PDA

View Full Version : Republican Candidate Calls Bush Administration “Nazis”



RBA
06-23-2005, 03:18 PM
http://www.lincolntribune.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=1452
P (http://www.lincolntribune.com/modules/news/index.php?storytopic=14)olitics : Republican Candidate Calls Bush Administration “Nazis”
Posted by Editor (http://www.lincolntribune.com/userinfo.php?uid=1) on 2005/6/23 10:37:44
Cary, NC - A candidate for North Carolina Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court has announced on her campaign's blog that she is leaving the Republican Party and denounced the Bush administration's policy on troop withdrawal from Iraq. Rachel Lea Hunter, a Republican and a candidate for Chief Justice, likens Bush’s administration to the “Nazis” and says that all who disagree with the administration are being branded as “traitors”.

Hunter is an attorney in Durham, NC with the firm of Browne, Flebotte, Wilson, Horn & Webb. Hunter’s web page says she offers pre-paid legal services. Hunter ran unsuccessfully in 2004 for the North Carolina Appeals Court. She recently announced her intent to run for the Supreme Court.


In her statement, Hunter expresses anger at former Charlotte Mayor Richard Vinroot for unsubscribing to her campaign’s email list. Hunter, who is a former volunteer for Vinroot’s gubernatorial campaign, was angry that Vinroot asked to unsubscribe to her campaign’s email list after an announcement that she was recovering from a recent surgery.

Hunter continues her assault on other elected Republicans as well as party leaders. The letter launches criticisms at NCGOP Chairman, Ferrell Blount, for a lawsuit that was brought against the NC Republican party for an illegal contribution it received from a national group. The NC party agreed to pay a $10,000 fine and return the money. The GOP however never spent the money donated because of questions as to whether it was legal.

The statement also alludes to Hunter’s apparent departure from the Republican Party. She states that: “I will unsubscribe from the party. I do not want to be associated with such individuals as these any longer.”

The long tirade against Hunter’s political enemies even includes quotes attributed to her pet. While criticizing the Republicans throughout the state, Hunter says that: “Max the dog says, they will be reduced to four people meeting in a phone booth at this rate.”

The candidate also takes time to blame “COPAM” for past criticisms of Hunter. “COPAM” is an acronym passed along on Internet message boards for a number of Republican leaders and operatives in North Carolina. No such group officially exists but the myth of such an organization has been perpetuated by campaign operatives of Hunter’s organization.

Hunter does not allude to which party she may join when and if she leaves the Republican Party.

pedro
06-23-2005, 03:24 PM
I wish people would stop comparing anyone to Nazi's

It does nothing to advance dialogue.

TMBS, I agree that the GOP's alienation of anyone who isn't 100% on-board with Bush's agenda is disturbing.

RedFanAlways1966
06-23-2005, 03:31 PM
I wish people would stop comparing anyone to Nazi's

It does nothing to advance dialogue.

Absolutely.

Are we trying to compare this person to Rep. Rangel or any of the other "BIG HITTERS" in D.C.? If so, straws are being grasped. What is this woman's job right now? Is she currently holding office. WHAT?!?! A lawyer from NC. That sounds all too familiar to me. And what is she attempting to run for in some election somewhere?

Oh, but wait... she is leaving the Repubs!! Hmmmmm. Perhaps a title change is in order? Ah... don't wanna be a party-pooper!

Jaycint
06-23-2005, 03:33 PM
I wish people would stop comparing anyone to Nazi's



100% agreed, it's ridiculous and makes the person saying it look pretty unintelligent. There are plenty of ways to say you disagree with someone or their policies without resorting to name calling, especially on the level of comparing someone to a Nazi.

registerthis
06-23-2005, 03:36 PM
Seriously, the nazi comparisons have to stop. It's practically a nonchalant reference at this point to compare someone to Hitler, or the Nazis in general. All it does is alienate people who may otherwise be convinced by a constructive argument, and it serves to de-value the evils and atrocities committed by the Nazis.

That being said, i think she is exactly right when she says that the Bush Administration has been successful at labelling people who disagree with their policies as unpatriotic traitors. I get sick of that comparison, too.

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 03:42 PM
I wish people would stop comparing anyone to Nazi's


I only wish that people would stop comparing people who don't behave like Nazis to Nazis.

People who behave like Nazis should be called Nazis. Nazism isn't an exclusively historical (1936-1945) movement. You don't "stop" a political description. If the shoe fits....

