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MWM
06-06-2009, 11:04 PM
Tales From Q School by John Feinstein

Probably not one of his better books, but still not too bad.

I was planning on reading that one this summer, so I hope I'm not disappointed.

Although, it will be hard for him to match A Good Walk Spoiled. That was a fantastic book, to which this one was spawned.

Stephenk29
06-08-2009, 03:01 AM
just finished The Silence of the Lambs. Thinking the sequel next.

BillDoran
06-08-2009, 01:23 PM
About fifty pages into Ulysses. Still adjusting to the Irish tone, but I am anticipating an excellent book thus far. It's hard not to enjoy the protagonist, Daedalus.

Redsfaithful
06-09-2009, 03:27 AM
I was planning on reading that one this summer, so I hope I'm not disappointed.

Although, it will be hard for him to match A Good Walk Spoiled. That was a fantastic book, to which this one was spawned.

Oh it was definitely a good read. He sets the bar so high that even what I'd consider one of his weaker efforts is still very solid.

AccordinglyReds
06-09-2009, 09:38 PM
Just finished The Black Swan

Starting Road to Serfdom...

UKFlounder
06-10-2009, 06:52 PM
I just finished A. Lincoln: A Biography by Ronald C. White Jr. and it may be the best, most well-written, interesting book I've ever read. I know some of that feeling is the freshness of just having finished it, but I really did enjoy it, how he not only described the events of Lincoln's life, but analyzed many of them and their meaning, and explored Lincoln's continued growth morally and politically. It simply was a very enjoyable book.

vaticanplum
06-10-2009, 09:27 PM
I just finished A. Lincoln: A Biography by Ronald C. White Jr. and it may be the best, most well-written, interesting book I've ever read. I know some of that feeling is the freshness of just having finished it, but I really did enjoy it, how he not only described the events of Lincoln's life, but analyzed many of them and their meaning, and explored Lincoln's continued growth morally and politically. It simply was a very enjoyable book.

After I finish my current book (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, which I have never read before), I embark on my personal Read About the Presidents! program. A biography per president, in chronological order. First on the list is Washington: The Indispensible Man by James Thomas Flexner. I may well use your glowing review as basis for my Lincoln pick (in like five years). Thanks!

OldRightHander
06-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Taking another trip through O'Brian. Currently on Post Captain, but I'm not home and I forgot to bring the next one with me. It might have to wait a few days until I get back to Cincinnati.

Strikes Out Looking
06-11-2009, 03:06 PM
After I finish my current book (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, which I have never read before), I embark on my personal Read About the Presidents! program. A biography per president, in chronological order. First on the list is Washington: The Indispensible Man by James Thomas Flexner. I may well use your glowing review as basis for my Lincoln pick (in like five years). Thanks!

I actually read a book on each president (that was deceased)--it took about 5 years and I had a hard time finding some of them. The thing I took away from it was how much history repeats itself. And even though its not a book on a president, Robert Caro's books about LBJ are great.

reds1869
06-11-2009, 03:18 PM
I'm currently reading Blood in the Cage by Jon Wertheim. It is about legendary trainer Pat Miletich and the rise of MMA (UFC in particular). It is a very good book if you have even the slightest interest in mixed martial arts.

Chip R
06-11-2009, 03:45 PM
And even though its not a book on a president, Robert Caro's books about LBJ are great.


I'll second that.

BoydsOfSummer
06-13-2009, 06:27 PM
Reading 'Scout's Honor' by Bill Shanks. Pretty good so far, though he -like many others- totally missed the point of 'Moneyball'. At least early on.

Chip R
06-15-2009, 01:20 AM
Reading 'Scout's Honor' by Bill Shanks. Pretty good so far, though he -like many others- totally missed the point of 'Moneyball'. At least early on.


He used to post on here. It was mainly to pimp his book though. I've read it and while he does bash the Moneyball philosophy, I did find it interesting how the Braves rose up from the ashes.

Stephenk29
06-15-2009, 12:25 PM
Alexander Hamilton

really good so far. The author's name escapes me since I don't have it right next to me.

marcshoe
06-16-2009, 03:12 PM
Ron Chernow? If so, excellent book.

What would make you enjoy it more would be to make sure nothing is distracting you by benching all of your best fantasy baseball players until you finish.

Stephenk29
06-16-2009, 03:35 PM
What would make you enjoy it more would be to make sure nothing is distracting you by benching all of your best fantasy baseball players until you finish.

That cost me Lester's 11k night last week.

Willard Sterne Randall is the author.

marcshoe
06-16-2009, 04:49 PM
I read the Chernow one a couple of years ago. It's 345,125 1/2 pages long, but worth it.

Roy Tucker
06-24-2009, 08:58 AM
Read ing "Rant" by Chuck Palahniuk.

Veeeerrry interesting.

chicoruiz
06-25-2009, 05:43 PM
Just finished "Stone's Fall" by Iain Pears, and it was pretty terrific. If you like intricate, fairly heavy historical mysteries, you can't go wrong with either this one or his earlier book, "An Instance of the Fingerpost".

Spitball
06-26-2009, 01:40 AM
I just finished Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It by Kelly Gallagher and am now reading The Power of Reading: Insights from the Research by Dr. Stephen Krashen. They are both excellent books.

Stephenk29
06-26-2009, 04:22 PM
Read ing "Rant" by Chuck Palahniuk.

Veeeerrry interesting.

Saying Chuck is interesting is the understatement of the century.

cumberlandreds
06-29-2009, 09:30 AM
I've started reading "Pull up a Chair" by Curt Smith. It's a biography on Vin Scully.
It's OK but so far I don't really like Smith's style of writing. It doesn't seem like it was well researched but I have been spoiled after reading biogragphies on Clemente,Gehrig and John Adams.
This starts my summer of reading biographies of sportscasters. I just purchased used copies of Dick Enberg's and Johnny Holiday's autobiography's. Enberg's came with a DVD and I watched it Friday night. It was good. He told a lot of funny stories and gave some good insights on some his high spots of his career and low points too.

Gainesville Red
06-29-2009, 10:19 PM
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Seems good so far, although I wish I spoke Spanish.

Roy Tucker
07-06-2009, 01:25 PM
The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston.

Very darkly humorous. About a guy on a trauma clean-up team. Lots of twisted humor about blood, gore, and guts. Pretty good. I'd give 4 stars out of 5 if you have the stomach for it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/05/books/05maslin-1.html

bucksfan2
07-06-2009, 04:09 PM
Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith was an excellent book. Its about Stalin era Russia that starts a little slow but was a page turner

The First Family by David Baldacci was a fantastic read. If you like Baldacci you will like this book.

Dawn Patrol by Don Winslow is another very good book. The book is based in San Diego and I had just vacationed out there. There is very good character development in the book and you find yourself wanting to be the main character.

Avenger by Frederick Forsyth. I am only about 50 pages into this book but so far so good. I have read only one other Forsyth book but it was impressive.

reds1869
07-06-2009, 05:07 PM
I'm reading Thames by Peter Ackroyd. A very entertaining and informative historical account of the mighty river by the author of London: A Biography. Interestingly enough the subtitle was removed for sale in the US; the British subtitle is "Sacred River."

RichRed
07-06-2009, 05:22 PM
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop. by Robert Coover

Hoosier Red
07-06-2009, 05:45 PM
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson



Great, great book. I might re read that one.

BillDoran
07-07-2009, 02:00 AM
My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead. A compilation of semantic love stories compiled by Jeffrey Eugenides. It includes, direct from the cover, Chekov to Munro, as well as Nabokov to Miranda July.

For lack of better term, an excellent sampler. Eugenides covers a lot of ground with those included. An excellent way to discover authors via one of today's best.

vaticanplum
07-07-2009, 05:36 PM
My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead. A compilation of semantic love stories compiled by Jeffrey Eugenides. It includes, direct from the cover, Chekov to Munro, as well as Nabokov to Miranda July.

For lack of better term, an excellent sampler. Eugenides covers a lot of ground with those included. An excellent way to discover authors via one of today's best.

I read that -- I think I may have even posted about it here. Some of those stories really stayed with me, like the one about the Russian girl. And then a few were boring. But overall I did really like it.

Falls City Beer
07-07-2009, 06:00 PM
I'm reading Thames by Peter Ackroyd. A very entertaining and informative historical account of the mighty river by the author of London: A Biography. Interestingly enough the subtitle was removed for sale in the US; the British subtitle is "Sacred River."

Have you ever read his biography of William Blake? It's good, a bit sensational. But an engaging read.

vaticanplum
07-07-2009, 06:19 PM
Have you ever read his biography of William Blake? It's good, a bit sensational. But an engaging read.

I have his book Albion (which touches on Blake a bit) but I've never read it. It looks pretty on the coffee table.

reds1869
07-07-2009, 06:34 PM
Have you ever read his biography of William Blake? It's good, a bit sensational. But an engaging read.

