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creek14
08-05-2005, 08:19 AM
I turned on the radio at 6:05 this am. I never listen to the radio in the morning, kind of odd I decided to turn it on.

Anyway, just as I turned it on, the talking head (wasn’t Jim Scott this am) started talking about Tony Perez bobblehead night and a little boy at the game named Antonio Perez. So I decided to listen.

Seems young Antonio is the 6 year old grandson of the man who had a heart attack (and later died).

When security realized there were no other family members there with Antonio (and wanting to shield him from what was going on with his grandfather), they took him to the bullpen and Tom Hume kept him busy.

Then Jr got wind of what was going on.

Jr told Tom that he wanted Antonio in the clubhouse after the game. So Tom took him there.

They said that all the guys were great with the little guy. They gave him bats and balls and other stuff and Felipe even signed the batting helmet he wore in the All Star game and gave it to him.

But I guess Jr was the one who really took care of him until family could get there and take him home.

Poor little guy, had to endure such trauma. But huge kudo’s to Jr and the Reds for looking after him.

remdog
08-05-2005, 08:24 AM
Great response by Jr., Hume, Lopez and all the other Reds.

Sorry for the little boy's loss. At six years old I would think it's difficult for him to grasp all that is going on.

Rem

RFS62
08-05-2005, 08:30 AM
Man, what a heartbreaker.

RANDY IN INDY
08-05-2005, 09:05 AM
Sad story, but again, I am so very impressed with Ken Griffey Jr.

KittyDuran
08-05-2005, 09:11 AM
Instead of making another thread, I posted this on the game thread of 8/3/05...

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs....EWS01/508050410

Here is the article from the Enquirer this morning...

Friday, August 5, 2005
Grandpa stricken in stands, boy finds comfort on field
Reds rally around frightened child

By John Fay
Enquirer staff writer

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Bill Summee has been a police officer since 1992, but nothing prepared him for the situation he encountered Wednesday night.

Summee, now a security officer for the Reds, responded to an emergency call to Section 143 at Great American Ball Park during the seventh inning. A man had collapsed, and paramedics were working on him.

As they tried to revive the man, who did not survive the apparent heart attack, an officer handed the man's 6-year-old grandson to Summee.

Little Antonio Perez had come to the game with his grandfather, whose name the Reds did not release, to celebrate Tony Perez Bobblehead Night.

Over the next 2½ hours, Summee and numerous Reds players and coaches stepped up to comfort and entertain the boy.

"It was a bad situation," Summee said. "But I'm proud of the way we handled it as an organization."

Once he had the boy, Summee's first order of business was to get Antonio out of the stands.

He wanted to get him away from where his grandfather was being treated.

"With all the commotion, I wanted to get him out of there," Summee said. "I took him down to the concourse. He laid his head on my shoulder and asked, 'Is my Pawpaw going to be all right?' "

Summee knew by then the boy's grandfather would not recover.

"We didn't think we should be the ones to tell him," Summee said. "We didn't lie to him, but we thought his parents should tell him."

At one point, the child asked: "How am I going to get home?"

"I told him I'd take him home," Summee said. "But he knew his grandmother's name and phone number."

A call was made, but the boy is from Hamilton, and it would take awhile for his parents and grandmother to get to the ballpark.

Summee still wanted to get Antonio away from the stands, so he took him into the Reds' bullpen, where bullpen coach Tom Hume let him sit on the bench for the last two innings of the game.

Then Ken Griffey Jr. became aware of what was going on and took charge.

"Win or lose, he was coming in the clubhouse," Griffey said.

As the Reds wrapped up their 8-5 victory over the Braves, Griffey went to the bullpen and got the boy.

The players included Antonio in their high-five celebration. Then they took him into the clubhouse.

"We play a game," Griffey said later. "What he was going through doesn't compare.

"It was important that the little guy not be by himself."

Clubhouse manager Rick Stowe said the other players followed Griffey's lead and rallied around the boy.

"Jacob Cruz, Jason LaRue, Junior, they were all great with him," Stowe said. "They gave him bats, balls, wrist bands. Felipe Lopez signed the helmet he wore in the All-Star Game and gave it to him."

