PDA

View Full Version : I Guess Now We Can Have Our Cross And Eat It, Too



macro
03-25-2005, 08:56 AM
I'm not sure what I think about this, but I'm leaning toward not liking it. What think you?

------------------------------------------------------

http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/11222239.htm

Posted on Thu, Mar. 24, 2005 http://www.kansascity.com/images/common/spacer.gif
Easter Bunny jilted? Chocolate crosses move into mainstream

http://www.kansascity.com/images/common/spacer.gif
MATT SEDENSKY
http://www.kansascity.com/images/common/spacer.gif
Associated Press
http://www.kansascity.com/images/common/spacer.gif

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A symbol of Christianity that sits atop church steeples, dangles from necks and hangs on walls is finding a new home - in the mouths of the faithful.

A mass-produced chocolate cross has entered the mainstream this Easter, with Kansas City-based Russell Stover distributing the treat to around 5,000 stores throughout the country.

Chocolate crosses have long been available, largely through smaller candy makers. But chocolate expert Clay Gordon said Russell Stover's addition of the item under its Pangburn's brand appears to be the first such effort by a major American company, meaning they'll likely end up in far more Easter baskets this year.

"Obviously they've seen that there's a market for chocolate crosses at Easter," said Lisbeth Echeandia, a consultant for Candy Information Service, which monitors candy industry trends. "I don't see it growing tremendously but I think there would be growth in the Christian market."

The chocolate cross is by no means expected to oust bunnies as an Easter basket staple. But Russell Stover president Tom Ward thinks it could expand the market to include "people who are new to our company that wouldn't buy rabbits."

"I think it's a market that's potentially overlooked," said Gordon, who runs four chocolate Web sites, including Chocophile.com.

At Schimpff's Confectionary in Jeffersonville, Ind., owners sell hundreds of various chocolate crosses each Easter. Owners at Broken Wheel Farm in Dracut, Mass., say chocolate crosses have become a tradition among some customers, but don't come close to eclipsing sales of their Easter ducks. And along with cross-shaped cookies, Cookies by Design offers Nativity scenes and Stars of David.

Stores across the country have put chocolate crosses on their shelves, but the Russell Stover-made crosses are perhaps the most widely available ever, found in about one-tenth of the 50,000 locations nationwide that also sell its other products. Ward said he has no sales figures from the item's inaugural season, though it stands to tap into a huge market.

Susan Smith, a spokeswoman with the National Confectioners Association, estimates Americans will buy $1.85 billion in candy this Easter. It is the second-biggest holiday for candy producers, behind Halloween.

Russell Stover hopes to see greater sales among Christians in general, but the third-largest American chocolate manufacturer is focusing specifically on Hispanic Americans.

Pangburn, which Russell Stover bought in 1999, has long had a hold in that market. The milk chocolate cross they're selling is about 6 inches high, adorned with a floral bouquet and filled with caramel made of goat's milk, popular in Mexico and Latin America. Its packaging features Spanish more prominently than English.

The idea of chomping on a piece of religious iconography may seem strange to some, but Ward said no one in his company felt there was anything negative about a chocolate cross.

"There are other things that we considered that we passed on," Ward said. "A molded Jesus, for example, would not be a good call and a cross with Jesus on it wouldn't be a good idea either."

But Joseph McAleer, a spokesman for the Roman Catholic diocese in Bridgeport, Conn., said the idea of a chocolate cross is no better.

"The cross should be venerated, not eaten, nor tossed casually in an Easter basket beside the jelly beans and marshmallow Peeps," he said. "It's insulting."

RedFanAlways1966
03-25-2005, 09:13 AM
What'll they think of next?!?! I think Richard Simmons is going to be even more disgusted with Easter!

I see it this way... most kids are going to eat chocolate and candy on Easter Sunday. It seems nice that some kids may further understand that Easter is the celebration of a Christian event (the rising of Jesus). Maybe this will help some kids associate Easter as the religious holiday that it is. Most probably will not think more than "yum, chocolate". But I do not see it as desecrating a religious symbol or anything like that. Hanging the cross upside-down or burning it would be, but this is not so bad.

I wonder What Would Jesus think? I think Jesus would like the idea. Kids like chocolate and they will eat lots of it on Easter. Reminding them of the religious-part during Easter is good.

StillFunkyB
03-25-2005, 09:15 AM
I agree RFA.

