PDA

View Full Version : So, whatcha reading?



TeamCasey
03-21-2002, 07:55 PM
Beside's Stephen King's latest, "Everything's Eventual", I bought two other new books this week.

One is Carl Hiaasen's "Basket Case". This is the author that I've mentioned before. He writes mysteries, with a really odd sense of humor. I beleive the murder weapon in this one may be a frozen lizard. I love his books ..... but I'm a tad peculiar myself...... as some of you know.

The other is "A Day at the Ballpark". It's the first book by a new author Steve Holt. Not sure why it caught my attention. Every now and then, I try a new author. I think it's a young man's coming of age from a difficult home kind of story.

I'm so far behind on my reading. I curse the internet and television sometimes. I can't wait until the weather warms up. I'm a more successful reader when I can go outside or go to a lake or park.

Has anyone read anything by Elmore Leonard? I haven't, but saw a book on Amazon that caught my eye. Is he any good?

So, what's everyone reading these days?

TeamCasey
03-21-2002, 07:57 PM
Are there any other "Constant Readers" out there? (a.k.a Stephen King fanatics)

Chip R
03-21-2002, 09:38 PM
at work, during lunch, Shelby Foote's 3rd volume in his 3 volume series about the Civil War: "From Red River to Appomattox". Before bed, "If I Never Get Back" by Darryl Brock which is a novel about the 1869 Red Stockings. In the "library" I'm reading "Texas" by James Michener.

<small>[ 03-21-2002, 08:41 PM: Message edited by: Chip R ]</small>

westofyou
03-21-2002, 09:42 PM
Each Night - Big Red Dynasty

Before Bed - Sex and Sunsets - Tim Sadlin

For betterment of myself - Flash Mx User Manual

CrackerJack
03-22-2002, 01:05 AM
Gotten into some Chuck Palahniuk lately (of "Fight Club" fame) - "Choke" and "Survivor" were great reads, I really like him, as far as modern writers go, bizarre but funny and thoughtful reads.

creek14
03-22-2002, 09:18 AM
A little ditty titled "Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools for Escape Systems Aerodynamic Analysis". So I'm a little geeky. My obsession for F-15's is almost as great as my obsession for baseball.

SunDeck
03-22-2002, 09:29 AM
It's embarrassing. I manage a department in a LIBRARY and I'm not reading anything at the moment. I'm a discredit to the profession, I know...
I started The Worm Forgives the Plow a week or two ago, but I'm in the middle of a remodeling project. The time just slips by. At any rate, it's a classic written in the 40's, a journal of a man's transition to a farming life.

Roy Tucker
03-22-2002, 10:40 AM
Just finished "John Adams" by David McCullough. A really fascinating life and I highly recommend it.

Also just finished "2182 kHz" by David Masiel on a recommendation from a publishing friend. A very interesting book and I predict big things for it. Its about modern day adventures on the Alaskan seas. If you liked "A Perfect Storm", you'll like this book.

Just starting "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay" by Michael Chabon.

Hoosier Red
03-22-2002, 10:44 AM
I'm currently reading Gods and Generals by Jeff Schaara. I read his father's book, the Killer Angels, and plan to read The Last Full Measure by Jeff later this year.

Roy Tucker
03-22-2002, 10:47 AM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by TeamCasey:
<strong>Are there any other "Constant Readers" out there? (a.k.a Stephen King fanatics)</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Me. Although I'm not as fanatical as I used to be (age seems to have lopped off my highs and lows and left me comfortably in the middle. I'm an old fart, I know <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" /> ).

Haven't read "Black House" yet but its on my pile. His new short story book looks kinda cool. It has "Riding the Bullet" in it which I read off the web. Don't know if it has "The Plant" or not.

Read Hiassen's "Sick Puppy". The proverbial quirky tale.

<small>[ 03-22-2002, 09:49 AM: Message edited by: Roy Tucker ]</small>

Roy Tucker
03-22-2002, 11:11 AM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by TeamCasey:
<strong>

Has anyone read anything by Elmore Leonard? I haven't, but saw a book on Amazon that caught my eye. Is he any good?

So, what's everyone reading these days?</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">I can't seem to stay away from this thread.

Elmore Leonard any good? Uh, like, yeah <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" /> Snappy dialogue, plot twists that blindside you like an NFL linebacker, and the driest wit this side of the Sahara.

Start with "Get Shorty" and "Out of Sight". Read "Hombre" to get a taste of his early stuff. "52 Pickup" is good too. His new book "Tishomingo Blues" is supposed to be very good.

Actually, you can't go wrong with any of his books. In case you can't tell, I think he's pretty good <img border="0" alt="[Smokin]" title="" src="graemlins/smokin.gif" />

TeamCasey
03-22-2002, 11:37 AM
Thanks Roy! Excellent. I'll give him a try. It was comments about his wit that drew my attention.

TeamBoone
03-22-2002, 03:33 PM
Isle of Dogs by Patricia Cornwell.

Chip R
03-22-2002, 03:51 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by creek14:
<strong>A little ditty titled "Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools for Escape Systems Aerodynamic Analysis". So I'm a little geeky. My obsession for F-15's is almost as great as my obsession for baseball.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Sounds like a page turner to me. Please, creek, don't spoil the ending for us. <img border="0" alt="[Devil]" title="" src="graemlins/devil.gif" />

RedHotNumber17
03-22-2002, 04:01 PM
For self-improvement: Cosmopolitan

For my Baseball Fix: Diamondbacks Magazine

My favourite book of all time is "The Outsiders" by S.E. Hinton...

TeamCasey
03-22-2002, 04:13 PM
I read the Outsiders in my youth .... a couple of times. Have you also read RumbleFish and That was Then, This is Now? I beleive both are S.E. Hinton.

creek14
03-22-2002, 05:04 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by Chip R:
<strong>[/qb]</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Sounds like a page turner to me. Please, creek, don't spoil the ending for us. <img border="0" alt="[Devil]" title="" src="graemlins/devil.gif" /> </strong>[/QUOTE]

The pilot ejects. Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

<small>[ 03-22-2002, 06:14 PM: Message edited by: creek14 ]</small>

Chip R
03-22-2002, 07:13 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by creek14:
<strong>The pilot ejects. Sorry, I couldn't help myself.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Maybe Hollywood will change that ending when the movie comes out. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />

Redsbbchick
03-22-2002, 08:09 PM
I am currently reading "Tales From the Dugout:The Greatest True Baseball Stories Ever Told" and Jane Austin's "Sence and Sensibility". I also just got done with Jane Austin's "Emma". Yeah I know an interesting combination. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />

PurplePanther73
03-23-2002, 04:23 PM
Right now I'm trying to make my way through The Hobbit in preparation for The Lord of the Rings trilogy. I'm having a hard time with The Hobbit because it's a little too whimsical for my taste. I hope The Lord of the Rings will be better; and based upon what I saw in the movie, I have no doubt that it will.

Next I'm going to read a couple Discworld books and then I'm re-reading Terry Brooks' first three Shannara novels.

Interspaced amoungst all this I'll be reading the latest edition of the Players Handbook and the Dungeon Master Guide for AD&D.

MWM
03-23-2002, 10:50 PM
I'm currently reading "Founding Brothers" by Joseph Ellis. If you enjoy colonial/early American History this is very good. Ellis discusses some of the defining events and political turmoil the early leaders of our country faced in the first decade after the Constitution was ratified.

This book reads much better than most historical scholarship. I am an avid reader of colonial American history and Revolutionary era history and you really don't have to have a detailed knowledge of this era to get a lot out of this book.

Crash Davis
03-25-2002, 12:00 AM
I just finished "Cod" by Mark Kurlansky. It came highly recommended, and I had no idea fish could be so instrumental in world history. Seriously, Cod played a big role in the discovery of America and the Revolutionary War among other historical events.

I, too, am now reading "Founding Brothers" by Joseph J. Ellis, but I've just gotten into it.

