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RFS62
07-08-2005, 11:53 AM
Hurricane Dennis is now up to sustained winds of 150 mph.

Landfall expected Sunday, most likely in the western Florida panhandle.


NOAA Chart (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at4%2Bshtml/143243.shtml?3day?large)

HotCorner
07-08-2005, 11:57 AM
That's a beast!

KronoRed
07-08-2005, 12:02 PM
I don't miss Florida

Reds Fanatic
07-08-2005, 01:19 PM
Winds are now at 150 MPH with wind gusts up to 185 MPH. This is a killer storm. Here is the latest projection map:
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/storm_graphics/AT04/refresh/AL0405W5+gif/211039W_sm.gif

GAC
07-08-2005, 01:34 PM
I thought any storm that big had to carry a female name? :lol:

RedsFan75
07-08-2005, 01:43 PM
My daughter is scheduled to return from a missions trip to Panama. She's currently scheduled to fly into Miami on Sunday with a connection to Cincinnati that evening.

Dennis is worrying me that her flights will be all messed up.

Before when a Hurricance would hit somewhere, I'd be pretty ambivilant. Paid a bit more attention when I lived in Texas, but not too much.

Now that I have concerns and worries, I've got a much keener sense of anxiety in relation to this hurricane. I can't even fathom how I'd feel if I lived in the path of it.

For all our members and readers in FL... My thoughts are with you.

HotCorner
07-08-2005, 02:21 PM
Hope it doesn't hit New Orleans head on. That would be a worst case scenario.

Interesting to note that the projected path has it over Cincinnati Wednesday. What type of winds and rain will accompany it that far north?

paintmered
07-08-2005, 02:48 PM
A squadron of F-15C out of Eglin were at Wright-Patterson flying around all day today.

If you are in the Dayton area, you get a free preview of the airshow a week early.

Jaycint
07-08-2005, 03:05 PM
Hope it doesn't hit New Orleans head on. That would be a worst case scenario.

Interesting to note that the projected path has it over Cincinnati Wednesday. What type of winds and rain will accompany it that far north?

Not much by then. To my knowledge hurricanes and tropical storms lose a significant amount of force by the time they get that far inland.

Hurricane Q and A (http://www.usatoday.com/weather/resources/askjack/archives-hurricane-science.htm)

GoReds
07-08-2005, 03:30 PM
Depends on the forward speed and intensity of the hurricane.

I lived in just outside of Charlotte, NC when Hugo came through. When it made landfall in Charleston, SC it had top sustained winds of 128MPH (some new estimates are indicating that wind speeds are not being measured properly and Hugo was stronger than 128). When it hit Charlotte, which is over 200 miles away, Hugo was still classified as a hurricane. Charlotte was devistated, btw.

A few years later, I lived in Cary, NC which is just south of Raleigh. Hurricane Fran made landfall at Wilmington and was still a hurricane when it passed over Cary more than 130 miles later. They were burning debris at several different dump sites for over a year in the Raleigh area after that.

Neither of the two hurricanes I encountered were nearly as intense as Dennis is at this moment. Dennis is likely to undergo some fluctuation before landfall, but will probably be a major hurricane at that point.

The comforting news is that Cincinnati is considerably further away from possible landfall positions than the cities I lived in. Dennis is not moving fast enough to maintain his intensity for a long period of time once he makes landfall.

However, anyone living within 200 miles of the coast should not take landfalling hurricanes lightly. You'll be unpleasantly surprised.

kyred14
07-08-2005, 05:42 PM
Hope it doesn't hit New Orleans head on. That would be a worst case scenario.

Interesting to note that the projected path has it over Cincinnati Wednesday. What type of winds and rain will accompany it that far north?

It will produce plenty of rain, something like 4-5 inches at least. Not too much wind by the time it get all the way up there.

Puffy
07-08-2005, 06:44 PM
I'm gonna get hit again.

:thumbdown

GAC
07-08-2005, 06:46 PM
Batten down the hatches Puffy. rfs and I were talkin' about you earlier with you being in Pensacola. Hope everyone comes through this OK.

