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savafan
08-09-2005, 10:18 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/08/AR2005080800157_pf.html

By BRAD FOSS
The Associated Press
Tuesday, August 9, 2005; 1:55 AM



WASHINGTON -- Oil prices jumped to a new high above $64 a barrel in Asian trading Tuesday, reflecting the market's persistent uneasiness about strong demand, tight supplies and a slew of threats to output around the globe.

Traders pinned the latest rally on security concerns in Saudi Arabia, refinery snags in the United States and the continued rise of gasoline consumption in spite of soaring pump prices.

The average nationwide price for regular unleaded gasoline jumped almost 8 cents last week to $2.37 a gallon, or 49 cents above last year, the Department of Energy said late Monday Still, government data show that gasoline consumption is up almost 1 percent at 9.1 million barrels a day through July, compared with last year.

Oil analyst Marshall Steeves at New York-based brokerage Refco Group Inc. said oil and gasoline prices were likely to keep rising until there were signs of a significant dropoff in demand, or a sharp slowdown in economic growth. "We're clearly not there yet," he said.

Light, sweet crude for September delivery rose as high as $63.99 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract settled $1.63 higher at $63.94 _ the peak close since Nymex trading began in 1983.

The previous closing high was $62.31, set Friday.

But on Tuesday, oil prices pressed their gains, above $64. Midmorning in Singapore, crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange reached a high of $64.27 a barrel in Asian electronic trading before slipping to $64.06, up 12 cents.

"The market clearly has the jitters," said Deborah White, energy analyst at SG Securities in Paris.

Broadly speaking, those jitters are tied to worldwide consumption, which is expected to average more than 84 million barrels a day in 2005, leaving only about 1.5 million barrels a day of spare production capacity that could be called upon in an emergency to offset a prolonged supply disruption.

Given such a slim margin for error in the supply chain, a large premium has been priced into every barrel of oil sold on futures markets. This premium takes into account the possibility of production outages stemming from hurricanes, terrorism and labor strife around the globe.

Several factors put the market on edge Monday:

_ The U.S. Embassy and consulates in Saudi Arabia were closed after authorities announced Sunday a security threat against U.S. government buildings inside the world's largest petroleum-producing country.

_ Iran, OPEC's second biggest player behind Saudi Arabia, resumed uranium conversion activities at its Isfahan nuclear facility Monday, a step that Europeans and the United States have warned would prompt them to seek U.N. sanctions against the Tehran regime.

_ A fire broke out at a Sunoco Inc.'s refinery in Philadelphia over the weekend. This followed a string of refinery fires and other snags over the past two weeks that have not severely diminished supply, but have nonetheless made oil traders nervous. "The fear factor is alive and well," said oil analyst Jim Burkhard of Cambridge Energy Research Associates.

_ Suspected rebels launched renewed attacks overnight on pipelines in eastern India, leaving oil operations in the remote region in critical shape, a top oil official said Monday.

The market has also kept a close eye on tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico, fearing a repeat of last year's Hurricane Ivan, which damaged oil facilities and caused output in the region to drop for several months.

Oil broker Tom Bentz of New York-based BNP Paribas Commodity Futures said there was no single event on which Monday's rally could be attributed. "We've just got a continuation of the uptrend here," he said. "And there's no sign that it will be stopping anytime soon."

In other Nymex trading, gasoline futures gained 2.48 cents to $1.857 a gallon while heating oil rose 5.82 cents to $1.7894 a gallon.

September Brent crude futures on London's International Petroleum Exchange gained $1.63 to settle at $62.70 a barrel.

While oil prices are about 40 percent higher than a year ago, they are still below the inflation-adjusted peak set in 1981.

___

Associated Press writers Edith Balazs in Budapest, Hungary, and Gillian Wong in Singapore contributed to this report.

HotCorner
08-09-2005, 10:35 AM
And gas prices jumped $.26 in one day!! (From 2.23 to 2.49) :angry:

Roy Tucker
08-09-2005, 10:37 AM
I got a taste of what the future might bring recently.