No, but I will have to do so. Blake is one of my favorite artists, so pairing him with one of my favorite authors seems like a win/win. Thanks for the suggestion.

RedEye
07-07-2009, 06:54 PM
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Seems good so far, although I wish I spoke Spanish.

I'm also reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I'm about 200 pages in so far, and it is pretty amazing. Very moving and tragic, but also funny.

redsmetz
07-10-2009, 01:40 PM
I just picked up a book at the downtown library: The Corporal Was a Pitcher, The Courage of Lou Brissie, by Ira Berkow formerly of the NY Times. It's the story of Lou Brissie who was seriously injured during WWII in Italy. He had been a good pitching prospect. The doctors wanted to amputate his legs due to the injuries and he convinced them not to. He came back to pitch for the A's and the Indians over seven seasons. In 1947, he went 23-5 for the Class A Savannah club in the Sally League. Good read so far and fascinating subject. He made the 1949 All Star team.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/b/brisslo01.shtml

cumberlandreds
07-10-2009, 02:20 PM
I just picked up a book at the downtown library: The Corporal Was a Pitcher, The Courage of Lou Brissie, by Ira Berkow formerly of the NY Times. It's the story of Lou Brissie who was seriously injured during WWII in Italy. He had been a good pitching prospect. The doctors wanted to amputate his legs due to the injuries and he convinced them not to. He came back to pitch for the A's and the Indians over seven seasons. In 1947, he went 23-5 for the Class A Savannah club in the Sally League. Good read so far and fascinating subject. He made the 1949 All Star team.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/b/brisslo01.shtml

Thanks for that recommendation. I've put it on my list for books to checkout through our library system here in Loudoun County Virginia.

I am currently reading "Oh My!" Dick Enberg's autobiography. So far its been a really good read. Its brought back a lot of memories of college basketball games he did in the 70's and 80's for NBC. I find it amazing how most of these sportscasters just kind of stumbled into their professions. Enberg for instance, got his start in radio by applying for a janitors job at Central Michigan. The station manager noticed he had good voice and asked him if he would be interested in a weekend DJ position that was open. He said sure and things just took off from that point.

reds1869
07-10-2009, 06:25 PM
For the MMA fans out there I recommend Got Fight by Forrest Griffin. Not exactly high brow stuff but very entertaining and I polished it off in under an hour. He is a very funny guy and quite opinionated as well. The "secret techniques" section alone is worth the time, especially when he talks about how to fend off a dog attack by using a rear naked choke. :D

joshnky
07-14-2009, 12:58 PM
Currently re-reading Academ's Fury by Jim Butcher. I discovered this author last year and love his novels. The Dresden Files and Codex Alera series' are terrific.

Caveat Emperor
08-10-2009, 02:29 PM
Read "Starship Troopers" by Robert Heinlen over the course of two plane rides (+ airport wait time) this weekend on the reccomendation of a couple friends who had to read it in college.

Fascinating book that bears only a passing resemblence to the movie of the same name.

RichRed
08-10-2009, 02:47 PM
Awesome book.. almost as good as Owen Meany, Irving is one of my faves of all time.

Finally got to A Prayer for Owen Meany. I'm a little over halfway through it and I'm really enjoying it.

Roy Tucker
08-10-2009, 03:46 PM
Read "Starship Troopers" by Robert Heinlen over the course of two plane rides (+ airport wait time) this weekend on the reccomendation of a couple friends who had to read it in college.

Fascinating book that bears only a passing resemblence to the movie of the same name.

I was a Heinlein junkie for a while in my late 20's. I think I read just about everything he wrote. You should go back and read his catalogue (from his early gee-whiz SF books to his later more serious efforts). Heinlein took a lot of very interesting moral, ethical, and political stances.

I remember when that movie came out I was severely disappointed. You should make the comparison with the book as the root source, not the other way around.

Caveat Emperor
08-10-2009, 04:12 PM
I was a Heinlein junkie for a while in my late 20's. I think I read just about everything he wrote. You should go back and read his catalogue (from his early gee-whiz SF books to his later more serious efforts). Heinlein took a lot of very interesting moral, ethical, and political stances.

I remember when that movie came out I was severely disappointed. You should make the comparison with the book as the root source, not the other way around.

The discussions on civic responsibility and politics were far more interesting to me than anything else regarding the book. While I didn't necessarily agree with the views expressed by the characters in the story, I thought it was a fascinating way to look at the inherent problems with giving people a voice in government/society with no expectations or responsibilities put back upon them. I found the social commentary to be particularly relevant in light of today's political environment.

As far as the movie goes, I enjoyed Starship Troopers as a schlock, over-the-top, 90s action/sci-fi piece. Having read the book, though, I'd love to see the movie re-done to be more faithful to the written work -- with a maybe a "Full Metal Jacket" lean to it.

Loved the book. I'm definitely going to check out more of his stuff.

dweston
08-10-2009, 08:41 PM
My book. :)
I want to read In Cold Blood....actually been meaning for some time now.

Scrap Irony
08-10-2009, 09:42 PM
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Love it. Absolutely hilarious. Dead-on Victorian voice.

BoydsOfSummer
08-11-2009, 12:36 AM
Just finished Scouts Honor by Bill Shanks. Guess what? The "Braves Way" and the "Moneyball Way" churned out about the same amount of talent. Moral of the story--you better be doing it all sorts of ways if you want to be successful.

This is not a shock to most Zoners.

Gainesville Red
08-11-2009, 09:25 AM
The Devil In The White City, Erik Larson

UKFlounder
08-11-2009, 09:48 AM
"Rebel Raider: The Life of General John Hunt Morgan" by James A. Ramage.

The cool thing is I know Dr. Ramage and he's a wonderful man. No review I will make of this book can ever be unbiased, but it has been an enjoyable read so far.

15fan
08-11-2009, 12:30 PM
Rome 1960: The Olympics That Changed the World

ochre
08-11-2009, 01:07 PM
The discussions on civic responsibility and politics were far more interesting to me than anything else regarding the book. While I didn't necessarily agree with the views expressed by the characters in the story, I thought it was a fascinating way to look at the inherent problems with giving people a voice in government/society with no expectations or responsibilities put back upon them. I found the social commentary to be particularly relevant in light of today's political environment.

As far as the movie goes, I enjoyed Starship Troopers as a schlock, over-the-top, 90s action/sci-fi piece. Having read the book, though, I'd love to see the movie re-done to be more faithful to the written work -- with a maybe a "Full Metal Jacket" lean to it.

Loved the book. I'm definitely going to check out more of his stuff.
"The moon is a harsh mistress" was one that I liked pretty well.

flyer85
08-11-2009, 01:51 PM
FDR's Folly

Roy Tucker
08-11-2009, 02:05 PM
My book. :)
I want to read In Cold Blood....actually been meaning for some time now.

Re-read that last year with my daughter.

She read that and "To Kill a Mockingbird" for English class. Interesting pairing.

*BaseClogger*
08-11-2009, 08:00 PM
I'm finally reading that Stephen Colbert book "I Am America and So Can You". It's quite funny so far, although not nearly as serious as I thought it was going to be... :laugh:

westofyou
08-11-2009, 08:06 PM
In the current rotation

Bridge of Sighs - Richard Russo
The Pitch that Killed (about Ray Chapman/Carl Mays)
The Powers that Be - David Halberstam
Baseball: The People's Game - Harold Seymour

flyer85
08-11-2009, 11:50 PM
The Pitch that Killed (about Ray Chapman/Carl Mays)
good book

edabbs44
08-12-2009, 12:20 AM
Just finished "A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers" and now on to “The First Family: Terror, Extortion, Revenge, Murder, and the Birth of the American Mafia”.

Scrap Irony
08-12-2009, 12:27 AM
Re-read that last year with my daughter.

She read that and "To Kill a Mockingbird" for English class. Interesting pairing.

Harper Lee based the character of Dill on her childhood friend, Truman Capote, who also wrote In Cold Blood. Lee helped her friend with research, and, some insist, at least revised the book so that it read better.

Too, Erik Larson's Devil In The White City is excellent. Larson has a way of making the characters come alive.

rdiersin
08-12-2009, 01:16 PM
In the current rotation

Bridge of Sighs - Richard Russo


I bought that book awhile ago, and just now getting into reading it. So far its good, though I guess I should expect that. Before that I had just finished rereading (or maybe re-re-rereading or something like that) the Hobbit. Its funny how you miss things no matter how many times you've read a book.

cumberlandreds
08-12-2009, 01:59 PM
Just finished reading "The Indifferent Stars Above". This a very interesting read about the plight of the Donner Party. It seemed to be very well researched although it could be disturbing for some readers. In case you don't know about this,the Donner Party was a group of people that migrated west in 1848. They left late in the year and got stranded in the Sierra Nevada mountains when unusually heavy snow started falling earlier than normal. They ran of rations and some resorted to canalbalism. The writer pulled no punches on the details of this either.