Puffy
07-08-2005, 06:51 PM
Thanks GAC - the eye is, as of right now, supposed to hit about 85-100 miles away from me (Pensacola/Alabama border) so that should mean strong winds and lots of rain, but thats it.

However, if it shifts just a smidge eastward, well, I am gonna be evacuated. Which sucks, cause I don't feel like fighting the traffic. But we shall see I guess.

KronoRed
07-08-2005, 06:53 PM
I'm gonna get hit again.

:thumbdown

Good luck Puffster :thumbup: hopefully it'll spin out and die on the gulf

Unassisted
07-08-2005, 06:54 PM
On behalf of my fellow citizens of South Texas, let me say that we would be happy to take this one off of your hands, Puffy. We need the rain. :)

SandyD
07-08-2005, 07:30 PM
Be safe, Puffy.

SandyD
07-08-2005, 07:53 PM
Not much by then. To my knowledge hurricanes and tropical storms lose a significant amount of force by the time they get that far inland.

Hurricane Q and A (http://www.usatoday.com/weather/resources/askjack/archives-hurricane-science.htm)

New Orleans has unique problems because it's below sea-level and sits on the south shore of a shallow lake that opens into the gulf. New Orleans hasn't had a direct hit in a long time, and there's no record of a "worst case scenario" storm.

This article (http://www.weather.com/newscenter/specialreports/hurricanes/vulnerablecities/neworleans.html) kind of explains the unique hurricane related problems facing New Orleans.

Edit: I was hesitant to say anything, since it looks like this one will miss us, thankfully. And I always feel guilty when someone else gets hit.

WVRed
07-08-2005, 09:16 PM
Looks like Pensacola is going to get hit again.:(

RFS62
07-09-2005, 08:07 PM
Mobile, Alabama is now in the center of the bullseye.

Winds back up to 115 and expected to strenghten. The eye-wall is tight and well defined. All this bodes ill for Mobile and the surrounding area.

Landfall expected tomorrow late in the afternoon, early evening.

OnBaseMachine
07-09-2005, 08:46 PM
Did I hear wrong or did they say this storm is expected to strenghten back into a category 4?

Edit...they just said winds are now up to 125 mph, six mph from a category 4.

RFS62
07-09-2005, 09:11 PM
This one is rare on several levels. Most of the Gulf hurricanes I've seen in the last 25 years are losing wind speed as they approach the coast, usually after passing over land in either Cuba or other islands. This one lost it's core, dropped to under 100 mph, and passed over the mountains of Cuba, then re-emerged on the north side and re-formed.

The eye-wall is tight and well defined. The pressure is dropping like a stone, a perfect conditon for strengthening. This situation is very serious.

paintmered
07-09-2005, 09:19 PM
Weather channel just said we should see category 4 in a few hours.

:scared:

Please be careful everyone.

SandyD
07-09-2005, 09:21 PM
RFS62, what's your source? Our local guys are all being non-commital and saying "somewhere from the Fla Panhandle to the Mississippi coast. I've been surprised, but I've yet to see an official forecast show west of Pensacola.

My boss isn't ready to let us stand down from evacuation, and won't until it makes the turn more to the north that they're promising.

OnBaseMachine
07-09-2005, 09:33 PM
RFS62, what's your source? Our local guys are all being non-commital and saying "somewhere from the Fla Panhandle to the Mississippi coast. I've been surprised, but I've yet to see an official forecast show west of Pensacola.

I'm not RFS, but here is a little information.


Hurricane Dennis regained some strength and is now a dangerous Category 3 hurricane whose 115 mile per hour winds seem headed for the Florida-Alabama state line, an area that has still not recovered from Hurricane Ivan 10 months ago.

http://www.2theadvocate.com/stories/070905/new_HD7pm001.shtml

RFS62
07-09-2005, 09:47 PM
The Weather Channel


125 mph winds now, projected to hit land as Cat. 4

RBA
07-09-2005, 09:53 PM
My Sister/Brother In Law will not evacuate once again. They live in Crestview, FL (about 45 miles west of Pensacola.) So another sleepless period for me coming up again.

