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WMR
06-29-2005, 09:25 AM
Posted on Wed, Jun. 29, 2005





Ex-Kentucky players overlooked in draft

By Jerry Tipton

HERALD-LEADER STAFF WRITER


In noting players who mistakenly forfeited their remaining college eligibility to enter last night's NBA Draft, basketball commentator Dick Vitale mentioned two former Kentucky players first.

"Who's advising these kids?" Vitale said as ESPN's telecast of the draft moved deep into the second and final round. "Randolph Morris. Kelenna Azubuike. ... They're going to be basketball vagabonds. They're listening to the wrong people."

Neither Morris nor Azubuike was selected in the 60-pick draft. NBA teams also passed over Chuck Hayes, the senior leader of Kentucky's team this past season and a foundational four-year player that UK billed as the college game's winningest performer.

None of the players could be reached for comment.

But people close to Hayes and Azubuike suggested the players will play in the NBA someday.

Gary Porter, who coached Hayes at Modesto (Calif.) Christian, said, "There's definitely a place for him."

Porter noted Hayes' perseverance and determination.

"He'll will himself to play (in the NBA)," Porter said. "It's not like him to quit. He's not a quitter."

Porter acknowledged no surprise in NBA teams bypassing Hayes.

"I think he's going to end up with somebody, probably as a free agent," Porter said. "That's what we've been thinking all along."

Hayes, who chose to watch the draft alone at his Modesto home rather than attend a larger gathering planned in his honor, sounded philosophical before the draft about his status.

"I hear I have some supporters," he said in a quiet voice. "I hear I have some doubters. That's been my whole career. Nothing new."

Azubuike's agent, Joel Bell, said an injury derailed his client's chances of being drafted.

"He was going great until he pulled a groin," the agent said of Azubuike's pre-draft workouts for NBA teams.

The injury caused Azubuike to miss the NBA Pre-Draft Camp in Chicago and removed him from individual team workouts for about three weeks, Bell said.

"He's a NBA player," the agent said of Azubuike's long-term basketball future. "Everybody who saw him in workouts knows he's a NBA player."

Chris Ekstrand, a NBA consultant and former editor of the league's official draft guide, had been less impressed with Azubuike's workouts. Azubuike had not distinguished himself from other prospects, Ekstrand said earlier this week.

"This is the time of year you have to separate yourself," Ekstrand said.

Morris' decision to enter the NBA Draft after one season for Kentucky sparked much debate. A high school All-American, he averaged 8.8 points and 4.2 rebounds as a UK freshman.

Morris, Azubuike and Hayes were not alone in failing to make a splash in the draft. Only one player from the Southeastern Conference was taken in the first round. The New York Knicks took David Lee of Florida with the final pick of the round.

Reigning SEC Player of the Year Brandon Bass of Louisiana State was taken by New Orleans with the third pick of the second round. Former Mississippi State forward Lawrence Roberts went to Seattle with the 44th pick, then had his rights traded to Memphis. Such familiar SEC players as Alabama's Kennedy Winston and Florida's Anthony Roberson and Matt Walsh were not drafted.

Former Louisville standout Francisco Garcia was selected in the first round by the Kings.

END OF JERRY TIPTON'S ARTICLE-----------------------------------------


Why Kelenna Azubuike did not stay around for his final year and make himself into a first-round draft pick with guaranteed money is beyond me... He's got a bad family situation, but it isn't like his dad is getting out of prison anytime soon (5 years). The money would have still been there, and it would have been a much easier road than the one he has now staked himself to. A pulled groin and BLAMMO you ain't gettin' drafted.

I'm a bit surprised that no one took Randolph Morriss, but I still think he should have stayed at least another year... Making an NBA team as a free agent is hardly a piece of cake, and there's a very good chance that he'll end up being forced to play overseas.

Dumb Dumb Dumb.

As far as Chuck Hayes,,, If that kid was 6' 10" instead of 6' 5", he'd have been a lottery pick, instead,,, making it in the NBA is going to be extraordinarily tough for this guy. This guy has got the heart of a lion, but playing power-forward in the NBA at 6' 5" is next to impossible. That's point-guard/shooting-guard size in the NBA. He'd be dwarfed by most 3's, and he simply doesn't have the game of a small forward.

If Chuck doesn't make it in the NBA, however, I have absolutely no doubt that wherever Chuck does end up, he'll be a difference-maker and a positive influence.