Blimpie
08-12-2009, 07:29 PM
My book. :)
I want to read In Cold Blood....actually been meaning for some time now.Great book. Don't bother with the movie.

westofyou
08-12-2009, 07:40 PM
Great book. Don't bother with the movie.

Movie is AWESOME, Robert Blake gives the performance of his life.

westofyou
08-12-2009, 07:44 PM
Just finished reading "The Indifferent Stars Above". This a very interesting read about the plight of the Donner Party. It seemed to be very well researched although it could be disturbing for some readers. In case you don't know about this,the Donner Party was a group of people that migrated west in 1848. They left late in the year and got stranded in the Sierra Nevada mountains when unusually heavy snow started falling earlier than normal. They ran of rations and some resorted to canalbalism. The writer pulled no punches on the details of this either.

Where they got holed up is an absolute nightmare place to get stuck in during the winter, bunch of greenhorns they were.

Blimpie
08-12-2009, 07:56 PM
Movie is AWESOME, Robert Blake gives the performance of his life.I agree that Blake gave a compelling performance--I probably would have felt differently had I not read the book.

My main issue is that Capote did such a masterful job developing the depth of the characters (both murderers and victims) in the book. Even with the ample movie length, it just felt rushed on screen.

westofyou
08-12-2009, 08:12 PM
I agree that Blake gave a compelling performance--I probably would have felt differently had I not read the book.

My main issue is that Capote did such a masterful job developing the depth of the characters (both murderers and victims) in the book. Even with the ample movie length, it just felt rushed on screen.

Agreed, the book was a work of art, it created a new genre, it was a pradigm.

Roy Tucker
08-17-2009, 09:24 AM
Harper Lee based the character of Dill on her childhood friend, Truman Capote, who also wrote In Cold Blood. Lee helped her friend with research, and, some insist, at least revised the book so that it read better.



Yep, pretty interesting stuff. 2 books that couldn't be any different but the authors were lifelong friends.

I was helping Lizzy with her summer reading paper over the weekend. She read "Grapes of Wrath" and "The Road" which sets up some interesting parallels. I'd read both in the past couple years.

Also read "The Shack" after having it recommended by church friends. I thought it was thought-provoking and a worthy read. Not the greatest piece of literature ever nor life changing (for me at least), but a good spiritual read.

A good dog book, "The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein. A dog/car racing book with a dog named Enzo.

Junk book time.... the new Dale Brown book "Rogue Forces" is pretty good. A step above formulaic, its like he actually thought a little bit when writing it.

pedro
08-17-2009, 01:03 PM
The Art of Racing in the Rain - Garth Stein

flyer85
08-24-2009, 02:26 PM
Same Kind Of Different As Me

AccordinglyReds
08-24-2009, 02:34 PM
And The Money Kept Rolling In (And Out) by Paul Blustein

cumberlandreds
08-27-2009, 09:17 AM
I just picked up a book at the downtown library: The Corporal Was a Pitcher, The Courage of Lou Brissie, by Ira Berkow formerly of the NY Times. It's the story of Lou Brissie who was seriously injured during WWII in Italy. He had been a good pitching prospect. The doctors wanted to amputate his legs due to the injuries and he convinced them not to. He came back to pitch for the A's and the Indians over seven seasons. In 1947, he went 23-5 for the Class A Savannah club in the Sally League. Good read so far and fascinating subject. He made the 1949 All Star team.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/b/brisslo01.shtml

Thanks for bringing this book to my attention. This was a great read and highly recommeded. It's just amazing all the adversity he overcame and what he endured to come back to pitch. Not to mention just to live a good day to day life. I thought it was terrible the way his MLB career ended. Hank Greenburg must have been just real butt to deal with as a GM.

PTI (pti)
08-31-2009, 04:25 PM
The Art of Racing in the Rain - Garth Stein


What in the world is that book?? I see it every single time I go to Amazon.com.



Started and finished "I Call the Shots" yesterday. 260 pages of Johnny Miller blabbing about non-sense, pretty much.

In the process of reading "Titan" (Ron Chernow). John Rockefeller is one bad mf'er. That book is seriously long, so I had to take a break about halfway thru.

And now I've started "A Civil War" (Feinstein).

RichRed
08-31-2009, 05:17 PM
Continuing with my recent John Irving kick, I'm about halfway through World According to Garp.

Chip R
08-31-2009, 07:23 PM
Finishing up "Campaigning For Grant" by Horace Porter and "Dixieland Delight: A Football Season on the Road in the Southeastern Conference" by Clay Travis. Just started, "Fast Copy: A Novel" by Dan Jenkins.

westofyou
09-01-2009, 04:51 PM
Continuing with my recent John Irving kick, I'm about halfway through World According to Garp.

He's probably my favorite contemporay writer by far, however as he gets older he's been less and less fun... is last novel was a chore and not one character was worth the time it took for me to slog through it.

pedro
09-01-2009, 05:37 PM
What in the world is that book?? I see it every single time I go to Amazon.com.



Started and finished "I Call the Shots" yesterday. 260 pages of Johnny Miller blabbing about non-sense, pretty much.

In the process of reading "Titan" (Ron Chernow). John Rockefeller is one bad mf'er. That book is seriously long, so I had to take a break about halfway thru.

And now I've started "A Civil War" (Feinstein).

It's a book about the tribulations of a man named Denny from the POV of his dog, Enzo. Very good book.

Stephenk29
09-17-2009, 07:48 PM
Anyone buy The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown? I ordered it but have yet to start reading it.

cumberlandreds
09-18-2009, 09:02 AM
I am reading "From Rock to Jock". It's the autobiography of Johnny Holliday who is now the Maryland football and basketball PBP announcer. He started out pretty much on the ground floor of Rock Music in the 50's. He was a highly acclaimed DJ in Cleveland,NYC and San Francisco in the 50's and 60's. He interviewed almost all the top acts of that time including the Beattles. He moved to the DC area in the late 60's and has been here since. He's been the PBP voice of the Maryland Terrapins for over 30 years and also does the pre and post game shows with Ray Knight for the Washington Nationals.

I just received my copy of "The Machine" from Amazon yesterday. I can't wait to start that one!

reds1869
09-18-2009, 09:37 AM
I'm reading Lamb by Christopher Moore. My wife has read all of his books and I finally gave in. I've been laughing non-stop so far.

pedro
09-18-2009, 02:23 PM
I'm reading Lamb by Christopher Moore. My wife has read all of his books and I finally gave in. I've been laughing non-stop so far.

I've read everyone. I'm a big fan.

TRF
09-18-2009, 02:26 PM
Sun Tzu - The Art of War

Translated by Samuel B Griffith

BillDoran
09-18-2009, 02:32 PM
Fat City by Leon Gardner

Denis Johnson claims to have read this book dozens of times and has said many of his books are poor imitations of Gardner.

It feels a little like a Yates book in that it paints a painful picture of how hopeless life can be. It's a rather bleak portrayal of relationships, but very well written.

UKFlounder
09-18-2009, 03:32 PM
"Employee Benefits" for a self-study course at work :)

I'll pick out something more "pleasureable" in a day or two to supplement that.

Roy Tucker
09-18-2009, 03:38 PM
I read my wife's copy of "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society" by Mary Ann Shaffer. I really liked it.

redsfandan
10-03-2009, 10:15 AM
It looks like this hasn't been out long but I was just curious if anyone had read it.

Cincinnati Schoolboy Legends: A hundred years of Cincinnati's most storied high school football players (Paperback)
by John Baskin, Lonnie Wheeler

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1933197552?tag=wvxuorg-20&camp=14573&creative=327641&linkCode=as1&creativeASIN=1933197552&adid=1YMX0F4N24GN137TB95M&

UKFlounder
10-12-2009, 08:14 PM
I just finished 1776 by David McCullough. It was a very interesting, enjoyable, informative narrative, not like most history books with footnotes throughout.

It gave me a nice perspective on how tough the Continental Army, as it came to be called, was during that pivotal year, the challenges they faced, and also gave some nice human-interest stories.

I was especially intrigued by Washington's distrust or dislike of New Englanders - a bit of sectional bias present much earlier than the Civil War era.

SandyD
10-13-2009, 08:08 AM
The Last Days of Last Island by Bill Dixon.

It's the story of the 1856 hurricane that devastated Last Island, which was a popular summer place back then.

Tony_Danza
10-14-2009, 05:28 PM
"The Great Depression: An International Disaster of Perverse Economic Policies" by Thomas E. Hall and J. David Ferguson. the title is a mouthful, but it is a pretty interesting read nonetheless

Yachtzee
10-15-2009, 12:39 AM
Has anyone read anything by Hertha Mueller, this year's Nobel winner for Literature? I'm thinking of picking up some of her works, not just because she won the Nobel, but also because she's an ethnic German from the Banat region now in Romania. The town she is from is very close to the towns my great-grandparents came from, so I'm really interested to read her stories.

cumberlandreds
10-15-2009, 08:57 AM
I just finished reading The Machine. A very recommended book for any Reds fan and baseball historian.

gonelong
10-15-2009, 10:21 AM
Treasure Island - not as good as I remembered, but holds up pretty well for a 200+ year old book.