I recently read "Round Ireland With a Fridge," and I laughed all the way through it. It reads like a geography/travel guide written byJerry Seinfeld (a funnier Irish version of Seinfeld).

jtc24
03-25-2002, 02:28 AM
Just started "Beyond Blame" by black conservative Armstrong Williams. He was a guest with Mike McConnell on WLW four or five years ago, and I'm just now getting around to reading his book that was discussed that day. It's a very revealing perspective of the problems that confront black folks in America today. I doubt those organizing the current boycots in Cincinnati would like what he has to say, though. So far I'm intrigued.

Roy Tucker
06-12-2002, 01:36 PM
Thought I'd resurrect this for the summer reading season...

Currently, I'm finishing off "The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse" by Louise Erdich. A really good but quirky book about a woman posing as a Catholic priest living in Indian reservations in the Dakota's in the late 1800's investigating a miracle. Sounds weird but its well told and written.

Also just read "The Nanny's Diaries". It was supposed to be funny, but I just couldn't get past reading about the lives of the ultra-rich and how empty, shallow, and pathetic their lives were. Others think it's hilarious. I thought it was sad.

Next on the stack is the Stephen King/Peter Straub "Black House", Elmore Leonard's "Out of Sight", and "A Lesson Before Dying" by Ernest Gaines.

Also read "Ender's Game" with my son as a end of the year school assignment. We had to read the book, write journals of our thoughts through the book, and present it to his class. It was pretty fun and I found out my son has great thoughts and writes well if he wants to.

creek14
06-12-2002, 01:50 PM
I just bought Portraits 9/11/01: The Collected "Portraits of Grief" from The New York Times. It's gutwrenching, but I feel I owe it to those people to read about their lives. I also bought "The Top 10 of Everything for 2002". Which is just a book of strange lists. For example: The top 10 daily newspapers in the US - 10 Dallas Morning News 9 Houston Chronicle 8 Long Island Newsday 7 Chicago Trib 6 New York Daily News 5 Washington Post 4 LA Times 3 NY Times 2 USA Today 1 WSJ. I just love useless trivia.

GIK
06-19-2002, 06:20 PM
Just bought Stephen King's "Dreamcatcher". It'll be my first SK experience.

UnderDunn
06-19-2002, 08:09 PM
GIK,

That's a good one. (A bit wierd and gross, but I loved it). I'm very biased though. There aren't many that I don't like other than Cujo.

TeamCasey's (UnderDunn's) Law and Cujo: Dogs should always be heroes, not villains...... and they should NEVER die!

Now that I've diverted my own message here. A good dog book is Watchers by Dean Koontz. Loved it. Walked away grinning from ear to ear.

If you decide you like Stephen King, The Stand is his all-time best IMO. The Stand is a fairly long summer-time read though.

I FINALLY finished re-reading The Talisman! Hooray! Took me forever. Darn this thing called the internet. It's cutting into my reading time. Now I'm either going to cleanse my palate or sink right into Black House. Not sure yet.

<small>[ 06-19-2002, 06:13 PM: Message edited by: UnderDunn ]</small>

Raisor
06-19-2002, 08:22 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by Roy Tucker:
<strong>Just finished "John Adams" by David McCullough. A really fascinating life and I highly recommend it.

.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Read it a few months ago, and thought it was great. The Adams/Jefferson friendship was tremendously weird (in a good way) :)

PSR

Raisor
06-19-2002, 08:27 PM
Let's see..

I'm currently re-reading two different book series in preperation of new releases.

I'm reading the Tom Clancy Jack Ryan-series right now, from the chronological beginning:
Without Remourse
Patriot Games
Red Rabbit (out in Aug)
Hunt for Red October
The Cardinal in the Kremlin
Clear and Present Danger
Sum of All Fears &lt;----I am here
Debt of Honor
Executive Orders
Rainbow Six
The Bear and the Dragon

I'm also re-reading the Left Behind series..

PSR

Hoosier Red
06-20-2002, 02:09 AM
Okay, I'm a 23 year old engaged man, and I just read the Harry Potter books 1-4.
My Fiance had to read the first one for a young adult literature class she took, she loved it, and read the next three before recommending them to me.
These books are fantastic! Brilliant storytelling, and some fun characters.
Recommended reading for anyone with children, or without. I haven't read Lord of the Rings, so I don't have any base for comparison, but I have a feeling when she finishes all 7 books, the series will be held up as a standard for fantasy literature for years to come.

GIK
06-20-2002, 02:52 AM
UD/TC: I'm excited to start the book as many people I know are SK fans (my brother being one of them). I just never was attracted to his work, but my girlfriend just read "Bag of Bones" and loved it...so I'll give him a whirl.

I also bought the Hobbit and the LOTR Trilogy. I'd like to read the Harry Potter books and I need the latest Left Behind novel.

Roy Tucker
06-20-2002, 05:26 PM
I could talk about books about as long I as I can talk abut the Reds.

Re: dog books

- I always recommend "Nop's Trials" by Donald McCaig. Just an awesome book.
- My youngest just read "Ole Yeller" and it took about 2 days to get her to stop crying.
- James Herriot's "Dog Stories" is great too.
- And just thinking about "My Dog Skip" gives me a big lump in my throat. I'm a sucker for dog stories.

Re: Adams/Jefferson

The one part of that book that fascinated me was when Adams and Jefferson went to England and spent a couple months walking the English countryside. What I'd give to accompany those two and just listen to their talks...

Re: Raisor and Clancy

- Man, you're a glutton for punishment. I've always wanted to go back and read them in order too, just didn't have the time.
- Clancy has a new book out soon called "Red Rabbit" that is from the "Patriot Games" Ryan era.
- And it's interesting to go over to alt.books.tom-clancy. Clancy participates from time to time.

Re: SK

- "Dreamcatcher" is pretty oogey but a good read. King has evolved to having a nice writing style.
- I'm about a 1/3 of the way into "Black House". It's really giving me the willies.
- And my son is reading "The Stand" now (the uncut version no less). He takes it everywhere we go. I had to tell him to turn off his light at 2 AM last night.

Re: Harry Potter

Just great books. I've recommended them to everyone, kids or no kids.

Summer time is a great time for reading. I sit out back on the deck till I can't see anymore (which is getting pretty late these days).

<small>[ 06-20-2002, 03:41 PM: Message edited by: Roy Tucker ]</small>

Sweetstop
07-01-2002, 04:25 PM
"A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius" by Dave Eggers, preceded by "Disobedience" by Jane Hamilton, preceded by "The Sweet Hereafter" by Russell Banks, preceded "A Savage Beauty" bio of Edna St. Vincent Millay, preceded by "Me Talk Pretty One Day" by David Sedaris.. next..."The Corrections: by Jonathon Franzen. Recommend anything by Barbara Kingsolver or Annie Proulx.

Crash Davis
07-01-2002, 06:42 PM
Roy,
I just picked up "The Metaphysical Club" by Louis Menand. I'm about 100 pages into it, and it's very good. Do you know this book? I believe it won the Pulitzer Prize this year or last.

westofyou
07-01-2002, 09:21 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial"> "Me Talk Pretty One Day" by David Sedaris.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Yea David!!!

A funny, funny man.

Just wrapping up "eight men out"

I'm looking for an EPIC..... something in the vein of David Copperfield or Owen Meany....

Suggestions are appreciated.

Hollcat
07-01-2002, 10:18 PM
Redszone!

CrackerJack
07-02-2002, 01:42 AM
I don't make a whole lot of time for reading but try to get a book in a month, unlike my college days.

Not that anyone cares or knows what the hell's wrong with my reading tastes but....

I'm finishing Chuck Palahniuk's books, Choke and Survivor. Very, very good stuff.

Jerzy Kosinski's classics I like a lot. (Pinball most recently, and of course "The Painted Bird" most read in HS or college).

Emma Goldman is an early 20th century Anarchist that I really admire and is one of my personal heroes.

"Living My Life" and "Anarachism, And Other Essays" are really her only published novels.

Kerouac, Bernard Shaw, Nietschze, Colin Wilson, (of "The Outsider" fame) all are brilliant hero authors of mine as well (sucker for the classics, the beat writers, philosophy and existentialists I guess).

I rarely run into anyone who study and read these types of authors regularly, so I'm kind of quiet about it.

Anyone with similar interests, would appreciate any recommendations.