"Ken Griffey Jr. was extraordinary," Summee said. "He went completely out of his way to do everything he could."

Said Griffey: "We just tried to make a bad situation a little better."

E-mail jfay@enquirer.com

Caseyfan21
08-05-2005, 09:11 AM
I was at the game sitting in right field. The players were all aware of what was going on in the stands. This was during the break for the umpire, and I specifically saw Hume and other bullpenners watching with a security guard down by the bullpen (guard obviously had a radio and was listening). I also saw Junior over talking to them and then he and a couple others were watching. After reading abotu this man's death last night, I couldn't really organize my thoughts to post anything. It really caught me off guard because I was there and watched what happened from a section over. I can't even tell you how many different times I've gone to a game with grandpa and if something like that happened to me, I don't know if I could ever go back, much less ever be a fan again. I know the kid was 6, and (unfortunately for him) probably at an age where he could realize what was going on. I was hoping the players who watched what happened would do something for the kid at some point, and this seems to reaffirm my beliefs in the character that some of the Reds players possess.

I really hope that the Reds stay in contact with this kid, because this has the ability to turn into a positive. Hopefully the kid can grow up and stay a fan of baseball and not be scared to the point of ever coming back. And I really pray for this child and his family, so they can pull through an event like this.

cumberlandreds
08-05-2005, 09:39 AM
Isn't it kind of ironic that the boys name is Antonio Perez and that this happened on Tony Perez bobble head night? I'm sorry for the loss. Had to be awfully tramatic for young man. Ken Griffey,jr. just keeps impressing me as a fine man.

shredda2000
08-05-2005, 09:45 AM
The boy's family will be in my thoughts and prayers...

In today's world, boys and girls need role models like Junior. It's nice to know that above all the media hype, Junior is still a human being with a heart.

Junior is DA man :thumbup:

deltachi8
08-05-2005, 10:45 AM
Its very sad, but I am proud to be a KGJr fan even more.

Unassisted
08-05-2005, 10:48 AM
Cool story. It's good to know that our favorite team has so many great guys on it. :thumbup:

Red Leader
08-05-2005, 11:11 AM
Great response by Jr., Hume, Lopez and all the other Reds.

Sorry for the little boy's loss. At six years old I would think it's difficult for him to grasp all that is going on.

Rem

I'm not trying to pick on your post here, Rem, please don't take this personally, but I have a 6 year old son. If my Dad were to take him to a game and something happened, my son would be traumatized. 6 year olds are a lot smarter than many of us give them credit for. I'm sure with all the chaos going on, he probably didn't know exactly what was going on, but believe me when I say that this kid is going to be grieving for awhile over this. It is absoltely great that the players, coaches, and other employees had the presence of mind to get the kid away from the situation and not let him witness all that was going on with his grandfather, that diversion and the experience of meeting some of these players was really helpful, I'm sure, but this kid is going to need some couseling and help going forward to get over this experience.

Reds Fanatic
08-05-2005, 11:34 AM
I was at that game on Wednesday and I had a bad feeling he had passed away from the way they carried him out. This happened at the same time the game was stopped when the umpire was injured. You could tell several of the players knew something serious was going on in the outfield stands. Junior went into the bullpen during the whole delay in play and I am sure that was to check on the situation with the young boy. Junior has always been my favorite player and it because of more than just the way he plays the game. Junior continues to be a true class act and I am really proud of the way him and all the other people involved handled this situation.

BuckU
08-05-2005, 11:35 AM
:clap:

For Jr. & the Reds...

Joseph
08-05-2005, 11:44 AM
I don't have anything to add that hasn't already been said here. I'm just very touched by this whole thing. I'd expect no less from a man with the class of Junior Griffey.

captainmorgan07
08-05-2005, 11:49 AM
sad story but good to see some of the reds help the boy with his grief give a hand to the reds for this one

Casey_21
08-05-2005, 12:01 PM
Poor little guy.. I hope he pulls through o.k... Best wishes to the Perez's. I am also very proud of the way Griff handled the situation... But who impressed me the most was FeLo. I don't think there are many young players who would give away their first all-star helmut. That kids got a heart of gold. Kudos to all the Reds.

