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DoogMinAmo
06-26-2005, 06:05 AM
Hello, My name is Sam, and I am non-partisan.

I have read the emotional political debates, and end up more confused than knowledgable. Growing up with well-to-do friends, I associated with Republicans, but without knowledge of what it represented. In college, I found myself surrounded by the opposite, without knowing how and why.

So that leaves me where I am now, without a party to call my own. With only the current regime during which I am politically aware/ curious, I do not want to pass judgement without full understanding of the two +. I realize there are conservative and liberalfactions of both, and of those two choices I am definitely of the liberal persuasion, but parties, no idea.

So can you help me out? This is not recruitment, or a bash session. This is not an opportunity to call people or party members out. Please let me know what is it is about each party that makes it your own. Why are you a ____?

Thanks.

zombie-a-go-go
06-26-2005, 06:36 AM
I'm an independent, because I don't blindly vote down a party line. And if I don't know enough about a particular race to make an informed decision, I don't vote on it.

*I am a registered Republican, but I registered to vote a long time ago.

MrCinatit
06-26-2005, 09:08 AM
i would also be classified as non-partisan. i cannot find myself ever being one who would blindly stick with one party, and to vote for that party no matter how dirty, crooked nor incompetent. and believe me when i say, both parties have equal amounts of dirt, crooks and incompetence to fullful such duties for 10 parties.
unfortunately in my opinion, it seems lately, one is found voting for the candidate which sucks the least, rather than who is most qualified. a sad statement on our political climate today, IMHO.

Jaycint
06-26-2005, 09:57 AM
I'm a libertarian . My party strives to create as much personal as well as economic freedom of choice as possible. Government in its smallest form is also a big draw for me.

savafan
06-26-2005, 01:14 PM
I'm an independent, because I don't blindly vote down a party line. And if I don't know enough about a particular race to make an informed decision, I don't vote on it.

*I am a registered Republican, but I registered to vote a long time ago.

I'm a carbon copy of zombie.

RosieRed
06-26-2005, 02:17 PM
I'm a registered Democrat, but tend to call myself an independent. I am definitely liberal. I don't always vote a straight Dem ticket, but if I stray from Democrats it's usually in favor of third-party candidates. (Though I have voted for a Republican here or there ... Pataki comes to mind, when I lived in NY.)

I don't agree with every single thing the Democratic party represents, and the party is definitely facing some pretty big problems right now IMO. But they seem to be the closest match to my views on big issues, such as gay rights, abortion, stem-cell research, education, economy, health care, taxes, etc.

For me personally, there are some issues on which I won't budge, namely abortion and gay rights. That is not to say those two issues are the only thing I judge political candidates on; just that those issues are very important to me, and are examples of why I almost always vote for Democrats.

Redsfaithful
06-26-2005, 02:21 PM
Here's a question for independents. How can you possibly vote for people in two different parties when the parties are so often polar opposites?

I'm not talking about local elections here where party affiliation doesn't matter really. House on up only. I really don't get it, it seems pretty schizo to me.

MrCinatit
06-26-2005, 08:28 PM
Here's a question for independents. How can you possibly vote for people in two different parties when the parties are so often polar opposites?

I'm not talking about local elections here where party affiliation doesn't matter really. House on up only. I really don't get it, it seems pretty schizo to me.

it actually is not what is left or right, it is what is wrong and right - at least in the eyes of the beholder. one party is not always right, one party is not always wrong.

Redsfaithful
06-26-2005, 08:33 PM
it actually is not what is left or right, it is what is wrong and right - at least in the eyes of the beholder. one party is not always right, one party is not always wrong.

Both parties are relatively consistent with what they believe. Voting a mixed ticket doesn't make sense to me, as it's voting for two different schools of political thought at the same time.

I tend to think people who are "independents" actually do most of their voting based on personality and not issues. Feel free to prove me wrong, that's what I was getting at with the original question.

MWM
06-26-2005, 08:45 PM
What do you do when you agree with one party on social issues and another on fiscal issues?

KronoRed
06-26-2005, 08:48 PM
What do you do when you agree with one party on social issues and another on fiscal issues?
What I do is weigh it...are the social issues really going to be changed if party A is in power? or is there more a chance that the fiscal issues would be changed if party B is in power?

Falls City Beer
06-26-2005, 08:52 PM
Both parties are relatively consistent with what they believe. Voting a mixed ticket doesn't make sense to me, as it's voting for two different schools of political thought at the same time.