Alex Todd
07-02-2002, 02:53 AM
I'm currently reading a couple of books:

The Beach, by Alex Garland....this is basically a fast paced story that shows that a perfect civilization cannot exist. A group of travelers (they hate to be called tourists) inhabit a small island near Thailand with a beautiful beach, secluded from everything.

I'm also reading High Fidelity, by Nick Hornby. This is the ultimate guy book. Girls, if you wanna know what guys think about relationships, read this

CrackerJack
07-02-2002, 02:56 AM
hehe, BTW Alex - if you haven't seen the film version of High Fidelity - it's a bit different (based in Chicago) watch it! One of my favorites. (John Cusack) Very, very funny.

<small>[ 07-02-2002, 12:56 AM: Message edited by: RedsFanInCincy ]</small>

Roy Tucker
07-02-2002, 03:15 PM
Re: Sweetstop

"A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius". What did you think? Maybe it's a generation gap, but I thought it overblown and self-indulgent. Just me though.

"The Sweet Hereafter", "Me Talk Pretty One Day", "The Corrections" all excellent. "Naked" by Sedaris is real good too. Barbara Kingsolver is excellent but bemeans men a little too often for my tastes. Read Proulx's "The Shipping News" a ways back. I'll have to put her on my reading list.

Re: Crash

"The Metaphysical Club" did win the Pulitzer in 2002 for history ("John Adams" won for biography). A publisher friend of mine has recommended it but it seemed pretty heavy-duty for trashy summer reading. Maybe I'll save it for my mid-winter hibernation.

Also, I got my book club to read "Round Ireland With a Fridge". It was hilarious.

Re: WOY

Hmmmm, epics. Good one is "Ahab's Wife". A really excellent book and underrated. Weaved around Melville, it stands up pretty well.

Re: RFIC

"sucker for the classics, the beat writers, philosophy and existentialists". Oh man, I read that in my angry youth period. Can't help you much there.

Stupid me, I didn't know the "High Fidelity" was a book. Good movie. I'll have to add it to my never-ending list of books to read.

CrackerJack
07-02-2002, 04:03 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Re: RFIC

"sucker for the classics, the beat writers, philosophy and existentialists". Oh man, I read that in my angry youth period. Can't help you much there.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Lol, that's what everyone tells me. Although I'm no longer "angry" or rebellious as I once was, I still love reading that stuff for some reason. Guess I refuse to "grow up" in some ways. (I don't read much Nietschze anymore for instance)

Sweetstop
07-02-2002, 04:09 PM
Roy: I do like AHWOSG, although both of your adjectives fit, and even though I'm 53 I can relate to it because of much tragedy in my early life and through my 20-something children. My son-in-law lent the book to me. Eggers over-the-top, off-the-wall style (ex. the interview w/ "Real World")is full of exuberance and is a real tour de force.

I read "Naked" also....will laugh at anything Sedaris says or puts in print.

I highly recommend E. Annie Proulx's book of short stories called "Close Range - Wyoming Stories."

RedHotNumber17
07-16-2002, 08:37 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by TeamCasey:
<strong>I read the Outsiders in my youth .... a couple of times. Have you also read RumbleFish and That was Then, This is Now? I beleive both are S.E. Hinton.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">You are correct, TC :) I have read them all and her books are always good, I think :)

Now I am reading a book called "All Men Are Jerks...Until Proven Otherwise" by Daylle Deanna Schwarz...I just had my boyfriend of the past 4 1/2 months cheat on me, so I needed some answers from a female point of view. Great reading so far :D Plus, the Cosmo fix...now Guys, if you want to know what women want/love/look for, there's some reading material for you <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />

Super_Barry11
07-17-2002, 04:15 AM
I am a HUGE Stephen King fan!! One of my favorites was The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon , because it reminded me of my adoration of Barry Larkin!! <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />

Roy- Black House is really, really stellar!! I absolutely loved it!
GIK- Dreamcatcher was pretty good, in my opinion. Wasn't one of my all-time faves, but nonetheless, a good read.

I just finished The Devil on Horseback , by Victoria Holt, which was surprisingly good, for something NOT by Stephen King!! <img border="0" alt="[Laughing]" title="" src="graemlins/laugh.gif" />

Next on my list is Storm of the Century (another King, of course!!) Actually, in addition to King, I also read quite a bit of Dean Koontz and Mary Higgins Clark (I think I've devoured most of hers already, though). Koontz books are pretty awesome!!

GAC
07-17-2002, 11:18 AM
I read the Hobbit over 20 years ago, and then started in on the Trilogy. About 1/2 way through the "Fellowship Of The Rings" I put it down and said I'd wait for the movie to come out :D

I love history and biographies. Just bought two great books while in the Smoky's on the people of Cades Cove in the 19th century, and then another on the establishment of the Great Smoky Mtn National Park (1900 to present).

I've been wanting to get the time to read the "Frontiersman", but haven't found the time. It chronicles the life of Simon Kenton (who lived in this area), and also my ancestor George Rogers Clark.

Crash Davis
07-18-2002, 08:01 PM
Just finished "Empire Falls" by Richard Russo, and I believe it won the Pulitzer for fiction. Great book, easy read, but a tad disappointed with the ending.

Also just finished "About a Boy" by Nick Hornby. Very entertaining and a page turner. I think I finished it in one day, but I had to stay up late to do it.

BuckeyeRedleg
07-22-2002, 02:16 AM
Phil Steele's College Football Preview.

OK, so I'm not that well rounded.

Aceking
07-22-2002, 12:39 PM
Just finished "Riding the Rap" by Elmore Leonard.

It was a very quick and enjoyable read.

bucksfan
07-22-2002, 01:04 PM
"Wilderness War" by Allan W. Eckert

Part of a series of narratives he wrote on how America came to be. Basically the series details the frontier period in America, up through the French/Indian war, Revolutionary War (this is the subject of Wilderness War), and so on. The author makes extensive use of old manuscripts, diaries, etc. to recreate conversation and thoughts to make this a very enjoyable though quite long history read. I really dig this stuff. Eckert takes no sides in any of this - just presents what happened based on historical records and what must have been an unimagineable amount of research.

This is the 4th book in the series I have read so far.

Dom Heffner
07-22-2002, 03:42 PM
I just finished Founding Brothers by Joseph Ellis and am now beginning another of his books, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson.

He has a book on John Adams that I am chomping at the bit to read.

After I finish these it is off to Setting the World Ablaze, another early republic book based on Washington, Adams, and Jefferson.

MWM
07-22-2002, 03:50 PM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by Dom Heffner:
<strong>I just finished Founding Brothers by Joseph Ellis and am now beginning another of his books, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson.

He has a book on John Adams that I am chomping at the bit to read.

After I finish these it is off to Setting the World Ablaze, another early republic book based on Washington, Adams, and Jefferson.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Dom,

I finished Founding Brother a few months ago. What did you think?

<small>[ 07-22-2002, 01:50 PM: Message edited by: MWM ]</small>

15fan
07-22-2002, 04:23 PM
Baseball As America.

The folks at National Geographic put it out within the last few months. Lots of 2-3 page takes on baseball being a part of the fabric of our country, etc. Even more important - there are pictures. LOTS of pictures (Willie Mays playing stickball, Satchel Paige warming up in Yankee Stadium, GIs playing ball in WWII, etc).

If I ever get to keep one of MY books on the coffee table, this will be it. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />

bucksfan
07-22-2002, 04:36 PM
That reminds me, 15fan, - my mom brought up a book for me a month or 2 ago. It was a color, hardcover book on baseball stadiums shaped partially like a baseball. A coffee-table book for my house if there ever was one. It has stayed there for a month now and Mres. bucksfan has yet to banish it to my "basket" underneath the coffee table.

<small>[ 07-22-2002, 02:36 PM: Message edited by: bucksfan ]</small>

Dom Heffner
07-22-2002, 05:20 PM
MWM,

I really enjoyed Founding Brothers. Joseph Ellis has become one of my favorite writers of history.

I liked the way he divided up the book into sections, and rather than give a chronological history lesson, he simply described a few events and what surrounded them: Hamilton and Burr's duel, the compromise made involving Hamilton's financial plan and Madison and Jefferson wanting the nation's capitol on the Potomac, etc.

I thought Ellis brought the seven people he discusses in the book to life.