KittyDuran
08-05-2005, 12:22 PM
I was at that game on Wednesday and I had a bad feeling he had passed away from the way they carried him out. This happened at the same time the game was stopped when the umpire was injured. You could tell several of the players knew something serious was going on in the outfield stands. Junior went into the bullpen during the whole delay in play and I am sure that was to check on the situation with the young boy. Junior has always been my favorite player and it because of more than just the way he plays the game. Junior continues to be a true class act and I am really proud of the way him and all the other people involved handled this situation.I thought he was still alive when he was taken out - from my viewpoint [they were in my section] - the grandfather sort of waved and some of fans gave him a hand. Of course, that could have been movement because of the stretcher - and I would think that if he did pass up in the seats that they would not have pulled the sheet over his face. :(

remdog
08-05-2005, 12:31 PM
I'm not trying to pick on your post here, Rem, please don't take this personally, but I have a 6 year old son. If my Dad were to take him to a game and something happened, my son would be traumatized. 6 year olds are a lot smarter than many of us give them credit for. I'm sure with all the chaos going on, he probably didn't know exactly what was going on, but believe me when I say that this kid is going to be grieving for awhile over this. It is absoltely great that the players, coaches, and other employees had the presence of mind to get the kid away from the situation and not let him witness all that was going on with his grandfather, that diversion and the experience of meeting some of these players was really helpful, I'm sure, but this kid is going to need some couseling and help going forward to get over this experience.

No problem, RL. In fact, I think that he realized what was happening it's just that I meant that a lot of it may have been a blurr with eveything going on. I could be wrong though. Just like adults, kids assimilate differently depending upon the individual.

Either way, great response by the Reds.

Rem

Johnny Footstool
08-05-2005, 01:21 PM
Felipe even signed the batting helmet he wore in the All Star game and gave it to him.

How about some props for Felipe? That helmet had to have special meaning for him.

Team Clark
08-05-2005, 01:31 PM
Not a surprise that Tom Hume and Ken Griffey Jr were involved. Two of the kindest, classiest people I have ever met. Great story.

Gallen5862
08-05-2005, 01:45 PM
Way to go Hume and Junior and Lopez and the rest of the guys who helped take care of the little boy. :thumbup: :clap:

bucksfan
08-05-2005, 02:21 PM
Sad, heartbreaking / heartwarming story all at once. Kudos to the Reds for helping the little guy the best they could.

My daughter is 3 1/2 and I know she'd grasp a lot of what was happening in a situation like that, especially after going through losing her dog suddenly in March. She still talks about how to get up to heaven to see Sunny, proposes things like a long ladder, etc... It rips my heart out but I take comfort that I honestly believe that she pictures Sun up there running in meadows with other doggies just having a great time...

KronoRed
08-05-2005, 02:40 PM
I hope the kid remembers his granddad taking him to the game and meeting all those players more then what happened, this is just so sad to read about..prayers to him and his family

Joseph
08-05-2005, 04:55 PM
Lance just inteviewed the security officer who helped the boy initially and he recounted the story. Said all told he was at the park maybe 2 1/2 hours without anyone other than the Reds to take care of him.

If it puts anyones mind at ease, the officer said when the childs parents arrived to pick him up, the boy's first words to them were "I got to meet Ken Griffey Jr."

Little Alex
08-05-2005, 05:32 PM
When you think about it, the Reds do have a collection of some pretty darn nice guys.

For example... who is the ultimate Mr. Nice Guy in baseball? President Nice Guy? Sean Casey of course. And we have him. Lopez, Dunn, Kearns and of course Junior. Class acts each one of them. I'm sure I am leaving people out here, but the whole way they handled that 6 year old whose grandfather died at GAB just reminded me of this.

A few years ago I was working at a prominant local restaurant and Aaron Boone was very rude to one of the servers there. I think he didnt get the table he wanted or something and it was packed. Anyway, so he complains the whole evening and then leaves no tip even thoug he is a multi-millionaire.

Can you imagine the Nice Guys doing something like that? Of course not. Dunn stiffing a waitress? Nope.

