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savafan
06-29-2005, 01:50 PM
It's hard to believe that we are the only intelligent life in the whole entire universe, that there are likely millions of other galaxies and other planets out there, and that earth is the only one inhabited by living beings. Do you think that we are alone in the universe, or are there others out there, possibly like us?

http://www.ufocasebook.com/centervilleohio.html

By Kenny Young

Those few residents of Centerville, Ohio who were up and about around 5:30 a.m. on Saturday morning, March 6, 2004 were going about their normal routines, waiting for daylight to break. Activity at police dispatch headquarters, meanwhile, was anything but routine. Phone lines began to light up with citizen complaints of bizarre ‘flashing in the sky’ and electrical disruptions that seized a large area from Lakeview Drive to Bethel Road, Stone Lake and Linden. One after another the calls came in.

“Centerville Police?” said the flustered police dispatcher to yet another caller.

“Has the whole street called?” came the voice on the other line.

“Oh my God…” the caller could be heard exclaiming. “I saw it, it was right over my house and it hovered down… I can’t believe I’m saying this! It looked like an ALIEN SHIP…!”

Needless to say, this morning would not be so routine at police dispatch headquarters.

The resident on Lakeview Drive, later contacted for this report, contends that a solid physical object was present in the skies near Stingley Elementary School in Centerville. This object was hovering at near treetop level and would interact with nearby power lines, causing an arcing ‘flash’ that would send a powerful explosive report across the sleepy and confused neighborhood. 1

This detail is consistent with callers heard on the 9-1-1 police tapes of the incident, obtained through the diligence of UFO investigator Bruce M. Forrester, Jr., of Bellbrook, Ohio, in which area residents inform of the sky lighting up and electrical disruptions. One caller said the source of the bright flashing was from somewhere ‘near Stingley school.’ 2

The Lakeview Drive resident who lives across from the school, and who also observed the object with his wife, said: “This house-sized object was a saucer-shaped metallic structure, polished aluminum surface with alternating sets of rotating, flare-like lights. The two sets of lights clearly rotated in opposite directions and were very bright, consisting of several colors ranging from yellow, amber, white and blue. There was no smoke or exhaust that I could see.”

This UFO was somehow interacting with power lines near Stingley Elementary School, according to the primary claimant. After each blinding explosion the air pressure in the neighborhood would “change” with a loud concussion, and at that point all the power would go out across the neighborhood. Following this disruption, the UFO would vanish from its place at treetop level near the school. The same - or a separate, identical object - would ‘reappear’ over an adjacent field as the power in the region would slowly restore. This object would then assume a slow path and amble back toward the school to its previous position where it would again explode with a flash after making some kind of ‘arcing’ contact with the power lines. This procedure, as said by the Lakeview Drive resident, would repeat several times.

Trees in the area were burnt during this drama, branches and limbs were said by the Lakeview Drive witness to flame and ‘glitter’ for several hours after the incident. The sparkling glitter was likened to flashing 4th of July fireworks. 3

“I wish that there was a good explanation for this,” said the Lakeview Drive witness, a 25-year old father of a newly born baby and working in ‘financial services.’ “It moved over the school and came down in the field. I saw it raise and lower. I know it was controlled and I wish I had somebody to come to my door and lay it on the line, just give me a good answer for all this.”

According to police logs obtained from the Centerville Police Department, the station was swamped with the calls coming in at around 5:37 a.m. and police officers were dispatched to the scene shortly thereafter. 4

Fire logs obtained from the Washington Township fire department indicate that a fire truck was dispatched to the location at 5:48a.m. and another unit sent at 5:58 a.m. 5

Making this situation a tad more interesting are reports that emergency responders in the fire department ladder truck also saw the UFO, and the gauges on their emergency vehicle ‘went funny.’

“The firemen were repeatedly asking me for descriptions of what I saw, and I told them and they said ‘that’s the same thing we saw.’” According to Lakeview Drive resident, citing firemen and police officers that loudly communicated with each other at the scene of the bedlam. 6

One area resident, standing in the midst of the hustle and bustle, jokingly said: “It must be Osama Bin Laden.”

