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Spring~Fields
03-10-2005, 08:38 AM
Coyotes pose threat to outdoor pets



Springfield resident Kathy Donovan charged into her back yard Wednesday morning to rescue her two dogs from menacing coyotes.

Donovan lives in the Kingsgate Commons development in northern Springfield. She knew coyotes lived in the brush and wooded area behind her home.

She was getting ready for work about 8:15 a.m. when she heard the warning.

“I heard Rudy bark, and it just wasn’t his normal ‘play bark,’” she said.

Donovan looked out the window and saw a coyote sitting inside her fenced back yard, watching her cattle dogs Rudy and Sadie. It was as large as an Irish setter.

“I absolutely freaked,” she said.

She ran into her back yard, grabbed Sadie and dragged her inside. The coyote did not seem intimidated by her, she said. It jumped outside the waist-high fence and began racing along its length while Rudy did the same inside the yard.

When Donovan returned for Rudy, she realized there was not one coyote outside the fence, but seven.Since 1998 the Clark County Humane Society has received a growing number of coyote-related calls, said the society’s Executive Director Ed Sisler.

The coyote sightings started in New Carlisle, then moved to South Charleston and then to South Vienna.

Two years ago the society started receiving calls from north Springfield.

The coyotes’ food supply has dwindled as their population increased, forcing them to look for food in more developed areas, Sisler said.

“Guess what he’s looking for?” Sisler said. “Cat. That’s dinner.”

Coyotes are omnivores and will eat carrion, fruits and vegetables, and small mammals.

The Humane Society sent three officers to Donovan’s house Wednesday morning, but they did not find the coyotes.

Sisler said they probably remained in the area.

Handling coyotes usually falls to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Division.

The Humane Society doesn’t want to infringe on the wildlife division’s territory, but it also needs to protect Springfield residents when coyotes pose a threat in residential areas, Sisler said.

No one from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources could be reached for comment Wednesday.

Ohio law allows coyotes to be shot when they attack livestock but says nothing about shooting when pets are attacked, Sisler said.

Pet owners can take several precautions to keep their animals safe, like keeping their pets on leashes. Coyotes fear humans more than the reverse, Sisler said.

Homeowners can also erect 6-foot high privacy fences or buy a Barker Breaker, a device that emits loud noises that can scare coyotes.

Donovan said she will no longer keep her dogs in the back yard at night.

“I know they’re out there, but I wasn’t expecting them to be in my back yard,” she said. “It scared me.”

http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/news/content/news/stories/2005/03/10/SNS0310coyotes.html?urac=n&urvf=11104614192390.3835301503786741

Coyote Behavior
One of the most adaptable animals in the world, the coyote can change its breeding habits, diet and social dynamics to survive in a wide variety of habitats.

Alone, in pairs or in packs, coyotes maintain their territories by marking them with urine. They also use calls to defend this territory, as well as for strengthening social bonds and general communication. Coyotes can easily leap an 8 foot fence or wall. They have been spotted climbing over a 14 foot cyclone fence.

http://www.desertusa.com/june96/du_cycot.html

RedsBaron
03-10-2005, 08:49 AM
A twelve gauge shotgun has its uses.

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 08:55 AM
We have a bunch of them in our woods too. I haven't seen one, but they howl and yip a lot. My neighbors see them. We stopped letting the cats out after dark.

We're not even rural.

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 08:56 AM
We also have pet issues with owls. Two people in my neighborhood lost small dogs to owls. Swooped right down and carried them off.

remdog
03-10-2005, 08:58 AM
Welcome to the California lifestyle. :eek:

Rem

RedFanAlways1966
03-10-2005, 09:05 AM
Scary stuff for pet owners. I think I need to train my little Jack Russell to use the bathroom toilet in the house.

I want to get angry at those coyotes and owls, but they are just doing what their instincts tell them to do. But I'd rather see a dead coyote/owl than a family grieving over a lost family pet. No doubt about that.

I guess it all relates to those of us who have to watch for deer when driving. The places these animals used to call home are shrinking everyday and they are trying to adapt as best they can. I guess something has to give... and I guess I have to side with the humans rather than people losing their pet or getting hurt in a deer-car accident. No simple solutions.

