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macro
07-22-2005, 10:41 AM
What to you think about this? I like it! The first Sunday in April has always been a day of celebration for me because of the extra hour of daylight tacked onto the end of the day. I do see the reason for concern for the extra hour of darkness being added to the morning, though.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-07-21-daylight-recreation_x.htm

Spring forward early, fall back late
By Wendy Koch, USA TODAY

Good news, golfers and after-school soccer players: Congress may give you four extra weeks a year of longer days in which to play.
The prospect of more daylight time was advanced Thursday when lawmakers agreed to add a four-week extension of the practice to an energy bill.

Daylight-saving would start three weeks earlier than usual, the second Sunday of March, and end a week later, the second Sunday of November. "Daylight-saving time is a fantastically effective spending program," says Michael Downing, author of the book Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time.

"You give Americans an extra hour of daylight, and they go outdoors," he says. "And when they go outdoors, they spend money."

An extension costs the U.S. government little or nothing, but it creates huge economic ripple effects. In favor are retailers and recreation groups, including the Sporting Goods Manufacturing Association and the National Golf Course Owners Association, which expect a boom in business.


The American Transport Association, which represents the nation's airlines, opposes it. The group says it would cost airlines millions in lost connections and uncompetitive schedules abroad. After it objected, Congress scaled back an initial two-month extension to one month and put off implementation until 2007.

The debate over daylight-saving time is about more than money.

Anne Weselak, president of the National Parent Teacher Association, says an extension means more kids would go to school in the dark. They would have trouble crossing the street, drivers might not see them, and abductions would be easier, she says.

David Prerau, author of Seize the Daylight, says the number of accidents involving kids going to school rose after daylight-saving time was last extended, in 1986. However, he says, that was more than offset by a drop in accidents after school.

Prerau says an extension would save energy, which is why it was added to the energy bill. He worked on a Department of Transportation study in the mid-1970s that estimated that daylight-saving time saves 1% of Americans' energy consumption.

Downing says claims of energy savings are outdated and unproved. He says that when daylight extends into the evening, Americans drive more and use more gas.

For decades, a mere one-hour shift in the nation's daylight has sparked vociferous debate, about winners and losers, costs and benefits.

Hollywood feared people would spend less time inside watching movies. In the 1930s, movie mogul Harold Franklin, then-president of Fox-West Coast, said that daylight-saving time cut theater receipts 10%-30% and warned that it "has unlimited possibilities for evil to us."

Proponents, beginning with Benjamin Franklin, have included department store magnates, 7-Eleven, sporting groups and even candy makers, who once sent pumpkins filled with candy to senators so they would endorse daylight-saving on Halloween.

In 1986, when Congress last extended it, the barbecue industry estimated its sales in grills and charcoal would rise $150 million yearly. Drive-in movie theaters were opposed, arguing that it would cut ticket sales.

For many Americans, though, daylight-saving time is about lifestyle, not economics.

Downing, skeptical of energy savings, says he nevertheless loves his long summer evenings.

"With daylight-saving time, people really do spend less time in their homes," he says.

"Most people adapt fairly quickly" to a one-hour change, says Ann Romaker at the Sleep Disorders Center at St. Luke's Hospital in Kansas City.

But she says the minority of Americans who are "true morning people" do not and will miss their sunshine.

Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., who proposed the extension, says daylight-saving time makes most people smile. "We all just feel sunnier after we set the clocks ahead," he says.

RANDY IN INDY
07-22-2005, 10:42 AM
I'm all for it. I wish it were daylight savings time, year round.

RedsFan75
07-22-2005, 10:56 AM
Either DST all year or Standard Time all year. I hate the changing.

RedsBaron
07-22-2005, 11:07 AM
I'm all for it. I wish it were daylight savings time, year round.I agree.

Johnny Vander m
07-22-2005, 11:19 AM
Either DST all year or Standard Time all year. I hate the changing.

I agree, stupid. They have it backwards, gets dark too early in the winter time, stays lite to late in the summer. Reverse it and it gets dark an hour later in the winter and visa versa.

Chip R
07-22-2005, 11:23 AM
I agree, stupid. They have it backwards, gets dark too early in the winter time, stays lite to late in the summer. Reverse it and it gets dark an hour later in the winter and visa versa.
They didn't even have the sun when you were young so what are you complaining about? ;)

SunDeck
07-22-2005, 11:31 AM
Are they going to add all the extra daylight to one day? That'd be cool.

RFS62
07-22-2005, 11:32 AM
I'm all for it. I wish it were daylight savings time, year round.


Heck yes, me too.

macro
07-22-2005, 12:17 PM
Are they going to add all the extra daylight to one day? That'd be cool.

Yes, but only in Alaska.

westofyou
07-22-2005, 12:24 PM
stays lite to late in the summer.

