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View Full Version : U.S. Border Patrol Comes Under Scrutiny



CTA513
06-07-2005, 03:24 PM
On April 25, Gregory Despres arrived at the U.S.-Canadian border crossing at Calais, Maine, carrying a homemade sword, a hatchet, a knife, brass knuckles and a chain saw stained with what appeared to be blood. U.S. customs agents confiscated the weapons and fingerprinted Despres, then let him into the United States.

The following day, a gruesome scene was discovered in Despres' hometown of Minto, New Brunswick: The decapitated body of a 74-year-old country musician named Frederick Fulton was found on his kitchen floor. The man's head was in a pillow case under a kitchen table. His common-law wife was discovered stabbed to death in a bedroom.

Despres, 22, immediately became a suspect because of a history of violence between him and his neighbors, and he was arrested April 27 after police in Massachusetts saw him wandering down a highway in a sweat shirt with red and brown stains. He is now in jail in Massachusetts on murder charges, awaiting an extradition hearing next month.

At a time when the United States is tightening its borders, how could a man toting what appeared to be a bloody chain saw be allowed into the country?

Bill Anthony, a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, said the Canada-born Despres could not be detained because he is a naturalized U.S. citizen and was not wanted on any criminal charges on the day in question.

Anthony said Despres was questioned for two hours before he was released. During that time, he said, customs agents employed "every conceivable method" to check for warrants or see if Despres had broken any laws in trying to re-enter the country.

"Nobody asked us to detain him," Anthony said. "Being bizarre is not a reason to keep somebody out of this country or lock them up. ... We are governed by laws and regulations, and he did not violate any regulations."

Anthony conceded it "sounds stupid" that a man wielding what appeared to be a bloody chain saw could not be detained. But he added: "Our people don't have a crime lab up there. They can't look at a chain saw and decide if it's blood or rust or red paint."

Sgt. Gary Cameron of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police would not comment on whether it was, in fact, blood on the chain saw.

On the same day Despres crossed the border, he was due in a Canadian court to be sentenced on charges he assaulted and threatened to kill Fulton's son-in-law, Frederick Mowat, last August.

Mowat told police Despres had been bothering his father-in-law for the past month. When Mowat confronted him, Despres allegedly pulled a knife, pointed it at Mowat's chest and said he was "going to get you all."

Police believe the dispute between the neighbors boiled over in the early-morning hours of April 24, when Despres allegedly broke into Fulton's home and stabbed the couple.

Fulton's daughter found her father's body two days later. His car was later found in a gravel pit on a highway leading to the U.S. border. Despres hitchhiked to the border crossing.

After the bodies were found on the afternoon of April 26, police set up roadblocks and sent out a bulletin that identified Despres as a "person of interest" in the slayings, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The bulletin caught the eye of a Quincy police dispatcher because it gave the suspect's Massachusetts driver's license number, missing a character. The dispatcher plugged in numbers and letters until she found a last known address for Despres in Mattapoisett. She alerted police in that town, and an officer quickly spotted Despres.

In state court the next day, Despres told a judge that he is affiliated with NASA and was on his way to a Marine Corps base in Kansas at the time of his arrest.

After the case was transferred to federal court, Despres' attorney, Michael Andrews, questioned whether his client is mentally competent.

Fulton's friends in Minto, a village of 2,700 people, told the New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal that he was a popular musician, a guitarist known as the "Chet Atkins of Minto" and a 2001 inductee in the Minto Country Music Wall of Fame.



:bang:

I cant believe they just confiscated the stuff and let him go.

Johnny Footstool
06-07-2005, 04:49 PM
They didn't think they had "just cause" to detain him.


"Nobody asked us to detain him," Anthony said. "Being bizarre is not a reason to keep somebody out of this country or lock them up. ... We are governed by laws and regulations, and he did not violate any regulations."

They confiscated his weapons and fingerprinted him, which is all they could do at that point.

Unassisted
06-07-2005, 05:30 PM
Sometimes laws that make good sense in 99.9% of situations seem really screwy in that other .1% of situations. The Fourth Amendment is a good thing.

pedro
06-07-2005, 05:50 PM
If this guy was an Arab he'd already be at Gitmo and we probably never would have heard a peep about it.

Falls City Beer
06-07-2005, 05:55 PM
If this guy was an Arab he'd already be at Gitmo and we probably never would have heard a peep about it.

Nah, they would have shot him on the spot, and then the officer who shot him would play pedal steel on Toby Keith's new album "A-RAB Stinkum"

BoydsOfSummer
06-07-2005, 10:36 PM
Picture of the dude. Yeah,nothing wrong with this cat.

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&ncid=1756&e=3&u=/050607/481/ny11906071829

Red in Chicago
06-07-2005, 10:42 PM
he has the same eyes as the "runaway bride" :devil:

RedFanAlways1966
06-08-2005, 08:38 AM
Good thing he committed the crime in Canada... for him. He might get back on the streets in no time. He might be looking at death row if it happened in the U.S.. Or perhaps the French (Ira Einhorn) will allow him to live as a free man in their wonderful country?!?

Anyhow.... I hope he enjoys shower-time. No soap-rope for you, loser.

TeamCasey
06-08-2005, 09:11 AM
he has the same eyes as the "runaway bride" :devil:

He does, perhaps both were abducted. Maybe we have a whole body snatcher thing under way.