If you can't tell, I really liked it.

The American Sphinx book is just as good if you haven't read it yet.

<small>[ 07-22-2002, 03:20 PM: Message edited by: Dom Heffner ]</small>

Guacarock
08-03-2002, 04:56 AM
Just finished two books by Eddie Muller -- "Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir" and "Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir." In the latter, Eddie interviews most of the surviving femme fatales from the Hollywood thrillers of the '40s and '50s, including Jane Greer, Evelyn Keyes, Audrey Totter and Ann Savage. Flinty, page-turning writing from the son of the famed San Francisco sports reporter.

Also got mesmerized by John Maclean's "Fire on the Mountain: The True Story of the South Canyon Fire." Solid investigative account of the Colorado firefighting disaster in which a blowup swallowed a crew of hotshots from Oregon. Tragic and timely. John's father Norman wrote the classic "A River Runs Through It."

Roy Tucker
08-12-2002, 02:03 PM
Decided to read books recommended by my family:

- Read Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" as recommended by my middle daughter. On our Boston/Cape Cod trip, we went to Concord and went to Orchard House (Orchard House web site (http://www.louisamayalcott.org/)). Thought it would be cool to read the book after seeing the desk where she wrote it. It was, since it is a semi-autobiographical novel and could relate a lot back to what we saw and heard. My youngest daughter is reading it now.

- Read "Owl in the Office" by Ben Baglio as recommended by my youngest daughter. It's part of the alliterative Animal Ark series (Piglet in the Playpen, Lamb in the Laundry, Puppies in the Pantry, etc.). I really liked it. Gently lays out ethical dilemmas and how kids deal with them. Well-told tale for young readers.

- Read "Under the Tuscan Sun" by Francis Maye on recommendation from my wife. Wow, what I'd give to go live that life for a while. My wife and I are setting up a fund for us to go to Tuscany (after sending our 3 kids to college :( ) Great book. Have the 2 sequels on the reading stack.

- Read "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros. It was my son's required summer reading and thought I'd read it with him. It is a series of short stories about a Hispanic girl growing up in Chicago. I liked it. My son said "it was a good book but I hated it".

- Read "Lucky Man" by Michael J Fox - was our book club July book - This turned out better than I thought. Fox has a keen eye for his celebrity and was bluntly honest than I thought he'd be.

Just ordered Clancy's "Red Rabbit" off Amazon. Looking forward to it.

bucksfan
08-12-2002, 02:10 PM
Originally posted by bucksfan
"Wilderness War" by Allan W. Eckert

Part of a series of narratives he wrote on how America came to be. Basically the series details the frontier period in America, up through the French/Indian war, Revolutionary War (this is the subject of Wilderness War), and so on. The author makes extensive use of old manuscripts, diaries, etc. to recreate conversation and thoughts to make this a very enjoyable though quite long history read. I really dig this stuff. Eckert takes no sides in any of this - just presents what happened based on historical records and what must have been an unimagineable amount of research.

This is the 4th book in the series I have read so far.

Still reading this. Told you it was long! :lol:

gm
08-12-2002, 08:19 PM
Lost Tales, Book 1 by JRR Tolkein (compiled by his son, Christopher)

In which I learned that as a youth JRR was profoundly influenced by...Finnish mythology (a very rare strain, that)

WebScorpion
09-13-2002, 05:18 PM
I'm reading Leonardo da Vinci's Complete Notes... you can too!

Free!

Project Gutenberg (http://gutenberg.net/)

Good place to get some of the older classics without spending all your savings. Sometimes I've just gotta have an old leatherbound book with musty pages, but I also find it comforting to have electronic copies of some of the classics. ;)

RANDY IN INDY
09-13-2002, 11:16 PM
Wooden- by Coach John Wooden

RBA
01-07-2005, 05:06 PM
Just started "Beyond Blame" by black conservative Armstrong Williams. He was a guest with Mike McConnell on WLW four or five years ago, and I'm just now getting around to reading his book that was discussed that day. It's a very revealing perspective of the problems that confront black folks in America today. I doubt those organizing the current boycots in Cincinnati would like what he has to say, though. So far I'm intrigued.


I wonder how much he was paid by the Bush Administration (and by the taxpayers) to say it? :allovrjr:

Cedric
01-07-2005, 05:12 PM
I'm reading Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton Bio. I just got done reading the Woodrow Wilson biography, good stuff.

SunDeck
01-03-2006, 07:02 PM
I am about a quarter through Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series. I'm on The Mauritius Command right now. Without a doubt, this is some of the best historical fiction, ever. O'Brian researched 18th century battles from original Royal Navy reports. His writing on seamanship is so good, you would think he spent his life aboard a fighting ship, when in fact he never sailed once.

registerthis
01-03-2006, 07:07 PM
Right now, I'm reading "Lies My History Teacher Told me" by James Loewen. It's immensely interesting...barely one chapter in and I've learned that Helen Keller was an avowed far-left Socialist who supported Lenin, and Woodrow Wilson was an unabashed racist who invaded Russia and enacted some of the most invasive and anti-civil rights legislation since the Alien and Sedition acts of 1789.

Just finished reading "In a Sunburned Country" by Bill Bryson, who took some time to travel through Australia and then, well, wrote about it. Interesting tidbit that I learned: in the 1960s, Australia had a Prime Minister named Harold Holt who went for a swim one morning and simply disappeared. He was never heard from again. Bryson makes two interesting points on that:

1- That such an event could even happen, and
2- That practically no one, in Australia or otherwise, even knows about it.

Great read, particularly if you have any interest in the land Down Under.

Crash Davis
01-03-2006, 07:50 PM
Right now, I'm reading "Lies My History Teacher Told me" by James Loewen. It's immensely interesting...barely one chapter in and I've learned that Helen Keller was an avowed far-left Socialist who supported Lenin, and Woodrow Wilson was an unabashed racist who invaded Russia and enacted some of the most invasive and anti-civil rights legislation since the Alien and Sedition acts of 1789.

Just finished reading "In a Sunburned Country" by Bill Bryson, who took some time to travel through Australia and then, well, wrote about it. Interesting tidbit that I learned: in the 1960s, Australia had a Prime Minister named Harold Holt who went for a swim one morning and simply disappeared. He was never heard from again. Bryson makes two interesting points on that:

1- That such an event could even happen, and
2- That practically no one, in Australia or otherwise, even knows about it.

Great read, particularly if you have any interest in the land Down Under.

I've read both of those in the past two years and enjoyed them. If you're looking for good light reading, Bryson's travel books are both fun and educational.

Crash Davis
01-03-2006, 07:59 PM
Currently re-reading Middlemarch by George Eliot. A 19th century classic, which was required reading for me several years ago. As predicted, it reads much better now that I'm older and am reading of my own volition. Eliot was just a phenomenal writer...blows me away how good she was.

Also reading:

Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare by Stephen Greenblatt. Pulitzer Prize Finalist in 2004 and an interesting look at Shakespeare's life and work taken together.

No Man Knows My History: The Life of Joseph Smith by Fawn M. Brodie. Originally written in 1945 and still one of the better American biographies. Yes, Mormonism, like all other major religions is based on a fairy tail.

The Ginger Man by J.P. Donleavy. Hilarious tail of Donleavy's anti-hero, Sebastian Dangerfield. And one of the Top 100 English language novels of the 20th century. Additionally, named in the recent Hunter S. Thompson pre-suicide Playboy interview as one of his all-time favorites.

westofyou
01-03-2006, 08:03 PM
No Man Knows My History: The Life of Joseph Smith by Fawn M. Brodie. Originally written in 1945 and still one of the better American biographies. Yes, Mormonism, like all other major religions is based on a fairy tail.The definitive book according to Jon Krakauer.

I'm currently reading:

Under the Banner of Heaven

Reefer Madness : Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market by Eric Schlosser

Until I Find You : by John Irving

and Mind Game by the BP Crew.

Betterread
01-03-2006, 10:04 PM
I just finished
Shalimar the clown by Salman Rushdie
I am currently reading
The Harmony Silk Factory by Tash Aw
and
Mourinho, Anatomy of a winner by Patrick Barclay
and
Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck
and waiting to read The Sea by John Banville
and
Russia under the Old Regime by Richard Pipes

snowstorm
01-03-2006, 11:05 PM
I'm reading Phil Jackson's book, The Last Season. It's the story of the 2003-2004 L.A. Lakers. It's very interesting (and funny, too).