It gets completely dark here about 10:30 here in the summer

pedro
07-22-2005, 12:27 PM
It gets completely dark here about 10:30 here in the summer

and about 5 in the winter.

SunDeck
07-22-2005, 12:34 PM
and about 5 in the winter.

Ohhhh, that's bad.
I had a job as a work study in Northern Germany. It was dark when I left for work and dark when I got off. And I worked in a windowless archive. It was like a Jim Jarmusch film.

westofyou
07-22-2005, 12:45 PM
and about 5 in the winter.

Pshaww..... 4:15 is more like it.

Good time to drink.

Chip R
07-22-2005, 12:51 PM
A saw a guy on Book TV on Cspan a few weeks ago who had a book about Daylight Savings time and all the changes that heve taken place not only for the entire country but for each respective state as well. It was actually pretty interesting.

SunDeck
07-22-2005, 12:54 PM
A saw a guy on Book TV on Cspan a few weeks ago who had a book about Daylight Savings time and all the changes that heve taken place not only for the entire country but for each respective state as well. It was actually pretty interesting.

To you and Cliff Claven... :D

gonelong
07-22-2005, 01:04 PM
Pshaww..... 4:15 is more like it.

Good time to drink.

It has to get dark early in the winter, Dude's got to play pool and bowl sometime.

GL

Chip R
07-22-2005, 01:21 PM
To you and Cliff Claven... :D
:mooner:

savafan
07-23-2005, 12:21 AM
From the really real important legislation department.

http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/07/22/congress.daylighttime.ap/index.html

WASHINGTON (AP) -- An agreement was reached Thursday to extend daylight-saving time in an effort to conserve energy, but not to the extent the House approved in April.

House and Senate negotiators on an energy bill agreed to begin daylight-saving time three weeks earlier, on the second Sunday in March, and extend it by one week to the first Sunday in November. The House bill would have added a month in the spring and another in the fall.

According to some senators, farmers complained that a two-month extension could adversely affect livestock, and airline officials said it would have complicated scheduling of international flights.

"We ought to take a hard look at this before we jump into it," said Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, who questioned how much oil savings the extension would produce.

Reps. Edward Markey, D-Massachusetts, and Fred Upton, R-Michigan, agreed to scale back their original proposal, and Senate negotiators accepted the new version, along with a call for a study on how much daylight-saving time actually affects oil consumption.

"The beauty of daylight-saving time is that it just makes everyone feel sunnier," said Markey.

Upton noted that the extension means daylight-saving time will continue through Halloween, adding to safety. "Kids across the nation will soon rejoice," said Upton, because they'll have another hour of daylight trick-or-treating.

Lawmakers said they hoped to complete the energy legislation next week.

Unassisted
07-23-2005, 12:37 AM
A little change now. A little more change later, hopefully. It's OK by me. I like having more daylight in the evening.

RBA
07-23-2005, 12:52 AM
"We ought to take a hard look at this before we jump into it," said Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, who questioned how much oil savings the extension would produce.
Hey, an extra hour of being home in the daylight is going to cost a lot more for families in the desert southwest. Everyone will be home an hour earlier, they will use more energy cooling their homes. That's not good for me.

Redsfaithful
07-23-2005, 03:15 AM
I really wish we'd do away with it all together.

SandyD
07-23-2005, 05:30 PM
When I lived there, Arizona didn't go a DST at all. Who wants an extra hour of daylight in the summer when temps are 100+? I liked it that way.

Here, it doesn't make as much difference whether the sun is up or not. Doesn't really "cool off" til after 10 anyway.

Personally, the only problem I see waking up in the morning. I have trouble waking up much before sunrise.

creek14
07-23-2005, 05:40 PM
It was dark when I left for work and dark when I got off. And I worked in a windowless archive.
That's how it is for me now. Sometimes in the winter I go more than a week without seeing the sun.

Explains a lot, doesn't it.

REDREAD
07-25-2005, 12:28 PM
According to some senators, farmers complained that a two-month extension could adversely affect livestock, .

Those cows sure get cranky when you mess with their clocks. :laugh:
How is the livestock going to even notice the difference?

creek14
07-25-2005, 12:38 PM
Those cows sure get cranky when you mess with their clocks. :laugh:
How is the livestock going to even notice the difference?
So RR is a city boy.

It's amazing how animals get this internal clock thing going. My grandfathers cows would all start walking towards the barn about 1/2 hour before milking time. They just knew.

gonelong
07-25-2005, 12:43 PM
So RR is a city boy.

It's amazing how animals get this internal clock thing going. My grandfathers cows would all start walking towards the barn about 1/2 hour before milking time. They just knew.