We are all God's creatures... but we cannot seem to all inhabit the same chunk of land.

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 09:09 AM
Don't get me wrong, I love that we have the owls and coyotes. I think it's awesome. You just take different precautions with your pets.

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 09:10 AM
...... those moles on the other hand ...... they're mincemeat!

Spring~Fields
03-10-2005, 09:20 AM
After that story broke last evening I did some searches on the web regarding coyotes, and some sources indicated that they are a threat to small children along with domesticated animals, so I could imagine scenarios where the increasing population of these animals moving toward populated areas of people becoming a real problem eventually.

Johnny Footstool
03-10-2005, 09:36 AM
We had a cougar attack here in good ol' Olathe, KS this summer.

RFS62
03-10-2005, 09:44 AM
I lived up in Sabino Canyon when I lived in Tucson, and every night you could hear an entire pack of coyotes howling, just yards away in the desert. It was very cool, but I never had any run-ins with them. I didn't realize they were a problem in the east.

Roy Tucker
03-10-2005, 09:54 AM
Coyotes have been spotted in our area, but we haven't seen any.

We've got a pretty decent sized woods and field behind our yard (roughly bounded by Fields-Ertel, Snider, Wilkens Blvd., and Irwin-Simpson) that a small herd of deer live in (I think about 8-10). We regularly see them in the field behind us. The township has plans to keep it a woods and make it a park.

We have a battery of bird feeders that we keep cause we like birds. One of the bad things is that hawks come every so often to pick off a bird or two from the feeders. A few times I've been working in the back yard and I notice the sun gets blotted out. I look up and there is a hawk swooping around the yard. He probably looking at me and thinking "we'll eat like kings".

And we often have owls hooting up a storm at night. Some of them are pretty big.

And the assorted moles, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, and skunks all make their appearances regularly. Had to call the critter gitter guy last year to get a mama skunk out from under our patio that have set up housekeeping. Our dog got skunked the year before and I wasn't going to live through that again.

RedFanAlways1966
03-10-2005, 10:03 AM
...... those moles on the other hand ...... they're mincemeat!

Reminds me of my youth (I grew up in the country)... every now and then our neighbor would be out in his yard on a Saturday afternoon. Nothing unusual about that, except he would be toting a shotgun in his hands. He'd find those holes in his yard that were made and inhabited by the pesky moles. The end of the shotgun would be put in the hole and BAM! Not sure how many of those suckas died each year beneath his yard, but it was cool as a kid to watch the neighbor shoot a shotgun into the ground!

We used to also have problems with field mice coming towards the family home during the winter months (they wanted warmth). My father was pretty good with the trusty shovel. He'd have me or my brother bang stuff in the garage to scare the mice out. When he'd spot one... whack, over the head with the shovel. He used to do the same out by our woodpile in the backyard. The main problem we seemed to have with the mice was them building a nest in the underside of an automobile hood (just above the engine block) back when cars had insulation in there.

westofyou
03-10-2005, 10:04 AM
so I could imagine scenarios where the increasing population of these animals moving toward populated areas of people becoming a real problem eventually.

The reverse comes into play too, many folks lose their pets (I have known a few) when they live in more remote areas. When I lived in the Bay Area a Coyote attacked a child in the foothills. at a park that I frequented.

It was a hiking park not a town park though.

6/13/96. A 3-year-old Palo Alto boy was attacked by a 2-year-old male coyote at the Windy Hills Open Space Preserve in Portola Valley, near Los Altos, CA. As the family was packing up the car after a picnic, the coyote used his teeth to grab the boy by the hand and drag him toward nearby bushes. The boy was playing with a Frisbee which was also bit by the coyote. The boy's 15-year-old brother scared away the coyote. The coyote was later trapped, and DNA testing (from the Frisbee) was attempted to make the id certain.

This was the first attack in the 25 year history of this Preserve. (Los Altos Town Crier 7/24/96)

Spring~Fields
03-10-2005, 10:17 AM
I didn't realize they were a problem in the east.