Roy Tucker
03-25-2005, 09:32 AM
I had to think about it for a few minutes, but decided I'm OK with it too. Along with the jelly beans, we've put prayer books, rosaries, etc in Easter baskets. Haven't mixed religion with candy directly though.

Like the article said, a chocolate cross with Jesus on it or a molded Jesus would be a bit much, but I see more good in this that harm. The reason for the season and all that.

Saw this in the Enquirer...

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050321/LIFE05/503210313

Easter baskets carry message with the sweets

By Joy Kraft / Enquirer staff writer

Move over Peter Cottontail. You have company on the Bunny Trail.

Jesus and the cast of the upcoming religious holiday are front and center in Easter baskets from 11th Hour Gift Service of Loveland, alongside chocolate bunnies, chirping chicks and cream-filled eggs.

"We thought people would like baskets with a more spiritual focus, with less candy and more age-appropriate family activities," says Jackie Rapose, co-owner with Anita Grolmes.

But that doesn't mean sweets have been banished.

There are Scripture Smarties, Lamb of God gummies and foil-covered chocolate crosses as sidelights to family-friendly fare that includes bottled bubbles, sticker and activity books, videos, finger paints, stamp art and books about Jesus and the Bible.

The baskets, which can be custom made, start at about $20 for an activity basket with a cuddly Easter duck, an egg filled with stickers, stamps, finger paints, Play-Doh and a craft book. Prices rise to $100 for the Catholic Home basket with a framed painting of Mary, stuffed animals, a video, books, a hand-blown crystal angel and candy.

The two basket creators started working with the Catholic Shop in Madeira but hope to market the baskets to other Christian stores as well.

"We'll tailor the contents to what folks want," says Rapose, "sticker books, Play-Doh, card games, coloring books."

The basket price includes delivery in the Greater Cincinnati area, and orders will be taken up to Friday. Information: (513) 235-6781 or the Catholic Shop, 7015 Miami Ave., Madeira.

E-mail jkraft@enquirer.com

Ravenlord
03-25-2005, 10:01 AM
i have no idea how i feel about this...my initial reaction is that it's wrong...but it does de-seccularize the holliday a bit......:confused:

RedsBaron
03-25-2005, 10:22 AM
I have mixed feelings. Christ taught that we are to bear our own crosses, not eat them........

Chip R
03-25-2005, 10:25 AM
Don't they already make chocolate or candy Jesuses? If so, I see nothing wrong with this. I guess I'm not a big Easter fan. I don't like how they move it around every year. I figure if they can figure out the approximate date of Jesus' birth, they can figure out an approximate date when He was crucified and thus fix a date for Easter.

REDREAD
03-25-2005, 12:20 PM
Don't they already make chocolate or candy Jesuses? If so, I see nothing wrong with this. I guess I'm not a big Easter fan. I don't like how they move it around every year. I figure if they can figure out the approximate date of Jesus' birth, they can figure out an approximate date when He was crucified and thus fix a date for Easter.

It gets moved around because it syncs up with Passover. So blame the Jewish people :)

GAC
03-25-2005, 12:36 PM
Lets see people try to eat one while they are watching the Passion. ;)

Me? I still prefer those marshmellow Peeps (chicks). Getting to do my Ozzy impersonation while I bite their heads off brings me such a thrill (and sugar buzz). :p:

Chip R
03-25-2005, 12:44 PM
It gets moved around because it syncs up with Passover. So blame the Jewish people :)
:eek: Who do you think I am, Bobby Fischer? ;)

zombie-a-go-go
03-25-2005, 12:57 PM
mmm... chocolate iconography

http://www.tidningen.aland.net/gallery/temp/04081309382365.jpg

Rojo
03-25-2005, 03:04 PM
Hey, when I was a kid we not only ate the body of christ, we drank his blood.

Unassisted
03-25-2005, 06:21 PM
This is the topic du jour on talk radio. I heard it discussed by 3 different talkmeisters.

GAC
03-26-2005, 11:35 AM
Hey, when I was a kid we not only ate the body of christ, we drank his blood.

I think the symbolic nature and spirituality of Communion is quite different, and the meaning of much more value, then eating a chocolate cross. It's just not the same.

WVRed
03-27-2005, 08:49 AM
I wonder how PETA feels about the Easter Bunny.;)

macro
03-27-2005, 11:07 AM
I wonder how PETA feels about the Easter Bunny.;)

Do you mean with the intense pressure and related labor involved in the egg delivery thing? Hey, Saint Nicholas does a similar thing in December and no one worries about him, so I have little time for concern over the rabbit.