Yep. One of the many jobs I have had along the way was working on my neighbors dairy farm. If you were running a little late the cows would be outside ready to get started and Mooing at you to get your butt in gear. Stupid cows.

GL

Blimpie
07-25-2005, 01:25 PM
When I lived there, Arizona didn't go a DST at all. Who wants an extra hour of daylight in the summer when temps are 100+? I liked it that way.

Here, it doesn't make as much difference whether the sun is up or not. Doesn't really "cool off" til after 10 anyway.

Personally, the only problem I see waking up in the morning. I have trouble waking up much before sunrise.I don't know if it is still as confusing today, but at one time during the late 1980's, the city of Indianapolis voted against implementation of DST...yet, the balance of the state switched their clocks twice per year.

Every time I would drive through that town, I couldn't help but think of the fifth dentist on that Trident commercial... :angry:

Roy Tucker
07-29-2005, 04:36 PM
Reading a trade rag today, one fallout from this will be a mini-Y2K exercise in the software world.

Much software has standard time/daylight time adjustments in it and those will all have to be examined and possibly modified. In my neck of the woods, Y2K was much-ado about nothing.

SunDeck
07-29-2005, 04:52 PM
I don't know if it is still as confusing today, but at one time during the late 1980's, the city of Indianapolis voted against implementation of DST...yet, the balance of the state switched their clocks twice per year.

Every time I would drive through that town, I couldn't help but think of the fifth dentist on that Trident commercial... :angry:

The state currently does not observe DST. Officially. However, there are counties in the Southeast and Northwest that stay with the nearest major Metro areas, Cincinnati and Chicago.

In 2004, by a narrow vote the General Assembly voted to move to DST. However, there is still debate about whether the state would go to Eastern (the current situation) or with Central. Evidently, the state has to present this to the Federal Gov't, whichever agency regulates the timezones.

Chip R
03-07-2008, 02:02 PM
In honor of the change this weekend, here's an article saying it costs more than it saves.

http://tech.yahoo.com/blog/null/83073

Degenerate39
03-07-2008, 02:30 PM
I could've told you that. To me all it does is mess my sleeping schedule up.

KronoRed
03-07-2008, 03:10 PM
It should be abolished, it should have been abolished a long time ago.

M2
03-07-2008, 03:28 PM
Does it give you more daylight after the end of the work day? If so, then it works for me.

As for the rest, ban air conditioners.

Nugget
03-07-2008, 03:30 PM
Bugger the energy debate - at least some of us get to see the sun more often when we go home.

15fan
03-07-2008, 03:42 PM
Does it give you more daylight after the end of the work day? If so, then it works for me.

As for the rest, ban air conditioners.

Agree on the first part.

Ban AC? I'll give up mine right after you give up your heating system.

MWM
03-07-2008, 03:47 PM
Does it give you more daylight after the end of the work day? If so, then it works for me.


My thoughts exactly. Never understood the dislike for having another hour of daylight.

pedro
03-07-2008, 03:50 PM
I love daylight savings time.

As for AC, I don't have it.

SunDeck
03-07-2008, 04:00 PM
I can get 18 holes in after work in June. That's gotta be worth something, right there.

Cyclone792
03-07-2008, 04:02 PM
If they're going to abolish either time setup, then abolish standard time. I could care less if it's light out at 6:30 in the morning, but I damn well want it to be light out at 8:30 to 9 at night.

Rojo
03-07-2008, 04:05 PM
If they're going to abolish either time setup, then abolish standard time. I could care less if it's light out at 6:30 in the morning, but I damn well want it to be light out at 8:30 to 9 at night.

That's it. I've always loved the daylight after work but I don't like my clock being jerked around.

Highlifeman21
03-07-2008, 04:58 PM
So this will be the weekend in Athens, OH when they riot b/c bar patrons are losing an hour of drinking time?

Gotta love tradition.

M2
03-07-2008, 05:05 PM
Ban AC? I'll give up mine right after you give up your heating system.

I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.

pedro
03-07-2008, 05:07 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.

that and garage door openers.

pedro
03-07-2008, 05:08 PM
So this will be the weekend in Athens, OH when they riot b/c bar patrons are losing an hour of drinking time?

Gotta love tradition.

we didn't really riot per se. we were just just a little grumpy.

Unassisted
03-07-2008, 05:13 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.Even though it makes southerners smell so much better? ;)

Rojo
03-07-2008, 05:30 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.

I thought southerners ruined it. (Ducks)

~Rojo, born in beautiful Beaufort, South Carolina.

Chip R
03-07-2008, 05:32 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.


That and General Sherman.

KronoRed
03-07-2008, 05:35 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.