“I told the two fire officers what I saw and asked them if I sounded like a complete lunatic,” said the Lakeview Drive resident. “He told me that I was not a lunatic and that they saw it too, and it made the gauges in their truck go nuts.”

Following this tantalizing lead, an inquiry was made to find out if emergency responders were also witness to this UFO.

Telephone greetings to the Centerville Fire Department’s “Station 41” about this issue were not warmly received, and the simple phone call requesting some basic information on the March 6 dispatch was rejected.

Lieutenant Sarah Lee, handling the inquiry to her department, advised that (oh joy!) she could not be of any help. To the contrary, the wagons were circling, the mote was being filled and hatches were being battened down as it was announced that any incoming inquiry must be made via “written request.”

“Why don’t you call Wright Patterson Air Force Base?” she said after listening briefly to the weird 9-1-1 tape by telephone.

“Wright Pat can help you more than I can. Unfortunately, I cannot answer any of your questions,” then advised Lt. Lee of the Centerville Fire Department. “It is routine procedure and policy for us to not ‘give out’ information without proper authorization.” 7

Like sheesh, you’d think this was an inquiry to Ft. Knox about their security methods.

Suddenly the operations and practices of this basic public agency seemed to be operating like the Freedom of Information Office of the super-secret “Blue Room” of Wright Patterson Air Force Base, the very base the inquiry was referred to. 8

A friendly letter was then penned to Fire Chief Parks, basically begging to be put in contact with the emergency responders who were on the scene of the UFO incident on March 6.

“I am not sure who gave you your information but it appears they were aware of something we did not see or share in,” said Fire Chief Kenneth C. Parks in response to the plea. 9

Apparently, The Chief also did not take kindly to the request for contact info with the emergency responders who were dispatched to the scene on March 6: “Our people are required by policy to refrain from discussing fire department actions without proper authorization. By policy, their reports are their response to any questions, outside of court action.”

Chief Parks speaks and the specter of court action is now vocalized. Courtesy, begging and pleading did no good, it seems, as the firemen at the scene will continue to remain anonymous and, interestingly, a friendly chat with a UFO investigator has been averted. One for officialdom.

But before the curious reader might find refreshing the idea of friendly openness and neighborly cooperation from the City of Centerville and her hirelings, there is also the attitude of Centerville’s Assistant City Manager, Judy Gilleland.

Gilleland was unaware of the mass confusion of March 6 despite assuring that she ‘would be’ aware of any such report as was described to her. This assistant City Manager seemed to take little interest or concern in the report of an object hovering over Stingley Elementary School. 10

“I believe I would know about downed power lines and trees and again, have heard nothing of the sort.

“Good news for us,” she said before curiously adding: “perhaps bad news for you?”

Assistant City Manager Gilleland, Fire Chief Parks and Lietenant Lee were all advised that there should be some concern of radioactivity near the site of Stingley Elementary School. These public employees clearly expressed a lethargic lack of motivation for the nature of the event described by witness on March 6. Is this a dangerous complacency that reeks of ultimate disregard for public safety in an uncertain time? Could Homeland Security be any more proud? 11

There may or may not be a firm explanation for the object described over Stingley school, but even if it were to have been some classified military operation (Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton/Beavercreek is less than 19-miles northwest), there should be some valid concern regarding a military operation so low over a residential quarter and near a school. Further, the type of propulsion method used on such a classified project and the possibility of lingering radiation near the school could pose threatening conditions for families and children in the areas of the school, Lakeview Drive, Bethel Road and Linden Road. This is and should be a sober concern.

When notified of this concern and asked to undertake action to check for radiation readings, the public officials of Centerville, Ohio took no safety measures in response to the appeal for caution.