Now if we can just get some Mr. Nice Guy pitching that doesn't suck, we'll be playoff bound.

realreds1
08-05-2005, 10:12 PM
A parallel moment:

http://home.att.net/~yflanagan/baseball/ricehero.html

THE DAY RICE MADE CONTACT:
ONE OF HIS MEMORABLE MOVES WAS TO AID AN INJURED YOUNG FAN

On that sunny Saturday, Aug. 7, 1982, some of the best seats at Fenway Park were in the front rows of the field boxes along the first base line. From that vantage point, fans are close to the action, without the distraction of the wire screen that protects fans behind the plate.

Tom Keane got three tickets through a friend who was close to Haywood Sullivan, the Red Sox's executive vice president. The tickets belonged to the wife of Red Sox manager Ralph Houk, but she wasn't using them. Keane used the opportunity to drive his sons, 4-year- old Jonathan and 2-year-old Matthew, from their Greenland, N.H., home to the game.

For Jonathan Keane, it was a dream come true. It was a chance to see his favorite player, promising infielder Dave Stapleton, up close. So, in the bottom of the fourth as Stapleton stepped to the plate, Jonathan Keane watched eagerly from the second row of Box 29.

A right-handed batter, Stapleton stood in against righthander Richard Dotson of the Chicago White Sox. Stapleton was late on a Dotson pitch, and he lined a foul ball to the right.

"A Quick Reaction"

Jonathan Keane is 19, a sophomore at North Carolina State. He lives in Bethlehem, N.H., and works during the summer as a waiter at Pier 2 in Portsmouth.

His only scar is a physical one -- a small line above his left eye. Keane doesn't remember anything after Stapleton made contact with the pitch, but team doctor Arthur Pappas said he had never seen so much blood at Fenway.

It happened in an instant, a little boy's dream becoming every parent's nightmare. Jonathan, who had come to Fenway that day looking for heroes, would find one.

``We were watching the game and all of a sudden I heard a `crack,' '' Tom Keane said. ``And I thought it hit the side of the dugout, because the dugout was right beside us. The ball was just hit so hard, you never even saw it. I turned around and looked and Jon was slouched over and blood was gushing out of his head.''

The foul line drive had struck the boy in the forehead, slicing open his left temple and fracturing his skull.

The damage was frighteningly obvious. There was so much blood, second baseman Jerry Remy, now a Red Sox broadcaster, nearly threw up in the dugout.

Red Sox center fielder Rick Miller, in the on-deck circle, yelled into the dugout for trainer Charlie Moss to come onto the field.

As Moss started, Jim Rice leapt past him.

The day had started routinely for Rice, who had hit a two-run double an inning earlier off Dotson to tie the score at 2. He was watching from the dugout as Stapleton batted. He heard Miller's plea but didn't see anyone moving.

Instinctively, Rice climbed into the stands and gathered Keane's bloody body into his arms. Rice carried him into the dugout, through the runway and into the trainer's room in the clubhouse. It all happened in seconds.

``It was just a reaction,'' Rice said. ``You don't have time to think about it. You just think about doing something.''

Pappas went directly from his box seat to the trainer's room, barely beating Rice into the clubhouse.

After a quick examination, the boy was put in an ambulance and taken to Children's Hospital, where he was listed in good condition.

Stapleton was shaken.

``I feel so badly,'' Stapleton said after the game. ``I just wish I could have it back.''

Stapleton visited Keane in the hospital the next day, followed by Tony La Russa, who was then the manager of the White Sox. Even Hank Aaron called. The game had been an NBC Game of the Week, and Aaron had seen it. He called Children's Hospital to make sure a boy he had never met was OK.

Father won't forget

Jonathan recovered from his injuries and was back at Fenway Park April 5,1983, for Opening Day.

The original plan was for Carl Yastrzemski Sr. to throw out the first pitch -- the younger Carl was starting his final season with the Red Sox -- but Sullivan called the Keanes and asked if Jonathan would also like to throw a first pitch. Jonathan accepted.

Keane says he still meets people who remember what happened to him. For Keane and his close friends, however, it's not a big deal.

``I try to keep it low,'' Keane said. ``I tell people I got hit in the head at Fenway and Jim Rice carried me off, and that's pretty much it.''