WVRed
07-09-2005, 10:57 PM
RFS62, what's your source? Our local guys are all being non-commital and saying "somewhere from the Fla Panhandle to the Mississippi coast. I've been surprised, but I've yet to see an official forecast show west of Pensacola.

My boss isn't ready to let us stand down from evacuation, and won't until it makes the turn more to the north that they're promising.

From everything i've heard, its expected to make landfall somewhere between Mobile and Pensacola(where there is only a half hour separating them).

My theory is if the storm hits Pensacola, it will level the city(which has yet to recover from Ivan). If it hits Mobile, it will do massive damage to the port, but will still level Pensacola since the storm will curve back that way.

Either way, I thank God above that I did not move down there the week Frances hit.

SandyD
07-10-2005, 12:14 AM
I'm hearing "between Pascagoula and Pensacola." Hasn't made the turn to NNW yet, which is what has my boss concerned. He's waiting for that turn to take us off alert.

Note: I was traumatized by hurricanes and hurricane stories when I was a kid. I'm amazed how accurate the forecasts are getting, but not completely trustful.

I really feel for the people in harm's way. You know, sometimes these storms weaken as they come ashore, so the winds at land fall aren't quite as strong as indicated. But, not sure how likely that is in this case, if it goes up Mobile Bay.

dman
07-10-2005, 01:16 AM
Thanks GAC - the eye is, as of right now, supposed to hit about 85-100 miles away from me (Pensacola/Alabama border) so that should mean strong winds and lots of rain, but thats it.

However, if it shifts just a smidge eastward, well, I am gonna be evacuated. Which sucks, cause I don't feel like fighting the traffic. But we shall see I guess.

Puffy, I hate to see anyone get walloped by a hurricane, but I especially hate to see the Pensacola/Emerald Coast areas get it. I spent quite a bit of time at NAS Pensacola. What a beautiful and under rated part of the state that is. Best of luck to ya and all who are in the path. Prayers are with you.

RBA
07-10-2005, 01:39 AM
Channel 11/Los Angeles says NWS has just upgraged this to Cat IV.

RBA
07-10-2005, 01:47 AM
Tropical Update




Dennis now a dangerous Category 4
12:36 a.m. ET Sun.,Jul.10,2005 C. Dolce, Meteorologist, The Weather Channel



OAS_AD('MapSpon')
if (isMinNS4) { var mapNURL = "/maps/news/atlstorm4/"; } Dennis Bottom Linehttp://image.weather.com/web/blank.gif
<LI>Landfall on Gulf Coast expected Sunday afternoon or evening

<LI>Impacts will not be limited to the coast

<LI>Currently undergoing significant intensification

<LI>Hurricane/Tropical Alerts (http://www.weather.com/weather/alerts/nswxcategory/huricane?from=tropupd_sidebar)

<LI>Prepare your home (http://www.weather.com/activities/homeandgarden/home/hometips/severeweather/hurricane_prepare.html?from=tropupd_sidebar) | Keep out wind & water (http://www.weather.com/activities/homeandgarden/home/hometips/severeweather/hurricane_windprotect.html?from=tropupd_sidebar)

<LI>Evacuating with pets (http://www.weather.com/newscenter/topstories/040804hurricanepets.html?from=tropupd_sidebar) | Keeping pets safe (http://www.weather.com/outlook/homeandgarden/pets/articles/d76?from=tropupd_sidebar)

2005 Storm Names (http://www.weather.com/newscenter/topstories/20050601hurricanenames.html?from=tropupd_sidebar)


As of 1:00 a.m. ET, Dennis' maximum sustained winds increased to 135 mph making it a dangerous Category 4 hurricane. This is the second time that Dennis has reached Category 4 status. Dennis is a very symmetrical hurricane with a well defined eye and could intensify even more as it pushes to the north-northwest through the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

Dennis’ outer rain bands are radiating northward bringing periodic bouts of heavy rain, gusty winds, and isolated tornadoes from the peninsula to the panhandle of Florida and points even farther north and west. Gusty winds will continue to impact much of Florida (particularly the western half of the state). Winds will increase across the Florida Panhandle as Dennis approaches during the overnight hours.