Instead, public hirelings in Centerville have dismissed this episode as a case of ‘wires arcing in high winds.’ 12

An inquiry made with the National Weather Service at Wilmington, Ohio revealed that although there was a high wind alert earlier on March 5th, high winds during the time of the reported incident were not an issue. Between 4 ? 5 a.m. on March 6, 2004, temperatures and conditions in Centerville, Ohio were in the mid 40s with winds out of the Northwest at only 12 miles per hour. Not quite the high winds previously reported. 13

Further complicating the ‘high wind’ dismissal would be comments from a telephone receptionist at DP & L (Dayton Power & Light) in which the cause of a power outages near Lakeview Drive on March 6 was due to a “circuit lockout” that took place from 5:34 until 10:45 a.m. resulting in service disruption, with no mention of high winds being made. 14

As for the Lakeview Drive resident, he isn’t very comfortable with the situation.

“It’s clear to me that something blew up there where the burnt trees are,” he said. There is no transformer there to blow up. That concerns me, given the magnitude of the explosion.”

The incident early in the morning of March 6, 2004 is real. Multiple callers to police headquarters advised of an unusual situation and upon arrival, emergency responders did address the situation of arcing power lines along with downed tree limbs. But essentially the strangeness of this whole situation rests with the testimony of the Lakeview Drive resident and his wife, both claim a very sensational, physical and intelligently controlled object situated low in the sky near Stingley school. This is reflected on the emergency 9-1-1 police tapes as the caller considers his own words with disbelief at what he is claiming to observe in the sky near his home. While others in the neighborhood were indeed alarmed and also calling police headquarters, they were only reporting generic ‘flashing’ in the sky along with power disruptions. The Lakeview Drive resident further informs that officers with the fire department did tell him they saw this object too, and the instrumentation on their vehicle was oddly effected, Most unfortunately, and also quite curious, is that this cannot be independently verified as per Chief Parks’ unusually harsh reference to court action.

And disturbingly, the Lakeview Drive resident also reports being sick in the last week of March, feeling nausea with a headache, a sickness he would describe as ‘low blood sugar’ even though he has never been diagnosed with this sickness. He also reports concern that his infant has experienced hair loss, although this could be normal as babies sometimes do lose their hair.

Or then again, perhaps it’s just those high winds.


NOTES

1. Friday, March 26, 2004 telephone interview with Lakeview Drive resident, also involved in the conversations were investigator Nancy Talbott of BLT Research (Cambridge, Massachusettes). The claimant also followed up with several E-mail contacts, answering 17-specific questions in correspondence dated April 17, 2004

2. 9-1-1 audio tapes from the Centerville, Ohio police department, March 6, 2004 obtained by Bruce M. Forrester Jr., Zephyr Technology, P.O. Box 55, Bellbrook, OH 45305

3. Inspection of the material by infrared scans of both the charred and unburned areas by Phyllis Budinger of Frontier Analysis. Also solvent extractions (hexane, acetone/methanol mix and water) from these areas and spectra analysis with nothing unusual detected. E-mail message May 3, 2004

4. “Call For Service Record” from the Centerville, Ohio Police Department dated 3/06/04, Call #: 04-006497. Responders were Officers J.A. McDaniel and D.G. Gaudette. Obtained by Bruce M. Forrester, Jr., Zephyr Technology

5. Fire logs and other reports released by Fire Chief Kenneth C. Parks of the Washington Township Fire Department, April 1, 2004. Information requested ‘in writing’ by Kenny Young in letter dated March 30, 2004 as per instruction of fire dept. personnel

6. Comments from Lakeview Drive resident to Kenny Young in E-mail message dated April 1, 2004

7. Return call to Kenny Young from Lieutenant Sarah Lee, Centerville F.D. Station #41 at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, March 30, 2003 calling from 937-438-2771

8. Presidential candidate Barry Goldwater often spoke of the harsh, expletive filled reprimand by General Curtis LeMay after asking for access to the legendary BLUE ROOM of WPAFB

