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jmcclain19
07-26-2005, 05:43 AM
Did anyone else know this? It's supposed to be a month long celebration of American made beers.

Here's the website

http://www.americanbeermonth.com/

So raise a tall, frosty, American made beer sometime in the next week everyone.

Noting it's American Beer month, here's an interesting piece on the state of the American Beer from the Boston Globe




Brewed for distinction

By Joyce Pellino Crane, Globe Correspondent | July 24, 2005

If beer went the way of coffee, there'd be a brew pub on every corner, and ordering a brewski would be just as commonplace as asking for a medium Sumatra with a shot of vanilla.


But even with July being American Beer Month, it's going to take a cultural revolution to turn Americans into Bavarians, at least in terms of beer drinking, said Jim Koch, founder of the Boston Beer Co., whose Samuel Adams beer makes up an infinitesimal part of the $77 billion-a-year industry.

''In southern Germany beer is part of their diet. It's viewed as food," Koch said. ''The same way we sit at lunch and eat out of the bread basket, they sip liquid bread."

For local craft brewers like David Asadoorian of the Concord Brewery in Lowell, greater demand for his product would turn a business that's just breaking even today into a profitable one.

Asadoorian belongs to a small but passionate breed of microbrew owners, producers, and distributors of specialty beers in batches (15,000 barrels or less) that are minuscule compared with the mass marketers. The brewery owner, whose day job is still accounting, has a long way to go before his prospects grow brighter.

As much as he hopes to make money, Asadoorian said he's in the business for the love of it.

''The coolest thing about it is I own a brewery," he said. ''It's fun."

Ray Daniels, director of craft beer marketing for the Boulder, Colo.-based Brewers Association, sees a promising future for craft brewers like Asadoorian.

''There's never been a better time to be a small brewer. Business is booming for the craft beer maker," he said.

Daniels defines a craft beer as one, such as Samuel Adams, whose brewer focuses on flavor and not ''drinkability," a promotional word used for the mass-produced Budweiser.

Still, despite Daniels's optimism, boosting sales requires advertising, and revenues at the Concord Brewery, for example, don't support that expense. It's a vicious cycle that Asadoorian said he'll overcome in time as sales increase.

This is the plight of the microbrewer, a business that mixes economics with artistry and yields a product that requires a following.

Beer drinkers are a loyal breed that returns to the same brand, say industry analysts. Despite its association with pleasure and fun, beer drinking requires some knowledge of the different styles, types, and characteristics that fall under the beer umbrella.

Though all beer starts out with water, yeast, malt, and hops, variations in bitterness, density, and color yield hundreds of different flavored beverages.

Smitty's Liquors in Tewksbury, for example, says it sells 85 beers, including ports, stouts, lagers, ales, and wheat beers. There are beers that taste bitter, those that taste fruity, and beers that are spicy. Some beer drinkers go for only imported beers such as Heineken and Labatt. Others prefer the regional beers of Samuel Adams and Boston-based Harpoon Brewery, while the bulk of Americans go for the nationally distributed brands like Budweiser or Miller.

Within Massachusetts, there are about three dozen microbreweries and brewpubs, which are restaurants that serve beer made on site. The only ones within the Globe NorthWest coverage area are the Concord Brewery and Martha's Exchange in Nashua, though avid beer drinkers can find small brewers in nearby communities such as Manchester, N.H., Haverhill, Waltham, and Cambridge.

Underscoring the challenges of the business, microbreweries in Wilmington and Derry, N.H., have gone out of business in recent years.

Asadoorian bought his business in November 2003 from master brewer Michael Labbe, who continues to work at Concord Brewery as an employee. Asadoorian, who was Labbe's accountant, said he relishes the business challenges, while Labbe prefers the artistry of beer crafting, opting to shed the operational headaches.

Now it's up to Asadoorian to figure out how to sell more beer.

One of the fastest ways to gain recognition for a brand, say industry experts, is by selling it at a professional sports team's ballpark. Unfortunately, that's one of the most difficult venues to break into, said Koch, who waited 15 years sell his brew at Fenway Park.