GL

MWM
10-15-2009, 10:27 AM
Treasure Island - not as good as I remembered, but holds up pretty well for a 200+ year old book.

GL

Wow, I just started reading that one yesterday. What are the odds? :cool:

freestyle55
10-15-2009, 10:33 AM
I just finished reading The Machine. A very recommended book for any Reds fan and baseball historian.

Seconded here, just finished it the other night. For a Reds fan who just missed that era, it's a great reminder of what I missed out on and some new stories that I'd never heard!

Also red The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown...meh...was ok, nothing to write home about.

Read the first Dexter book and am reading the second one now...both have been good, first book is similar with some differences to the first season of Dexter, but the second one moves away from the show.

cumberlandreds
10-15-2009, 12:25 PM
Seconded here, just finished it the other night. For a Reds fan who just missed that era, it's a great reminder of what I missed out on and some new stories that I'd never heard!



I was growing up during that era and it brought back a lot of good memories. Lot of the stuff I had never heard either. Some interesting inside stories. Griffey Sr. isn't portrayed that well either.

Chip R
10-15-2009, 02:30 PM
I was growing up during that era and it brought back a lot of good memories. Lot of the stuff I had never heard either. Some interesting inside stories. Griffey Sr. isn't portrayed that well either.


I just finished it myself. Sr. comes off a lot better than some others. Sparky didn't come off well at all.

cumberlandreds
10-15-2009, 03:55 PM
I just finished it myself. Sr. comes off a lot better than some others. Sparky didn't come off well at all.

Yea, Sparky didn't either. The author,Posnarnski said in the acknowledgements that he was never able to get with Sparky when researching the book. I wonder if that had anything to do with it?
Rose really came off as a kinda pathetic figure in the last chapter too.

freestyle55
10-15-2009, 06:02 PM
I just finished it myself. Sr. comes off a lot better than some others. Sparky didn't come off well at all.

Definitely made me wonder would could have been with Sr...

gonelong
10-16-2009, 12:10 AM
Wow, I just started reading that one yesterday. What are the odds? :cool:

Pretty scarce, you can lay to that.

GL

Stephenk29
10-20-2009, 11:51 PM
Liberal Fascism, Johan Goldburg.

Anything hitting the best seller list has to be worth a glimpse right?

SullyGator
10-21-2009, 09:30 PM
Reading The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. Huge fan of Dickens so I figured I would try Collins out. Good, but definitely not Dickens :rolleyes:.

Redlegs23
10-21-2009, 10:48 PM
The Battle of Mogadishu - First Hand Accounts From the Men of Task Force Ranger

I just watched Black Hawk Down the other night and it sparked my interest, bought the book for $3 online. Very good so far.

Scrap Irony
10-22-2009, 12:28 AM
Just finished Evil Genius. Not horrid. Not great. Meh.

Roy Tucker
10-22-2009, 09:21 AM
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson. Very good. Had to develop an eye for Swedish names.

westofyou
10-22-2009, 10:54 AM
Catcher - Peter Morris

westofyou
10-22-2009, 10:55 AM
Reading The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. Huge fan of Dickens so I figured I would try Collins out. Good, but definitely not Dickens :rolleyes:.

Love Dickens too, ever read Robertson Davies? John Irving has some Dicken's like qualities too.

Roy Tucker
10-22-2009, 12:15 PM
I still think its fascinating that most of Dickens' major novels all were written in episodes that came out weekly or monthly.

I can't imagine reading Tale of Two Cities or Oliver Twist and having to wait weeks if not months between chapters.

Irving has a new book out, Last Night in Twisted River.

Scrap Irony
10-22-2009, 01:58 PM
Dickens is too "God in the Machine" for my tastes. But you have to respect his craft. Lovely sentences.

marcshoe
10-22-2009, 11:12 PM
I haven't read Wilkie Collins for a little while. I need to dip back into the old stuff.

Right now, I'm reading Peter Legernis' (sp) Watchers series to teach in class, as well as Donald Miller's new one, with a title I can never remember. Some good stuff in it about making your life a good story.

SullyGator
10-23-2009, 12:47 AM
Love Dickens too, ever read Robertson Davies? John Irving has some Dicken's like qualities too.

Actually haven't read Davies or Irving. I'll have to check them out... Thanks for the advice :).

Redsfaithful
10-24-2009, 02:25 AM
Read the first Dexter book and am reading the second one now...both have been good, first book is similar with some differences to the first season of Dexter, but the second one moves away from the show.

Be wary of the third book, I felt like it was pretty inferior after enjoying the first two.

Ravenlord
10-24-2009, 04:12 AM
"The Giver", a book that is in large part, why i have my massive distrust of authority.

marcshoe
10-24-2009, 10:15 PM
"The Giver", a book that is in large part, why i have my massive distrust of authority.


A book I had every intention of teaching in my seventh grade classroom this year until I found out the freshmen teachers at the high school grabbed it when the reading list was divvied out.

I may teach it anyway. They won't get mad at me for two years.

Roy Tucker
10-25-2009, 12:34 PM
A book I had every intention of teaching in my seventh grade classroom this year until I found out the freshmen teachers at the high school grabbed it when the reading list was divvied out.

I may teach it anyway. They won't get mad at me for two years.

All 3 of my kids read it in school in 7th or 8th grade.

marcshoe
10-25-2009, 04:33 PM
I've always known it as a middle school book. I don't know how the HS managed to claim it.

Yachtzee
10-25-2009, 09:43 PM
"Fever Pitch" by Nick Hornby.

MWM
10-25-2009, 10:21 PM
Just started reading "Get Out of My Life, but First Could You Drive Me and Cheryl to the Mall?: A Parent's Guide to the New Teenager"

Should be required reading for parents of pre-teens.

Strikes Out Looking
12-14-2009, 03:47 PM
I just finished "Forever Blue" a biography of Walter O'Malley. It shows how he tried to keep the Dodgers in Brooklyn but Robert Moses blocked him at every turn. Interesting read.

MWM
12-14-2009, 04:31 PM
Read "The Blind Side" by Michael Lewis last week. Phenomenal book, even better tahn Moneyball, IMO. Not only is the MIchael Oher story fascinating, but his background story on the evolution of the left tackle using Bill Parcells vs Bill Walsh is incredibly insightful. He's such a good writer. Also, his description of the recruiting process and of the plight many kids from these destitute areas we like to pretend don't exist was eye opening. Overall, one of the best books I've read in a while.

KoryMac5
12-14-2009, 07:05 PM
Read Renegade by Richard Wolfe who covered the last presidential election. Currently reading Ghost Soldiers which deals with the Ranger rescue of soldiers in the Phillipines during WWII.

Roy Tucker
12-15-2009, 09:01 AM
Read "The Blind Side" by Michael Lewis last week. Phenomenal book, even better tahn Moneyball, IMO. Not only is the MIchael Oher story fascinating, but his background story on the evolution of the left tackle using Bill Parcells vs Bill Walsh is incredibly insightful. He's such a good writer. Also, his description of the recruiting process and of the plight many kids from these destitute areas we like to pretend don't exist was eye opening. Overall, one of the best books I've read in a while.

Read that a couple years ago. Like you said, a very good and interesting read. Gritty. Lewis communicates complex issues with clarity.

When I saw the trailer for the movie at the theater, I scratched my head when they showed the title at the end, I said "no! what? I can't believe they made a movie of that". My 16 yr. old daughter loved it so it had to be schmaltzed up a lot.

Finished "No Less Than Victory", the 3rd book in the Jeff Shaara WWII Europe trilogy. Shaara has grown as a writer and is pretty good now. This book is the Battle of the Bulge and then the Allies-German-Russian end-game. I liked it.

Roy Tucker
12-15-2009, 09:14 AM
Also stole Wally Lamb's Christmas book "Wishin' and Hopin'" off my wife's stack.

I liked it a lot. A nice Christmas read. I'm a sucker for Christmas books.

MWM
12-15-2009, 08:49 PM
When I saw the trailer for the movie at the theater, I scratched my head when they showed the title at the end, I said "no! what? I can't believe they made a movie of that". My 16 yr. old daughter loved it so it had to be schmaltzed up a lot.


I was pleasantly surprised that the movie didn't cheese it up too much, although it did to some degree. And they actually stuck fairly closely to the real events without taking far reaching liberties (i.s. Rudy). I thought it was well done and Sandra Bullock did a really good job.

But it's also one of those stories that had it been a movie and not a real story, I would have never believed it. It's really an amazing story in real life.