9. Fire Chief Kenneth C. Parks of the Washington Township Fire Department, in a letter dated April 1, 2004. Information requested ‘in writing’ by Kenny Young in letter dated March 30, 2004 as per instruction of fire dept. personnel

10. E-mail comments by Judy Gilleland, Assistant City Manager for Centerville, Ohio. dated March 29, 2004. Gilleland was contacted because City Manager Gregory B. Horn had taken vacation time and was unavailable for comment

11. Weeks after the event, the branches were analyzed with a radiation detection monitor by Phyllis Budinger, Frontier Analysis. No radiation above normal background was detected. E-mail advisement May 5, 2004

12. E-mail comments by Assistant City Manager Judy Gilleland (March 29) and letter by Fire Chief Kenneth C. Parks (April 1) advising that high winds throughout Washington Township caused wires to arc.

13. Inquiry with The National Weather Service at Wilmington, Ohio by investigator Donnie Blessing, State Section Director for Ohio MUFON (Mutual UFO Network). Inquiries made in report filed March 9, 2004

14. Telephone inquiry with Dayton Power & Light (DP&L) in which they advised of a ‘CIRCUIT LOCKOUT’ effecting Lakeview Drive region on March 6 between 5:23 and 10:45 a.m., inquiry made by Kenny Young, Friday, March 26, 2004

Chip R
06-29-2005, 01:51 PM
I only believe in aliens from this planet. :D

savafan
06-29-2005, 01:54 PM
I only believe in aliens from this planet. :D

That would be the illegal kind. It's hard not to believe in them, I see so many of them working construction here in the Dayton area.

RedFanAlways1966
06-29-2005, 02:03 PM
I will believe it when one of these UFOs lands and some sort of lifeform gets out... and I see it.

Why is it that UFOs were not really reported until the mid-1900's? I have read where the first report was in 1561, but still. Or were there reports of settlers, Civil War soldiers or gold-rushers seeing them? Defenders wiol say that people were afraid to report them b/c they might be institutionalized. I am not an expert on the matter, but it seems as though reports did not really start until "later on". Then all of a sudden, people are reporting them from everywhere. Heck, there wasn't even an abduction tale until Barney & Betty Hill in 1961. Then guess what... abductions happened all over the place after that. Hmmmm.

Nessie, Yeti, crop cirlces, ghosts, UFOs... I don't believe in any of them. Don't hate me.... it is just how I feel!

KronoRed
06-29-2005, 02:04 PM
Of course, this whole show just for us? not buying it :)

registerthis
06-29-2005, 02:09 PM
I think there's intelligent life elsewhere, but I don't believe it has visited us yet.

RFS62
06-29-2005, 02:10 PM
Any civilization with the technology to get here from the nearest inhabitable planet would probably be that much more advanced than us socially also. It would be like watching an ant farm for them.

Do you talk to the ants in your ant farm, and let them know what you're doing up there?

Plus, I know for a fact that several of them post here.

Redsland
06-29-2005, 02:12 PM
There's a difference between believing that life exists somewhere else, and believing that it comes here to visit.

Science says one of those things is a near certainty, and that the other is almost certainly poppycock.

zombie-a-go-go
06-29-2005, 02:15 PM
It's hubris of the highest kind to think we are the most intelligent species in this infinite universe.

I'm not going to say "believe," because it takes a little more than eyewitness accounts unsubstantiated by hard evidence to convince me of existence , but "suspect?"

Yeah, I suspect.

Johnny Footstool
06-29-2005, 02:15 PM
Why is it that UFOs were not really reported until the mid-1900's? I have read where the first report was in 1561, but still.

People have been reporting strange phenomena in the skies since they started scratching things on the walls of caves. The prophet Ezekiel reported "wheels of fire" in the sky. The natives of Central and South America have interesting drawings depicting "gods" that appear to be men in space suits. In modern times we started associating this phenomena with "little green men" instead of "gods."

savafan
06-29-2005, 02:17 PM
Why is it that UFOs were not really reported until the mid-1900's? I have read where the first report was in 1561, but still. Or were there reports of settlers, Civil War soldiers or gold-rushers seeing them?