Doc. Scott
01-04-2006, 02:31 PM
I do read heavy stuff from time to time, but I cannot tell a lie: I'm reading fantasy novels by George R.R. Martin (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books&field-author-exact=George%20R.R.%20Martin&rank=-relevance%2C%2Bavailability%2C-daterank/103-3560416-9843017). Robert Jordan (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books&field-author-exact=Robert%20Jordan&rank=-relevance%2C%2Bavailability%2C-daterank/103-3560416-9843017) lost me around book six.

Jaycint
01-04-2006, 02:52 PM
The Thousand Orcs - R.A. Salvatore

Crash Davis
01-04-2006, 03:52 PM
The definitive book according to Jon Krakauer.

I'm currently reading:

Under the Banner of Heaven

WOY,
That's pretty much how I was lead to it. I read Under the Banner of Heaven a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it. I filed the Fawn Brodie biography of Joseph Smith away as a book to pick up later...mostly because Krakauer was so impressed with it.

I was interested to see the reviews of Krakauer at the time, and that led me to some reviews on Brodie's biography. The reviews of Brodie & Krakauer pretty much went like this:

Strict Mormons: hated them both and couldn't believe the lack of faith and the utter disrepect shown towards Joseph Smith and the one true religion.

Any other educated human being: very impressed with both books and appreciative of the light shone on fundamentalism in general and the Morman faith specifically.

registerthis
01-04-2006, 03:59 PM
WOY,
That's pretty much how I was lead to it. I read Under the Banner of Heaven a couple of years ago and really enjoyed it. I filed the Fawn Brodie biography of Joseph Smith away as a book to pick up later...mostly because Krakauer was so impressed with it.

"Under the Banner..." is sitting on my coffee table and is next on my reading list. Personally, I quite like the idea of a religion founded by a man who has Magic Glasses.

Yachtzee
01-04-2006, 04:06 PM
"1776" by David McCulloch

Crash Davis
01-04-2006, 06:33 PM
"Under the Banner..." is sitting on my coffee table and is next on my reading list. Personally, I quite like the idea of a religion founded by a man who has Magic Glasses.

"Magic Underpants!"

I think that's the cartoon version of his life.

TRF
01-04-2006, 06:49 PM
The Two Georges by Harry Turtledove. I love Alternate History.

AJAX in Action. For the geek in me.

ochre
01-04-2006, 06:57 PM
I just finished
Shalimar the clown by Salman Rushdie

how'd you like that? I just finished it too. I thought it was pretty good. I found it to be an interesting narrative on Kashmir. Additionally it was, generally a pretty good story.

ochre
01-04-2006, 07:01 PM
Right now, I'm reading "Lies My History Teacher Told me" by James Loewen. It's immensely interesting...barely one chapter in and I've learned that Helen Keller was an avowed far-left Socialist who supported Lenin, and Woodrow Wilson was an unabashed racist who invaded Russia and enacted some of the most invasive and anti-civil rights legislation since the Alien and Sedition acts of 1789.


I recommend that book to nearly everybody I ever talk to. Almost literally. I'm sure I've annoyed some people by recommending it multiple times :).

Sweetstop
01-04-2006, 07:20 PM
Saving Fish From Drowning by Amy Tan currently
next...Our Endangered Values by Jimmy Carter
The Year Of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

TeamCasey
01-04-2006, 07:22 PM
My brother sent me the whole Robert Jordan set. I'll never read them.

Betterread
01-04-2006, 08:58 PM
how'd you like that? I just finished it too. I thought it was pretty good. I found it to be an interesting narrative on Kashmir. Additionally it was, generally a pretty good story.
Rushdie's writing is really enjoyable so it was time well spent to sit down with his latest opus. The parts about Kashmir were the most effective part of the novel for me. Max Ophul's history represented so many European and American archetypes for my taste (too symbolic?) and was the least effective aspect of the novel.

ochre
01-05-2006, 12:31 AM
Rushdie's writing is really enjoyable so it was time well spent to sit down with his latest opus. The parts about Kashmir were the most effective part of the novel for me. Max Ophul's history represented so many European and American archetypes for my taste (too symbolic?) and was the least effective aspect of the novel.
The featured characters were definitely allegorical to the particular nations/regions involved.

I think he did a nice job of weaving in the mystical, fantastical, and mundane to paint the picture of Kashmir. Weaving the unrest in LA into the picture late in the book kind of portrays anyone in the world as open to similar fates as the Kashmiris.

marcshoe
01-05-2006, 12:51 AM
Currently, "We Are Lincoln Men" by David Donald. I read his biography of Lincoln a couple of years ago, and was impressed with the way he presented the evolution of Lincoln's views on slavery, and showed how the supposedly impotent emancipation proclamation made abolition inevitable. I was also interested in the role Lincoln's secretaries Hay and Nicolay played, and am reading this (which I requested when asked what I wanted for Christmas) as a sort of a companion piece.

Haven't got to the part about the secretaries yet.

Crash Davis
02-17-2006, 06:07 AM
I am currently unemployed after a recent major move from Cincinnati to Savannah, Georgia. The predictable result is way too much time turning pages.

Recently finished:

Middlemarch, by George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans), 785 pages of outstanding fiction. Hyperbole alert: Written in 1873, I seriously believe this is the best ever piece of British fiction...and Dickens ain't a patch on Eliot's arse. This novel is one of the top two or three I've ever read. What the Bible has been throughout the last 1800 years for the common man, Middlemarch could well be for the literati of modern times. An all-encompassing scope of humanity.

The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World, by A.J. Jacobs. Chronicles this Esquire writer's pledge to read the complete Encyclopedia Brittanica from A to Z. Interesting enough and funny at times, smug and too waspy at others. Overall, a good bedtime or bathroom read.

Misfit: The Strange Life of Frederick Exley, by Jonathan Yardley

Last Notes From Home, by Frederick Exley

Exley is the author of late 60's cult classic A Fan's Notes, which has been for quite some time a true writer's favorite. I believe this book to be neck-and-neck with The Great Gatsby as the Greatest American Fiction. I can't recommend A Fan's Notes highly enough; unfortunately, Exley's subsequent attempts at fiction were major disappointments.

Recently started:

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Rabbit, Run by John Updike

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

bianchiveloce
02-17-2006, 07:31 AM
Steven Squyres' Roving Mars.


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1401301495/102-6835783-1645740?v=glance&n=283155

GIK
02-17-2006, 02:40 PM
I finished "Angels and Demons" a few weeks ago and am now on "The Da Vinci Code".

TeamBoone
02-17-2006, 04:06 PM
Aren't Dan Brown's books great?

GIK
02-17-2006, 04:33 PM
I really really liked "Angels", but I started "Da Vinci" a few weeks ago and put it down. Not sure why. I'm going to restart it tomorrow, though, and knock it out next week. I'd definitely like to get through it before the movie.

Sweetstop
02-17-2006, 05:13 PM
I am currently unemployed after a recent major move from Cincinnati to Savannah, Georgia. The predictable result is way too much time turning pages.

Recently finished:

Middlemarch, by George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans), 785 pages of outstanding fiction. Hyperbole alert: Written in 1873, I seriously believe this is the best ever piece of British fiction...and Dickens ain't a patch on Eliot's arse. This novel is one of the top two or three I've ever read. What the Bible has been throughout the last 1800 years for the common man, Middlemarch could well be for the literati of modern times. An all-encompassing scope of humanity.

The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World, by A.J. Jacobs. Chronicles this Esquire writer's pledge to read the complete Encyclopedia Brittanica from A to Z. Interesting enough and funny at times, smug and too waspy at others. Overall, a good bedtime or bathroom read.

Misfit: The Strange Life of Frederick Exley, by Jonathan Yardley

Last Notes From Home, by Frederick Exley

Exley is the author of late 60's cult classic A Fan's Notes, which has been for quite some time a true writer's favorite. I believe this book to be neck-and-neck with The Great Gatsby as the Greatest American Fiction. I can't recommend A Fan's Notes highly enough; unfortunately, Exley's subsequent attempts at fiction were major disappointments.