Both Jonathan and his father still go to games at Fenway. Jonathan, possessing the air of indestructibility that accompanies youth, enjoys sitting in the low boxes close to home plate, indifferent to the possibility he could be struck again.

Tom Keane isn't so self-assured. When he visits Fenway, he sits in the safety of the grandstand, far from the line drives.

``I don't like it [in the field boxes],'' Tom Keane said. ``It's very
uncomfortable because it brings back the memories of that.''

That day, Aug. 7, 1982.

Tom Keane said it could have been much worse, and that Rice's quick thinking may have saved his son's life.

``Time is very much a factor once you have that kind of a head injury and the subsequent swelling of the brain,'' Pappas said. ``That's why it's so important to get him to care so it can be dealt with. [Rice] certainly helped him very considerably.''

His Place in History

Today, Rice is the Red Sox's hitting instructor. He was happy to learn that Keane is doing well, and is attending college not far from Rice's home state, South Carolina.

``It's a good feeling,'' Rice said. ``At least he knows that we have
southern hospitality.''

Rice, 44, retired in 1989 with 382 home runs and a .298 career average. The player who Aaron once said would be the one to break his all-time home run record has been on the Hall of Fame ballot twice. He has not come close to making it. The experts say part of the reason he won't is his poor relationship with the media. With writers, Rice was often cold and surly,
not the kind of personality one thinks of when discussing the ``character issue.''

Mo Vaughn sees it differently. Vaughn, in some ways, is the Jim Rice of the '90s: a power-hitting All-Star and team leader. Vaughn had his own experience aiding a young boy, befriending and hitting a home run for cancer patient Jason Leader in 1993.

``Jim's was a reaction, mine was more over a period of time,'' Vaughn said. ``It all means the same. We're all trying to help people.''

Vaughn says Rice should be inducted.

``He's one of the greatest players in Red Sox history,'' Vaughn said. ``He should have his day.''

Tom Keane agrees. He only met Rice once, but in those brief seconds 15 years ago, Keane learned all he'd ever need to about Rice's character. He was a witness to another of Rice's career statistics: one save.

``It was a very humanitarian thing that he did,'' Keane said. ``I think he's a wonderful person. I think he belongs in the Hall of Fame. He's certainly in our Hall of Fame.''

CrackerJack
08-05-2005, 11:31 PM
The Reds certainly do have some likeable players, makes it that much tougher to see this group continue to have bad years.

Falls City Beer
08-06-2005, 12:15 AM
The Reds certainly do have some likeable players, makes it that much tougher to see this group continue to have bad years.

You said it.

But it keeps me rooting for them even through the dark years. You don't have to be a first-rate person to succeed, but when you are a first-rate person it makes it that much easier for others to root for you when you do.

This team needs to lock up Lopez. The kid strikes me as a great face for the organization.

pedro
08-06-2005, 12:39 AM
IMO Griffey is a great influence on the younger guys, maybe more so as a person than as a ballplayer. That's not an easy feat. The fact the Junior is a pretty humble guy is pretty impressive considering the environment he grew up in. That speaks well to his parents and how they raised their kids. And I agree about Lopez, I think this may be the first positive environment Lopez has ever experienced, and I think he likes it. I'm not really talking about his play either, he just really seems happy and everything I hear about him makes me think he's a pretty good guy. I wonder if Lopez would have blossomed without Griffey and Larkin. Either way, I'm sure glad RA isn't mentoring the kid.

Larkin Fan
08-06-2005, 12:55 AM
That story is heartbreaking and my heart goes out to that poor child.

Junior is a classy guy, pure and simple. This isn't something he had to do. And when he does things like this, it just goes to show just how meaningless and petty the unjust heat that he takes on a regular basis is. Makes me proud to have always been a Junior fan and supporter. Kudos to him.

Cedric
08-06-2005, 02:13 AM
Ken Griffey Jr is an amazing person. My gf and my sister met him on Face Off at Kings Island and he went well out of his way to get a picture with them, talk with them, and Chief Bender even got the picture signed for her later from Griffey . That was even though his whole family was there. That pales in comparison to this sad story, but the guy is a first rate human being.