''We had to change people's fundamental perception about American beer and create a whole new category of beer in people's minds," he said. ''When we started, nobody knew what a craft beer or microbrew was and the whole idea of quality American beer was an oxymoron."

Koch got a few breaks, however. He won a spot at the Patriots' Foxboro Stadium in the mid-1990s because of a connection to the Kraft family, and by the late '90s, he was advertising at Celtics games.

Asadoorian has his sights set on the Lowell Spinners games, but Budweiser is a sponsor of the Red Sox-affiliated team, which he believes leaves little room for other beer vendors.

"Opportunities for Concord or some of the other brewers around do exist," said Brian Lindsay, the Spinners' vice president of business operations. "It's just that we have a relationship with [Tewksbury distributor] D.J. Reardon right now -- which does not leave out anybody else. Things are the way they are, and next year they may be something else."

''Being in those parks is one of the ways we would have the opportunity to have people try our beer because we have a captive audience . . . ," said Asadoorian. ''Something like that would be a huge public relations benefit to us."

Anheuser-Busch of St. Louis is the largest beer distributor in the country, claiming 50 percent of the US market, according to a company spokesman. Miller, Coors, and Pabst are distant competitors. Even after 20 years, Koch has only one-half of 1 percent of the market, underscoring the difficulty of branding such a specialty item.

US beer drinkers consumed 206 million barrels in 2004, with 6.6 million of those craft beers, according to Beer Marketer's Insights of Nanuet, N.Y., a beer industry informational website. Though liquor sales have been flat in recent years, the Brewers Association claims the craft beer segment of the industry grew by 7.2 percent in volume from 2003 to 2004.

Nonetheless, Anheuser-Busch is in no danger of losing a significant market share to a microbrewer anytime soon, Daniels said.

''It's a challenging business," he said of craft beer. ''I liken it to something like the music business because there's a tremendous amount of romantic appeal . . . there's a lot of people who will work for not a lot of money or put their own money into it."

That's where Asadoorian finds himself. With a payroll of three full-time and two part-time employees and annual production of about 3,500 barrels (each containing 31 gallons), he says he's breaking even. If the company can increase sales, Asadoorian plans to put the profits into advertising. Within a few years, he hopes to double production, and at that point, the business would yield a profit.

But Daniels has got his eye on the big picture, imagining increased demand for quality brews at higher prices.

''What Starbucks did is make coffee into an affordable luxury," he said, ''and that, indeed, is what craft beer is."

GAC
07-26-2005, 08:20 AM
Why only a month? ;)

919191
07-26-2005, 08:57 AM
I'm glad it is in a 31 day month!

Roy Tucker
07-26-2005, 09:06 AM
I like beer.

zombie-a-go-go
07-26-2005, 10:03 AM
I like beer.

Yes.

RFS62
07-26-2005, 10:10 AM
I like beer.



Mmmmm...... beer good

no beer bad

CrackerJack
07-26-2005, 12:48 PM
American Micro brews are thankfully putting the respect back into American brewing, there's some good ones and they are quite unique and creative.

Thank God I wasn't old enough to drink in the 70's & 80's, what a nightmare era of American beer, nothing but "McBeer" choices in mass production with plenty of water added. yuck!

westofyou
07-26-2005, 12:52 PM
Thank God I wasn't old enough to drink in the 70's & 80's, what a nightmare era of American beer, nothing but "McBeer" choices in mass production with plenty of water added. yuck!

Ah yes.... then one day a friend says to me in 1987... try this, It's called Sierra Nevada.

KronoRed
07-26-2005, 12:56 PM
I don't like beer

Guess I'll stick with apple juice :D

Crash Davis
07-26-2005, 12:57 PM
Ah yes.... then one day a friend says to me in 1987... try this, It's called Sierra Nevada.

I see the Sierra Nevada often when I'm reaching for my Killian's or Leinie's, but I've never bought it. Is it that good?

CrackerJack
07-26-2005, 01:08 PM
Ah yes.... then one day a friend says to me in 1987... try this, It's called Sierra Nevada.

So one or two came around at the end of the decade. The variety was utterly lacking in those days (I drank plenty of beer in the late 80's any ways as a HS senior).