I think that Chuck Hayes might be destined for things greater than basketball.

As far as Randolph and Kelenna, however: Stupid Stupid Stupid. :thumbdown :( :rolleyes:

flyer85
06-29-2005, 09:27 AM
:bowrofl:

WVRed
06-29-2005, 09:32 AM
In noting players who mistakenly forfeited their remaining college eligibility to enter last night's NBA Draft, basketball commentator Dick Vitale mentioned two former Kentucky players first.

"Who's advising these kids?" Vitale said as ESPN's telecast of the draft moved deep into the second and final round. "Randolph Morris. Kelenna Azubuike. ... They're going to be basketball vagabonds. They're listening to the wrong people."

Neither Morris nor Azubuike was selected in the 60-pick draft. NBA teams also passed over Chuck Hayes, the senior leader of Kentucky's team this past season and a foundational four-year player that UK billed as the college game's winningest performer.

None of the players could be reached for comment.

But people close to Hayes and Azubuike suggested the players will play in the NBA someday.

Gary Porter, who coached Hayes at Modesto (Calif.) Christian, said, "There's definitely a place for him."

Porter noted Hayes' perseverance and determination.

"He'll will himself to play (in the NBA)," Porter said. "It's not like him to quit. He's not a quitter."

Porter acknowledged no surprise in NBA teams bypassing Hayes.

"I think he's going to end up with somebody, probably as a free agent," Porter said. "That's what we've been thinking all along."

Hayes, who chose to watch the draft alone at his Modesto home rather than attend a larger gathering planned in his honor, sounded philosophical before the draft about his status.

"I hear I have some supporters," he said in a quiet voice. "I hear I have some doubters. That's been my whole career. Nothing new."

Azubuike's agent, Joel Bell, said an injury derailed his client's chances of being drafted.

"He was going great until he pulled a groin," the agent said of Azubuike's pre-draft workouts for NBA teams.

The injury caused Azubuike to miss the NBA Pre-Draft Camp in Chicago and removed him from individual team workouts for about three weeks, Bell said.

"He's a NBA player," the agent said of Azubuike's long-term basketball future. "Everybody who saw him in workouts knows he's a NBA player."

Chris Ekstrand, a NBA consultant and former editor of the league's official draft guide, had been less impressed with Azubuike's workouts. Azubuike had not distinguished himself from other prospects, Ekstrand said earlier this week.

"This is the time of year you have to separate yourself," Ekstrand said.

Morris' decision to enter the NBA Draft after one season for Kentucky sparked much debate. A high school All-American, he averaged 8.8 points and 4.2 rebounds as a UK freshman.

Morris, Azubuike and Hayes were not alone in failing to make a splash in the draft. Only one player from the Southeastern Conference was taken in the first round. The New York Knicks took David Lee of Florida with the final pick of the round.

Reigning SEC Player of the Year Brandon Bass of Louisiana State was taken by New Orleans with the third pick of the second round. Former Mississippi State forward Lawrence Roberts went to Seattle with the 44th pick, then had his rights traded to Memphis. Such familiar SEC players as Alabama's Kennedy Winston and Florida's Anthony Roberson and Matt Walsh were not drafted.

Former Louisville standout Francisco Garcia was selected in the first round by the Kings.

Why Kelenna Azubuike did not stay around for his final year and make himself into a first-round draft pick with guaranteed money is beyond me... He's got a bad family situation, but it isn't like his dad is getting out of prison anytime soon (5 years). The money would have still been there, and it would have been a much easier road than the one he has now staked himself to. A pulled groin and BLAMMO you ain't gettin' drafted.

I'm a bit surprised that no one took Randolph Morriss, but I still think he should have stayed at least another year... Making an NBA team as a free agent is hardly a piece of cake, and there's a very good chance that he'll end up being forced to play overseas.

Dumb Dumb Dumb.

As far as Chuck Hayes,,, If that kid was 6' 10" instead of 6' 5", he'd have been a lottery pick, instead,,, making it in the NBA is going to be extraordinarily tough for this guy. This guy has got the heart of a lion, but playing power-forward in the NBA at 6' 5" is next to impossible. That's point-guard/shooting-guard size in the NBA. He'd be dwarfed by most 3's, and he simply doesn't have the game of a small forward.

If Chuck doesn't make it in the NBA, however, I have absolutely no doubt that wherever Chuck does end up, he'll be a difference-maker and a positive influence.