I tend to think people who are "independents" actually do most of their voting based on personality and not issues. Feel free to prove me wrong, that's what I was getting at with the original question.

I don't know what motivates independents either. Independent of what? Wouldn't you be able to construct a list of issues, have an independent answer where he/she falls on each issue, and then determine, roughly, where he/she lands to the right or left of center? I mean, I understand creating a party either more liberal or more conservative than either party as it stands right now, but from centrist to middle right and middle left, the Republican and Democratic Parties run the gamut.

pedro
06-26-2005, 09:55 PM
I'm a democratic because I've read "The Jungle" and I believe that there is a place in Government for regulation and social programs for the poor.

Do I think the execution of entitlements in this country is wasteful and abused? Of course.

Does that mean I'm going to put my faith in private industry to do things I feel are the governments job? Absolutley not.

Redsfaithful
06-26-2005, 10:05 PM
What do you do when you agree with one party on social issues and another on fiscal issues?

I don't think you can. Neither party is terribly fiscally conservative, they just disagree when it comes to deciding where the money should be going.

MWM
06-26-2005, 10:07 PM
What about globalization? They certainly disagree on that. And that's a pretty darn important issue to me.

Larkin Fan
06-26-2005, 10:26 PM
Both parties are relatively consistent with what they believe. Voting a mixed ticket doesn't make sense to me, as it's voting for two different schools of political thought at the same time.

And voting a straight ticket because the candidate is in an individual's political party doesn't make sense to me, but that's because each of us is allowed to feel differently about given things. I've found that many candidates hold positions on some issues that are entirely different than the general consensus of their party. I vote merely on who I feel can get the job done,


I tend to think people who are "independents" actually do most of their voting based on personality and not issues. Feel free to prove me wrong, that's what I was getting at with the original question.

I think you'd be surprised. I couldn't care less about a candidate's personality. I gather the facts and vote strictly on the positions that I agree with/disagree with. And most independents I know do the very same thing. I'm not going to vote for someone just because they're in a certain party. That makes little sense to me, but it honestly doesn't bother me because everyone is entitled to vote the way they see fit. I just don't think it's fair to label independents as people that have no clue about the issues and vote merely on personality.

Johnny Vander m
06-26-2005, 11:22 PM
I have always been and voted Conservative Repulican but agree with Redsfaithful on Independents. However if the Libertarians ever had a good canadate I would vote that way.

Redsfaithful
06-26-2005, 11:43 PM
What about globalization? They certainly disagree on that. And that's a pretty darn important issue to me.

They do? They both seem pro-globalization to me. Yeah the Democrats make noise about outsourcing, but I sincerely doubt they'll ever do anything about it. Clinton and NAFTA and all.

GAC
06-27-2005, 08:41 AM
If you vote a straight party ticket, then aren't you then accused of being a mindless lackey?

Chip R
06-27-2005, 09:28 AM
Here's a question for independents. How can you possibly vote for people in two different parties when the parties are so often polar opposites?
Because you can't paint every candidate with the broad brush you paint their respective parties with. Would you say someone like Zell Miller represents what the Democratic party stands for? What about a John McCain who isn't the typical Republican. Some would say the President isn't a typical Republican except on moral issues. And, of course, there are personal issues. Many Republicans* wouldn't vote for the President because they felt he lied about Iraq. But I think some Democrats* voted for him because they felt he would be a better option in the War on Terror.

* Independendents who lean toward that particular party.

Roy Tucker
06-27-2005, 09:43 AM
Not registered as either Republican or Democrat. I was a card-carrying liberal hippie as a youth (voted for George McGovern and John Anderson) and have grown more conservative as I get older.

Because of selfish reasons (trying to preserve my hard-earned assets and care for my family trumps giving to social programs), I vote more Republican than Democrat these days.

Philosophically, I'm getting more libertarian and basically want Goverment to get the hell out of everyones business.

Redsfaithful
06-27-2005, 01:42 PM
Because you can't paint every candidate with the broad brush you paint their respective parties with. Would you say someone like Zell Miller represents what the Democratic party stands for? What about a John McCain who isn't the typical Republican. Some would say the President isn't a typical Republican except on moral issues. And, of course, there are personal issues. Many Republicans* wouldn't vote for the President because they felt he lied about Iraq. But I think some Democrats* voted for him because they felt he would be a better option in the War on Terror.

* Independendents who lean toward that particular party.