AccordinglyReds
12-16-2009, 12:16 AM
End The Fed by Ron Paul.

redsfandan
12-16-2009, 01:44 AM
House of Leaves

Redsfaithful
12-16-2009, 06:38 AM
House of Leaves

Trippy book, I found that to be a really fun read.

vaticanplum
12-16-2009, 12:28 PM
My presidents project - a biography of each president in chronological order - continues. I'm all the way up to Jefferson (Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation by Merrill Peterson). This is going to take me the rest of my life.

Also reading Summerland by Michael Chabon, at an obviously inappropriate time of year. Actually Jefferson's on hold til that's done.

BoydsOfSummer
12-24-2009, 01:09 PM
Nine Innings, by Dan Okrent. Yet another baseball book.

pedro
12-24-2009, 02:55 PM
Michael Chabon - Manhood for Amateurs.

Chip R
12-24-2009, 02:59 PM
Rogue Warrior - Green Team - Richard Marcinko

Roy Tucker
12-30-2009, 10:56 AM
Reading "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett now. I like it.

Blimpie
12-30-2009, 11:01 AM
"Your Brain at Work" by David Rock

Just getting started with this one--not exactly a light-read.

Hoosier Red
12-30-2009, 04:32 PM
Just finished "The Machine" seriously it took me all of 1 day. I went to Alabama with my wife's family and woke up early, I didn't want to go to the living room because her little brother was sleeping there, so I just sat and read the Machine for about an hour and a half sitting in the bathtub.

Also because I read a ton on that trip, I also finished "Cincinnatus: The secret plot to save America" excellent book turned to just good at the end.

BillDoran
12-30-2009, 04:38 PM
My presidents project - a biography of each president in chronological order - continues. I'm all the way up to Jefferson (Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation by Merrill Peterson). This is going to take me the rest of my life.

Your project made me think of Sufjan Steven's states project. Alas, he gave up. Persevere!

For Christmas I received the first two books in Robert Massie's Winston Churchill biography and William Vollman's Europe Central. Really excited about digging into all of them.

I'm also looking forward to reading David Halberstam's The Best and the Brightest and The Powers That Be.

Hoosier Red
12-30-2009, 05:11 PM
For Christmas I received:
The aforementioned: THe machine and Cincinnatus,
Signing their lives away-a book about the signers of the declaration of independence
Codex by Lev Grossman
The Magicians by Lev Grossman
The Intelligencer by I'm not sure who
Super Freakanomics by Steven Leavitt
I'm really excited about all the new books I get to read.

Dom Heffner
12-30-2009, 06:28 PM
Open- Andre Agassi

reds1869
12-30-2009, 07:54 PM
I, too, received The Machine for Christmas and am getting ready to dig in.

Scrap Irony
12-30-2009, 09:46 PM
Just finished Stephen King's opus, Under the Dome. Oddly, it's not about the Astros of the late 60's and early 70's. It's an okay book. Solid, but overly long. Seriously overly long. At this point, King could publish a laundry list an it be a best seller, but he really needs a good editor.

marcshoe
12-30-2009, 10:11 PM
I got Under the Dome for Christmas and hope to finish it by my June birthday. I'm a little more than 300 pages in.

RedsBaron
01-01-2010, 10:47 AM
I have just finished reading Jon Meacham's "American Lion," his biography of Andrew Jackson. It is a good, though not great, biography of the 7th president. I received it as a Christmas present in 2008 but only got around to reading it last month. I enjoyed it.
Now I have to decide which of my 2009 Christmas book gifts to begin.
I will probably start with Joe Posnanski's "The Machine." My mom and my wife each gave me a copy, one of which I will return. I really look forward to reading it.
I also have Jeff Shaara's "No Less Than Victory," his concluding novel of his World War II trilogy. I read the first two and I look forward to reading it as well.
I had suggested Steven F. Hayward's "The Age of Reagan: The Conservative Counterrevolution 1980-1989" as a gift. My wife gave it to me. My mom meant to as well, but happily she erred and gave me Hayward's earlier book "The Age of Reagan: The Fall of the Old Liberal Order 1964-1980," so I have the set. Having just finished the Andrew Jackson book I am not ready to start another political/presidential book just yet.
One of our legal assistants gave me James McPherson's "Battle Cry of Freedom," but I already had, and have read, a copy of that re-telling of the Civil War.

Spitball
01-01-2010, 02:11 PM
I'm currently reading Sway by Zachary Lazar. It is fictionalized story that entwines the stories of the late 1960s Manson clan and the Rolling Stones. So far, it has been an interesting read.

Strikes Out Looking
01-01-2010, 05:18 PM
My presidents project - a biography of each president in chronological order - continues. I'm all the way up to Jefferson (Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation by Merrill Peterson). This is going to take me the rest of my life.



I did this, I think it took me about 10 years (and I only read biography's on dead presidents). The hardest part was finding books on some of the more obscure ones--Benjamin Harrison was my white whale, but you won't have a problem until you get to the President's after Van Buren.

The most interesting thing is the fact that history tends to repeat itself, something that most nitwits that report or commentate on today's news do not understand.

Happy reading!

marcshoe
01-01-2010, 06:12 PM
There was a series of short biographies published a few years back that covered all the presidents. I've peeked at some of the more obscure ones, and one day I'd like to go through the whole bunch.

RedsBaron
01-01-2010, 07:30 PM
There was a series of short biographies published a few years back that covered all the presidents. I've peeked at some of the more obscure ones, and one day I'd like to go through the whole bunch.

The History Book Club is running such a series, although I don't think a book on every president has been published yet in that series.

marcshoe
01-01-2010, 08:27 PM
Here's (http://www.americanpresidentsseries.com/booklist.asp) the series I was talking about. It looks like they're up through George HW Bush. I'm not sure if there are any missing pieces.

There are some interesting authors in this series (McGovern on Lincoln, for instance). I remember seeing an interview with John Dean in which he defended Harding, saying he was a better president than his reputation would allow. 'course he'd pretty much have to be.

RedsBaron
01-02-2010, 09:33 AM
Here's (http://www.americanpresidentsseries.com/booklist.asp) the series I was talking about. It looks like they're up through George HW Bush. I'm not sure if there are any missing pieces.

There are some interesting authors in this series (McGovern on Lincoln, for instance). I remember seeing an interview with John Dean in which he defended Harding, saying he was a better president than his reputation would allow. 'course he'd pretty much have to be.
That's the series that the History Book Club has been offering. It appears they are missing books on William Henry Harrison (who was president for only one month), Franklin Pierce, Millard Fillmore (I'm sure everyone is anxious for that one), Andrew Johnson, William Howard Taft, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush.

Falls City Beer
01-02-2010, 11:21 AM
The Age of Wonder by Richard Holmes

GIK
01-02-2010, 05:01 PM
'A Dirty Job' by Christopher Moore. My Dad got me hooked on Moore when he gave me 'Lamb' for Christmas a couple years back. Great stuff.

OldRightHander
01-02-2010, 07:01 PM
http://www.longitudebooks.com/images/book_large/EUR239.jpg

Redsfaithful
01-02-2010, 07:58 PM
The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe

Hoosier Red
01-03-2010, 08:44 PM
'A Dirty Job' by Christopher Moore. My Dad got me hooked on Moore when he gave me 'Lamb' for Christmas a couple years back. Great stuff.

I loved Lamb, it really is a good read.

Hoosier Red
01-03-2010, 08:45 PM
http://www.longitudebooks.com/images/book_large/EUR239.jpg

That's a good book ORH, have you read the other books in the series. I ended up going 1-5 and I think there's still one more coming out.

Stephenk29
01-04-2010, 01:19 AM
I'm bouncing around like crazy but:

An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson
The Twentieth Century by Howard Zinn
1960 (about the Presidential election) David Pietrusza
Red Dragon
A Clockwork Orange

Hoosier Red
01-04-2010, 12:18 PM
That's a good book ORH, have you read the other books in the series. I ended up going 1-5 and I think there's still one more coming out.

Actually I just realized that's the new book in the series. Well I've got one more to buy.

vaticanplum
01-11-2010, 11:09 AM
I did this, I think it took me about 10 years (and I only read biography's on dead presidents). The hardest part was finding books on some of the more obscure ones--Benjamin Harrison was my white whale, but you won't have a problem until you get to the President's after Van Buren.

The most interesting thing is the fact that history tends to repeat itself, something that most nitwits that report or commentate on today's news do not understand.

Happy reading!

Thanks :) I'm giving myself some leeway, e.g. when I get to WH Harrison I think I'll read a book about campaigns because his was more notable than his presidency. It's good to know someone got through a project like this. Looking forward to stuff like Nathaniel Hawthorne's biography of Franklin Pierce.

The context is totally the most interesting part, including the way things do repeat...especially for someone like me who has trouble remembering chronology. This makes everything make that much more sense. The other thing that has proven interesting is getting a fuller picture of presidents and events by reading about them in very different surrounding books. I was trying to avoid the 1000-page Jefferson biography, but he's played such an enormous and contrasting role in both of the first two biographies, far more than Washington and Adams played in each other's. So I think he deserves a huge book. That dude was ALL over the place.