On Sunday, the northern Gulf Coast from east of New Orleans to the Florida Panhandle needs to be as prepared as absolutely possible for the destructive winds, battering waves, coastal flooding and flooding rains of a major hurricane when Dennis finally moves ashore during the afternoon or, at the very latest, the evening hours. At U.S. landfall, Dennis could be almost as potent as when it hit the south-central coast of Cuba on Friday. If mandatory evacuation orders have been issued for your area, leave. Rainfall amounts of 4-8 inches are likely for the Florida Panhandle, southern Alabama, and southern Mississippi with locally higher amounts along and east of where the center of circulation tracks.

Hurricane warnings remain in effect for the northern Gulf Coast from the Pearl River east to Steinhatchee River with tropical storm warnings from Steinhatchee River to Bonita Beach along the Gulf Coast of Florida. The hurricane warning in the Florida Keys has been downgraded to a tropical storm warning from the Seven Mile Bridge to Dry Tortugas. In Louisiana, tropical storm warnings are posted from Grand Isle to the Pearl River, including New Orleans and Lake Ponchatrain.

Hurricane Dennis made a brief landfall near Cabo Cruz, Cuba on Thursday evening. The eye made a second landfall on the south-central coast of Cuba as a Category 4 hurricane, winds of 149 mph, near Cienfuegos early Friday afternoon. Dennis weakened as it moved over Cuba and was downgraded to a Category 1 storm with top sustained winds of 90 mph after emerging into the Gulf of Mexico, but it has dramatically recovered to a Category 4. Four Atlantic weather systems -- Arlene, Bret, Cindy and Dennis -- reached Tropical Storm status by July 5, the earliest for so many named storms in recorded history. Only three major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher) have hit the U.S. coast in July in the past 100 years. When the maximum sustained winds in Hurricane Dennis peaked at 150 mph on Friday morning, Dennis officially became the strongest July Atlantic Basin hurricane on record and the strongest Atlantic hurricane this early in hurricane season.

RBA
07-10-2005, 02:07 AM
'Monster' Storm To Slam Gulf Coast With 140 MPH Winds

Forecaster: 'This Thing Is Going To Devastate...'



POSTED: 11:51 pm EDT July 9, 2005
UPDATED: 1:42 am EDT July 10, 2005


A "monster" Hurricane Dennis is expected to slam into the Gulf Coast Sunday as a Category 4 storm with 140 mph winds, according to Local 6 meteorologist Tom Sorrells.



Dennis ("]http://images.ibsys.com/2005/0710/4704266.jpg[/url] Hurricane Dennis will be a "monster" storm when it slams into the north Gulf Coast tonight and will likely cause widespread devastation, according to Local 6 meteorologist Tom Sorrells.






"This storm just flat out blew up," Sorrells said. "This thing is going to devastate where it hits. It's a monster Category 4 storm by tonight. It's going to be a huge national story for days to come."

http://images.ibsys.com/sh/images/ibs_icon/popup.gif PROJECTED PATH: NHC Map [/b] (http://www.local6.com/hurricanes/4704232/detail.html#)
http://images.ibsys.com/sh/images/ibs_icon/popup.gif MORE: 2005 Storm Forecast (http://www.local6.com/hurricanes/4704232/detail.html#)| 2005 Storm Names (http://www.local6.com/hurricanes/4704232/detail.html#)
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http://images.ibsys.com/sh/images/ibs_icon/article.gif NOTE: Check List (http://www.local6.com/weather/776961/detail.html)| Be Prepared (http://www.local6.com/weather/776931/detail.html)
http://images.ibsys.com/sh/images/ibs_icon/website.gif EXCLUSIVE: Hurricane Guide -- Storm Status (http://www.local6.com/hurricanes/index.html)
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http://images.ibsys.com/sh/images/ibs_icon/phone.gif PHONE: Florida Emergency Information Line: (800) 342-3557



Early Sunday, Dennis had regained Category 3 status with top sustained winds of 125 mph, and hurricane forecasters said the storm would likely continue to strengthen overnight, nourished by warm Gulf waters.