We were on vacation in Destin FL about a week after Hurricane Dennis hit nearby. About 100 miles outside of the Pensacola/Destin areas, they had signs on the interstate saying gas was scarce further in and to fill up now (which we did). Evidently the evacuation of the area had emptied most stations and they were having a hard time catching up.

After being in Destin for a few days, I went to get gas. Most of the major refueling stations like Shell, BP, etc. had none (they put plastic shopping bags over the pump nozzles). After talking to a guy at the condo, he said there was a little station nearby that had gas.

There was a line of about 20 cars waiting to get gas. There were many panicky people that were runnig on fumes and desperate to get gas. I witnessed about 3 separate confrontations about where in line you were that featured big-time temper flares and much X-rated swearing. Some of it was racial. There were a couple times where I thought there was going to be gun-fire. To say it was ugly was the understatement of the year.

I had the distinctly uneasy feeling I was catching a glimpse of the future.

registerthis
08-09-2005, 10:38 AM
Well, you gotta feel for the poor oil companies though. I mean, Exxon/Mobil only made $7.6 billion in profits--PROFITS--last quarter. How are you supposed to live on that?

I'm also thankful that Bush's recent energy policy will do so much to negate the rising price of gas and...er, well, never mind.

Glad I ride the subway!

westofyou
08-09-2005, 10:51 AM
I had the distinctly uneasy feeling I was catching a glimpse of the future.

http://www.azimut2001.com/images/sfondi/film/mad_max_2.jpg

Johnny Footstool
08-09-2005, 10:54 AM
The juice...the precious juice...

Sham
08-09-2005, 01:46 PM
Hemp is the answer:

http://www.artistictreasure.com/learnmorecleanair.html

Heath
08-09-2005, 02:36 PM
time to ramp up the ethanol......

westofyou
08-09-2005, 02:46 PM
Hemp is the answer:

http://www.artistictreasure.com/learnmorecleanair.html

Yeah... but I forgot the question.

zombie-a-go-go
08-09-2005, 02:48 PM
You almost have to feel sorry for China. The country is starting to industralize, but with oil prices going up and up, and the big focus on alternative fuels, you wonder if just as they finally get themselves into gear the world will have turned away from fossil fuels, leaving them with all this (relatively) brand new, utterly worthless, oil/coal-fueled machinery.

One also has to wonder if the rising demand of oil throughout the world wouldn't be so acute if it weren't for the Free Trade Agreements...

remdog
08-09-2005, 03:01 PM
One also has to wonder if the rising demand of oil throughout the world wouldn't be so acute if it weren't for the Free Trade Agreements...

Please explain your comment vis a vie FTAs.

Rem

remdog
08-09-2005, 03:06 PM
I'm also thankful that Bush's recent energy policy will do so much to negate the rising price of gas and...er, well, never mind.

There is very little, if anything, that can be done about gasoline prices in the short term. The biggest problem with the energy bill is that it still doesn't allow drilling in the arctic.

Additionally, refinery capacity is needed to refine more oil into gasoline but it's been years since a new refinery was built in the US. A lot of NIMBY going on there----by a lot of people that clamor for more gasoline.

Rem

RBA
08-09-2005, 03:09 PM
Oil/Gas it's all going to go up. No way around it. Yes, we need alternative sources of energy fast, but that's not going to happen while oil and gas is still reality cheap. We'll get alternative sources of enegy, but I hope America leads the way and fast.

remdog
08-09-2005, 03:15 PM
Correct, RBA. The way out of this mess is to take a long-term approach and be willing/resigned to forking out more money while those approaches (hopefully) come to fruition.

Rem

zombie-a-go-go
08-09-2005, 03:15 PM
Please explain your comment vis a vie FTAs.

Rem

Okay, and this is just a random query, nothing I've given much thought to (which will rapidly become apparent as you read this :laugh: );

Through free trade agreements, the USA has made it more profitable for companies (noth foreign and at home) to produce goods in other countries for import to the USA. If there is an increase in production out in these other countries, particularly "Third-Worlders" (Cambodia? Taiwan?), you have to create infrastructure to support it. That means industrialization... greater industrialization means greater reliance on oil. Which means these other countries are taking oil supplies that were once surplus when the USA was the real "superpower consumer" of the black gold.

