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View Full Version : Mo Clarett And The NCAA Just Couldn't Get Together For A Talk?



Playadlc
05-19-2005, 01:12 PM
This will probably ruffle some feathers here, but what is that?

The NCAA can put together teams of investigators to travel the globe to talk to players, coaches, anybody that they need to in order to fully investigate charges.

They can delay hearings, meetings, findings and rulings.

But here, they just don't have time to talk to THE guy who said players get paid and get "no work" jobs and get special treatment in classes and on tests.

All I can say is "wow."

http://www.sportsline.com/collegefootball/story/8483577

Unassisted
05-19-2005, 01:17 PM
"The NCAA tried numerous times to interview Maurice Clarett about accusations he made against Ohio State's football program, but the former Buckeyes running back never responded to its requests."

The NCAA doesn't have subpoena powers and Clarett's allegations didn't point to anything that was illegal. IMO, the fact that Mo couldn't be bothered to respond (even with a telephone call - surely, he has a phone :rolleyes: ) says far more about the veracity of his statements than it does about the NCAA's investigative procedures.

Roy Tucker
05-19-2005, 01:33 PM
"NCAA investigators called Clarett's cell phone numbers, relatives, former representatives and friends, and attempted to contact him in person, David Price, the NCAA's vice president of enforcement services, said in a statement.

"Not once did Mr. Clarett respond to our repeated requests to meet with investigators or provide information," Price said.

Clarett's agent, Steve Feldman, said he was aware the NCAA might have an interest in speaking with his client but it has not contacted him since he started representing Clarett in February.

"What happened in Ohio is in the past," Feldman said. "He's just going to concentrate on playing for the Broncos."
I think the NCAA tried every avenue possible to talk to him and Clarett wanted to have nothing to do with it.

So much for Mo standing on his principles.

LoganBuck
05-19-2005, 01:55 PM
Also at issue is that during the fiasco that was the first NCAA investigation into the "theft" from the car, he was found to have lied to the NCAA at least 12 times. His credibility in their eyes was questionable. This was echoed by some of the guys on 1460 AM out of Columbus. Even if they had talked to him his credibility without evidence would have been an issue.

Playadlc
05-20-2005, 12:49 PM
"The NCAA tried numerous times to interview Maurice Clarett about accusations he made against Ohio State's football program, but the former Buckeyes running back never responded to its requests."

The NCAA doesn't have subpoena powers and Clarett's allegations didn't point to anything that was illegal. IMO, the fact that Mo couldn't be bothered to respond (even with a telephone call - surely, he has a phone :rolleyes: ) says far more about the veracity of his statements than it does about the NCAA's investigative procedures.

Under NCAA regulations, they CAN postpone any official inquiry and/or any findings/report until everyone needed to complete the investigation is made available. If those regulations were followed, OSU would have an incentive to get Clarett and the NCAA together so the NCAA sword doesn't hang over their head longer than necessary (i.e. so Michigan can't outrecruit them by telling recruits "that official NCAA inquiry isn't over...be careful if you are considering OSU").


So - what really happened? Since Clarett left school, he was no longer subject to being "produced" by OSU for an NCAA interview. Despite the crocodile tear-announcement of how hard they tried, the NCAA clearly didn't try very hard to get with Clarett, and Clarett didn't try at all to get with the NCAA.

Was he "incented" to be too busy? Did the NCAA REALLY want to talk to him anyway? Well, we'll never know, but it sure has an appearance of impropriety.

The message here is clear - ditch the kid (or at least make it look like you ditched the kid) and stonewall the NCAA. If you are big enough, you'll get away with it.