But right now I am reading "Bonk" by Mary Roach and some Sam Shepard plays.

Great suggestions in this thread as always.

SandyD
01-13-2010, 10:08 PM
Currently reading:

The Three Musketeers
The Lost German Slave Girl
It Happened in New Orleans
Dear Husband

Strikes Out Looking
01-14-2010, 08:52 PM
Just finished Game Six. Man, I miss the Big Red Machine.

WMR
01-19-2010, 06:18 PM
Anyone ever read any Hubert Selby Jr.? Just read 'Last Exit to Brooklyn' again and started re-reading 'The Demon.' He has such a unique style and vision; definitely one of my favorite authors.

reds1869
01-20-2010, 06:08 PM
Stuff White People Like by Christian Lander. Being from an English/German background and marrying into a German/Irish family, it's like the book was written about my relatives. Funny stuff.

Eric_the_Red
01-21-2010, 09:40 AM
Quiet Strength by Tony Dungy. I'm looking forward to reading Uncommon, his second book, when I am done with this one. His leadership and faith is inspiring.

Kingspoint
01-22-2010, 05:02 AM
A May, 1866, Harper's Pictorial Weekly, that put together a compilation of what happened to the best of their ability from both sides of the Civil War from 1861-1865. The book is 12-1/4 x 15-1/4 inches in size so it can include engravings and maps. 836 pages. It's more descriptive than story-telling, so it can be really dry quite often. Since it was put together in 1866, it also was written to a well-educated audience. That's how they wrote most of their works back then, not to 12-year old comprehensions like they do now. I thought I had pretty good comprehension when it came to reading, but this is very difficult. It's common for a sentence to run on for 10 lines, while put together in a fashion similar to the Constitution of the United States.

It makes me tired quickly when I'm reading it if it's late at night. I love it, though, as it's from first hand accounts throughout.

Roy Tucker
02-21-2010, 01:19 PM
Reading "The Tourist" by Olen Steinhauer. Excellent spy book in the vein of John Le Carre. "Tourists" are CIA killer spies who are highly lethal, surpassingly cynical vipers. The main character is Milo Weaver who was a tourist, left the game, but got sucked back in.

You really have to read it carefully. There are multiple names, opaque motives, deceptive marching orders and vast capacities for duplicity. Lots of "holy crap" moments. Quite the ride if you like the genre. Roy give it 5 stars.

nate
02-22-2010, 06:50 PM
OK, I have to give a shout-out to Redszone's own RedsManRick for this one. On one of my pedantic "streakiness" tangents, he suggest I read "The Drunkard's Walk" by Leonard Mlodinow. I did and now would categorize my mind to be sufficiently "blown."

Well, not "blown" so much as...I dunno...having someone with much more intellectual "thunder" co-sign for me.

I highly recommend reading it if you haven't.

TRF
03-03-2010, 11:10 AM
Has anyone read Good Omens? I just started it, and its hilarious.

Hoosier Red
03-03-2010, 02:27 PM
Just finished "Codex" by Lev Grossman, I had read "The Magicians" earlier and feel like I always like his books but the endings make me just feel meh.

RichRed
03-03-2010, 02:29 PM
"Notes From a Small Island" by Bill Bryson. Bryson never fails to crack me up.

RedsManRick
03-03-2010, 02:46 PM
OK, I have to give a shout-out to Redszone's own RedsManRick for this one. On one of my pedantic "streakiness" tangents, he suggest I read "The Drunkard's Walk" by Leonard Mlodinow. I did and now would categorize my mind to be sufficiently "blown."

Well, not "blown" so much as...I dunno...having someone with much more intellectual "thunder" co-sign for me.

I highly recommend reading it if you haven't.

No problem, Nate. I'm now reading another book in the same vein, Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. This is the book that preceded The Black Swan.

westofyou
03-03-2010, 04:16 PM
Just finished "The Machine", thought it was good, kinda soft in content, very dumbed down, likely to reach a wider audience.

Currently reading

Diamond Appraised: A World-Class Theorist and a Major League Coach Square off on Timeless Topics in the Game of Baseball, By Craig Wright and Tom House.

Scrap Irony
03-03-2010, 07:22 PM
Has anyone read Good Omens? I just started it, and its hilarious.

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett Good Omens? I loved it. Pratchett is one of my absolute favorites. I highly, highly recommend his other works, especially his Ankh-Morph novels.

TRF
03-03-2010, 11:22 PM
Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett Good Omens? I loved it. Pratchett is one of my absolute favorites. I highly, highly recommend his other works, especially his Ankh-Morph novels.

that's the one. a similar theme, at least so far to Heinlein's Job: a comedy of justice.

sonny
03-03-2010, 11:43 PM
what am I reading right now? Advertisements.

redsmetz
03-09-2010, 12:08 PM
I've been meaning to post this all week. I'm currently reading "Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour'." by David Bianculli. I was in junior high when this show was on and remember enjoying. I've heard over the years about the battles they had to get things on the air, but wasn't aware of those battles back then. Tom Smothers was awarded a writing Grammy a couple of years back because he left his name off the entry for the award they won that year due to all the controversy going on then. Interesting read.

marcshoe
03-09-2010, 09:33 PM
I'm reading a collection of Arthur Machen's weird tales.

vaticanplum
03-19-2010, 05:46 PM
I'm finally reading Anna Karenina. It's dang good! Who knew?

SunDeck
03-19-2010, 07:48 PM
All the Brave Fellows by James Nelson.
It's the third book I've read by him. Quite good a story teller and he certainly knows his way around a square rigger.

Will M
03-19-2010, 08:53 PM
I'm reading a collection of Arthur Machen's weird tales.

me too!

i just started reading 'The Great God Pan' today.
i have wanted to read this guys stuff ever since i read that he was a big influence on Lovecraft. only recently have i had the time to do a lot of reading for fun. after Machen i am going to check out more stuff by Clark Ashton Smith.

marcshoe
03-19-2010, 09:15 PM
Interesting. I've wanted to read more Machen for years, and suddenly it dawned on me that there was this little thing called Amazon. The volume I'm reading now started with The Great God Pan, and I'm now up to The Three Imposters (the title of the collection) which includes The Novel of the Black Seal, the first story I ever remember reading by Machen.

It's put out by Call of Cthulhu fiction, which concentrates on Lovecraft-connected work.

Stephenk29
03-20-2010, 01:55 AM
Just purchased Shutter Island, looking forward to it.

Roy Tucker
03-20-2010, 11:11 AM
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford. Nice read.

A love story between a Japanese girl and Chinese boy in Seattle at the start of WWII. The narrative switches between 1942 and 1986. A good look at the internment camps the Japanese-Americans got thrown in. Some 40's jazz thrown in. Excellent sense of time and place.

Will M
03-27-2010, 05:21 PM
Interesting. I've wanted to read more Machen for years, and suddenly it dawned on me that there was this little thing called Amazon. The volume I'm reading now started with The Great God Pan, and I'm now up to The Three Imposters (the title of the collection) which includes The Novel of the Black Seal, the first story I ever remember reading by Machen.

It's put out by Call of Cthulhu fiction, which concentrates on Lovecraft-connected work.

i liked the Great God Pan. you can clearly see how this influenced Lovecraft.

The Hill of Dreams was very very slow & too long. The 'payoff' was IMO more worthy of a short story than a novel or novella.

I think I'll read some Edgar Rice Burroughs now. He is definitely on the opposite end of the spectrum from Machen.

Tixe: if you like older weird fiction look into getting a Kindle. Any pre 1922 book is in the public domain and you can download it for free from places like Gutengerg.org or archive.org

pedro
04-07-2010, 12:16 PM
"Bite Me" (http://www.chrismoore.com/biteme.html) by Christopher Moore. As with all his books it is a fun read.



http://img1.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n64/n323619.jpg

Jack Burton
04-07-2010, 02:29 PM
"Breakfast of Champions" by Vonnegut, weird stuff.... but I guess that's to be expected.

Caveat Emperor
04-07-2010, 04:28 PM
I think I'll read some Edgar Rice Burroughs now. He is definitely on the opposite end of the spectrum from Machen.

I went through a Burroughs kick a few summers back -- "Tarzan of the Apes" wasn't all that spectacular, but I think it's more a case of being overly familiar with the source material (through the various adaptations) and the original just not living up to what I'd thought it would be.

"A Princess of Mars" was a pretty good read, though. I'd say that it was formulaic, but I'm not sure that any formula existed at the time it was written -- so I'm guessing that a lot of other science fiction took it's cue from "Mars." If you're at all a sci-fi fan, it's probably worth a read just on that alone.

marcshoe
04-07-2010, 10:31 PM
I've just started "The Hemingses of Monticello" by Annette Gordon Reed. A good read so far--interesting(to me, at least) insights on colonial Virginia--and at 662 pages, it had better stay interesting.

paintmered
04-07-2010, 11:31 PM
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. It's an entertaining read. :thumbup:

I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell and some of the Christopher Moore books are next on my list.