I think that Chuck Hayes might be destined for things greater than basketball.

As far as Randolph and Kelenna, however: Stupid Stupid Stupid. :thumbdown :( :rolleyes:

WMR
06-29-2005, 09:35 AM
Hey thanks, WVRed, I should have done a better job separating the article from my editorializing. ;) LOL

WVRed
06-29-2005, 10:02 AM
Why Kelenna Azubuike did not stay around for his final year and make himself into a first-round draft pick with guaranteed money is beyond me... He's got a bad family situation, but it isn't like his dad is getting out of prison anytime soon (5 years). The money would have still been there, and it would have been a much easier road than the one he has now staked himself to. A pulled groin and BLAMMO you ain't gettin' drafted.

I dont know how much you know about the NBA, but if you want a bigger payday down the road, the second round is the best place to get drafted.

First rounders get a guaranteed three years. OTOH, the maximum a player can get signed is for 2 years as a second rounder. But its harder to work yourself up and get regular playing time as a second rounder.

But if you succeed, you get a big payday after two years rather than three. Carlos Boozer and Gilbert Arenas say hello.

As for Azubuike, the biggest mistake he made was hiring an agent, therefore killing his chances of returning to college. Azubuike was expected to be a second round pick, and when he pulled his groin, that shot his chances of being drafted. He should have taken the example of Dee Brown of Illinois.


I'm a bit surprised that no one took Randolph Morriss, but I still think he should have stayed at least another year... Making an NBA team as a free agent is hardly a piece of cake, and there's a very good chance that he'll end up being forced to play overseas.

Dumb Dumb Dumb.

I am also suprised Morris didnt get taken, as he was projected to go as high as the Knicks 30th pick in the first round, and as low as the Hornets in the second round. He is, however, eligible to return to Kentucky since he didnt hire an agent, but whether Tubby Smith would accept him back is another story.


As far as Chuck Hayes,,, If that kid was 6' 10" instead of 6' 5", he'd have been a lottery pick, instead,,, making it in the NBA is going to be extraordinarily tough for this guy. This guy has got the heart of a lion, but playing power-forward in the NBA at 6' 5" is next to impossible. That's point-guard/shooting-guard size in the NBA. He'd be dwarfed by most 3's, and he simply doesn't have the game of a small forward.

If Chuck doesn't make it in the NBA, however, I have absolutely no doubt that wherever Chuck does end up, he'll be a difference-maker and a positive influence.

I think that Chuck Hayes might be destined for things greater than basketball.

Hayes should have tried for an Antonio Gates career in the NFL;).

cumberlandreds
06-29-2005, 10:44 AM
I read soemwhere that Azubuike's dad could get released early if he pays back what he stole from his clients. If that's true I can't blame him for trying to go pro early. I'm sure he was under a lot of pressure from his family to do this. But he should have waited to have hired an agent. He pulled a groin in workouts and couldn't do any more of these private workouts for teams. That may have affected that he didn't get drafted.
As for Morris,he was just dumb. His father thinks he's second coming of Bill Russell and thought he should go pro. He'll be what Vitale calls a vagabond. You'll see him Europe and may be some brief stints in the NBA. Nothing more. Don't expect him back playing for Tubby. The Morris's napalmed any chance of that.

kyred14
06-29-2005, 11:02 AM
Not sure what the UK players were thinking. These two have go on the worst decisions ever list. Along with Walsh and Roberson from FLA. Idiotic could be the word I am looking for. Here is another article on the mislead players:

By Pat Forde
ESPN.com


What now, Randolph Morris?

What now, Kelenna Azubuike?

You guys could have been part of a 2006 national championship contender at the University of Kentucky – maybe even the preseason No. 1 team. Instead you wake up today as young men without a team, or a grasp on your dream.

You whiffed in the NBA draft, making the worst career decisions since Michael Jordan decided he could hit a curve ball.


What now, Matt Walsh?

What now, Anthony Roberson?

You could have been part of a team equipped to battle Kentucky on even terms, the Florida Gators. Instead you wake up today with egos and expectations trampled after seeing 60 players picked by the NBA – none of them you. Your "advisers" who counseled you to turn pro and stay in the draft ... what are they telling you this morning – if they have the nerve to return your calls?

What now, Olu Famutimi?

What now, Kennedy Winston?