Here are documented reports of sightings from 1865 to 2005:

http://www.ufocasebook.com/casefiles.html

Red Leader
06-29-2005, 02:18 PM
I live in Centerville. Not close to where this sighting was, but I am extremely familiar with this location. It is about a mile from where I grew up, and where my parent's currently live. What I don't get is: The Centerville Fire Department is directly across the street from Stingley Elementary. Why would they have to be dispatched? All they would have had to do was open the garage bay doors and walk out into the "driveway" to view it. They should have seen it from the fire house without even opening the door. I would have to believe that if residents near the "field" or playground of Stingley were effected, the Fire Station would have been effected as well. That part, I don't understand at all.

RFS62
06-29-2005, 02:21 PM
That part, I don't understand at all.



Of course you don't. Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones flashed that thingy in your face.

savafan
06-29-2005, 02:27 PM
Funny thing, right after I post this, I see this on Yahoo:

http://sg.news.yahoo.com/050629/3/3t7yj.html

BERLIN (Reuters) - Hollywood actor Tom Cruise not only battles creatures from outer space in his latest film "War of the Worlds," he also believes aliens exist, he told a German newspaper on Wednesday.

Asked in an interview with the tabloid daily Bild if he believed in aliens, Cruise said: "Yes, of course. Are you really so arrogant as to believe we are alone in this universe?

"Millions of stars, and we're supposed to be the only living creatures? No, there are many things out there, we just don't know," Cruise, 42, said in the interview published in German.

Cruise is a follower of the Scientology church founded by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, and his recent willingness to discuss the faith has raised eyebrows in the media.

Most controversially, Cruise criticized actress Brooke Shields for revealing she had taken antidepressants. An official Scientology Web site argues that people should live drug-free.

Cruise also dismissed psychiatry as a "pseudo science," invoking the ire of the American Psychiatric Association that called the remarks "irresponsible."

But many scientologists feel they are unfairly criticized, arguing that although many believe in the concept of aliens, it is not such an unreasonable proposition, and that the side effects of some medication are not fully understood.

Cruise's new film "War of the Worlds" is based on British writer H.G. Wells' 1898 story of the invasion of Earth by Martians.

Red Leader
06-29-2005, 02:27 PM
Here is a map. Stingley is highlighted. The Fire Dept. is across the street from Stingley and the "field". It is located on Maple.

RFS62
06-29-2005, 02:50 PM
Ya know, I'll bet fish who are caught and returned are a lot like people who are abducted by space aliens.

You're swimming along, minding your own business, hanging out with your fish buddies, and lo and behold, a big fat juicy worm.

So, you do what any fish would do, you chomp down on it. And "HEY.... Whoa!!!!" .... up you go to the mother ship. And they prod you, and photograph you, and pass you around to the other aliens, and finally after scaring you half to death, they return you to the place they took you from.

And then you tell your fish buddies what happened, and they're all like "yeah, sure" and they talk about you behind your back and now you're that crazy fish who believes in life above the water, and stuff.

Red Leader
06-29-2005, 02:51 PM
Of course you don't. Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones flashed that thingy in your face.

As long as I don't end up looking like these kids, I don't care about any "flashy thingies" :laugh:

http://www.thetempleofmetal.gr/cinema/signs/signs_03.jpg

SunDeck
06-29-2005, 03:22 PM
I don't believe in aliens from other planets, but I do believe in aliens from this planet.

RFS62
06-29-2005, 11:02 PM
Wow, so far 81% of people responding to this poll believe in aliens from other planets. That's almost exactly the percentage of people who were happy with the moves the Reds made in the offseason!!!

Coincidence, I think not!!!

Reds/Flyers Fan
06-29-2005, 11:32 PM
I most definitely believe that there is life somewhere other than planet Earth. In fact, I believe that there are civilizations that range from the exceptionally advanced to the pitifully inept. We on Earth, having been around for the blink of an eye, probably fall closer to the latter example.