Greater demand = higher prices. So if our FTAs contributed to the increasing industrialization of other countries, then we have ourselves to "blame" for higher prices at the pump.

Addendum A: I'm not saying that improving the quality of life in other countries via industrialization is a bad thing, or that we should "keep them living in their mud huts so we can have cheaper oil... viva le Americana!"

Addendum B: I'm also not saying that I really have any inkling what I'm talking about. Just making random, wild, spitballing guesses that those who know more about the subjects will probably thoroughly debunk. :cool:

registerthis
08-09-2005, 03:16 PM
Oil/Gas it's all going to go up. No way around it. Yes, we need alternative sources of energy fast, but that's not going to happen while oil and gas is still reality cheap. We'll get alternative sources of enegy, but I hope America leads the way and fast.
I hope they tax gasoline at $5 a gallon...that's the kind of wake-up call the u.S. needs to start making the search for alternative fuels an active priority. Not this bogus energy bill Bush just passed, whose focus was on providing money for exploratory drilling and tax breaks to oil co.'s--albeit with a token shot of funding for alternative fuels.

When Johnny SUV wakes up one morning and sees regular unleaded at $7-$8 a gallon, then maybe the pressure for developing alternative fuels will increase.

zombie-a-go-go
08-09-2005, 03:17 PM
I hope they tax gasoline at $5 a gallon...that's the kind of wake-up call the u.S. needs to start making the search for alternative fuels an active priority. Not this bogus energy bill Bush just passed, whose focus was on providing money for exploratory drilling and tax breaks to oil co.'s--albeit with a token shot of funding for alternative fuels.

When Johnny SUV wakes up one morning and sees regular unleaded at $7-$8 a gallon, then maybe the pressure for developing alternative fuels will increase.

I'd vote for that.

remdog
08-09-2005, 03:25 PM
OK, I follow your logic there ZOG. It may or may not be valid but I can see how you arrived at the conclusion.

US gasoline prices have been well below the cost of gasoline in other countries for decades (especially considering the average GDP in those countries). While this price rise (I believe at least) was started as an artificial 'scarcity' by producing countries that were unhappy with the $25-$28/brl price a couple of years ago, it got away from them and actually jepordizes continued growth in the world markets as well as long-term independence from oil which would not be in the producers' best inerest. (Whew! That was a pretty good run-on sentance!) I don't pretend to be able to lay out that scenario all in one sentance but I do trade commodities from time to time (not oil/gasoline) and sometimes the market functions independently of the real world.

Rem

Redsfaithful
08-09-2005, 03:41 PM
The biggest problem with the energy bill is that it still doesn't allow drilling in the arctic.

From everything I've read it doesn't seem like the oil available in Wildlife Reserve will make a dent on prices or supply. Perhaps I'm wrong, I'm certainly willing to read others opinions.

BTW, I cant recommend this book enough:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0865714827/104-6128274-6166337?v=glance

Reds4Life
08-09-2005, 03:54 PM
When Johnny SUV wakes up one morning and sees regular unleaded at $7-$8 a gallon, then maybe the pressure for developing alternative fuels will increase.

SUV's get blamed because they are an easy target, there are plenty of cars out there that get just as poor mileage.

registerthis
08-09-2005, 04:04 PM
SUV's get blamed because they are an easy target, there are plenty of cars out there that get just as poor mileage.
OK, well the same goes for Johnny Poorgasmileagecar then.

Unassisted
08-09-2005, 09:25 PM
I heard some talk radio "expert" say the other day that even if someone flipped a magical switch that made every car on US highways into a hybrid, that US fuel consumption would return to its previous number in 3 years because of the rate at which US fuel consumption and number of vehicles on the road here are expanding.

Heath
08-09-2005, 10:22 PM
I heard some talk radio "expert" say the other day that even if someone flipped a magical switch that made every car on US highways into a hybrid, that US fuel consumption would return to its previous number in 3 years because of the rate at which US fuel consumption and number of vehicles on the road here are expanding.

But here lies in the ol' supply vs. demand....if supply is up...is demand down? and vise versa...we should - technically - be able to save what we don't consume.

now back to the real world......

did anyone see that FX drama movie - "Oilstorm"? - I didn't - anybody want to add from watching that show?

here's a dumb thought - but it might kill the economy - but maybe we have to "gas ration" - you get so much per week - But, it might be able to slow down some dependencies and have the ability to save some oil.