Raisor
04-07-2010, 11:39 PM
I'm big into Alternative history fiction, with my favorites being Eric Flint, SM Stirling, and Harry Turtledove. Anyone recommend anyone else?

pedro
04-08-2010, 01:00 AM
I'm big into Alternative history fiction, with my favorites being Eric Flint, SM Stirling, and Harry Turtledove. Anyone recommend anyone else?

Michael Chabon's "Yiddish Policemen's Union" is a very good book.

http://www.amazon.com/Yiddish-Policemens-Union-Novel/dp/0007149824

Chip R
04-08-2010, 10:19 AM
The Fifties by David Halberstam
Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi
Rogue Warrior Destination Gold by Richard Marchinko

hebroncougar
04-08-2010, 11:26 AM
I'm big into Alternative history fiction, with my favorites being Eric Flint, SM Stirling, and Harry Turtledove. Anyone recommend anyone else?

Newt Gingrich's WWII and Civil War series are both good stuff.

Roy Tucker
04-08-2010, 11:45 AM
Tomato Rhapsody: A Fable of Love, Lust & Forbidden Fruit by Adam Schell.

A would-be Shakespearean fable set in a 16th-century Tuscan village about how tomatoes came to be in Italy. Lots of fun and the proverbial bawdy tale. Great characters who converse in paragraph-long rhyme.

Redsfan320
04-08-2010, 11:50 AM
George Orwell's 1984. Great insightful book.

320

RichRed
04-08-2010, 03:18 PM
Continuing my way through John Irving's work, I'm on "Hotel New Hampshire" now. Probably my least favorite of his that I've read so far, but I'm only halfway through it.

pedro
04-08-2010, 04:49 PM
Continuing my way through John Irving's work, I'm on "Hotel New Hampshire" now. Probably my least favorite of his that I've read so far, but I'm only halfway through it.

"A Prayer for Owen Meany" is my favorite, by far.

RichRed
04-08-2010, 05:17 PM
"A Prayer for Owen Meany" is my favorite, by far.

I really liked that one too.

Irving's got a thing about bears, doesn't he? "New Hampshire"'s at least the third book of his that features a bear somewhere in the story.

Jack Burton
04-08-2010, 07:39 PM
"Breakfast of Champions" by Vonnegut, weird stuff.... but I guess that's to be expected.

Finished, quick read but not a whole lot of substance. Quite a few lol moments (take a leak/steal a mirror comes to mind). Kurt must have been going through some type of crisis when he wrote this one, not my favorite but definitely worth reading.

redsmetz
04-27-2010, 03:59 PM
A good dog book, "The Art of Racing in the Rain" by Garth Stein. A dog/car racing book with a dog named Enzo.

Dragging this up from last year. I picked this book up last week at the library to have a paperback to take to Boston for a long weekend. Read the thing from Friday to yesterday. Good book with an interesting narrative point of view (the dog is the narrator). Reminded me a little of The Curious Story of the Dog in the Night for an unusual voice for the story.

TRF
04-27-2010, 04:44 PM
I'm big into Alternative history fiction, with my favorites being Eric Flint, SM Stirling, and Harry Turtledove. Anyone recommend anyone else?

I haven't read anything by Flint, but have you checked out Days of Infamy by Harry Turtledove? That's an interesting twist on Pearl Harbor.

Mario-Rijo
05-07-2010, 01:48 AM
"Trump the art of the deal" It's old but I had it laying around and figured why not.

Will M
05-11-2010, 03:31 AM
I just finished the english translation of the 8000 page manga Lone Wolf & Cub. Its not a big eyes colored hair manga. Its a realistically drawn story written in the 1970s with adult men as the target audience. Itto Ogami is a high ranking official of the Shogunate who is framed for being disloyal. Instead of committing ritual suicide he plans for revenge. What complicates things is that he carries around with him his 1 year old son. Hence the title. Over 3 years he travels around Japan performing assassinations, saving his cash & planning for the day he can get his revenge. this is a fantastic manga. highly recommended. published in the US in 28 volumes by Dark Horse Comics.

This is also the basis for 6 movies made in the 1970s as well as a TV show.
The movies are also highly recommended. If you have ever seen the Zatoichi movies the star of Lone Wolf & the star of Zatoichi are brothers. Both were fine acrobats & martial artists. I have not yet seen the TV show.

westofyou
05-11-2010, 10:56 AM
I really liked that one too.

Irving's got a thing about bears, doesn't he? "New Hampshire"'s at least the third book of his that features a bear somewhere in the story.

Irving is my fave, he worked with a bear in Europe I believe, much of what he wrote early on was experienced somewhat

westofyou
05-11-2010, 10:57 AM
"Breakfast of Champions" by Vonnegut, weird stuff.... but I guess that's to be expected.

Kurt changed my life when I was 16

westofyou
05-11-2010, 10:57 AM
Currently reading - Lost city of Z and Americas game (NFL history)

IslandRed
05-11-2010, 11:51 AM
I've been on a re-reading kick lately -- Lords of the Realm, Little League Confidential and a couple of Carl Hiassen titles. I haven't read John Irving in years, maybe time to dust off one of those too.

pedro
05-11-2010, 12:39 PM
Kurt changed my life when I was 16

Ditto.

I'm reading "Lean on Pete" by Willy Vlautin

Roy Tucker
05-11-2010, 12:44 PM
Kurt changed my life when I was 16

My daughter just asked me to go buy a book off her assigned reading list for her to read. I bought Slaughterhouse 5. We'll see what she thinks.

SunDeck
05-19-2010, 11:36 AM
Atropos.
It's one of the many excellent books in the Hornblower series.

RichRed
05-19-2010, 03:03 PM
"The Natural" by Bernard Malamud

NorrisHopper30
05-19-2010, 03:04 PM
Just got done reading Moneyball, incredible..MUST READ.

pedro
05-19-2010, 03:07 PM
"The Natural" by Bernard Malamud

Great book, so very different than the movie.

pedro
05-19-2010, 03:09 PM
I just started "Fordlandia"

Proving that truth can indeed be stranger than fiction, Fordlandia is the story of Henry Ford's ill-advised attempt to transform raw Brazilian rainforest into homespun slices of Americana. With sales of his Model-T booming, the automotive tycoon saw an opportunity to expand his reach further by exploiting a downtrodden Brazilian rubber industry. His vision, the laughably-named Amazonian outpost of Fordlandia, would become an enviable symbol of efficiency and mark the Ford Motor Company as a player on the global stage. Or so he thought. With thoughtful and meticulous research, author Greg Grandin explores the astounding oversights (no botanists were consulted to confirm the colony's agricultural viability) and painful arrogance (little thought was paid to how native Brazilians would react to an American way of life) that hamstrung the project from the start. Instead of ushering in a new era of commerce, Fordlandia became a cautionary tale of a dream destroyed by hubris. --Dave Callanan

edabbs44
05-19-2010, 03:20 PM
Plowed through a ton of financial books lately related to the meltdown. Just finished Columbine also, very interesting book.

Chip R
05-19-2010, 03:43 PM
Great book, so very different than the movie.


Yeah, I read it recently. I can understand why they made the movie different though.

RichRed
05-19-2010, 03:46 PM
Yeah, I read it recently. I can understand why they made the movie different though.

Me too. Hobbs is more of a hero in the movie, and more of an anti-hero in the book. Plus the book is pretty dark overall.

RedsBaron
05-19-2010, 04:23 PM
I just finished Richard Frank's "Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japenese Empire." Frank makes a convincing case that dropping the two atomic bombs upon Japan was necessary to force Japan to surrender and end World War II, and almost certainly saved more lives, both American and Japanese, than would have been lost had Japan refused to surrender and the Allies had then proceeded with an invasion of Japan.

bucksfan2
05-19-2010, 04:52 PM
Plowed through a ton of financial books lately related to the meltdown. Just finished Columbine also, very interesting book.

Recommend any financial books?

Just finished The Big Short by Michael Lewis. It was a very good book. Still wondering what the heck those bankers were thinking.

edabbs44
05-19-2010, 10:56 PM
Recommend any financial books?

Just finished The Big Short by Michael Lewis. It was a very good book. Still wondering what the heck those bankers were thinking.

Big Short was cool. Really enjoyed A Colossal Failure of Common Sense, which was a book on the Lehman failure. The Sellout was ok, but expected more. Liked Street Fighters as well.

flyer85
05-19-2010, 11:46 PM
Wide is the Water, The World Turned Upside Down

getting ready to start Liars Poker

BillDoran
05-20-2010, 01:34 AM
I Am Not Sidney Poitier by Percival Everett.