And yes Sierra Nevada is very good Crash, IMO.

westofyou
07-26-2005, 01:10 PM
I see the Sierra Nevada often when I'm reaching for my Killian's or Leinie's, but I've never bought it. Is it that good?

I love their Pale and Summerfest. The Porter is very good and the stout is a good bottled stout at best.

They and Anchor Steam saved us in the bay Area in the late 80's.

Created a love for hops on my end... so I like my beer bitter and hoppy.

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 01:15 PM
And August is "Work your beer belly off month".

Roy Tucker
07-26-2005, 01:38 PM
Thank God I wasn't old enough to drink in the 70's & 80's, what a nightmare era of American beer, nothing but "McBeer" choices in mass production with plenty of water added. yuck!
Ah yes, the era of the Coors mystique.

To drink a Tuborg, Heineken, or a Lowenbrau made you a beer connoisseur.

There still were a lot of local breweries around but, having been raised on 3.2 beer, I have no idea if they were good or not. I think I was still a Stroh's man then. That and Rolling Rock. And lots of pot.

westofyou
07-26-2005, 01:42 PM
Ah yes, the era of the Coors mystique.

To drink a Tuborg, Heineken, or a Lowenbrau made you a beer connoisseur.

There still were a lot of local breweries around but, having been raised on 3.2 beer, I have no idea if they were good or not. I think I was still a Stroh's man then. That and Rolling Rock. And lots of pot.

Moosehead beer was very vogue as well... went well with kentucky ditch weed too.

Rojo
07-26-2005, 01:47 PM
Ah yes.... then one day a friend says to me in 1987... try this, It's called Sierra Nevada.

I used to change beers all the time. I would get on a kick, drink the hell out of it then get sick of it. But I've been drinking Sierra's steady for about 8 years. Their wheat beer is even better than the Pale.

I can remember when imports were the rage. Heineken, Moosehead, Labatt's were top shelf. What were we thinking!?

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 02:05 PM
Moosehead beer was very vogue as well... went well with kentucky ditch weed too.

Genny wide mouths, man.

Don't want to turn this into another "what's your favorite beer" thread, but I could drink this stuff for a month straight, morning, noon and night. I'm a sucker for a good Pils.

Flensburger (http://www.flens.de/)

RawOwl UK
07-26-2005, 02:07 PM
A guy at work has just returned home from a visit to Chatanooga, he was in a Hooters Bar while he was there & ordered a Beer . When the girl asked him for ID he replied "I dont often carry ID at 56 years of age" he got the beer in the end with a driving licence with no photo.

Is this always the case in the States ? Over here you could get served at 15 years old if you looked a little older !!!

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 02:11 PM
Is this always the case in the States ? Over here you could get served at 15 years old if you looked a little older !!!

Used to be pretty easy, but not so any more. And don't forget, you folks are getting hammered and boarding a train home. We get into our pickups, drive down the wrong side of the street and plow into crowds of people waiting at crosswalks.

westofyou
07-26-2005, 02:16 PM
Is this always the case in the States ? Over here you could get served at 15 years old if you looked a little older !!!

All you guys get a head start on us with that hard cider too.

RawOwl UK
07-26-2005, 02:26 PM
All you guys get a head start on us with that hard cider too.

:beerme: MMMM The Cider, I like a pint of Woodpecker Cider(with a couple of chunks of ice) sitting outside the pub on a hot sunny day .

Seriously though I dont find too many problems in the UK with drinking at 18. Of course trouble does happen when alcohol fueled BUT getting used to it when young does take the novelty value away from people when they become legal.

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 02:31 PM
getting used to it when young does take the novelty value away from people when they become legal.

That is exactly the impression I have gotten. My cousins in Germany are in their teens and they pretty much are allowed to have a beer now and then. Overall, I have the impression that alcoholic drinks just aren't thought about in the same way there. Binge drinking would be entirely out of the question for most of the Europeans I know. Having 2-3 pints in an evening? No problem. But drinking until you hurl? That seems ridiculous to them.
Does that square with your experience RawOwl?

westofyou
07-26-2005, 02:36 PM
Having 2-3 pints in an evening? No problem.