What I want to stop is people saying you can't call hate-mongering, hyper-nationalistic, authoritarian regimes fascist or Nazi regimes. That would be the crime. That, because it represents some unspeakable evil, somehow the word itself prevents us from seeing the political form of Nazism in our contemporary lives. Nazism exists without ovens, Hitler, and Dachau.

pedro
06-23-2005, 03:47 PM
I only wish that people would stop comparing people who don't behave like Nazis to Nazis.

People who behave like Nazis should be called Nazis. Nazism isn't an exclusively historical (1936-1945) movement. You don't "stop" a political description. If the shoe fits....

What I want to stop is people saying you can't call hate-mongering, hyper-nationalistic, authoritarian regimes fascist or Nazi regimes. That would be the crime. That, because it represents some unspeakable evil, somehow the word itself prevents us from seeing the political form of Nazism in our contemporary lives. Nazism exists without ovens, Hitler, and Dachau.

See, I do equate Nazism with ovens, Hitler and Dachau.

If you want to call Bush a Fascist, now that's another story.......

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 03:52 PM
See, I do equate Nazism with ovens, Hitler and Dachau.

If you want to call Bush a Fascist, now that's another story.......

I'm not comparing Bush (or anyone--well, I'd compare some people to Nazis, but I'm not naming any names) to a Nazi, btw. Let me make that abundantly clear. So as not to be dinged or threatened with a booting-off.

Not trying to be a jerk, but Nazism is largely ahistorical--it's a political, in addition to being a historical, descriptor.

pedro
06-23-2005, 03:54 PM
Hey, if someone want to ding me for calling Bush a fascist have at it.

M2
06-23-2005, 03:58 PM
I only wish that people would stop comparing people who don't behave like Nazis to Nazis.

People who behave like Nazis should be called Nazis. Nazism isn't an exclusively historical (1936-1945) movement. You don't "stop" a political description. If the shoe fits....

What I want to stop is people saying you can't call hate-mongering, hyper-nationalistic, authoritarian regimes fascist or Nazi regimes. That would be the crime. That, because it represents some unspeakable evil, somehow the word itself prevents us from seeing the political form of Nazism in our contemporary lives. Nazism exists without ovens, Hitler, and Dachau.

Great post. Hypernationationalsim isn't pretty stuff. It can lead a nation to think it has the right to seize individual property or to elevate symbolism above individual liberties. It can cause leaders to suggest we the people need to sacrifice freedom for security. It make those leaders unaccountable for their actions, where all they have to do to explain themselves is to insist they're doing it for the greater good even if the rationale for their actions seems nonsensical. It can cause the majority to dump their wrath on smaller segments of society as immoral, impure and ruining the fabric of society itself.

Honestly, I'm shocked and amazed more people aren't up in arms about how far off the rails our government has gone (and I'm talking about both parties here). Democratic compliance is every bit as bad as Republican paternalism.

Jaycint
06-23-2005, 04:36 PM
That, because it represents some unspeakable evil, somehow the word itself prevents us from seeing the political form of Nazism in our contemporary lives.

See, when used in our political climate right now though the word Nazi is used to get a reaction and rise out of people which is inappropriate in my opinion. The people using it aren't using it to conjure up similarities between the political movements in 1930's Germany and current day America. They are using it to conjure images of concentration camp atrocities, Hitler, etc. etc. Anybody who thinks otherwise is letting their political partisanship blind them to the obvious.

M2
06-23-2005, 04:47 PM
They are using it to conjure images of concentration camp atrocities, Hitler, etc. etc. Anybody who thinks otherwise is letting their political partisanship blind them to the obvious.

To my reading, the NC judge mean it in exactly the way FCB was talking about. Her comments had everything to do paranoid autocracy and nothing to do with concentration camps and Hitler. IMO anyone taking this in the mass murder direction (though 100,000+ dead Iraqis might like to rise from the grave and argue that point) is doing that on their own initiative.

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 04:48 PM
See, when used in our political climate right now though the word Nazi is used to get a reaction and rise out of people which is inappropriate in my opinion. The people using it aren't using it to conjure up similarities between the political movements in 1930's Germany and current day America. They are using it to conjure images of concentration camp atrocities, Hitler, etc. etc. Anybody who thinks otherwise is letting their political partisanship blind them to the obvious.

I agree. I don't think any particular American politician fits the bill, but I sure as heck don't believe the word should be "off-limits."