They are reported to be in every county of Ohio. I thought that they were suppose to be afraid of people until yesterday, that article is speaking of the northern edge of town and they have a lot of housing in that area, it is not like it is far out in the country. The same lady that was interviewed in the article also said in a tv interview that they came to her back door via their garage. :eek: "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" :eek:

Unassisted
03-10-2005, 10:19 AM
We have coyotes, foxes, deer and armadillos in our neighborhood. I don't live on the edge of town, but there is substantial undeveloped and wooded acreage nearby. Several neighbors have lost cats to the coyotes. They are truly brazen.

When I lived in Wisconsin, this was a problem there, too. I remember news stories about people losing their chained-up or fenced-in outdoor dogs to coyotes.

I don't get too excited about any of this, a) because I don't have pets and b) because I always figure that the coyotes were there before we were and they have some natural entitlement to anything that we are foolish enough to put in their feeding zone.

westofyou
03-10-2005, 10:24 AM
I don't get too excited about any of this, a) because I don't have pets and b) because I always figure that the coyotes were there before we were and they have some natural entitlement to anything that we are foolish enough to put in their feeding zone.

I have encountered Coyotes hiking and riding numerous times, they run away always. Having lived in the west you accept them as part of the ecosystem and learn to deal. Lock down trash, bring in pets etc... My friend lived on a ranch in Sonoma county and her neighbor raised sheep. He would catch a coyote and hang its body from his fence next to his front gate as a message to the others to stay away. It was somewhat gross, yet effective.

Spring~Fields
03-10-2005, 10:25 AM
The reverse comes into play too, many folks lose their pets (I have known a few) when they live in more remote areas. When I lived in the Bay Area a Coyote attacked a child in the foothills. at a park that I frequented.

It was a hiking park not a town park though.

6/13/96. A 3-year-old Palo Alto boy was attacked by a 2-year-old male coyote at the Windy Hills Open Space Preserve in Portola Valley, near Los Altos, CA. As the family was packing up the car after a picnic, the coyote used his teeth to grab the boy by the hand and drag him toward nearby bushes. The boy was playing with a Frisbee which was also bit by the coyote. The boy's 15-year-old brother scared away the coyote. The coyote was later trapped, and DNA testing (from the Frisbee) was attempted to make the id certain.

This was the first attack in the 25 year history of this Preserve. (Los Altos Town Crier 7/24/96)

So then they can be genuine threat to people and domesticated animals. Perhaps to children playing in their backyards, maybe.

westofyou
03-10-2005, 10:27 AM
So then they can be genuine threat to people and domesticated animals. Perhaps to children playing in their backyards, maybe.

Miniscule threat, I'd be more worried about teenagers on their first drunk than a coyote.

http://tchester.org/sgm/lists/coyote_attacks.html

Here are some overall statistics:

* Officials with the California Department of Fish and Game estimate that roughly one person gets bitten by a coyote per year in California. The last human to be killed by a coyote was a child in the Los Angeles area around 1980. (SDUT 1/3/95, B1; 5/16/00, B3)

For comparison, over 300 people have been killed by domestic dogs in the U.S. between 1979 and the late 1990s. (Humane Society of the U.S., reported in Tracking and the Art of Seeing, Paul Rezendes, second edition, 1999, p. 194)

* From 1993 to 1997 there were seven coyote attacks on humans in Arizona, with over half in 1997. (SDUT 12/17/97, A3)

* "The best estimates assert that, in recorded history, there have been 20 to 30 coyote attacks on humans that resulted in injuries." (Tracking and the Art of Seeing, Paul Rezendes, second edition, 1999, p. 194)

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 10:30 AM
One of the reasons some of these animals become a problem is people feeding them scraps.

I admit feeding the raccoons, but now we toss stuff way out onto the woods. (We used to feed them cookies right on the back deck.)

westofyou
03-10-2005, 10:31 AM
I admit feeding the raccoons, but now we toss stuff way out onto the woods. (We used to feed them cookies right on the back deck.)

My wife got attacked by a coon that her grandfather fed..... just like you do.

TeamCasey
03-10-2005, 10:38 AM
My wife got attacked by a coon that her grandfather fed..... just like you do.

I'm sure, I totally know better.

We just left stuff out. We never fed them by hand. We don't leave it out anymore, since we have city cat and boy in the house.

We throw questionable apples, oranges into the woods ........ but only because it's fun to pretend you're pitching in a major league game from the second floor deck. I pick certain trees for strike zones.