Heath
08-09-2005, 10:27 PM
Here's an interesting story



Africa looms larger on US oil map

www.chinaview.cn 2005-07-23 13:54:40

NAIROBI, July 23 (Xinhuanet) -- Africa's vast oilfields discovered in recent years have attracted much attention from countries around the world, including the world's top oil consumer, the United States, which is increasingly focusing on African oil to secure stable energy supply.



OIL HUNGRY ECONOMY DEMANDS STABLE ENERGY SOURCE

As the world's biggest oil consumer, the United States devours 20 million barrels of crude oil everyday, almost one third of the global consumption. Meanwhile, its oil consumption is very much import-dependent, with more than 60 percent from the Middle East.

However, after the September 11 attacks and the US-led war against terror, many experts and lobbyists have expressed concernsthat instability and anti-Americanism in the Middle East could endanger oil supplies.

President George W. Bush has said he wants to pursue energy sources that are closer to home so the country is less dependent on supplies from "unstable" parts of the world.

The United States, which is stepping up oil exploration in the Gulf of Guinea basin off the coast of west Africa, has been striving to keep crude flowing into its oil-hungry economy.

"African oil should be treated as a priority for the US national security post 9-11. I think that the post 9-11 it's occurred to all of us that our traditional sources of oil are not as secure as we thought they were," US Congressman William Jefferson once told a meeting of the African Oil Policy InitiativeGroup (AOPIG).

Africa now has the third largest oil reserve in the world, onlyafter the Middle East and South America. According to the OPEC statistics, till the end of 2003, there were 93.55 billion-barrel finds of oil on the continent, accounting for about 10 percent of the world's total. Currently the continent has an output of 8 million barrels a day, nearly 11 percent of the global daily yield.

The US government is gradually making policy shift to search for new oil supply in Africa, a continent that in the past had counted for little in its global strategy. In the Bush administration's 2003 National Security Strategy report, cooperation with African oil producers has been underlined as the important approach to "strengthen the US national security."

The more hawkish advocates of the policy even want the US military to create a Gulf of Guinea Command -- similar in scale tothe Korea Command -- and to build a naval base on the island country of Sao Tome and Principe to protect the oil supplies.

US oil companies are also pushing for government policies that improve access to crude supplies in Africa.

Dave O'Reilly, chief executive of No. 2 US oil company ChevronTexaco Corp, said that protecting US energy needs means recognizing issues not just in energy policy but also in foreign and trade policies.



EXPLORATION INTO AFRICA REWARDS

Efforts are not only from the US government, oil executives and policy-makers are now both exploring into west Africa's vast oilfields to secure cheap oil, and the rewards are potentially great.

According to the US Department of Energy, by 2003, 15.3 percent of US oil comes from Africa and US-owned firms are investing 10 billion dollars a year there. And it was estimated that by 2015 west Africa will represent 25 percent of total US oil needs and by2020 will be exporting to it some 770 million barrels of African oil a year.

Former US president Bill Clinton in May 2000 signed the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) in order to integrate Africa into the global economy by boosting trade with the United States, the continent's largest single country market.

Oil represents the lion's share of what Africa sells to the United States -- some 87 percent of exports -- concentrating AGOA's influence into a handful of countries including Angola, Chad and Gabon and Nigeria, the continent's top oil producer and ranked 11th worldwide. Nigeria is already the fifth largest exporter of oil to the United States, and with 1.5 million barrels a day flowing into US ports. West Africa exceeds Saudi Arabia as a source of US imports.

The US companies' oil exploration in the Gulf of Guinea basin has covered an area of more than 200,000 square km, involving nearly 10 countries.

ChevronTexaco Corp is planning an investment of 20 billion US dollars in the next five years, to further improve its oil production capacity in Africa. The company's executive O'Reilly said improving security and the investment climate in west Africa,which supplies light sweet crude oil that is in high demand, should be a priority in the US foreign policy.