You bailed on Arkansas and Alabama, respectively, where you could have been key players on potential Top 25 teams. Instead you wake up today with the words "undrafted free agent" following your names, and no guaranteed money headed to your bank accounts. Hope you guys didn't spend too much advance money from your agents, because it could be hard to pay them back on a D-League salary.

Tuesday night, a looming lose-lose proposition came home to roost on the Southeastern Conference. And in the end, it was worse than even the most devout pessimists could have envisioned.

On the whole, it was a validating night for the stay-in-school activists. Eleven seniors were picked in the first round, and 14 of the first 38 picks were throwback players who actually embraced the quaint notion of a four-year, expenses-paid education and on-the-job basketball training. Eighteen of the 30 first-rounders were college seniors or juniors, continuing a trend that says three years of college is a sensible minimum for all but the most gifted players.

It was significantly less validating for guys like Chris Taft, who left Pittsburgh early and was exposed as under-skilled and under-motivated in NBA workouts, subsequently plummeting to No. 42. It definitely wasn't good for the six high school players who slipped into the second round – a development none of the sweet-talkers who counseled them on making the jump ever mentioned.

And it was a night that left nobody from the gutted SEC happy.

No league had more underclassmen declare. When the NBA scouts yawned in their direction, when the mock drafts ignored them, when the analysts predicted draft-night humiliation – most of them stubbornly stayed in anyway. And then Tuesday night was a disaster for the deluded.

Exactly one SEC player was drafted in the first round – a senior at that. Florida's David Lee was the 30th and last pick in the guaranteed-money zone. After that came LSU sophomore Brandon Bass at No. 33, Mississippi State signee Monta Ellis at No. 40, Georgia signee Louis Williams at No. 45 and Mississippi State senior Lawrence Roberts at No. 55.

After Lee, they're guaranteed absolutely nothing at this point. NBA earnings will most likely be contingent upon making a team, and that won't be easy. Only 24 percent of the current NBA players were second-round picks, which means by average that one of the four SEC second-rounders will make a squad.

And those guys are the lucky ones compared to the SEC's undrafted half-dozen. Sixteen percent of The League membership was undrafted – but most of those guys had to scuffle around for years far off Broadway before getting their shot. (And that shot almost always comes at a league-minimum salary.)

Of the SEC's undrafted group, the kid who has to feel lousiest today is Morris. He nearly joined Atlanta AAU teammates Dwight Howard and Josh Smith in the draft out of high school but chose to attend Kentucky instead. Once there, Morris spent all season proving that he had no business in the draft, averaging a listless 8.8 points and 4.2 rebounds. He was considered one of the most underachieving freshmen in the nation.

But instead of returning for several seasons of seasoning, he stunned Kentucky by faxing coach Tubby Smith his declaration to enter the draft. Even after working out to tepid reviews, Morris left everyone hanging until the last minute and then issued a release through his new agency, SFX, saying that he was staying in the draft. (Now that Morris has gone undrafted, it's high time for SFX to earn its money.)

Between those two events, Morris spent his time scrupulously avoiding contact and counsel with Smith. That obviously would have made too much sense.

After all, the coach has only sent Tayshaun Prince, Jamaal Magloire, Nazr Mohammed, Keith Bogans, Scott Padgett and Erik Daniels into The League from Kentucky, so what would he know? His close ties to Pistons coach Larry Brown and others in the NBA wouldn't be worth much when it came to judging Morris' draft value, right? Clearly, it's better to listen to Word On The Street – or whatever word the kid was hearing – for this life-altering decision.

But Morris is just one of many young basketball players who wake up today wondering what happened to their American Dream. There was supposed to be a butler knocking on the door with a seven-figure contract on a platinum serving tray. He's nowhere to be found.

Here's the deal: A lot of these kids want someone to lie to them, and there are a blue million liars out there ready and willing to do so. When the going gets tough, the scammers get going – and the horribly flawed entity that is American youth basketball serves up scammer fodder by the dozens.

Too many kids don't want to go to school. (See: high schooler Amir Johnson, who turned pro instead of going to Louisville when he couldn't get the standardized test score for freshman eligibility. He was the 56th player picked, which is pretty much the bullet train to the D-League or overseas – not that Rick Pitino's program can offer anything that, say, Turkey is lacking.)

Too many kids don't want to live a world where hard work and demanding coaches are part of the daily routine. (News flash to the '06 hamburger All-Americans: several of the top college programs expect you to take charges, pass the ball AND go to class. Really!)