"If you care anything at all about Panama City or Pensacola, you really have to hurt for these folks because by tomorrow, they would have had a Category 4 hurricane rumble through there with maximum sustained winds of 140 mph -- total devestation in the area," Sorrells said.

When Dennis makes landfall, it is projected to continue to plow through parts of Mississippi as a Category 1 storm.

"It gets trapped between a high pressure center out west and a ridge of high pressure that buffered it away from Florida to the east and it becomes a major rain storm across the Tennessee Valley."

At 1 a.m. EDT, Dennis' eye was 235 miles south of Panama City in the Panhandle and 310 miles southeast of Biloxi, Miss.

After missing Key West by about 125 miles, it was moving northwest at about 14 mph and expected to turn more to the north before landfall, forecasters said.

1.4 Million Ordered To Evacuate



Evacuations were ordered for nearly 1.4 million people ahead of expected landfall Sunday afternoon.



Many residents decided to remain home, however, even with forecasts that the storm could reach Category 4 strength.

"Category 4 is not just a little bit worse -- it's much worse," said Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.





http://images.ibsys.com/2005/0710/4704202.jpg ("]http://images.ibsys.com/2005/0709/4702497.jpg The storm also forced people from the Florida Panhandle to Louisiana to pack up and evacuate as it churned along a path that could at least sideswipe areas still rebuilding from last year's four hurricanes.






"The damage increases exponentially as the wind speed increases. And no matter where it makes actual landfield, it's going to have a tremendous impact well away from the center."

Along the Gulf Coast, many residents were patching up roofs on their homes or living in government trailers because of damage caused by Hurricane Ivan just 10 months ago. For them, Dennis meant another tense weekend of long lines for gas and searching for generators and plywood.



"I'm tired of all this packing up," said Melba Turner, 70, of Fort Walton Beach. "We look like the Beverly Hillbillies when we get all packed up and leave. I'd rather stay. We're getting too old for all this fussing."





Current Warnings





A hurricane warning remains in effect for portions of the northern and northeastern Gulf Coast from the Steinhatchee River westward to the mouth of the Pearl River.



At 11 p.m., the tropical storm warning along the Florida west coast is canceled south of Bonita beach.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect along the Florida west coast from east of the Steinhatchee River southward to Bonita Beach, and for the lower Florida keys west of the Seven Mile Bridge.

A tropical storm warning is also in effect for the southeastern Louisiana coast west of the mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle, including metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Ponchartrain.



20 Deaths In Haiti, Cuba



The hurricane, blamed for at least 20 deaths in Haiti and Cuba, was expected to dump more than a half-foot of rain and swamp shores with waves and storm surge more than a story high on the Gulf Coast.



[url=") A hurricane warning remains in effect for portions of the northern and northeastern Gulf Coast from the Steinhatchee River westward to the mouth of the Pearl River.






State radio in Cuba said hundreds of homes around the island's southeastern coast had been destroyed or heavily damaged, and civil defense officials said more than 1.5 million people had fled their homes.

Early Saturday, Dennis largely spared the Florida Keys as it swept into the Gulf of Mexico.

The only signs of the damage in Key West were flooded streets littered with tree branches, plywood, street signs and other debris, but more than 211,000 homes and businesses lost power Saturday across Southern Florida, including all of Key West.

"We're holding up," Key West Mayor Jimmy Weekly said. Residents who evacuated the lower Keys were asked to away until Sunday, and visitors were told they could return Monday.

Several tornadoes in the Tampa Bay area caused minor damage such as downed trees, and more twisters were likely in parts of the Gulf of Mexico coast Sunday.



In Alabama, about 500,000 people were under evacuation orders, as were 700,000 in Florida and 190,000 in Mississippi. Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Alabama Gov. Bob Rille, mindful of Ivan last year, urged residents to evacuate if they were told to do so.

"I do worry about the folks in ... places that really got hit hard," Bush said. "They're hurting. I think there is a legitimate feeling, 'Why me? What did I do wrong."' Traffic doubled on some Mississippi highways as people fled inland from the coasts of Florida, Alabama and Louisiana. Alabama officials turned Interstate 65 into a one-way route north from the coast to Montgomery.