OnBaseMachine
08-17-2005, 09:59 PM
Reds help ease boy's sadness
Youngster visits ballpark for first time since grandfather's death
By Anthony Castrovince / MLB.com

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/images/2005/08/17/TsyfNJog.jpg
Wily Mo Pena entertains 6-year-old Antonio Perez during the boy's visit with the Reds. (David Kohl/AP)

CINCINNATI -- The memories of the tragedy are likely to stay with Antonio Perez.

Perhaps, though, they'll be enveloped by memories of a much more positive nature.

The 6-year-old boy isn't likely to forget attending the Aug. 3 Reds game in which his grandfather, Spencer Brock, suffered a heart attack in the stands and passed away. But Antonio also isn't likely to forget the kindness shown to him by the Great American Ball Park staff and the Reds' players during that traumatic experience.

As paramedics attempted to save Brock, who was also Antonio's T-ball coach and who had brought the young boy to the game for Tony Perez Bobblehead Night, Antonio was whisked away to the Reds' bullpen, where he sat and watched the last two innings of the Reds' 8-5 win over the Braves.

When the game ended, Antonio was escorted onto the field. He traded high-fives with the players, then was taken by the hand and brought into the clubhouse.

The players showered him with gifts, such as bats, balls and wristbands. Felipe Lopez even gave him the batting helmet he wore in this year's All-Star Game.

"They helped him get his mind off [the tragedy]," said Debbie Brock, Antonio's grandmother. "They were really wonderful with him."

Antonio and his family, which includes 4-year-old sister Maya and mother Sharon Brock, wanted to find a way to say thank you Wednesday.

"We brought dozens and dozens of cookies," Debbie said. "We weren't sure what else to do."

But the players kept giving to the little boy. They bought him a motorized scooter and safety helmet, a PlayStation 2 and various accessories and electronic devices and gave him more autographed balls, bats and gloves. He unwrapped the presents in the middle of the clubhouse after batting practice.

The boy was understandably leery of returning to Great American Ball Park after everything he had experienced here.

"He was a little apprehensive about coming here tonight," Debbie said. "Not to meet them, but just the situation. He wanted to go to another stadium."

But the Reds' players sent him off with plenty of pleasant memories. Antonio played catch with Adam Dunn, stretched with Wily Mo Pena and took some batting practice off Ken Griffey Jr. in the indoor cages.

"Needless to say, they've been wonderful to him," Brock said.

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/news/article.jsp?ymd=20050817&content_id=1173938&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

Caseyfan21
08-17-2005, 11:22 PM
Great story, glad to see things are looking better for this little guy. :)

RedsMan3203
08-18-2005, 02:18 AM
You guys are killing me.... I don't know them... I haven't had anything like this happen in my family... And i'm crying... Yes... a grown man crying....

I love my Reds... :beerme:

Nugget
08-18-2005, 04:15 AM
There's more to baseball than winning.

KronoRed
08-18-2005, 02:41 PM
That's great to read...kid will remember that (and all that stuff ;) ) for a long time :)

Chip R
08-18-2005, 02:47 PM
I read the Enquirer's story about that today and the boy asked his mom if they were going to sit in the same place he and his grandpa sat in last time. Also his grandpa was only 49. :eek:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050818/SPT04/508180498/1071

Reds still taking care of Perez
Boy treated to second round of gifts after grandfather's death

By John Fay
Enquirer staff writer

Antonio Perez, the 6-year-old whose grandfather suffered a fatal heart attack while the two attended the Reds-Braves game Aug. 3, is doing all right.

"He's good," said his mother, Shannon Brock.

She wanted to thank the Reds for the part they played in that.

Antonio, who had come to the game specifically because it was Tony Perez Bobblehead Night, was left in the hands of Reds security personnel - and eventually Reds players - after his grandfather, Spencer Brock, collapsed.

"We're here to thank them," Shannon Brock said Wednesday before the Reds-Giants game. "We wanted to thank the players personally. ... If not for them, I think Antonio would have been a little bit traumatized."

On the night her father was stricken, Shannon got a call on her cell phone.

"It was from a Hamilton County police officer. He said my father had taken ill and we needed to pick up Antonio," she said.

Shannon, who lives in Hamilton, did not suspect the worst. Spencer Brock, 49, had high blood pressure, so Shannon figured her father might have fainted in the heat. On the way down, she called Christ Hospital and learned what had happened.

