsfaithful
05-22-2009, 11:37 AM
Tales From Q School by John Feinstein

Probably not one of his better books, but still not too bad.

redsmetz
05-22-2009, 12:04 PM
Truman by McCullough

I really like McCullough's books and he did a fabulous job on the Truman biography. He won a Pulitzer for it, one of two he's won.

bucksfan2
05-22-2009, 01:09 PM
Tales From Q School by John Feinstein

Probably not one of his better books, but still not too bad.

I really liked that book. Give you insight on how tough it is to make it on the PGA tour.

vaticanplum
05-22-2009, 01:52 PM
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks. My friend is making me read it. Zombies aren't really my thing, but it's entertaining so far. And topical. (not the zombie part)

SunDeck
05-22-2009, 02:20 PM
I've given up on Everything is Illuminated. Tried to stick with it; coworkers said it was wonderful, but after 50 pages the parallel plots just don't have enough holding them together to keep me interested in flipping back and forth between them.

Next up is Kim, by Kipling. Something I've wanted to read for a long time.

SunDeck
05-22-2009, 02:24 PM
Speaking of Zombies:

http://roberthood.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/prideandprejudiceandzombies.jpg

I don't get it, but people are reading this.

Roy Tucker
05-22-2009, 02:24 PM
World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks. My friend is making me read it. Zombies aren't really my thing, but it's entertaining so far. And topical. (not the zombie part)

I read that. Picked it up on a lark from the library.

Enjoyed it more than I thought I would.

vaticanplum
05-22-2009, 04:29 PM
I've given up on Everything is Illuminated. Tried to stick with it; coworkers said it was wonderful, but after 50 pages the parallel plots just don't have enough holding them together to keep me interested in flipping back and forth between them.

I loved that book, but I definitely think that was because of style more than substance. I thought it was very creative and funny. But it's definitely dense and kind of all over the place. The ending is beautiful though.

SunDeck
05-22-2009, 06:13 PM
I loved that book, but I definitely think that was because of style more than substance. I thought it was very creative and funny. But it's definitely dense and kind of all over the place. The ending is beautiful though.

You're about the ninth person that has said that to me. I'm like a thirteen year old boy when it comes to fiction. Keep it simple, move it along, don't make any fancy moves.

westofyou
05-22-2009, 06:35 PM
Speaking of Zombies:

http://roberthood.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/prideandprejudiceandzombies.jpg

I don't get it, but people are reading this.

Sad just sad... the original is a darn fine read though.

westofyou
05-22-2009, 06:35 PM
I've given up on Everything is Illuminated. Tried to stick with it; coworkers said it was wonderful, but after 50 pages the parallel plots just don't have enough holding them together to keep me interested in flipping back and forth between them.

Next up is Kim, by Kipling. Something I've wanted to read for a long time.

My wife bailed on that, angry that it got so much press and sucked so much of her time.

flyer85
05-22-2009, 06:39 PM
Last Place on Earth

SunDeck
05-23-2009, 08:48 AM
Last Place on Earth

That's on my list, also. Let us know what you think!

Redsfaithful
05-23-2009, 01:08 PM
I really liked that book. Give you insight on how tough it is to make it on the PGA tour.

Yep, I guess I really hadn't realized how much people bounce on and off the tour.

Also, World War Z was great. They're turning it into a film which I'm pretty psyched about.

flyer85
05-23-2009, 03:04 PM
That's on my list, also. Let us know what you think!
excellent to this point ... Huntford is certainly not a fan of Scott (with good reason IMHO)

Spitball
06-06-2009, 01:15 AM
I'm about to finish Readicide by Kelly Gallagher. The author contends that the NCLB era and its emphasis on test taking assessment are causing American educators to lose their focus on authentic instruction. It is a pretty interesting read.

paintmered
06-06-2009, 05:22 PM
Speaking of Zombies:

http://roberthood.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/prideandprejudiceandzombies.jpg

I don't get it, but people are reading this.

It is a complete bastardization of awesome to the original text. I'm one of those reading it and find it to be hysterical.