Now we're talking... I'll have to take you up on that offer next time I'm in town.

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 02:40 PM
Now we're talking... I'll have to take you up on that offer next time I'm in town.
Is that a lot? It explains a lot if it is.
:beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme:

RawOwl UK
07-26-2005, 03:19 PM
Having 2-3 pints in an evening? No problem. But drinking until you hurl? That seems ridiculous to them.
Does that square with your experience RawOwl?

Well :help: Monday night, is pool night for me. I usually finish work at 5 then go out around 7 get home around 11:30 . I usually drink around 9 pints. Some mornings I feel rough sometimes like I hadn't had a drink.

Binge drinking happens a lot where I live tbh, but it is controlled. You will find people where I live in the local bar when it opens at 10:30 (back door) untill around 6pm then stagger harmlessly home.

westofyou
07-26-2005, 03:23 PM
Is that a lot? It explains a lot if it is.
:beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme: :beerme:

When I have to sleep at my inlaws yes.... :bang: If it's not a 8.0 then I can handle quite a few, but the higher the booze content the less I can drink in volumn.

Rojo
07-26-2005, 03:33 PM
Well :help: Monday night, is pool night for me. I usually finish work at 5 then go out around 7 get home around 11:30 . I usually drink around 9 pints. Some mornings I feel rough sometimes like I hadn't had a drink.

Your Monday pool night sounds like my Thursday pool night. I swear every time that I'm going to keep it under three beers but I usually end up closer to 6 beers and two shots of bourbon. Fridays at work are hell.

Puffy
07-26-2005, 03:38 PM
So, July is American Beer Month.

In Puffy's world the following are Beer months - January, March, February, April, May, July, June, August, September, December, October and November.

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 03:40 PM
Well :help: Monday night, is pool night for me. I usually finish work at 5 then go out around 7 get home around 11:30 . I usually drink around 9 pints. Some mornings I feel rough sometimes like I hadn't had a drink.



I can't drink that much and still swim. :D

RFS62
07-26-2005, 03:41 PM
Puffy's world is a happy place.

jmcclain19
07-26-2005, 03:48 PM
I bought a twelver of Samuel Adams Summer Ale to go with my recent streak of a local microbrew's Scottish Ale that I'm hooked on. I plan to finish out beer month in style.

I still have quite a few Sam Adams Cherry Wheat special from the early in the summer biding their time in my beer fridge.

Good times

westofyou
07-26-2005, 03:51 PM
Fruit in my beer... I'm not listening.

http://usernomics.com/images/earhands.jpg

jmcclain19
07-26-2005, 03:56 PM
Something tells me WOY you're not a fan of Pyramid's stuff either

Heh - if Cherry beer is good enough for Sam Adams, than it's good enough for me.

Puffy
07-26-2005, 04:00 PM
Heh - if Cherry beer is good enough for Sam Adams, than it's good enough for me.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2004-9/825505/cs_samjackson2.jpg

Yachtzee
07-26-2005, 04:05 PM
Well :help: Monday night, is pool night for me. I usually finish work at 5 then go out around 7 get home around 11:30 . I usually drink around 9 pints. Some mornings I feel rough sometimes like I hadn't had a drink.


What I wouldn't give to head on down to the local pub and have a pint of real, cask-conditioned, hand-pulled English ale. For all the advances we've made here in the US during the microbrewery revolution, the one thing that hasn't taken hold that I'd like to see more of is cask-conditioned ale delivered by way of the "beer machine" as I believe they call it. No forced carbonation whatsoever. Delicious. It also helped me find the answer to the age-old question of Americans visiting England, "What is a firkin?"

Yachtzee
07-26-2005, 04:11 PM
Something tells me WOY you're not a fan of Pyramid's stuff either

Heh - if Cherry beer is good enough for Sam Adams, than it's good enough for me.