Yes, they are known as lunatics

MWM
03-07-2008, 05:48 PM
How did AC ruin the south? I've not heard that before.

pedro
03-07-2008, 05:50 PM
How did AC ruin the south? I've not heard that before.

nobody sits on their front porch or stands out at the fence chatting anymore because it's too damn hot to sit inside.

M2
03-07-2008, 06:25 PM
nobody sits on their front porch or stands out at the fence chatting anymore because it's too damn hot to sit inside.

Exactly, the heat created a more social, slower pace of life.

RANDY IN INDY
03-07-2008, 07:10 PM
I know a lot of southerners who maintain AC ruined the south.

I kinda like the AC more than I like the "funeral home fans" that they used to hand out on Sunday mornings at church. I do remember slow days in the summer where we all sat on the front porch or under a shade tree and just watched time pass by. Kinda miss those days.

RANDY IN INDY
03-07-2008, 07:13 PM
BTW, I love daylight savings time. Leave it that way year round.

camisadelgolf
03-08-2008, 01:37 PM
Personally, I think we should add two hours to every day and take out February to compensate.

Rojo
03-08-2008, 03:11 PM
Personally, I think we should add two hours to every day and take out February to compensate.

Not a bad idea. I had a dissimlar idea, however. Add a thirteenth month. Twelve months would have 28 days -- exactly four weeks. December would have 29 and you'd still have a February 29th every four years. It would really help accounting, payroll, etc....

pedro
03-08-2008, 03:13 PM
Not a bad idea. I had a dissimlar idea, however. Add a thirteenth month. Twelve months would have 28 days -- exactly four weeks. December would have 29 and you'd still have a February 29th every four years. It would really help accounting, payroll, etc....

we could call it "smarch"

SandyD
03-08-2008, 04:04 PM
Exactly, the heat created a more social, slower pace of life.

My dad's neighbors (when he was growing up) said they used to love to listen to my dad's family's dinner conversations thru their open window.

Teachers used to punish us by turning off the fans and closing the windows.

I admit to being spoiled, but I won't live without a/c. I can't stand the heat/humidity.

Oh, and if you lived in Arizona, you wouldn't be so anxious for that extra hour of daylight. I remember the weight that was lifted from my shoulders when the sun went down out there. Gorgeous sunsets, and a sigh of relief. Sitting out under the stars was MUCH more pleasurable then sitting out in the evening.

15fan
03-08-2008, 09:56 PM
How did AC ruin the south? I've not heard that before.

There are 2 ways to look at it:

1: Allegedly, no one sits outside on their porch, sipping lemonade or sweet tea, and chatting with the neighbors.

or

2: It made it bearable for yankee transplants to start migrating en masse to dixie as coporations sought to grow marketshare and locate operations in the southeast. More yankees = bad by traditional southerners.

(I'd make the case that it's a push as to whether A/C or television was the single biggest technological advance that gave the necessary traction to the civil rights movement to usher in some much needed social change in this part of the world. If A/C thus "ruined" the South, I'd argue that it was a ruining that was long overdue...)

Unassisted
03-08-2008, 10:07 PM
nobody sits on their front porch or stands out at the fence chatting anymore because it's too damn hot to sit inside.
Just imagine what a dent AC must have made in lemonade and mint julep consumption!

Rojo
03-09-2008, 09:03 PM
(I'd make the case that it's a push as to whether A/C or television was the single biggest technological advance that gave the necessary traction to the civil rights movement to usher in some much needed social change in this part of the world. If A/C thus "ruined" the South, I'd argue that it was a ruining that was long overdue...)


MLK made the prediction that the first beneficiaries of desegration would be white southerners.

WebScorpion
03-12-2008, 02:43 PM
Why don't we all just agree that the work day should be from 6:30am to 2:30pm and have TONS of sunlight left after work? http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/wootrock.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

remdog
03-12-2008, 05:14 PM
BTW, I love daylight savings time. Leave it that way year round.

I'm with you, Bubba! :)

Let's just go to all DST all the time!

Rem

rotnoid
03-15-2008, 01:22 PM
Why don't we all just agree that the work day should be from 6:30am to 2:30pm and have TONS of sunlight left after work? http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/wootrock.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

I work the 6:45 to 3:15 and love every minute of it. I've got time for the kids and wife before AND after supper. It's a change I wish I'd made sooner.

Rojo
03-18-2008, 01:50 PM
Why don't we all just agree that the work day should be from 6:30am to 2:30pm and have TONS of sunlight left after work? http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/wootrock.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

I was thinking we should make it noon til 8pm. I have to force myself to bed at 1am.

There's an interesting theory about this. The conjecture is that some people may have inherited genetic traits of farmers while others still have hunting "genes".

Farmers like mornings, routine and predictibality while hunters like nights, multi-tasking and excitement.

Since we live in a farmer's world, hunters are SOL and diagnosed with ADD, hyperactivity and such.