However, confident that the hurricane would make landfall farther east, officials in New Orleans told nearly half a million residents they could stay home. A voluntary evacuation was lifted for suburban Jefferson Parish, including the barrier island town of Grand Isle.

"We want you to be somewhat comfortable, but not totally relaxed," New Orleans Mayor Ray Angina said Saturday.

Among the evacuees were tens of thousands of military personnel, their families and much of the war equipment that officials didn't want to leave in harm's way. At Hurlburt Field, home to the Air Force's 16th Special Operations Wing, not a plane was in sight Saturday.

But many people refused to be scared away.

http://images.ibsys.com/2005/0709/4703468.jpg ("") Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami say Hurricane Dennis has strengthened and is expected to gradually get stronger as it moves over open water.






"I always stay," nightclub worker Clifton Ugh said in Gulf Shores, Ala. "I've never evacuated. We don't have any place to go. We'll have a couple of decks of cards and some candles and flashlights."

"This is home. This is what we go through," Danielle Kelson said as she filled up gas cans in Pensacola.

Some neighborhoods in Mobile, Ala., had the appearance of a typical Saturday as people mowed lawns, jogged, and shopped.

"God's going to take care of me," Dorothy McGee of Prichard, Ala., said as she shopped for groceries. And besides, she said, "I have nowhere to go."



Feeder Bands Ending In Central Fla.



The heaviest feeder bands from Hurricane Dennis traveled through Central Florida Saturday night.

"It is starting to peel away to the northwest, away from Central Florida," Sorrells said. "Some of the heavier feeder bands that we have already seen Saturday night will be the heaviest ones we will see, even though tomorrow promises to be an active day in Central Florida with a lot of thundershower activity and rain."

Sorrells said the area will still get some lighter feeder bands rolling through the Central Florida area Sunday.





Watch Local 6 Weather with Tom Sorrells, Michele Cimino and Larry Mowry for your forecast.

RFS62
07-10-2005, 07:32 AM
Cat 4, 145 mph wind speed. Same as Andrew.

Puffy
07-10-2005, 11:15 AM
Latest reports have Dennis hitting anywhere from Fort Walton Beach (a great, great little town about 40 miles east of Pensacola and about 40 miles from my house) to Mobile. Any way you look at it, the Florida Panhandle is gonna get walloped, because you never, ever wanna be on the east side of the eye, and thats where the lion share of the panhandle is gonna be.

Ugh, I hope Pensacola survives - those poor people don't deserve this so soon after Ivan

letsgojunior
07-10-2005, 11:27 AM
Puffy you've evacuated right?

Reds Fanatic
07-10-2005, 11:28 AM
Latest update is winds at 140 MPH but some gusts near the eye have been as high as 185. Hurricane force winds are over a 200 mile area.

paintmered
07-10-2005, 11:34 AM
Hurricane force winds are over a 200 mile area.


Yikes. Last I heard yesterday, it was only 40 miles. This storm must have really strengthened over the past 12-24 hours.

Puffy
07-10-2005, 11:39 AM
Puffy you've evacuated right?

Yup. I am in Central Florida right now

Reds Fanatic
07-10-2005, 11:49 AM
Yikes. Last I heard yesterday, it was only 40 miles. This storm must have really strengthened over the past 12-24 hours. Actually the newsperson that said 200 miles just changed it to say Tropical storm force winds are over a 230 mile range.

SandyD
07-10-2005, 11:49 AM
Yeah, I really feel for the people of the panhandle right now. Hope everyone stays safe.

Hurricane force winds span 40 miles. Tropical Storm force winds span 230 miles.

Puffy, I agree with you about Pensacola. Tough year for them.

Edit: whenever a storm hits like this I really want to drop what I'm doing and go help with the clean-up. Wish I could, but work and all gets in the way.