I just visited Pyramid when I was Seattle a few weeks ago. Good stuff. My wife, who is usually a Bud Lite drinker, enjoyed the apricot. I was more partial to the pub draft they had on tap. Went nicely with the fish tacos. I was also able to hit the Pike Brewery and Hale's (where my brother had his rehearsal dinner). Good beers all.

westofyou
07-26-2005, 04:14 PM
What I wouldn't give to head on down to the local pub and have a pint of real, cask-conditioned, hand-pulled English ale. For all the advances we've made here in the US during the microbrewery revolution, the one thing that hasn't taken hold that I'd like to see more of is cask-conditioned ale delivered by way of the "beer machine" as I believe they call it. No forced carbonation whatsoever. Delicious. It also helped me find the answer to the age-old question of Americans visiting England, "What is a firkin?"

3 out of every 5 pubs here in PDX have hand pulls.

Yachtzee
07-26-2005, 04:18 PM
3 out of every 5 pubs here in PDX have hand pulls.

I think I might have found the destination for my next vacation.

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 04:41 PM
3 out of every 5 pubs here in PDX have hand pulls.
Yeah, it's a shame. So many johns have automatic flushes now.

Puffy
07-26-2005, 04:55 PM
Yeah, it's a shame. So many johns have automatic flushes now.

Yup, those old hand pull toilets were perfect for hiding a gun. Otherwise Michael would have never been able to kill Sollozzo and McClusky

Roy Tucker
07-26-2005, 05:04 PM
3 out of every 5 pubs here in PDX have hand pulls.
Last time I went to a bar and asked for a hand pull, I almost got arrested.

GAC
07-26-2005, 08:30 PM
Last time I went to a bar and asked for a hand pull, I almost got arrested.

Depends on what kind of bar it is doesn't it?

GAC
07-26-2005, 08:33 PM
Nothing says "put a gun to my head hangover" like....

http://www.beercollections.com/Specialty-Beer-Items/Images/IM903008Open.gif

or

http://www.smsnoveltiques.com/images/radio-pabst.jpg

SunDeck
07-26-2005, 09:48 PM
Depends on what kind of bar it is doesn't it?
The Handpull may be taxable in Nevada.

Rojo
07-27-2005, 12:56 PM
Pabst is the trendy beer with ironic kids these days. Every bar in SF has it.

westofyou
07-27-2005, 12:58 PM
Pabst is the trendy beer with ironic kids these days. Every bar in SF has it.

Yeppers, that and Hamms is the Blue Collar beer of choice for the local kids paying 36K to go to Reed College.

Roy Tucker
07-27-2005, 01:13 PM
Pabst is the trendy beer with ironic kids these days. Every bar in SF has it.
Good Lord.

My daughter has been wearing my embroidered hippie belt that I bought from Chess King at the Dayton Mall circa 1968. Her guitar teacher saw it, recognized it, and offered her $500 for it.

Rojo
07-27-2005, 01:46 PM
Yeppers, that and Hamms is the Blue Collar beer of choice for the local kids paying 36K to go to Reed College.

Priceless! At my local tavern, its Pabst for the Comp Lit majors and Bud for the truck drivers.

Chip R
07-27-2005, 01:56 PM
http://www.twoharborsforum.com/discus/messages/37/1590.jpg

zombie-a-go-go
07-27-2005, 02:13 PM
Last time I went to a bar and asked for a hand pull, I almost got arrested.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

I tried Pabst last summer... being ironic just isn't worth it.

Newcastle, Sam Adams, and Bass are my drinks of choice. And Chris Moerlein at the ballpark.

SunDeck
07-27-2005, 02:24 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:

I tried Pabst last summer... being ironic just isn't worth it.

Newcastle, Sam Adams, and Bass are my drinks of choice. And Chris Moerlein at the ballpark.

Yep, when I'm so wrapped up in my persona that it affects my choice of beer, then I'm quitting altogether.

Couldn't agree more about Christian Moerlein- a quality beer before they were cool. Anyone who visits me knows to bring a twelver, since it isn't sold here.

Rojo
07-27-2005, 03:38 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:

I tried Pabst last summer... being ironic just isn't worth it.

Thank God I'm over 30 and can stop worrying about trying to be this or that. Now, I just focus on what I really like. Color me lame.