If extraterrestrial life does exist, why would they want to contact us? What, exactly, can we offer to them? If they are able to contact/visit us, it can be assumed that they are FAR more technologically advanced than us. So what's in it for them to dial us up? Perhaps there is a network of advanced civilizations out there and they keep in contact with one another, sharing advances and ideas. If they're keeping a passive eye on Earth what would they see?

They would see a history of violent wars and a cavalier disregard for our planet. For thousands of years we have been killing each other. If peaceful civilizations exist outside of our solar system, what would make them think that we wouldn't try to conquer/kill them too, if given the chance?

Our history doesn't lie, and lately (in the last century at least) it's being beamed to the universe via radio and television waves which roam space and serve as a billboard for Earth -- assuming they are being detected. What will other civilizations think of our humanity when they watch the Nazis rage through Europe, the Columbine and Oklahoma City tragedies, or 9/11? What will they think of our technology when our most advanced ship (at the time) runs full-speed into an iceberg and sinks? What will they think of our intelligence when they witness what we're doing to the world's rainforests? What will they think of our civilization when some of our most charismatic leaders are targets for murder -- Russian czars, Martin Luther King, JFK, Pope John Paul II, Ronald Reagan?

Why, again, would they want to contact us?

I have another theory, which fits in well with War of the Worlds now in theaters. What if Earth turns out to be one of the richest planets in the universe in terms of natural resourses and physical beauty? And what if some alien creatures have been observing our human history and see the utter destruction we have reaped on our own planet. Would they consider Earth too valuable to be "wasted" on such a hopeless civilization as ours? Could they be planning an invasion to rid Earth of its harmful inhabitants so that the rest of the universe may be able to enjoy what's left of a truly remarkable planet?

What if we, as humans, were able to observe another Earth-like planet with limitless resourses and life-sustaining qualities but it was infested with destructive, insignificant cockroach-type creatures that were relatively new to that planet. And, if we had the technology to wipe out those worthless creatures and return that planet to its original beauty while reaping the bounties of its resourses, would we do it? Eventually. Probably. Why can't that happen to us?

wheels
06-30-2005, 12:24 AM
I think we'll all know the answer to these questions soon enough.

GIK
06-30-2005, 01:19 AM
Ya know, I'll bet fish who are caught and returned are a lot like people who are abducted by space aliens.

You're swimming along, minding your own business, hanging out with your fish buddies, and lo and behold, a big fat juicy worm.

So, you do what any fish would do, you chomp down on it. And "HEY.... Whoa!!!!" .... up you go to the mother ship. And they prod you, and photograph you, and pass you around to the other aliens, and finally after scaring you half to death, they return you to the place they took you from.

And then you tell your fish buddies what happened, and they're all like "yeah, sure" and they talk about you behind your back and now you're that crazy fish who believes in life above the water, and stuff.

:laugh: :thumbup:

Johnny Footstool
06-30-2005, 01:40 AM
Hollywood actor Tom Cruise not only battles creatures from outer space in his latest film "War of the Worlds," he also believes aliens exist, he told a German newspaper on Wednesday.

Of course Cruise believes in aliens. That's one of the basic tenets of Scientology -- Earth was a slave colony founded by some ancient alien overlord.

pedro
06-30-2005, 02:10 AM
Of course Cruise believes in aliens. That's one of the basic tenets of Scientology -- Earth was a slave colony founded by some ancient alien overlord.

I wish they would suck the aliens out of my brain without me having to give them 10% of my money.

Guess I'll just have to live with them. (for now) ;)

Yachtzee
06-30-2005, 02:31 AM
It's hubris of the highest kind to think we are the most intelligent species in this infinite universe.



Well, if you would just consult the guide, you would know that humans are only the third most intellegent species on earth.

http://hitchhikers.movies.go.com/

TeamCasey
06-30-2005, 07:05 AM
There's already evidence of bacterial life on Mars.