Reds personnel had been careful about what they told Antonio.

"He didn't know," Shannon said. "He told me, 'Pawpaw fell asleep and they couldn't wake him up.' We told him he went to Heaven and is with Jesus. He understood that."

Antonio was excited to meet the Reds again Wednesday. On the night of the incident, he got a tour of the clubhouse, as well as gifts of bats, gloves, helmets and balls.

"He was excited to come back," Shannon said. "But he said, 'Mom, we're not going to sit in those same seats, are we?' "

After batting practice Wednesday, Jacob Cruz and Wily Mo Peña led Antonio - eyes closed - to the middle of the clubhouse, where awaiting him were two huge gift bags and a miniature replica chopper, complete with an electric motor. The bags were stuffed with youth baseball equipment, plus a personal entertainment system and other goodies.

"It's been a little overwhelming," Shannon said, "but very nice."

KearnsyEars
08-18-2005, 04:10 PM
Jeeze.....kid was compensated for.

smith288
08-18-2005, 08:16 PM
Jeeze.....kid was compensated for. Doubt it...but I know what you mean.

28 yrs old and I welted up...friggin Reds and their hugging ways...

Shaknb8k
08-18-2005, 10:44 PM
http://www.sportsline.com/mlb/story/8747844

Just another article i thought some of you all would want to read. It takes a lot to make a 20-year old teary-eyed but this definatly has done it.

TeamBoone
08-19-2005, 12:43 AM
For those of you who don't want to click:

Reds already one of season's big winners
Aug. 18, 2005
By Scott Miller, CBS SportsLine.com Senior Writer

You know the problem lately?

We spend so much time cleaning the fungus from the shower-room tile -- Rafael Palmeiro, Kenny Rogers -- that sometimes we forget why we came to the ballpark to begin with.

Soon enough, the pennant races and the October leaves will remind us.

For now, there is Bill Summe, Ken Griffey Jr. and a struggling bunch of fifth-place Cincinnati Reds.

And when it comes to what baseball is and what it should be, well, good luck to October in topping this one.

Summe doesn't play a position with the Reds, unless you know the corresponding number to mark on the scorecard -- 10? 11? -- for a public safety security officer. But when he was summoned into the middle of a crisis in Cincinnati's Great American Ball Park during a game earlier this month, he moved as deftly as Davey Concepcion ever did.

A man had collapsed as the Reds were playing the Atlanta Braves and, as paramedics feverishly worked to revive him -- they couldn't; Spencer Brock, 49, passed away later that night from a heart attack -- one of the officers handed a little boy to Summe.

One look at the man and Summe, a policeman in Cincinnati's Springfield Township since 1992, knew it wasn't good. So he and Sarah McManus, a colleague in the Reds security office, took little Antonio Perez, 6, and walked him away from his stricken grandfather as quickly as they could.

"He looked at me and asked, 'Is my Pawpaw going to be all right?'" said Summe, 39. "I knew from my years of experience as a police officer that the guy didn't have much of a chance. They were administering CPR, and I said 'We'll do everything we can.'

"I didn't realize at that point that he was only with his grandfather. I figured they had his grandmother or some others with them."

They didn't. It was Tony Perez Bobblehead Doll night at Great American Ball Park, and when you're a 6-year-old boy named Antonio Perez in Cincinnati -- where the Hall of Famer had spent most of his career -- well, don't you have a solemn duty to be at the ballpark on a night like that? So he and grandpa went to the game. Just the two of them, a night out, part of a terrific crowd of 37,157 and, well, there's always so much that happens that the box score doesn't tell.

Mostly, Summe simply wanted to get little Antonio away from the seat, away from the section, away from the crowd. They walked up to the concourse first. They weren't too far from the Reds bullpen. So Summe walked him there, told bullpen coach Tom Hume what was going on and asked if it would be OK if the two of them could kind of hide away in there for a while.

"I wanted to get the child's mind off of it," Summe said.

When an overwhelmed 6-year-old in a stadium swelled with people, noise and lights, a boy you're pretty sure has just lost his grandfather, looks up at you and asks, "How am I going to get home?" well, not every situation is in the security manual.