Too many kids don't want to believe that the world is bigger than the Nike and adidas all-star camps. (True, only four players were taken in the first round straight from international teams. But 10 foreign players went in the second round – and something tells me that Kennedy Winston and Matt Walsh were never warned by their "advisers" that their draft slots could be taken by the Uros Slokars and Cenk Akyols of the world.)

So the scammers sprinkle some feed in front of the pigeons, and pretty soon they're eating right out of their hands. But now those hands are empty, and they have no good explanations for what happened.

Instead of explanations, there is only one overriding question for the guys who gambled their education and lost:

What Now?

kyred14
06-29-2005, 11:05 AM
Hayes should have tried for an Antonio Gates career in the NFL;).

I heard on the news an NFL team contacted UK about Hayes and football.

WVRed
06-29-2005, 11:34 AM
I heard on the news an NFL team contacted UK about Hayes and football.

That is true. Hayes and Pittsburgh's Chevon Troutman were contacted about possibly playing football. Troutman signed with the Redskins already as a TE, but Hayes was being looked at as a DE.

cumberlandreds
06-29-2005, 12:12 PM
That is true. Hayes and Pittsburgh's Chevon Troutman were contacted about possibly playing football. Troutman signed with the Redskins already as a TE, but Hayes was being looked at as a DE.

IIRC Troutman was released after his first day of practice. He was obviously not a football player even though he had the body for it.

LincolnparkRed
06-29-2005, 12:28 PM
I wonder if part of Kentucky's problems with players and the draft has equalled what has happened with Duke. Everyone know the players are good but they play as a team alot better than the individuals do. I mean other the Bogan & Prince, name a Kentucky player who go alot of run in the NBA last season.

UKFlounder
06-29-2005, 12:55 PM
I mean other the Bogan & Prince, name a Kentucky player who go alot of run in the NBA last season.

Nazr Mohammed started for the World Champs and played 20+ minutes per game, Antoine Walker played a lot, Jamaal Magloire was injured for much of the year, but plays a lot of minutes, Derek Anderson gets minutes for Portland, and even Scott Padgett had a few games around 20 minutes for Houston. I think Tony Delk gets a lot of minutes for a bad Atlanta team, while Walter McCarty got more minutes in Boston than in Phoenix.

LincolnparkRed
06-29-2005, 01:03 PM
Nazr Mohammed started for the World Champs and played 20+ minutes per game, Antoine Walker played a lot, Jamaal Magloire was injured for much of the year, but plays a lot of minutes, Derek Anderson gets minutes for Portland, and even Scott Padgett had a few games around 20 minutes for Houston. I think Tony Delk gets a lot of minutes for a bad Atlanta team, while Walter McCarty got more minutes in Boston than in Phoenix.

Should have qualified that as name Tubby Smith Players, which none of those count.

kyred14
06-29-2005, 01:24 PM
Should have qualified that as name Tubby Smith Players, which none of those count.

I think thats a theme throughout college basketball. With the high schoolers and overseas players, the college ranks the get the "second" rate players sometimes. College basketball is still much more popular, however

Blimpie
06-29-2005, 01:45 PM
Should have qualified that as name Tubby Smith Players, which none of those count.Both Magloire and Padgett played for Tubby on the 1998 championship team. I assume you will now say that "yeah, but they were recruited by Pitino"... ;)

Blimpie
06-29-2005, 02:06 PM
Random thoughts on this matter....

Hayes
The local news claimed that there were 2-3 teams that were very impressed (Houston expressed the most interest) with Chuck on his individual workouts and were hoping that he would not be drafted. That way, they could negotitate their own terms in the way of a contract. Also, the NFL thing is more than just a rumor. Chuck was an all-state WR/CB in high school (in California, no less), so he's not just another Antonio Gates wannabe on the football field.

Azubuike
Least likely to play any minutes in the NBA. Doesn't play a lick of defense other than going for the occasional blocked shot. Not only is he a "tweener" in many scout's opinions, but he has absolutely the wrong mentality for his position. He was never aggressive enough on offense and was consistently out-rebounded by players much shorter than he. Tubby said it best, "Looks like Tarzan, plays like Jane."

Morris
Gotta defend the dude a little on this one. There had to be some friction between Tubby and Morris to have his career end the way that it did. After Azubuike flew the coop, UK was poised to make Randolph the focal point of the offense next season. It's not like he was scoring a scary amount of points last year or anything. In fact, staying on the floor was even a challenge as he easily led the team in personal fouls. He has consistently gotten BAD advice from his father....er, I mean, his manager. His dad makes Richard Williams look like Ward Cleaver. Many local sources indicated that Randolph's workouts were a complete disaster. When terms like "lazy" and "unmotivated" are being bantered around by scouts after your workouts, it's time to call some European teams.