RedsBaron
06-30-2005, 08:15 AM
Adam Dunn hit a sacrifice fly, so anything must be possible. ;)

RFS62
06-30-2005, 08:36 AM
Of course Cruise believes in aliens. That's one of the basic tenets of Scientology -- Earth was a slave colony founded by some ancient alien overlord.


Ya know, that explains a lot. I may have to look into this Scientology stuff.

MrCinatit
06-30-2005, 08:36 AM
there are billions upon billions of stars in our galaxy. there are billions upon billions of galaxies in our universe.
yeah i watched Cosmos.
anyway, with so many planetary systems out there, the chances of life NOT being out there are staggering. on Earth, we have found life thriving in locations we long thought impossible - the depths of the ocean, near volcanoes, in puddles of acid.
if life can exist in those circomstances here, it is unthinkable to me that it could not exist out there. it is also quite possible that life could evolve into something intelligent.
my problem with the traditional "space alien" views is they all look too much like us. two arms. two legs. two eyes. a mouth. the torso.
an intelligent lifeform which has evolved in a completely independent location from our own will look nothing like us...i doubt we can imagine what life on another planet will look like. in fact, when we first encounter another intelligent life form, there is a chance we might not even be able to identify it as a life form.

so...in summary...yes, i do believe there is life out there. however, i do not believe we have been visited as of yet.

macro
06-30-2005, 10:01 AM
Why is it that when the potential for life in other places is discussed on TV or whatever, they very often rule out certain locations as uninhabitable? I've heard them say things like "it's too hot", "it's too cold", "its gasses are poisonous", etc. My question has always been "So, what if their bodies are equipped to like temperatures of 500 degrees? What if those "poison" gasses suit their "lungs" just fine? Why is the definition of what is fit for life always based on the assumption that the rules of earth apply everywhere?

I have a theory about the potential for alien visitors. It's based on an episode of The Twilight Zone. (Okay, stop laughing or rolling your eyes - I'm being serious here. :) Keep in mind that I'm no physics expert, though.)

In this episode of the Rod Serling classic, human space travelers arrive on another planet and find that everything and everybody looks pretty much like Earth. Thing is, nobody or nothing appears to be moving. They later discover that everything is, in fact, in motion, but it's going so slowly that they can't detect the movement, much as we don't see the movement of hands on a clock. As best I remember, the people on this planet didn't know that their visitors were there, because the humans were moving so fast in relation to how fast those people's brains detected and processed speed, much like we can't see a bullet when it's shot from a gun.

So, is it possible that people are visiting right now, and we just cant see them because they're so fast in relation to what our brains can process and our eyes can see? Or do I need to stop taking Rod Serling so seriously? :laugh:

RedsBaron
06-30-2005, 10:06 AM
Why is it that when the potential for life in other places is discussed on TV or whatever, they very often rule out certain locations as uninhabitable? I've heard them say things like "it's too hot", "it's too cold", "its gasses are poisonous", etc. My question has always been "So, what if their bodies are equipped to like temperatures of 500 degrees? What if those "poison" gasses suit their "lungs" just fine? Why is the definition of what is fit for life always based on the assumption that the rules of earth apply everywhere?

I have a theory about the potential for alien visitors. It's based on an episode of The Twilight Zone. (Okay, stop laughing or rolling your eyes - I'm being serious here. :) Keep in mind that I'm no physics expert, though.)

In this episode of the Rod Serling classic, human space travelers arrive on another planet and find that everything and everybody looks pretty much like Earth. Thing is, nobody or nothing appears to be moving. They later discover that everything is, in fact, in motion, but it's going so slowly that they can't detect the movement, much as we don't see the movement of hands on a clock. As best I remember, the people on this planet didn't know they were there, because they were moving so fast in relation to how fast those people's brains detected and processed speed, much like we can't see a bullet when it's shot from a gun.