Reds Fanatic
07-10-2005, 11:51 AM
[This map shows where the winds are expected to be the worst.
http://www.crownweather.com/denniswind.gif

WVRed
07-10-2005, 12:41 PM
http://ewbullock.com/webcams/hugesize.jpg

http://www.weatherusa.net/skycamnet/showcam.php?state=Florida&id=8

RBA
07-10-2005, 02:00 PM
:(

WFTV.com
Man Accidentally Runs Over Son While Preparing To Evacuate

POSTED: 11:58 am EDT July 9, 2005

DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, Fla. -- The Florida Highway Patrol says a man accidentally ran over his three-year-old son while the family prepared to evacuate in the Panhandle ahead of Hurricane Dennis.


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Highway patrol says 32-year-old Gerald Miller was either trying to park the family's van or back up to a trailer in the driveway of his DeFuniak Springs home.

Miller's two sons, three-year-old Christopher and eight-year-old Brandin, were in the van as he put it in reverse with the right sliding door open.

FHP Corporal Mark Weeks says Miller didn't see the boys jump out of the van and ran over Christopher.

The boy was pronounced dead in the family's driveway.

Highway patrol says drugs or alcohol were not involved in the accident, and that Miller probably won't face charges.

RBA
07-10-2005, 02:08 PM
CNN said those of you in the Ohio Valley should start preparing yourselves for flooding as the storm is projected to stall inland and dump huge amount of rain.

RBA
07-10-2005, 02:11 PM
http://image.weather.com/images/maps/tropical/spec_trop7_720x486.jpg

RBA
07-10-2005, 02:52 PM
Hurricane Eye Wall hitting Land at this time. It's now a CAT III. Fort Walton Beach. Winds 120 MPH.

KronoRed
07-10-2005, 03:03 PM
Yup. I am in Central Florida right now
Good to hear

TeamMorris
07-10-2005, 03:11 PM
Watching the weather channel right now. Getting pretty nasty :eek:

The gulf coast is very beautiful and I would consider living there...after the past 2 years though I may have changes my mind! Very scary storms that they deal with! I think I will stick with vacationing there in the spring :thumbup:

RBA
07-10-2005, 03:19 PM
CNN reporting a Crestview, FL hotel is evacuating 100 people as the roof has blown off.

RBA
07-10-2005, 03:53 PM
Anderson Cooper almost got hit by a Giant Aluminum sign on CNN.

SandyD
07-10-2005, 04:00 PM
Those guys are nuts. I really, really get angry when I see them doing this stuff. Do we really need to see a person standing out in Hurricane force winds to know that it is windy? The stuff blowing around doesn't give us a clue?

Really bugs me.

So sad about the family and the child.

RBA, are you in touch with your family in Crestview? Hope they're all right.

GAC
07-10-2005, 07:58 PM
CNN said those of you in the Ohio Valley should start preparing yourselves for flooding as the storm is projected to stall inland and dump huge amount of rain.

Not that I want a hurricane to be the source, but we need the rain bad here. Been hot and dry as the dickens here for the last month. Grass is brown everywhere, and the corn/soybean ain't lookin' too good.

OnBaseMachine
07-11-2005, 12:12 PM
Just heard on the local news that there is a tropical depression forming and is headed in the general direction of Florida. Do these people ever get a break?

I'm headed to the beach on Saturday, so I hope this thing doesn't get too serious.

Red Leader
07-11-2005, 12:48 PM
I hope my main man Puffy is hunkered down safely with some Jack Daniels and his blow up doll by his side. :thumbup:

KronoRed
07-11-2005, 01:07 PM
I hope my main man Puffy is hunkered down safely with some Jack Daniels and his blow up doll by his side. :thumbup:

Image

Head

Get Out

Please

AHHH

:explode:

Puffy
07-11-2005, 01:38 PM
I hope my main man Puffy is hunkered down safely with some Jack Daniels and his blow up doll by his side. :thumbup:

I had to buy a new one. The old one, well, served her purpose but had become old and overused.

Red Leader
07-11-2005, 02:00 PM
Glad to hear your safe (and taken care of) :thumbup:

RFS62
07-11-2005, 02:04 PM
http://www.redszone.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2022

Raisor
07-11-2005, 02:27 PM
I give you, my back yard.

Thanks Dennis.

Red Leader
07-11-2005, 02:29 PM
I give you, my back yard.

Thanks Dennis.

Can you get the X-wing fighter to rise up out of there?