Another energy giant Exxon Mobil Corp, which is going to invest50 billion US dollars in the area in the next 10 years, said it had begun offshore production at a major facility off Angola, which is counting on oil revenues to help its recovery from three decades of civil war.

Exxon Mobil said its local subsidiary had started production ofthe 3.5 billion dollar "Kizomba B" project to develop one billion barrels of oil lying more than 320 km off the coast of Angola.

Angola is fast becoming a world oil player as sub-Saharan Africa's second largest producer after Nigeria, with output expecting to hit 2 million barrels a day by the end of 2007.

Exxon Mobil and its foreign partners in Angola -- Britain's BP,ENI of Italy and Norwegian firm Statoil -- have announced 38 discoveries in Angola with the potential to yield up to 4.5 billion oil-equivalent barrels. Enditem

Heath
08-09-2005, 10:28 PM
also for you oil heads - map of crude oil locations determined by the department of energy.....
http://energy.er.usgs.gov/products/papers/World_oil/oil/

GAC
08-10-2005, 08:54 AM
It's still cheaper then bottled water. :lol:

Johnny Footstool
08-10-2005, 09:16 AM
Africa's vast oilfields discovered in recent years have attracted much attention from countries around the world, including the world's top oil consumer, the United States, which is increasingly focusing on African oil to secure stable energy supply.

Cool! When do we invade?

registerthis
08-10-2005, 09:31 AM
It's still cheaper then bottled water. :lol:
But water tastes better. A cold, refreshing bottle of water goes down so much better than a quart of 10W-30, especially after a lengthy workout at the gym.

registerthis
08-10-2005, 09:32 AM
Cool! When do we invade?
Just as soon as we can pin some WMD's on 'em.

Redsfaithful
08-10-2005, 01:13 PM
It's still cheaper then bottled water. :lol:

Where are you buying bottled water where it costs more than 2.49 a gallon?

savafan
08-10-2005, 03:28 PM
It has happened.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20050810/bs_nm/markets_oil_dc



By Richard Valdmanis 18 minutes ago

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Oil prices surged nearly two dollars a barrel on Wednesday after a U.S. government report ignited concerns that strong demand and a spate of refinery problems could trigger a crunch in gasoline stockpiles.

The gains came against the backdrop of rising tensions in the energy-rich Middle East, after the United States closed its diplomatic missions in Saudi Arabia this week due to the threat of attacks by militants.

U.S. light sweet crude futures soared $1.93 to $65.00 a barrel, the highest on record. London Brent jumped $2.08 to new peak of $64.06 a barrel.

A U.S. government report issued on Wednesday showed crude stockpiles in the world's biggest energy consumer rose last week by 2.8 million barrels, due to hefty imports and slower refining activity.

But the report from the Energy Information Administration also showed a 2.1 million barrel decline in gasoline stockpiles due to strong demand and slower domestic production -- bringing inventories 7.9 million barrels, or 3.7 percent, below last year's level.

"Gasoline inventories are of greater concern, but the draw was smaller than in previous weeks, and we don't have that much time left in the driving season," said Timothy Evans, senior analyst at IFR Energy Services.

U.S. gasoline demand has been running at a robust 1.4 percent higher than a year ago over the past four weeks, despite record high retail prices at the pumps -- a sign the economy is holding up against soaring energy costs.

While crude prices are running at their highest on record in nominal terms, when adjusted for inflation they remain below their 1980 height over $82.

TIGHT CAPACITY

Crude oil producers and refiners have struggled to keep up with demand growth over the past two years, reducing the cushion of spare capacity needed to make up for any sudden shortfall.

Worries over that scenario grew this week when the United States temporarily shut its missions in Saudi Arabia because of a security threat in the world's top oil exporter and
OPEC's second biggest producer
Iran pressed ahead with its nuclear work in defiance of the
European Union.

OPEC producer nations, which control about 40 percent of the world's oil exports, have been pumping at their highest levels in decades in an effort to cool prices.

Venezuela's oil minister said Wednesday the cartel has done all it can to boost oil supply, but global prices will probably hold at their current levels.

"We have said that this is a structural issue, not a short-term factor, and the price is going to stay the same," Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez told reporters during a visit to Uruguay.