If a person fits the bill, then he/she is a Nazi, plain and simple. And you don't have to run a concentration camp to be a Nazi--I can't stress that enough. Nazism grew out of some very simple political ideas, enumerated very nicely in M2's statement above; Nazism wasn't born the day the Nazis rolled through Poland--its seeds were planted much earlier, and its political "shape" was manifest, in many ways, in the seeds.

6 million dead Jews, Catholics, homosexuals, and mentally ill were the symptom, not the cause.

registerthis
06-23-2005, 04:51 PM
To my reading, the NC judge mean it in exactly the way FCB was talking about. Her comments had everything to do paranoid autocracy and nothing to do with concentration camps and Hitler.
Well, perhaps in her well-thought out speach that was what was intended...but I don't think there's much doubt that the first images conjured up in people's minds when they hear "Nazi" is that of concentration camp horrors. The Judge has a valid point, I believe. The average person on the street, however, won't initially equate Naziism with the stifling of dissent--but with the murder of 12 million people.

M2
06-23-2005, 04:56 PM
Well, perhaps in her well-thought out speach that was what was intended...but I don't think there's much doubt that the first images conjured up in people's minds when they hear "Nazi" is that of concentration camp horrors. The Judge has a valid point, I believe. The average person on the street, however, won't initially equate Naziism with the stifling of dissent--but with the murder of 12 million people.

I don't know. I think a large number of the people on the street understand more about the Nazi movement than you're giving them credit for. Clearly she wasn't talking about concentration camps, so hopefully those people who paid attention in high school will realize she's talking about the political mechanics of facism.

RedFanAlways1966
06-23-2005, 05:04 PM
Regardless of her interpretation... there are some things that should not be used for comparison. On the top of most people's list would be Nazi Germany. There really is no need to explain why. It was a very bad chapter in the history of mankind. Most people understand this. And make no mistake... when a politician-type uses it, it is purely for shock-value.

TABOO. That is an easy one-word description. And when you decide to get that shock-value by using it, you will end up worse off than before you said it in most cases. For good reason in my opinion.

Puffy
06-23-2005, 05:07 PM
6 million dead Jews, Catholics, homosexuals, and mentally ill were the symptom, not the cause.

Ahhhh, its so refreshing when someone actually uses the 6 million number correctly. I get so sick of people saying, "6 million jews were murdered in the Holocaust...."

It wasn't 6 million jews, it was 6 million people. Somewhere around 5 million of which were jewish obviously, so they deserve to be the prominent one mentioned, but still, try to explain to people that it wasn't 6 million jews and look out, cause you are in for an argument.

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 05:09 PM
Regardless of her interpretation... there are some things that should not be used for comparison. On the top of most people's list would be Nazi Germany. There really is no need to explain why. It was a very bad chapter in the history of mankind. Most people understand this. And make no mistake... when a politician-type uses it, it is purely for shock-value.

TABOO. That is an easy one-word description. And when you decide to get that shock-value by using it, you will end up worse off than before you said it in most cases. For good reason in my opinion.

Then it's a problem with the American public, a group so blinded by the connotation of the word "Nazism" that they can't dispassionately understand that the word is a political description with a clear set of behaviors and beliefs.

It's not "taboo."

registerthis
06-23-2005, 05:09 PM
It wasn't 6 million jews, it was 6 million people. Somewhere around 5 million of which were jewish obviously, so they deserve to be the prominent one mentioned, but still, try to explain to people that it wasn't 6 million jews and look out, cause you are in for an argument.
I believe it was 12 million people murdered overall by the Nazi regime (not all in death camps, obviously.)

6 million Jews, and 6 million gypsies, blacks, homosexuals, Arabs, etc.

RedFanAlways1966
06-23-2005, 05:12 PM
Then it's a problem with the American public, a group so blinded by the connotation of the word "Nazism" that they can't dispassionately understand that the word is a political description with a clear set of behaviors and beliefs.

It's not "taboo."

I am sorry that you see it that way. I am afraid that you are in a small minority. But that is your right. Sure... just a word that does not imply murdering Jews, homosexuals and people deemed not worthy to live. But to many people in this WORLD it goes deeper. That is a fact. Like it or not.

Puffy
06-23-2005, 05:14 PM
I believe it was 12 million people murdered overall by the Nazi regime (not all in death camps, obviously.)

6 million Jews, and 6 million gypsies, blacks, homosexuals, Arabs, etc.