So into the bullpen it was. Word quickly spread, and Cincinnati reliever Randy Keisler plopped little Antonio down next to him on the bench.

Toward the end of the game, an 8-5 Reds victory, Griffey, from his position in center field, looked over and noticed the little boy.

"What's up?" Junior asked.

Nobody was quite sure what would happen next. Summe knew one thing: He didn't feel it was his place to tell Antonio that his grandfather was gravely ill, or worse. But he sure didn't want to lie to the boy, either.

That's another reason they were in the bullpen instead of back in the stadium security office.

"If we were back in our office, I was afraid he'd overhear what had happened over the radio," Summe said.

So the game ended, and as it did, Griffey first veered back toward the bullpen before trotting back toward the infield. He instructed Summe and Antonio to follow him, they were going onto the field.

"Win or lose, he was coming in the clubhouse," Griffey told the Cincinnati Enquirer.

Next thing the boy knew, he was in line toward the pitcher's mound, high-fiving with the rest of the Reds players following the win.

And then, the clubhouse.

"Junior spent half an hour or longer with him," Summe said. "Jason La Rue gave him a bat and a computer bag so he'd have something to hold all of the stuff. Felipe Lopez gave him the batting helmet he used in the All-Star Game.

"The thing is, we all pretty much have kids. We wanted to make sure the child was OK, because he was scared."

Imagine. After a blooper of a summer, the Reds storm back to stage the perfect rally.

Antonio's grandmother and stepfather picked him up later that night, and their tear-stained faces told him all he needed to know.

And that would pretty much be the end of the story, until ...

Wednesday, the family returned to Great American Ball Park because Antonio's mother, Shannon, and grandmother, Debbie -- along with Antonio's stepdad and 4-year-old sister, Maya -- wanted to thank the Reds. They brought homemade chocolate chip and peanut butter cookies to the security office, and then they moved along to thank the players.

Griffey again took Antonio onto the field, this time for batting practice before the Reds' game with the San Francisco Giants. In fact, Griffey himself threw some pitches to Antonio. Wily Mo Pena showed Antonio how the big guys stretch before a game.

Then, they had Antonio close his eyes as they led him back into the clubhouse. There, led by Jacob Cruz and Pena, the Reds gave him some wrapped presents -- a motorized scooter and safety helmet, a PlayStation 2 and other accessories and electronic devices and some bats, balls and gloves.

"It was pretty neat," Summe said. "Right in the middle of the clubhouse, all the players gathered around him as he opened his presents."

Antonio's reaction?

"In awe would be the best way to describe it," Summe said. "His hero now is Ken Griffey Jr. Griffey reached into his locker and took out a brand new glove and handed it to him.

"Ken does this kind of stuff all the time, he just doesn't like to make waves with it. He's like the canoe paddling out there in smooth water."

The Reds at midweek were 54-66, 22 games behind St. Louis in the NL Central, trailing even Milwaukee in the division standings. They fired manager Dave Miley earlier this season and they're being second-guessed -- deservedly -- for some of their offseason moves.

Yet given the organization's nimble reaction on as bad a night in human terms as you could imagine ... anybody want to dare suggest that the Reds aren't having a successful season?



http://www.sportsline.com/mlb/story/8747844/1

Caveat Emperor
08-19-2005, 01:27 AM
I was having a conversation with my friend about this the other day...we often don't acknowledge the truly and genuinely compassionate people in life often enough, because the things they do often fly compeltely under the radar. They do so not because they aren't important or because they aren't special...but because the people who perform acts of kindness and genorosity out of the goodness of the heart do so for the act itself, not as a method of generating "good publicity" or making a good "photo op." They'll often do so quietly and with little fanfare, taking to heart what a wiser man than I once said: "let your right hand not know what your left is doing."

Reading this story makes gets me misty eyed...but it also makes me smile, because I know that for every 1 story like this that gets reported (and there is usually 1 every few years), there are probably a dozen that never see a headline or a newspaper page. It makes me feel good that I show up in the stands and root for players who, while not being the most successful on the field, are good citizens and have some semblence of priorities in their lives.

Winning is great...but winning the right way is a 10,000 times better feeling.