On Tuesday, OPEC President Sheikh Ahmad al-Fahd al-Sabah of Kuwait blamed refinery bottlenecks for record oil prices.

Adding to gains Wednesday, BP said its Schiehallion North Sea oilfield would be down until the end of the month as it repairs fire damage. Unplanned closures and scheduled maintenance have cut around 10 percent of North Sea output in August.

In the United States, where refinery problems have pushed gasoline prices to historic highs, BP said it had shut a unit at its Texas City refinery.

U.S. gasoline futures struck a record Wednesday of $1.8990 a gallon.

savafan
08-11-2005, 01:31 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/markets_oil_dc;_ylt=AokbJRpw_F1Y_D3PGO35YrADW7oF;_ ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl



By Janet McBride and Peg Mackey 1 hour, 35 minutes ago

LONDON (Reuters) - Oil charged to $66 to a new high on Thursday as
Iran's nuclear work put it at odds with the United Nation's atomic watchdog and more U.S. refinery snags threatened gasoline supplies to the world's biggest consumer.

Earlier the International Energy Agency said non-
OPEC output was falling short of expectations, compounding supply concerns.

U.S. light sweet crude was up $1 at $65.90 at 1540 GMT after hitting a record-high of $66.00. London Brent was up $1.55 at $65.54 after touching $65.66.

"The presence of significant headline risk, most particularly from Iran's international relations, the Atlantic hurricane season and from tightness in refining, is continuing to support prices at higher levels," said Barclays Capital.

In Vienna, the board of governors of the
International Atomic Energy Agency approved a resolution demanding that Iran suspend all nuclear activities, a diplomat said.

EU diplomats said if OPEC's second biggest producer failed to comply with the resolution they would push for Iran to be referred to the UN Security Council for punitive action.

REFINERY STRAIN

In the United States, where refinery problems have strained gasoline stocks during the peak demand season, BP shut several units at its Texas City refinery, a source familiar with the plant's operation said.

And ConocoPhillips Wood River refinery suffered a power problem, market trading sources said.

The news came on the heels of U.S. stock data on Wednesday that showed another fall in gasoline inventories in the world's biggest consumer.

Edward Meir of Man Energy said oil price forecasts were running the gamut. "In markets like these, it is best to let things run their course, especially given the fact that there are no resistance 'signposts' to guide us."

The International Energy Agency, adviser to 26 industrialized nations, earlier nudged up its world oil demand growth forecasts for this year and next, leaving already stretched OPEC to fill the supply void.

The IEA cut non-OPEC supply growth this year by 205,000 barrels per day, with production problems in the U.S. Gulf, Mexico, Norway and Britain accounting for most of the shortfall. Russia is also pumping less than expected.

"The extent to which (the IEA) felt compelled to cut its estimates of non-OPEC production is a bullish factor," said Deborah White, senior energy analyst at SG Commodities.

Even with U.S. crude averaging above $53 a barrel for the year to date, in real terms prices are still below the $80 a barrel average of 1980, after the Iranian revolution.

RBA
08-12-2005, 10:10 PM
Rumblings Increase About Trucking Protest To High Gas Prices

August 12, 2005

By Bryan Johnson (BryanJ@komotv.com)

http://www.komotv.com/news/images/truck_gas_081205.jpg




SEATTLE - Trucks drivers are telling KOMO 4 News they are hearing increasing discussion about parking rigs to protest high diesel prices.

Several drivers say the talk is "all over the CB" across the country.

This week, log truck drivers in southwestern Washington parked their rigs to try to force additional fuel allowance from timber companies. In the Miami area, truck drivers formed a 20-mile long protest caravan.

At the North Bend truck stop, diesel hit about $2.91 a gallon and even at a Costco membership gas station, the price of regular gasoline was priced at just under $2.58 a gallon.

At that gas station, Paul Sockwell filled, up saying he expects to pay much more soon: "This is cheaper gas right now." Asked if he thinks it's going to go higher, Sockwell said: "Of course, it's supply and demand."

Right now demand remains high.

And many pay the piper. Neda Nessirian drives a Suburban. Her reaction to $2.58 a gallon: "It's almost like a car payment, like a brand new Mercedes $400-$500 gas."