I'm pretty sure the 6 million "Holocaust" number is the death camps. And among those 6 million were the groups FCB mentioned. There is also no completely accurate numbers of the breakdowns, but like I stated I think the 6 million holocaust deaths included 4.8-5.2 million jews.

FCB probably knows better than I though

registerthis
06-23-2005, 05:18 PM
Well, this website (http://www.holocaustforgotten.com/) lists the totals as 5.8 million Jews, and 5 million "non-Jews" (the people listed above). If this can be considered an authoritative source.

BTW--does this conversation seem as ridiculous to you as it does to me? Are we REALLY arguing about the appropriate number of MILLIONS who were killed? :eek:

Lest anyone forget how awful that regime truly was.

RedFanAlways1966
06-23-2005, 05:34 PM
Lest anyone forget how awful that regime truly was.

Thank you. The reason that most people consider using it as a comparison to almost anything is TABOO.

Rojo
06-23-2005, 05:39 PM
One death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic - Joe Stalin.

Anyhow, there's plusses and minuses to using words like Fascist and Nazi. First of all, you get noticed. How better to get the lazy media to pay attention to an issue than to start name-calling.

The negative: you lose credibility. Its like the word "conspiracy". Hillary Clinton was essentially correct about the "vast right wing conspiracy", she just should've chosen a different word.

RedsBaron
06-23-2005, 05:44 PM
Whenever I hear any speaker calling someone else a "Nazi" or a "Fascist" or a "Communist", the speaker pretty much loses me right there.
I'm not saying namecalling doesn't work with some. I don't care for it.

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 05:53 PM
Whenever I hear any speaker calling someone else a "Nazi" or a "Fascist" or a "Communist", the speaker pretty much loses me right there.
I'm not saying namecalling doesn't work with some. I don't care for it.

The problem is believing these words to be "bad words." Sometimes these words simply convey the truth. Which IS a shame; it shouldn't cut into someone's credibility if he/she calls a fascist a fascist. But it just goes to show that if enough people are told often enough that they "can't" say this or that, they'll believe it. The truth-value of a word crumbles. Shame. It's a perfectly useful word to describe real-world behaviors. Not simply the visions of Steven Spielberg.

Falls City Beer
06-23-2005, 05:57 PM
Lest anyone forget how awful that regime truly was.

No danger there. I think my position is the strongest argument FOR not forgetting.

registerthis
06-23-2005, 06:00 PM
No danger there. I think my position is the strongest argument FOR not forgetting.
I know, FCB...hope you don't think I was implying otherwise.

Sometimes the whole ridiculousness of that event just hits me.

Falls City Beer
06-24-2005, 12:17 AM
Speaking of word-twisting, what's up with all the news sources calling that Killen guy from Mississippi (who killed the civil rights workers) an "ex" or "former" Klan member? Are you kicked out for not paying dues? Don't you have to renounce the Klan's philosophies to be a "former" or "ex" Klansmen? Is there a Klan Kard? Personally, I think that if you're an adult and you choose to be a Klansman that label should follow you to the grave.

cincinnati chili
06-24-2005, 12:36 AM
I've read that there were over 19 million Soviet civilians killed in World War II. I'm pretty sure the 6 million estimate only pertains to the camps.

RedsBaron
06-24-2005, 07:04 AM
Speaking of word-twisting, what's up with all the news sources calling that Killen guy from Mississippi (who killed the civil rights workers) an "ex" or "former" Klan member? Are you kicked out for not paying dues? Don't you have to renounce the Klan's philosophies to be a "former" or "ex" Klansmen? Is there a Klan Kard? Personally, I think that if you're an adult and you choose to be a Klansman that label should follow you to the grave.
There is at least one adult who chose to be a Klansman, and who wrote a letter condemning the "mongrelization" of the nation that would occur through integration, who serves in the U.S. Senate even today. This same Senator voted against the 1964 Civil Rights Act and also voted against every African-American ever nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court. The label may follow him to the grave, but he has prospered anyway.

cincinnati chili
06-24-2005, 08:32 AM
There is at least one adult who chose to be a Klansman, and who wrote a letter condemning the "mongrelization" of the nation that would occur through integration, who serves in the U.S. Senate even today. This same Senator voted against the 1964 Civil Rights Act and also voted against every African-American ever nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court. The label may follow him to the grave, but he has prospered anyway.

Robert Byrd?