You're right, but at the same time I think guys like Miller and McCain are extremely rare and generally mostly talk. McCain has a pretty consistently conservative voting record. Just because he's willing to badmouth Republicans doesn't make him someone a left leaning person should be willing to vote for, if we're dismissing personality from the equation.

I'm convinced Miller has dementia or something, 9/11 really made him do a 180 in a lot of ways.

But anyway, the vast majority of politicians vote with their party. So voting for a mixed ticket still doesn't make sense to me.

Again I'm talking the upticket races, House of Rep. on up.

If you vote for Voinovich for your Senator and then vote for a Democrat as your Rep. then you're voting for two entirely different visions of government. I truly think the vast majority of people who vote that way are voting purely on personality. Voting for "the man" not the party and what not, even though the man is going to vote with his party 90+ percent of the time.

registerthis
06-27-2005, 02:08 PM
If you vote for Voinovich for your Senator and then vote for a Democrat as your Rep. then you're voting for two entirely different visions of government.
To be fair, though, Voinovich has done a good job sticking with Dems on the Bolton confirmation. A bit surprising to me, really.

TeamCasey
06-27-2005, 03:27 PM
I'm with Rosie.

RedFanAlways1966
06-27-2005, 03:39 PM
To be fair, though, Voinovich has done a good job sticking with Dems on the Bolton confirmation. A bit surprising to me, really.

Sen. DeWine & Sen. Voinivich will never receive a vote from me again. I feel very betrayed... as every Ohio-R should.

And you can mark that 1st sentence of mine as a truthful statement... unlike the statements of most who sit in the Senate Chambers. Never will there be a hole next to their name on my card. And I won't try to blame hanging chads (or any other LAME excuse). NO VOTE FOR THEM!

Chip R
06-27-2005, 04:34 PM
Sen. DeWine & Sen. Voinivich will never receive a vote from me again. I feel very betrayed... as every Ohio-R should.

And you can mark that 1st sentence of mine as a truthful statement... unlike the statements of most who sit in the Senate Chambers. Never will there be a hole next to their name on my card. And I won't try to blame hanging chads (or any other LAME excuse). NO VOTE FOR THEM!A lot feel the same about Bob Taft too. I heard something last week that his approval rating was at 19%. :eek: And it isn't getting any better for Taft either.

RedFanAlways1966
06-27-2005, 07:48 PM
A lot feel the same about Bob Taft too. I heard something last week that his approval rating was at 19%. :eek: And it isn't getting any better for Taft either.

Yep and you can include me in that 81 percentile. I do believe Gov. Tax is out of terms for Gov. in Ohio. I am not sure of his future aspirations, but he had better stay in the private business sector or live off the Taft money. It seems as though he has not only shot his political foot, but put it through the woodchipper as well.

SunDeck
06-28-2005, 02:55 PM
I have come to the conclusion that I am an independent. I'm a leftist on some things (like health insurance), but pretty conservative about other things. The Republican marriage of the religious right and the old fashioned fiscal conservatives leaves me sick to my stomach, but the left wing anti-realist, anti-growth, anti, anti, anti, anti has always seemed too pessimistic for me. I'm a growth guy, an optimist, but I don't like people telling me their God should be running rough-shod over the rights of women, gays and anyone else who doesn't fit into their anachronistic portrait of America. So color me and Indie voter, keep my taxes low and don't forget that this is a big, big colorful boat that we call the USA.

Rojo
06-28-2005, 05:12 PM
I'm registered Democratic, vote for the party consistently and occassionally mark my ballot Green. I've never voted Republican.

I look at it like this: until we change the actual architechture of elections, we're pretty much stuck with two choices. And I'd much rather cast my vote to the left end of the spectrum whomever that is and that's usually a Democrat. If I have a choice between indistinquishable Republican/Democratic centrists, I'll pick a Democrat every time because they'll help the party that's closest to my beliefs.

Red Leader
06-28-2005, 05:21 PM
Not registered as either Republican or Democrat. I was a card-carrying liberal hippie as a youth (voted for George McGovern and John Anderson) and have grown more conservative as I get older.

Because of selfish reasons (trying to preserve my hard-earned assets and care for my family trumps giving to social programs), I vote more Republican than Democrat these days.

Philosophically, I'm getting more libertarian and basically want Goverment to get the hell out of everyones business.

I am the same as Roy, even though I wasn't old enough to vote for McGovern or Anderson. :D