One of the more enjoyable reads I've had in the past year.

bucksfan2
05-20-2010, 04:12 PM
Big Short was cool. Really enjoyed A Colossal Failure of Common Sense, which was a book on the Lehman failure. The Sellout was ok, but expected more. Liked Street Fighters as well.

I like to read financial books but they often put me to sleep. Thats why I enjoyed The Big Short.

∆nima
05-20-2010, 04:17 PM
I'm currently reading The Electric Michaelangelo by Sarah Hall. Really starting to love it around the 100 page mark.

BoydsOfSummer
06-06-2010, 01:46 AM
Keeping with my trend of learning nothing outside the baseball world, I am reading 'The Bullpen Gospels' by Dirk Hayhurst. Some have read his diaries over at Baseball America I'm sure. Awesome book. It's a bit like reading Bull Durham instead of watching it. :thumbup:

bucksfan2
06-07-2010, 10:17 AM
Reading Getting Back To Even by Jim Cramer right now. It is an interesting book on how to invest post 2008 crash. It is also fun to read it about 6-12 months after the fact to see where is suggestions are.

ThornWithin81
06-07-2010, 11:17 AM
Currently reading Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski.

OesterPoster
06-07-2010, 11:26 AM
Just finished my umpteenth Vince Flynn book, and ready to move on to the next one...probably Pursuit of Honor. Might change it up a bit with a Brad Thor instead.

BillDoran
06-08-2010, 01:47 AM
I Sailed with Magellan by Stuart Dybek. If you like fine-crafted prose and have lived or do live in Chicago, this is almost mandatory reading. Dybek is a writer's writer though, can get a little poetic/flowery at times.

White Teeth by Zadie Smith. I expected a lot more. A terribly gifted writer with quite a dexterous vocabulary, but poor plotting and thin characters (too many) left me disappointed.

Just picked up the Chicago issue of Granta for any lit mag fans out there. So far pretty enjoyable. Lots of Algren/Algren-themed material, which I enjoy.

Roy Tucker
06-08-2010, 09:19 AM
The Girl Who Played with Fire - Stieg Larsson

Read the first book in the series and really liked liked it.

SirFelixCat
06-08-2010, 02:02 PM
Against my better judgement, I've gotten myself sucked into George R.R. Martin's epic that might never be finished. But, man 'o man, it's an awesome, awesome series thus far (1/2 way thru book 2).

WMR
06-08-2010, 02:15 PM
George R.R. Martin and Orson Scott Card are the two greatest fiction writers of this era, IMO.

reds1869
06-08-2010, 03:21 PM
I'm Reading To the Last Man by Jeff Shaara. It is a novel about World War I and is pretty gripping. So far it primarily follows the Escadrille Americaine (mainly Lufbery) and The Red Baron. I highly recommend it to the history buffs on this board.

Edit: I also love Shaara's other work, as well as his father's classic The Killer Angels, which is still one of my favorites after all these years.

VR
06-08-2010, 06:29 PM
Gilead was an easy, very entertaining read.

Jack Burton
06-15-2010, 12:55 PM
Just finished The Count of Monte Cristo, 1200+ pages of greatness. Took quite some time to finish but it was well worth it.

bucksfan2
06-15-2010, 01:06 PM
Just finished The Count of Monte Cristo, 1200+ pages of greatness. Took quite some time to finish but it was well worth it.

Loved that book. But I only read the abridged version in HS. Still consider it one of my favorite books of all time.

Kingspoint
06-15-2010, 05:53 PM
Something long overdue....Gore Vidal's "Lincoln".

Scrap Irony
06-17-2010, 01:22 PM
Just finished Terry Pratchett's latest paperback. Great, biting parody of life today, as always. (Sad that Pratchett has Alzheimer's.) Now reading Bite Me, by Christopher Moore.

Not bad so far, but hard to get into.

DirtyBaker
06-17-2010, 01:42 PM
Triumph Forsaken, The Vietnam War

Chip R
06-17-2010, 04:39 PM
One Very Hot Day - David Halberstam
Catch every Ball - Johnny Bench & Paul Daugherty
Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World by Margaret MacMillan

ThornWithin81
06-17-2010, 04:48 PM
Falling Man by Don Delillo

RichRed
06-17-2010, 05:06 PM
Grabbed a book on my bookshelf to start reading when I'm dong the treadmill, so I'm rereading "If I Never Get Back" by Darryl Brock about a guy who finds himself back in 1869 and travels around with the Red Stockings as they barnstorm across the country. Fun book.

I'm reading this one now, based on the recommendation of several 'Zoners, and really enjoying it. Very entertaining book.

Roy Tucker
06-17-2010, 06:05 PM
Now reading Bite Me, by Christopher Moore.

Not bad so far, but hard to get into.

Me too.

And yeah, I'm finding it hard to get engaged in. I thought it was just me.

pedro
06-17-2010, 06:43 PM
Me too.

And yeah, I'm finding it hard to get engaged in. I thought it was just me.

Have you read the first two in that trilogy?

I definitely would think it wouldn't be as easy to get into if you hadn't.

I liked it but it was not my favorite of his.

Kingspoint
06-17-2010, 07:39 PM
Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World by Margaret MacMillan

Very interesting time. It's the main reason why World War II came about.

What they did to the German people set it up for anyone with half a brain to come along and promise them the world while taking them out of their misery. Revenge is rarely a good solution.

Compare that to the battles among Politicians in the U. S. after the Civil War ended.

Rojo
06-17-2010, 09:13 PM
Just finished The Count of Monte Cristo, 1200+ pages of greatness.

Even better sandwich.

Gainesville Red
06-17-2010, 09:37 PM
Riders of the Purple Sage, Zane Grey

Roy Tucker
06-18-2010, 09:02 AM
Have you read the first two in that trilogy?

I definitely would think it wouldn't be as easy to get into if you hadn't.

I liked it but it was not my favorite of his.

I think that's what my problem is. I didn't realize it was book 3 of a trilogy till I read the reviews. Whoopsy.

Thanks, Pedro.

Raisor
06-18-2010, 06:25 PM
Anthony Bourdain's latest “Medium Raw.”

I've read all his non-fiction books, and this is one of them.

paintmered
06-18-2010, 07:06 PM
Lamb by Christopher Moore.

Stephenk29
06-23-2010, 09:23 PM
The Cider House Rules - John Irving.

Like it so far, Irving seems to be a good writer.

pedro
06-24-2010, 03:37 AM
The Cider House Rules - John Irving.

Like it so far, Irving seems to be a good writer.

One of my favorite books ever. If you have not read "a prayer for Owen meany" I can not recommend it enough.

Roy Tucker
06-24-2010, 09:03 AM
"Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son" by Michael Chabon. Excellent read. Highly recommended for not only father and men but all sexes and ages.

Not your usual Father's Day Cosby-like read. A series of very well-written essays on fatherhood and manhood and life in general. A Chabon mixture of humor, seriousness, pith, and the most blunt god-awful truths you've ever read.

I read this paragraph last night and it stopped me dead in my tracks:



The truth is that in every way, I am squandering the treasure of my life. Itís not that I donít take enough pictures, though I donít, or that I donít keep a diary, though iCal and my monthly Visa bill are the closest I come to a thoughtful prose record of events. Every day is like a kidís drawing, offered to you with a strange mixture of ceremoniousness and offhand disregard, yours for the keeping. Some of the days are rich and complicated, others inscrutable, others little more than a stray gray mark on a ragged page. Some you manage to hang on to, though your reasons for doing so are often hard to fathom. Bust most of them you just ball up and throw away.

Roy Tucker
06-24-2010, 12:50 PM
Anthony Bourdain's latest ďMedium Raw.Ē

I've read all his non-fiction books, and this is one of them.

He is speaking here in town at the Aronoff on Sunday.

gonelong
06-24-2010, 01:32 PM
Stephen King - Blockade Billy (Meh)

OUReds
06-24-2010, 01:40 PM
The Cider House Rules - John Irving.

Like it so far, Irving seems to be a good writer.

The first 2/3rds of the book is some of my favorite writing ever. The last 1/3rd? Not so much. Still a fine read though.

pedro
06-24-2010, 01:54 PM
"Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son" by Michael Chabon. Excellent read. Highly recommended for not only father and men but all sexes and ages.

Not your usual Father's Day Cosby-like read. A series of very well-written essays on fatherhood and manhood and life in general. A Chabon mixture of humor, seriousness, pith, and the most blunt god-awful truths you've ever read.

I read this paragraph last night and it stopped me dead in my tracks:


I really enjoyed that book. He's a great writer.

I'm about halfway through "That Old Cape Magic" by Richard Russo which is very good as I expected it would be.

RedsManRick
06-24-2010, 02:00 PM
Just finished listening to Atlas Shrugged -- 50+ some hours, but fun for an amateur sociologist and political scientist.

I followed that up with Accidental Billionaire, a book about the founding of Facebook. It was definitely a light, quick read, but interesting if you don't know the story.