I have no love for the guy, but haven't there only been 2 African Americans ever nominated to the Supreme Court? (both confirmed)

RedFanAlways1966
06-24-2005, 09:00 AM
Speaking of word-twisting, what's up with all the news sources calling that Killen guy from Mississippi (who killed the civil rights workers) an "ex" or "former" Klan member? Are you kicked out for not paying dues? Don't you have to renounce the Klan's philosophies to be a "former" or "ex" Klansmen? Is there a Klan Kard? Personally, I think that if you're an adult and you choose to be a Klansman that label should follow you to the grave.

I am surprised to hear this from you. I thought I have heard you mention that your life involves helping others to find work after they have received rehabilitation for crimes they committed. Along the same vein... should future employers not trust people who once saw crime as a means to support themselves? You seem to be saying that we should "scarlett letter" people who were Klan members. I personally wouldn't mind it, since I have no tolerance for people who do and join ignorant things. Regardless of their reason(s) for doing these ignorant things.

On a side note... the Klan used to be a real popular thing in Ohio way back when in the early 1900's. It was more about having an organization to rival the Catholics org. called The Knights of Columbus. For awhile in some parts it was all about hatred of Catholics and not so much the things that we normally associate with the KKK. I had a great aunt who passed away back in the late 1980's. I went with my father to Jackson, Ohio where she lived to help cleanup her house for sale. She had gobs of junk in her cellar. I found a box full of KKK literature and other items. I was shocked. My father explained that her late husband was a member as were most of the males in his family. Later I took some time to study this junk. Everything in it was about raising a good family and a hatred for Catholics. Nothing about black Americans or Jews or anything that we normally think. There were even handwritten notes about certain men in the area that were confronted for beating on their wife. It was interesting to say the least. Different times back then of course, but still a very bad thing (esp. today!).

RedFanAlways1966
06-24-2005, 09:03 AM
... but haven't there only been 2 African Americans ever nominated to the Supreme Court? (both confirmed)

Yes. Despite the far-reaching efforts of one political party and a woman who was jilted in love to stop the nomination of one of these fine men.

I will not mention any names! :)

Falls City Beer
06-24-2005, 10:01 AM
I am surprised to hear this from you. I thought I have heard you mention that your life involves helping others to find work after they have received rehabilitation for crimes they committed. Along the same vein... should future employers not trust people who once saw crime as a means to support themselves? You seem to be saying that we should "scarlett letter" people who were Klan members. I personally wouldn't mind it, since I have no tolerance for people who do and join ignorant things. Regardless of their reason(s) for doing these ignorant things.

On a side note... the Klan used to be a real popular thing in Ohio way back when in the early 1900's. It was more about having an organization to rival the Catholics org. called The Knights of Columbus. For awhile in some parts it was all about hatred of Catholics and not so much the things that we normally associate with the KKK. I had a great aunt who passed away back in the late 1980's. I went with my father to Jackson, Ohio where she lived to help cleanup her house for sale. She had gobs of junk in her cellar. I found a box full of KKK literature and other items. I was shocked. My father explained that her late husband was a member as were most of the males in his family. Later I took some time to study this junk. Everything in it was about raising a good family and a hatred for Catholics. Nothing about black Americans or Jews or anything that we normally think. There were even handwritten notes about certain men in the area that were confronted for beating on their wife. It was interesting to say the least. Different times back then of course, but still a very bad thing (esp. today!).

Like I said in my post, if you publicly renounce your decision to join the Klan and live a life afterwards dedicated to changing your ways, I would consider that contrition. But clearly Killen doesn't fit that bill. That's all I'm saying.

Falls City Beer
06-24-2005, 10:06 AM
There is at least one adult who chose to be a Klansman, and who wrote a letter condemning the "mongrelization" of the nation that would occur through integration, who serves in the U.S. Senate even today. This same Senator voted against the 1964 Civil Rights Act and also voted against every African-American ever nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court. The label may follow him to the grave, but he has prospered anyway.

Byrd's a monster. Just like Helms and Strom Thurmond and John Ashcroft.

registerthis
06-24-2005, 10:12 AM
Yes. Despite the far-reaching efforts of one political party and a woman who was jilted in love to stop the nomination of one of these fine men.

I will not mention any names! :)
Like Eugene Robinson once wrote:

Clarence Thomas is the whitest black man I know.