So, is it possible that people are visiting right now, and we just cant see them because they're so fast in relation to what our brains can process and our eyes can see? Or do I need to stop taking Rod Serling so seriously? :laugh:
The original Star Trek had a similar episode.

LvJ
06-30-2005, 10:23 AM
By God, I believe in Tom Cruise! :dancingco

GAC
06-30-2005, 10:27 AM
Any civilization with the technology to get here from the nearest inhabitable planet would probably be that much more advanced than us socially also. It would be like watching an ant farm for them.

Do you talk to the ants in your ant farm, and let them know what you're doing up there?

Plus, I know for a fact that several of them post here.

Shhhhhhhhhhhhh.

Larkin Fan
06-30-2005, 10:35 AM
There's already evidence of bacterial life on Mars.

There's also biochemical evidence of life on Mars as well.

It's unrealistic to me to think that Earth is the only planet that has life on it.

oneupper
06-30-2005, 10:51 AM
Well, if you would just consult the guide, you would know that humans are only the third most intellegent species on earth.

http://hitchhikers.movies.go.com/

So the answer to the question must be 42.

MrCinatit
06-30-2005, 11:11 AM
So the answer to the question must be 42.

SHHHH! we'll be blowed up!






(think about that one for a while)

oneupper
06-30-2005, 11:12 AM
SHHHH! we'll be blowed up!






(think about that one for a while)

Hey. I'm cool...I've got my towel.

RFS62
06-30-2005, 11:21 AM
Don't panic.

Red Leader
06-30-2005, 11:25 AM
Stay hot.

savafan
06-30-2005, 12:37 PM
There's also biochemical evidence of life on Mars as well.

It's unrealistic to me to think that Earth is the only planet that has life on it.

I believe that the Viking orbiter also sent back pictures of pyramids and dwellings on the surface of Mars.

Redsland
06-30-2005, 12:40 PM
As far as the microbial evidence and biochemical evidence of Martian life, those findings are hotly debated. The scientific community, generally speaking, is not ready to say that they've found anything definitive. Particularly if you’re speaking of the chemical reactions detected during experiments by the Viking probes.

As to macro's question about the conditions for life, that is a very good question. We have only one set of examples of living creatures to study, and so exobiologists tend to make their assumptions about alien life by extrapolating from terrestrial life. Exobiologists realize that it's a dicey proposition to extrapolate from only one example.

That said, it is generally accepted that life requires chemical reactions, like the ones that allow us to turn food into energy and structures. Further, it is generally assumed that the structures would be built out of a plentiful resource that would necessarily be very chemically reactive. The sixth-most common element in the universe is carbon. Among the plentiful elements, it has unique advantages when it comes to reactivity.

We are based on carbon probably for these reasons. It is plentiful and it is versatile. Based on these facts, it seems logical to assume that it’s the most common organic building block out there. (Other possible elements, like silicon, are significantly less plentiful and chemically weaker.)

The chemical reactions taking place to sustain life require a solvent. Here we use water, which is made up of hydrogen and oxygen, which are two of the most common elements in the universe. Water has a great capacity to dissolve substances like life-sustaining chemicals, a great capacity to carry heat and regulate local temperature, and exists in liquid form across a wide temperature range. No other solvent we know of combines these advantages.

So, again, based on the fact that water is plentiful and versatile, terrestrial life uses it, and, we assume, extraterrestrial life does too, by and large.

Once you make the assumption that most life is carbon-based and most life requires water, you place great limits on the kinds of places where life can arise. Water, for example, exists in liquid form across a certain range of temperatures and pressures. A place that’s too cold for liquid water won’t be able to use it in the creation of life. At the same time, you place great limits on the physical tolerances of creatures, since carbon burns and water freezes.

In large part, two things drive all of these assumptions. First, that the universe, like the earth, uses the simplest solution and/or most plentiful resource most of the time. Second, that the periodic table shows you, in rapidly decreasing order, the relative abundance of elements. After that, it’s all chemistry.