Recently started:

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Rabbit, Run by John Updike

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

You talked me in to reading Middlemarch. I've been meaning to forever. I'm also getting into Graham Greene finally. Your choices sound like a college Lit class. The three you recently started are all definitely worthwhile. I've also got all of Updike's Rabbit books on my to re-read list. Don't forget Anna Karenina, the recent translation by that couple captures Tolstoy well.

cinredsfan2000
02-17-2006, 08:40 PM
I really really liked "Angels", but I started "Da Vinci" a few weeks ago and put it down. Not sure why. I'm going to restart it tomorrow, though, and knock it out next week. I'd definitely like to get through it before the movie.


See with me it was the oppisite i picked up DA VINCI code and couldnt put it down.Where as with Angels i started it around thanksgiving and put it down .just finished it a couple days ago it didnt really grab me like Da vinci code did .
Now reading "the FIRM" by John Grisham for about the fith time or so

TeamBoone
02-17-2006, 09:14 PM
I really really liked "Angels", but I started "Da Vinci" a few weeks ago and put it down. Not sure why. I'm going to restart it tomorrow, though, and knock it out next week. I'd definitely like to get through it before the movie.

I'm like CRF, I couldn't put Da Vinci down. It hooked me in from the beginning. It was the first book by him I'd ever read. Afterward, I went out and bought some of his others... I haven't read Angels & Demons yet but I did read Digital Fortress and liked it very much as well.

Regarding Grisham, I loved The Firm... second to The Pelican Brief. I don't think his recent books hold a candle to his earlier ones.

Crash Davis
02-18-2006, 11:59 PM
I'm looking for a good read on the history of Africa since the beginning of European exploration and colonialism. I've read King Leopold's Ghost, but I'm looking for something a bit more comprehensive. Any suggestions?

If anybody has a suggestion for a good book on the history of Europe (East & West) over the past 400-500 years, I'm looking for something like that as well. I know Jacques Barzun has one on Western Civilization, and that may be my best bet...but I was looking for other options.

Thanks.

OldRightHander
02-21-2006, 02:09 PM
I'm currently reading Utah Beach by Joseph Balkoski. It's a nice non fiction account of the amphibious and airborne landings on June 6. It has a lot of excerpts from eye witness accounts. I also just finished The Pale Horseman by Bernard Cornwell, a good historical novel set in 9th century England. A couple weeks ago I read Time and Chance by Sharon Kay Penman which is about the early years of Henry II's reign and his squabbles with Thomas Becket. I would recommend any of the above.

Nugget
02-21-2006, 09:07 PM
A little more expansive that just the history of Europe but covers most of the western society and that's Paul Johnson's History of the Modern which is 1815-1850 his Modern Times. For American History his History of the American Peoples is a great read as well.

Jaycint
02-21-2006, 10:19 PM
Book Of The Dead, The Complete History of Zombie Cinema by Jamie Russell

Betterread
02-21-2006, 10:46 PM
[QUOTE=Crash Davis]I'm looking for a good read on the history of Africa since the beginning of European exploration and colonialism. I've read King Leopold's Ghost, but I'm looking for something a bit more comprehensive. Any suggestions?

If anybody has a suggestion for a good book on the history of Europe (East & West) over the past 400-500 years, I'm looking for something like that as well. I know Jacques Barzun has one on Western Civilization, and that may be my best bet...but I was looking for other options.

Thanks.[/QUOTE

It depends on the type of historical writing and scholarship you prefer. If you want a style that discusses its sources and gathers and analyzes data to support its conclusions, you must often endure a dry, dense academic writing style that takes concentration. I find Richard Pipes various books on Russian history to be written for a general audience yet still displaying good scholarship and so I have enjoyed them. Barzun's book is written in a light, readable style and emphasizes historical cultural achievements. Its probably not going to challenge any cultural norms you hold but it provides plenty of avenues for further reading.

Crash Davis
03-04-2006, 07:22 AM
In a cool little downtown Savannah bookstore I stumbled upon the Africa book for which I was searching. "White Nile" by Alan Moorehead, published in 1960 and about the mid to late 19th century search for the source of the Nile and the opening of Central Africa. Livingstone, Burton, Stanley, Speke, Baker, Gordon, et al. are covered along with many other interesting characters. This was a great read, and I stumbled on a few other books related to the topic...so I'll be back downtown next week looking for some filler material.

"White Nile" covered the area from the Nile to Zanzibar. "King Leopold's Ghost" covered the whole Congo region. Now I just need to find something interesting to cover the rest of Africa. I wouldn't mind a book that goes into more detail on the skirmishes leading up to and involving WWI in Africa.

What does Robert Redford call it in Out of Africa? "Just spoiled rich kids fighting over toys." Something like that.

nycredsfan
04-18-2006, 12:15 PM
Sorry to drag out an old thread, but has anyone on here read Haruki Murakami? Kafka on the Shore was the first of his books that I have read and have since spent the last six months reading through the rest. Holy smokes is he good.

Other books I have read recently and would recommend: In Persuasion Nation by George Saunders, Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace, Apex Hides the Hurt by Colson Whitehead, Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster

Again, sorry for the old thread, but I missed it the first couple times around love to see what people are reading (one of the true joys of riding the subway everyday).

SunDeck
04-18-2006, 12:21 PM
I'm still reading O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series. I'm on the 14th book. Don't know what I will do after that. This is some of the best writing I have ever encountered.

westofyou
04-18-2006, 12:28 PM
Still sifting slowly through Until I Find You : by John Irving (fiction just doesn't pull my strings lately)

Pennant Race by Jim Bronson
Branch Rickey by Arthur Mann

The Devil In The White City is in the cue

pedro
04-18-2006, 12:36 PM
I just read "Little Green Men" by Christopher Buckley. It was ok.

Before that I read "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" by Mark Haddon which I liked and "A Long Way Down" by Nick Hornby which was good too.

Puffy
04-18-2006, 12:37 PM
A book called, "Warlords: An Extraordinary Re-Creation of World War II Through the Eyes and Minds of Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, And Stalin"

Tells the story thru each man's eyes. Good stuff.

nycredsfan
04-18-2006, 12:40 PM
Still sifting slowly through Until I Find You : by John Irving (fiction just doesn't pull my strings lately)

Pennant Race by Jim Bronson
Branch Rickey by Arthur Mann

The Devil In The White City is in the cue

The Devil In the White City was very good. Along the same lines, I recently read Manhunt: The 12 Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer and found it quite entertaining.

RichRed
04-18-2006, 07:21 PM
Still sifting slowly through Until I Find You : by John Irving (fiction just doesn't pull my strings lately)

Pennant Race by Jim Bronson
Branch Rickey by Arthur Mann

The Devil In The White City is in the cue

I LOVE Pennant Race. My mom bought it for me at a yard sale for about 50 cents when I was a kid and I read it at least five times. Kind of an early-1960s Ball Four with tamer language.

BoydsOfSummer
04-18-2006, 10:18 PM
Concepts in Biology, it's a real page turner.

Crash Davis
04-20-2006, 01:10 AM
"Into the Country" by John McPhee
"Going to Extremes" by Joe McGinniss

Both are very good Alaskan travel books from the late 70s and were used by Brand & Falsey as the basis for the show "Northern Exposure".

"The Guns of August" by Barbara Tuchman about the outbreak of WWI.

pedro
04-20-2006, 01:12 AM
Dirty Job - by Christopher Moore.

Redsfaithful
04-20-2006, 01:47 AM
Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert A. Heinlein

Puffy
04-20-2006, 11:14 AM
Also reading "Summer of 49" by David Halberstam

pedro
04-20-2006, 11:24 AM
Also reading "Summer of 49" by David Halberstam

fantastic book!