Redsland
03-10-2005, 11:04 AM
I have encountered Coyotes hiking and riding numerous times…
Were they wearing fanny packs and listening to iPods?

:D

westofyou
03-10-2005, 11:07 AM
Were they wearing fanny packs and listening to iPods?

:D

No... but I have run into Steve Jobs at the aforementioned park that the child was attacked at. He was wearing a black turtleneck and it was 82 degrees out.

TC81190
03-10-2005, 03:30 PM
A twelve gauge shotgun has its uses.

http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/contrib/geno/shotgun.gif

Phoenix
03-12-2005, 11:15 AM
Coyotes are most definately afraid of people.

MuEconRedLeg
03-12-2005, 02:53 PM
We have lost 2 calves to coyotes back home on the farm (Taylor County WV). I killed one a few years back, and other family members have killed 7 since then.

Which brings me to my opinion on coyotes; the only good one is a dead one.
:D

GAC
03-13-2005, 05:31 AM
A twelve gauge shotgun has its uses.

Yes, but knowing the area that SF is talking about, that is within city limits. I don't think that is permissible.

People don't realize that coyotes have become a huge problem here in Ohio.

GAC
03-13-2005, 05:34 AM
One of the reasons some of these animals become a problem is people feeding them scraps.

Another reason is that they are losing their fear of man, the more plentiful they become. Especially when they begin to expand their territories in order to eat/survive.

Spring~Fields
03-14-2005, 10:26 AM
Yes, but knowing the area that SF is talking about, that is within city limits. I don't think that is permissible.

People don't realize that coyotes have become a huge problem here in Ohio.

It was within ciy limits and they get all excited about discharging firearms in the city. ;) I have seen plenty of deer running around near where you said that your one brother lives off Miracle Mile, so it would not suprise me if we hear of coyotes coming to that area too someday.

bomarl1969
03-14-2005, 02:50 PM
A word from the wise (and the members of the DNR)...if you value your pets, your children, or YOURSELF, kill every single one of those mean varmits that you see. I know of people, pets, and children being attacked by coyotes.

True story, 2 years ago I was deer hunting in WV. It was early, probably around 6:00 am and daylight was just breaking. I was about to climb the tree in my tree stand when suddenly a coyote came running at me as if he was going to tear me to pieces. I put a round from my .30 cal. carbine through his head.

Also my brother-in-law says that just about everytime he is in his tree stand 3 or 4 coyotes run around the tree not intimidated at all by a human presence. They are evil, and will attack anything.

GAC
03-14-2005, 09:20 PM
It was within ciy limits and they get all excited about discharging firearms in the city. ;) I have seen plenty of deer running around near where you said that your one brother lives off Miracle Mile, so it would not suprise me if we hear of coyotes coming to that area too someday.

My brother sold that house last summer and now lives in the "richy" section just north of Mercy Hospital (where all the snobs live). :allovrjr:

TeamCasey
03-15-2005, 06:13 AM
A word from the wise (and the members of the DNR)...if you value your pets, your children, or YOURSELF, kill every single one of those mean varmits that you see. I know of people, pets, and children being attacked by coyotes.

True story, 2 years ago I was deer hunting in WV. It was early, probably around 6:00 am and daylight was just breaking. I was about to climb the tree in my tree stand when suddenly a coyote came running at me as if he was going to tear me to pieces. I put a round from my .30 cal. carbine through his head.

Also my brother-in-law says that just about everytime he is in his tree stand 3 or 4 coyotes run around the tree not intimidated at all by a human presence. They are evil, and will attack anything.

But you invaded their country with weapons of mass destruction! ;)

bomarl1969
03-15-2005, 11:20 AM
But you invaded their country with weapons of mass destruction! ;)
:MandJ: Yes I did!

But no seriously, they will and have attacked children in their own backyard. I curse the DNR for turning those damn things lose around here. Now the DNR says to kill them all... :rolleyes:

Spring~Fields
03-16-2005, 01:08 AM
My brother sold that house last summer and now lives in the "richy" section just north of Mercy Hospital (where all the snobs live). :allovrjr:

Wow!! Incredible that bumpkins from Spfld could own homes like those isn't it, they are uniquely nice and huge.