Chip R
06-24-2005, 10:44 AM
Honestly, I'm shocked and amazed more people aren't up in arms about how far off the rails our government has gone (and I'm talking about both parties here). Democratic compliance is every bit as bad as Republican paternalism.You can get away with stuff like that when there's a war on. Alien and Sedition act (although there wasn't a hot war going on there sure was a cold one), suspension of habeus corpus writs during the Civil War, internment camps during WWII, the HUAC during the Cold War, all the crap LBJ and Nixon pulled during Vietnam. The government can justify this by saying that there's a war on and if you don't accept this kind of stuff the enemy will win. If you dissent you appear to be unpatriotic, a troublemaker, or even a war criminal. Most governments engaging in such practices will use that fear to their political advantage.

Jaycint
06-24-2005, 11:44 AM
Like I said in my post, if you publicly renounce your decision to join the Klan and live a life afterwards dedicated to changing your ways, I would consider that contrition. But clearly Killen doesn't fit that bill. That's all I'm saying.

Maybe he said somewhere along the line recently that he renounced his membership in the KKK just to make himself look better for his trial. I don't know, just speculation. I know if I was facing life in prison I would be pulling out every trick in the book to get out of it. Not saying he was sincere if he DID happen to renounce his membership, just that maybe he did in order to look better before the jury.

RedFanAlways1966
06-24-2005, 11:45 AM
Like Eugene Robinson once wrote:
Clarence Thomas is the whitest black man I know.

What? You mean that safety for the Atlanta Falcons who was arrested for soliciting an undercover cop posing as a prostitute the night before the biggest game of his pro career?!?

;) :devil:

Falls City Beer
06-24-2005, 11:49 AM
Maybe he said somewhere along the line recently that he renounced his membership in the KKK just to make himself look better for his trial. I don't know, just speculation. I know if I was facing life in prison I would be pulling out every trick in the book to get out of it. Not saying he was sincere if he DID happen to renounce his membership, just that maybe he did in order to look better before the jury.

I agree. There's nothing to go on in this world but a man's words and his actions. He could have, but I've not read one scrap that says he is contrite or that he's renounced his membership. And yeah, it may just be a ploy if he was to do it.

If anything, his attitude has shown a considerable amount of intransigence and stubbornness, not typically the hallmarks of contrition.

RedsBaron
06-24-2005, 10:28 PM
Robert Byrd?

I have no love for the guy, but haven't there only been 2 African Americans ever nominated to the Supreme Court? (both confirmed)
Yep. Byrd voted against both.
I don't know Byrd's heart. Maybe he really has changed, but he was in his mid to late 20s when he was active in the KKK, so he wasn't a mere kid. That said, it was a long time ago, so I may be unfair to him bringing his KKK membership up.
I've always thought certain politicians of Byrd's former era were opportunists first and racists second. I'm particularly thinking of Strom Thurmond and George Wallace. Both initially built their politcal careers on racism, but when the political winds changed, they then welcomed support from African-Americans. If Wallace had thought that there were more votes in supporting rather opposing integration in 1963, he probably would've been opening the school house door rather than blocking it.
Of course, after his death we learned that Thurmond was receptive to African-Americans in certain ways even early in his career.

GAC
06-26-2005, 10:05 AM
The average person on the street, however, won't initially equate Naziism with the stifling of dissent--but with the murder of 12 million people.

But simply trying to stifle dissent is not a characteristic solely equated to Nazism. And that is why the term should not be thrown around so loosely. Even democracies stifle certain types of dissent. Even political parties do it to those within their own party over ideological differences. The judicial branch does it. It's evident everywhere.

Also- it's HOW (tactics used) that dissent is being stifled. The Nazi's terrorized, intimidated, and tried to isolate those within their society (Jews). And when that didn't prove effective, they isolated, tortured, experimented on, and murdered mercilessly. It was nothing short of pure, unadulterated evil. Hitler was a disturbed psychopath/madman.

Anything close/similar to that happening in this country? No.

Sometimes my teenagers think their Mom and Dad are members of the Nazi party simply by the rules we set within this household. :lol:

It seems the term Nazi was thrown out a few years ago at this adminstration, and now it's kinda caught on as a "catch phrase" due to the sensationalism it brings.

Those using it know exactly why, and the intent, for why they are using it.... to malign. Pure and simple. Either that, or they are just simply ignorant of what a Nazi is, and what is identified with that ideology.

It's sad.

Jaycint
06-26-2005, 11:08 AM
Great post GAC, that is pretty much what I was trying to get at but failed to word it quite as well.