Chip R
04-20-2006, 11:31 AM
Baseball Dynasties by Rob Neyer and Eddie Epstein
The Choice by Bob Woodward
Real Grass Real Heroes by Dom DiMaggio
The Majors by John Feinstein

RedsManRick
04-20-2006, 12:11 PM
FantasyLand: A season on baseball's lunatic fringe by Sam Walker
The World is Flat by Thomas L Freidman
Baseball Between the Numbers by BP Staff

cumberlandreds
04-20-2006, 01:44 PM
Just finished reading "Biggest Brother". It's a biography of Major Dick Winters from The Band of Brothers of 506 PIR during WWII. Excellent read especially if you like the mini series,Band of Brothers.

westofyou
04-20-2006, 02:01 PM
Just finished reading "Biggest Brother". It's a biography of Major Dick Winters from The Band of Brothers of 506 PIR during WWII. Excellent read especially if you like the mini series,Band of Brothers.
I saw that in the airport book store, looked through it, I love tha Mini Series, have the DVD and like those Ambrose books as well.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 02:05 PM
Little Dorrit

westofyou
04-20-2006, 02:08 PM
Little Dorrit
Davey Coppergirl is what my wife calls that.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 02:11 PM
Davey Coppergirl is what my wife calls that.

Better, IMO, than David Copperfield.

Hard Times is the balls, though.

Sweetstop
04-20-2006, 02:48 PM
The Jeff Daniel's character in "The Squid and the Whale", who is a writer and literary snob, tells his son that A Tale of Two Cities is "lesser-Dickens" and not to waste time w/ it. Somehow, it has fallen through the cracks of my reading. I've seen the movie w/ Ronald Colman and know the story is compelling. Should I waste my time? It's a far, far better thing...

vaticanplum
04-20-2006, 03:20 PM
Better, IMO, than David Copperfield.

Hard Times is the balls, though.

One of my two favorite writers ever. I just read Bleak House again a couple of weeks ago.

westofyou
04-20-2006, 03:25 PM
One of my two favorite writers ever. I just read Bleak House again a couple of weeks ago.
I couldn't get through that about a year ago, it sits aside with about 250 pages to go, and I too love Dickens.

westofyou
04-20-2006, 03:26 PM
The Jeff Daniel's character in "The Squid and the Whale", who is a writer and literary snob, tells his son that A Tale of Two Cities is "lesser-Dickens" and not to waste time w/ it. Somehow, it has fallen through the cracks of my reading. I've seen the movie w/ Ronald Colman and know the story is compelling. Should I waste my time? It's a far, far better thing...
Ughh that movie made me want to take a shower after I watched it.

vaticanplum
04-20-2006, 03:37 PM
Well, to combine the last two posts, Bleak House is good, but yes, a bit dry at times. But Tale of Two Cities is AMAZING, it's a good introduction to Dickens even though some people claim it to be the most un-dickenslike of Dickens. Flawed, but great. I hated it in high school, picked it up again as an adult, and couldn't believe how good it is. I finished it on a flight, just as it was landing, and was crying so much that the guy next to me flagged down a stewardess to get me tissues.

It's not his best book -- the girl character in particular is like a cardboard cutout -- but it's very emotional and covers a lot of ground. So yes, I think you should read it. Plow through it if it gets tough, because the end is great.

cumberlandreds
04-20-2006, 04:00 PM
I saw that in the airport book store, looked through it, I love tha Mini Series, have the DVD and like those Ambrose books as well.

I highly recomend it. Winters also has his own autoboigraphy out. I can't remember the name of the book. It just came out and I just got it. I will read it later this summer or fall and let you all know what it's like.

I pulled out Winters book last night,It's called Beyond Band of Brothers, The memiors of Dick Winters.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 04:04 PM
I mostly despise contemporary MFA fiction, but one of the greatest and most underrated books I've ever read is a book called State of Grace by Joy Williams (she's a mad genius and a brilliant teacher, btw--I speak from experience).

Rojo
04-20-2006, 04:31 PM
Reading the "The Iron Heel" by Jack London. It's London's little-known (buried?) dystopic novel of a future capitalist police-state. The Iron Heel predates Looking Backward, Brave New World and 1984.

Honestly, its not a great novel but still fascinating.

dsmith421
04-20-2006, 05:50 PM
Borges - Collected Fictions.

I have some weird dreams.

redsmetz
04-20-2006, 05:53 PM
Still sifting slowly through Until I Find You : by John Irving (fiction just doesn't pull my strings lately)

Pennant Race by Jim Bronson
Branch Rickey by Arthur Mann

The Devil In The White City is in the cue

I'm currently working on Game of Shadows about the organzied African American baseball.

pedro
04-20-2006, 08:43 PM
I mostly despise contemporary MFA fiction, but one of the greatest and most underrated books I've ever read is a book called State of Grace by Joy Williams (she's a mad genius and a brilliant teacher, btw--I speak from experience).

What is considered contemporary MFA fiction? Anyone who has a masters in fine arts?

are there particular authors that you are thinking of when you say this? Just curious.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 08:56 PM
That comment is pretty reductive, pedro, on my part. Sorry if it offended anyone. I guess I feel I can say it, having graduated from an MFA program. And it mostly applies to the poetry end of things, which I know much, much better than the current fiction scene.

It generally applies to extraordinarily careful, "little" books that eschew difficulty, complexity and most of all earnestness for flippancy, cynicism, and dullness. My wife and I call it "chucklehead" fiction. Too many people think that they're humorous. And they're just not. So they really need to stop trying.

Rojo
04-20-2006, 09:14 PM
It generally applies to extraordinarily careful, "little" books that eschew difficulty, complexity and most of all earnestness for flippancy, cynicism, and dullness. My wife and I call it "chucklehead" fiction. Too many people think that they're humorous. And they're just not. So they really need to stop trying.

Por ejemplo?

I have a bit of a complex around MFA as well. When I first moved to San Francisco, some girl told me she was moving back to NYC to pursue her MFA. "What's that?", I said. She looked at me like the propeller had just fallen from my beanie.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 10:49 PM
Por ejemplo?

I have a bit of a complex around MFA as well. When I first moved to San Francisco, some girl told me she was moving back to NYC to pursue her MFA. "What's that?", I said. She looked at me like the propeller had just fallen from my beanie.

Padgett Powell, Denis Johnson, and their legion of imitators. (Though, to be fair, Denis Johnson has written some beautiful poems).

nycredsfan
04-20-2006, 11:00 PM
That comment is pretty reductive, pedro, on my part. Sorry if it offended anyone. I guess I feel I can say it, having graduated from an MFA program. And it mostly applies to the poetry end of things, which I know much, much better than the current fiction scene.

It generally applies to extraordinarily careful, "little" books that eschew difficulty, complexity and most of all earnestness for flippancy, cynicism, and dullness. My wife and I call it "chucklehead" fiction. Too many people think that they're humorous. And they're just not. So they really need to stop trying.

Criticizing MFA fiction from Philadelphia. Is that you King Wenclas?

I agree with what you said, but was surprised you mentioned Denis Johnson (I thought Angels was a pretty great book). I thought you would be talking about the preciousness of McSweeney's and all those followers.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 11:08 PM
Criticizing MFA fiction from Philadelphia. Is that you King Wenclas?

I agree with what you said, but was surprised you mentioned Denis Johnson (I thought Angels was a pretty great book). I thought you would be talking about the preciousness of McSweeney's and all those followers.

Yes, McSweeney's and their ilk. I just don't like Johnson's little gimmicks in his fiction--he should have stuck with poetry. I understand why people like Johnson's fiction, it just does nothing for me.

But strangely, I really love Stanley Elkins, a proto-chucklehead, but a damn great mind; something about him I trust completely.

King Wenclas? Good one. No, I don't deride the program I went through--there's nothing wrong, in and of themselves, with MFA programs. Not in the least. And I don't begrudge rich folk for being great writers--Merrill was one of the greatest writers of the last 50 years.

nycredsfan
04-20-2006, 11:15 PM
Have you ever read George Saunders? He probably falls right into your chucklehead categorization, but is probably my favorite living writer (at least of short fiction). If you haven't, I would recommend the book Pastoralia and more specifically the story Sea Oak.

In all seriousness, being in Philadelphia do you know of the Underground Literary Alliance? I will refrain from commenting on it just in case.

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 11:18 PM
Have you ever read George Saunders? He probably falls right into your chucklehead categorization, but is probably my favorite living writer (at least of short fiction). If you haven't, I would recommend the book Pastoralia and more specifically the story Sea Oak.