How are the mynochs this time of year? ;)

Raisor
07-11-2005, 02:33 PM
Can you get the X-wing fighter to rise up out of there?

How are the mynochs this time of year? ;)

Judge me by my size, do you? And well you should not, because my ally is the Force, and a POWERFUL ally it is...

pedro
07-11-2005, 02:35 PM
Where in Atlanta do you live Raisor?

Raisor
07-11-2005, 02:40 PM
Where in Atlanta do you live Raisor?

south side, Fayetteville.

West Cobb County, where Amanda lives, is a disaster area. I can't even get up there. Millions of dollars worth of damage. A car dealership in Douglasville is completely under water, 50 cars totaled.

My boss actually had the balls to sound pissed I was taking today off.

pedro
07-11-2005, 02:41 PM
south side, Fayetteville.

West Cobb County, where Amanda lives, is a disaster area. I can't even get up there. Millions of dollars worth of damage. A car dealership in Douglasville is completely under water, 50 cars totaled.

My boss actually had the balls to sound pissed I was taking today off.

wow. that sucks.

KronoRed
07-11-2005, 02:46 PM
Yer house ok Raisor?

How much water there in Swamp Phil?

Raisor
07-11-2005, 02:48 PM
Yer house ok Raisor?

How much water there in Swamp Phil?

The house is actually fine.

We've got a creek that runs in our backyard that overflowed. It's a soggy mess right now, but the neighbors are far far worse.

With all the water in the back, if a polar bear comes looking for fish, I'm leaving.

Just sayin.

Red Leader
07-11-2005, 02:50 PM
The house is actually fine.

We've got a creek that runs in our backyard that overflowed. It's a soggy mess right now, but the neighbors are far far worse.

With all the water in the back, if a polar bear comes looking for fish, I'm leaving.

Just sayin.

With all of that standing water around for a couple days at least, you may want to make sure to spray yourself down real good when going outside. Sounds like a good place to breed West Nile to me.

Raisor
07-11-2005, 02:59 PM
With all of that standing water around for a couple days at least, you may want to make sure to spray yourself down real good when going outside. Sounds like a good place to breed West Nile to me.


oh. joy.

pedro
07-11-2005, 02:59 PM
The house is actually fine.

We've got a creek that runs in our backyard that overflowed. It's a soggy mess right now, but the neighbors are far far worse.

With all the water in the back, if a polar bear comes looking for fish, I'm leaving.

Just sayin.

I'd leave if any rednecks come by turtle hunting too.

http://www.albinotricolors.com/images/va%20turtle%20hunting.jpg

KronoRed
07-11-2005, 04:43 PM
oh. joy.
Just move ;)

OnBaseMachine
07-12-2005, 12:27 PM
Emily Becomes Fifth Named Storm Of Hurricane Season

UPDATED: 11:27 am EDT July 12, 2005

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A new tropical storm picked up speed and was expected to gain strength as it churned toward the Caribbean early Tuesday.

Tropical Storm Emily was 575 miles east-southeast of Barbados. Hurricane watches have been issued for Barbados, Grenada, St. Lucia and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, meaning hurricane-force winds could be felt by late Wednesday or early Thursday. A tropical storm watch has been issued for Tobago.

The storm is predicted to be near Puerto Rico by Friday and could approach the U.S. mainland by early next week.

At 11 a.m EDT, the storm had maximum sustained winds of about 50 mph and was moving west at about 20 mph. It was expected to strengthen while gradually turning toward the west-northwest.

"The Bermuda high is blocking it from moving northward and the trade winds are blowing right across the Lesser Anilles and Hispaniola," Channel 4 chief meteorologist George Winterling said Monday evening on the local station. "This track will be further north than Dennis. It will probably be next weekend before we get a good idea whether Emily will be a threat to the United States."

Forcasters expect Emily could grow into a Category 2 hurricane before reaching the islands. It is currently at 11.0 north and 51.3 west, or 2,350 east southeast of Jacksonville.

Emily's formation late Monday was the earliest date on record for five named storms to develop, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

The Atlantic hurricane season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30.

http://www.news4jax.com/weather/4709124/detail.html