Blimpie
06-30-2005, 02:23 PM
I believe that John Clay may have nailed this one...


Draft a cautionary tale for Rondo
DON'T WASTE CAREER BY LEAVING UK EARLY
By John Clay
HERALD-LEADER SPORTS COLUMNIST

What a waste.

What a total, unbelievable, undeniable waste.

Welcome to reality, Randolph Morris and Kelenna Azubuike.

And that's just from Kentucky.

Make room for Kennedy Winston, Anthony Roberson, Matt Walsh and Olu Famutimi.

And that's just from the Southeastern Conference.

Around these parts, Tuesday night's 2005 NBA Draft will be known not for Andrew Bogut, or the four North Carolina Tar Heels taken in the first 14 picks.

The draft will be remembered for those not chosen, especially the ones so sure they would defy common sense and popular opinion only to end up so alone.

Happy now, Randolph Morris?

True, it appears the 6-foot-10 center with his head in the clouds could bypass those burned bridges and return to UK from neverland via a technicality, but only with his tail between his legs.

Ready for life overseas, Kelenna Azubuike?

True, family considerations made your situation unique, but now your NBA payday appears to be, at the least, delayed.

We heard a lot Tuesday night from ESPN's overly crowded assemblage of talking heads that these players were listening to the wrong people.

Truth is they weren't listening at all.

At least not to anyone telling them what they did not want to hear.

Who besides delusional family members -- take a bow, Ralph Morris -- and slimy agents were telling Morris, who averaged all of 8.8 points and 4.2 rebounds as a freshman, that he was a first-round pick?

After watching a mediocre Morris workout, Rex Chapman predicted last week the center would not be drafted. Rex was right.

Who, besides his agent, told the annoyingly unaggressive Azubuike he would be among the chosen ones?

What was that figure quoted Tuesday, that 16 percent of current NBA rosters comprise non-drafted players? But what is the percentage of non-draftees who try and try but never earn an NBA pay stub?

In the end, Tuesday night's twin disappointments should serve as a cautionary tale for one current Cat.

Are you listening Rajon Rondo?

In his heart of hearts, UK's freshman point guard probably wanted to test the NBA waters this year.

And three of the first five -- Illinois' Deron Williams at No. 3, Wake Forest's Chris Paul at No. 4 and North Carolina's Raymond Felton at No. 5 -- players chosen Tuesday were point guards.

But that trio owns something Rondo does not yet possess. An outside shot.

Paul hit 47.4 percent of his three-pointers last season. After making just 31.3 percent of his threes as a sophomore, Felton locked himself in the gym for the summer and upped that figure to 44 percent last season.

Rondo made just 30.3 percent of his threes last year, a lower figure than Williams, Paul or Felton posted at any time in their collegiate careers.

Plus, Williams and Felton both remained in college for three years before taking the NBA plunge. The extra time only helped their stock rise.

Take that as an object lesson, Rajon.

Develop a shot, shine as a super sophomore, and you could be on that stage next year shaking hands with David Stern and keeping it real with Stuart Scott.

But it's also possible you could roll the dice and be sitting at home at 11:45 on draft night wondering, "What am I going to do now?"

Just ask Randolph Morris and Kelenna Azubuike.

A career is a terrible thing to waste.

WVRed
06-30-2005, 02:34 PM
http://home.ripway.com/2004-9/176143/RandolphMorris.jpg

Blimpie
06-30-2005, 03:53 PM
http://home.ripway.com/2004-9/176143/RandolphMorris.jpgTake one looks at those eyes and you'll know why the NBA owners passed on Randolph :eek: :eek: :eek: . Nobody really wants the "Runaway Bride" to be their power forward, do they?

Cedric
07-01-2005, 01:38 AM
The SEC is constantly overrated by the media and therefore a lot of these players are hyped during the college season when they just aren't that good. That conference is a joke in basketball. Kentucky was average at best the last two years but actually looked great because of how miserable that conference is. Uab anyone? Who is good in that conference? Florida is weak and way way inconsistent, LSU is football, Arkansas isn't good anymore. It's way below the Big Ten, ACC, and Big East.