In all seriousness, being in Philadelphia do you know of the Underground Literary Alliance? I will refrain from commenting on it just in case.

I've heard of ULA, sure. But I have nothing to do with it? Please don't refrain from commenting.

I've read some George Saunders. He's not odious. There are some fine practitioners of fiction out there, no question. I don't want to leave the impression that I chuck it all out the door. I quite love Kathryn Davis' work.

nycredsfan
04-20-2006, 11:28 PM
Wow, I am thrilled that you mentioned Kathryn Davis. I just finished The Thin Place not too long ago and was amazed. You are absolutely right about her. It's the only book of hers that I have read and I only read it because some of the litbloggers wouldn't shut up about how great it was. Do you have a suggestion on which of her books to read next?

I read quite a lot of contemporary fiction, but most of what I read is from the older writers. I can't stomach much of the young attractive New Yorker (place of residence, not magazine) type of fiction. I tried to read Indecision by Kunkel and wanted to cry at what gets hyped these days. I will stick with Murakami, Auster and the like.

I am impressed that you made it through an MFA. I went for a semester to Brooklyn College for an MFA and couldn't tolerate it.

As for the ULA, I actually agree with a lot of what they have to say, but they are so ridiculous about it that they will never be taken seriously. Did Dave Eggers steal this guy's girlfriend or what?

Falls City Beer
04-20-2006, 11:38 PM
Wow, I am thrilled that you mentioned Kathryn Davis. I just finished The Thin Place not too long ago and was amazed. You are absolutely right about her. It's the only book of hers that I have read and I only read it because some of the litbloggers wouldn't shut up about how great it was. Do you have a suggestion on which of her books to read next?

I read quite a lot of contemporary fiction, but most of what I read is from the older writers. I can't stomach much of the young attractive New Yorker (place of residence, not magazine) type of fiction. I tried to read Indecision by Kunkel and wanted to cry at what gets hyped these days. I will stick with Murakami, Auster and the like.

I am impressed that you made it through an MFA. I went for a semester to Brooklyn College for an MFA and couldn't tolerate it.

As for the ULA, I actually agree with a lot of what they have to say, but they are so ridiculous about it that they will never be taken seriously. Did Dave Eggers steal this guy's girlfriend or what?


I'd read Hell by K. Davis immediately. I have a good friend who is currently studying under Ms. Davis right now; he said she's a brilliant teacher in addition to being an astonishingly great writer.

The program that I went through was so absurdly poetry-oriented that it made for a tremendously supportive environment. I had it easy, I suppose.

nycredsfan
04-20-2006, 11:45 PM
I'd read Hell by K. Davis immediately. I have a good friend who is currently studying under Ms. Davis right now; he said she's a brilliant teacher in addition to being an astonishingly great writer.

The program that I went through was so absurdly poetry-oriented that it made for a tremendously supportive environment. I had it easy, I suppose.


Thanks. I'll grab it tomorrow. Working in a library can be quite convenient. Do you read much in the way of contemporary poetry? I don't really follow it much. Bob Creeley was my last connection to living poets, so when he died I was screwed.

letsgojunior
04-21-2006, 12:06 AM
Farnsworth, Young, and Sanger - Contracts
Rabin, Kwall, Rabin - Fundamentals of Modern Property Law

:(

redsmetz
04-21-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm currently working on Game of Shadows about the organzied African American baseball.

Made a mistake, I'm actually reading "Shades of Glory" about African American baseball history.

DropDocK
04-21-2006, 10:52 AM
The Devil In the White City was very good. Along the same lines, I recently read Manhunt: The 12 Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer and found it quite entertaining.


Another plug for Devil, fascinating book. I've heard rumors it's going to be made into a movie. The 12 day chase is on my to read list.

Right now, The Dead Beat by Marilyn Johnson. It's about obits and obit writers. Appreciated if you have an offbeat sense or humor or interests.

Alexander McCall Smith has a little series, not the lady detective series, but one about a German professor that is very amusing. There is Portuguese Irregular Verbs, The Finer Points of Sausage Dogs and a third title for which the name escapes me. He's also going to be in Fairfield soon, May 2, to talk about his works.

vaticanplum
04-24-2006, 05:27 PM
Made a mistake, I'm actually reading "Shades of Glory" about African American baseball history.

Well, I am reading Game of Shadows, so we've got it all covered. :)

Larkin411
04-24-2006, 09:39 PM
I just finished Anna Karenina which makes me very proud, that thing was looooong. Very good as well.

On the baseball side, I'm starting the new Andrew Zimbalist book, In the Best Interests of Baseball? The Revolutionary Reign of Bud Selig. I'm hoping it will be good since I've liked a lot of his other stuff.

Sweetstop
04-24-2006, 11:15 PM
I just finished Anna Karenina which makes me very proud, that thing was looooong. Very good as well.

On the baseball side, I'm starting the new Andrew Zimbalist book, In the Best Interests of Baseball? The Revolutionary Reign of Bud Selig. I'm hoping it will be good since I've liked a lot of his other stuff.

Was it the (Penguin Classic Deluxe Edition) Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translation of AK? It is superb. I read it last year and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Larkin411
04-25-2006, 08:47 PM
Was it the (Penguin Classic Deluxe Edition) Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translation of AK? It is superb. I read it last year and thoroughly enjoyed it.

That's the one! I really enjoyed it which was unexpected. I like my long, arty farty French novels but I'd never really tried the Russian stuff and was a little worried it would be too grim or boring. But it was great and now I really want to read more Ruskie Lit, just as soon as I finish the other 5 or 6 books that all need to be returned to the library in two weeks :) .

Falls City Beer
04-25-2006, 08:59 PM
That's the one! I really enjoyed it which was unexpected. I like my long, arty farty French novels but I'd never really tried the Russian stuff and was a little worried it would be too grim or boring. But it was great and now I really want to read more Ruskie Lit, just as soon as I finish the other 5 or 6 books that all need to be returned to the library in two weeks :) .

Read The Double by Dostoievsky. My favorite novella on earth.

DropDocK
04-25-2006, 09:28 PM
Russian literature is my favorite. I have a taste for tragedy.

Ibsen, playwright, is good as well. Hedda Gabler, A Doll's House.....

Rojo
04-25-2006, 09:32 PM
Crime and Punishment and Notes from the Underground are my one and two favorite books.

Freddie_Free
04-25-2006, 10:00 PM
Jose Garcia Marquez's 100 Years of Solitude

Crash Davis
04-26-2006, 12:53 PM
Jose Garcia Marquez's 100 Years of Solitude

Fantastic book. I think we had a discussion about that one on here a couple of years ago. I was reading it for the first time, and Roy Tucker recalled that it was a fine book but all he remembered was everyone being named some form of "Jose". That can be more than a little confusing.

One thing is for sure though: I've never read a book quite like this one. It's unique. If classic books were American cities, I think 100 Years of Solitude would be New Orleans.

this1belongs2
04-26-2006, 03:06 PM
Gotten into some Chuck Palahniuk lately (of "Fight Club" fame) - "Choke" and "Survivor" were great reads, I really like him, as far as modern writers go, bizarre but funny and thoughtful reads.

I love Palahnuick (Paula-nick)! Choke rocked!

creek14
05-22-2006, 06:19 PM
Shooter: The Autobiography of the Top-Ranked Marine Sniper

Falls City Beer
05-22-2006, 07:01 PM
Shooter: The Autobiography of the Top-Ranked Marine Sniper

For a minute, I thought "Shooter?" Must be the autobiography of the inimitable closer Rod Beck.

http://sportsmed.starwave.com/media/mlb/2003/0515/photo/g_beck_vi.jpg

westofyou
05-22-2006, 07:03 PM
I love Palahnuick (Paula-nick)! Choke rocked!
I used to work with a tech writer who worked with CP at Freightliner (where they both were tech writers) He claimed that CP was his mentor.

vaticanplum
05-22-2006, 07:10 PM
I am actually reading a book about the Cincinnati subway, interesting and very frustrating stuff. I am arming myself for my trip to the Queen City this weekend, I plan to try to get a feel from the locals why the city has been historically so averse to public transporation over the last century. I am kind of a public transportation nazi.