Neda's upset her gas bill now averages close to $500 a month. P> Pity the truckers, the cost of diesel: $2.90 a gallon. Mike Fox spent $1,700 between Indiana and North Bend. His wife, Caroline, told KOMO 4 news: "Right now we are running in the red. We are putting out more on the trucks that what we are making."

Asked why he continued to drive, Fox said: "Because there's nothing else to it. It's all we do. It's all I've ever done."

The truckers have heard of logging trucks parking in protest in Grays Harbor. Quietly, not openly yet, they are talking of parking their rigs.

Mike said: "I don't know (if) we can bring the price of fuel down by doing that; but, hopefully, it would get the government's attention. Something has to be done about it."

The wife of another long-haul driver, Judy Looney said: "That'd get a message to just about everyone -- when your grocery store start running out of food."

And driver Owen Adams said: "You would be hungry if you didn't get your food, if you didn't eat; and that's what I do, I haul produce." Adams isn't ready to park just yet, although he got a shock when he checked the pump. His total bill after buying fuel for the truck and the refrigerator was $352.

RBA
08-12-2005, 10:13 PM
Posted on Thu, Aug. 11, 2005_krdDartInc++;document.write('');[/url] [url=""]http://ad.doubleclick.net/ad/miamiherald.homepage/homepage;kw=center6;pos=center6;group=rectangle;or d=1123899097641? (http://ad.doubleclick.net/click;h=v5|32d3|0|0|%2a|c;13624649;0-0;1;7904810;255-0|0;8899541|8917437|2;;~sscs=%3fhttp://www.careerbuilder.com/tv/?lr=cbcb_mh&siteid=ckrmi02901) R E L A T E D C O N T E N T http://www.miami.com/images/miami/miamiherald/12360/152772083360.jpgCHUCK FADELY/HERALD STAFF FUELING CONTROVERSY: Truck drivers parked at Miami City Hall to encourage Congress to pass a mandatory fuel surcharge law that would automatically pay truckers more as diesel prices rise.More photos (javascript:openSlideshow('/mld/' + getPublication() + '/slideshow.htm?content_id=12357958&pub_name=' + getPublication() + '&language=en&palette_name=miamiherald&site_name=' + getSite() + '&start=2&component_title=&component_desc=',400, 519);) R E L A T E D L I N K S • http://www.miami.com/multimedia/miami/news/archive/icons/video.gif CBS4 Video | See footage of the convoy and protest (http://wfor.dayport.com/launcher/7613/?tf=video_player.tpl)if (typeof(krd_topix_property) != 'undefined') {document.write('var topixcats = new Array();');}var topixcats = new Array();M O R E N E W S F R O M http://www.miami.com/images/logos/partners/topix_button.gif (http://www.topix.net/) • Truckers (javascript:openTopixWin('http://www.topix.net/business/truck-drivers?p=5006&s=PB&co=1'))http://www.miami.com/images/common/spacer.gif
TRANSPORTATION
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Truckers protest heavy load

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Truckers demanded mandatory fuel surcharges in a protest convoy along South Florida's freeways
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BY JANE BUSSEY AND LARRY LEBOWITZ
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jbussey@herald.com
http://www.miami.com/images/common/spacer.gif

Hundreds of towering truck cabs streamed down South Florida's freeways on Wednesday in a protest convoy to demand mandatory fuel surcharges, snarling traffic and irritating travelers across the Miami metropolitan region in the process.

Trucker Marvin Palacios had grievances as broad as the wide-brimmed cowboy hat that topped his 6-foot-2-inch frame.

''Oil is becoming more expensive every day and the owners of the trucking companies don't want to pass fuel surcharge to the drivers,'' said Palacios. ``I have a family. The cost of living is going up and we aren't earning any more.''

The caravan, organized by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the International Longshoremen's Association, was staged to encourage Congress to pass a mandatory fuel surcharge law that would automatically pay truckers more as diesel prices rise.

''¡No Mas! [No More]'' said posters showing a gasoline nozzle stabbing drivers in the back that were held aloft by demonstrators. They were also were plastered on the cabs of several hundred semis that traveled from Hialeah Gardens to Miami City Hall for a mid-day rally.

Honking horns punctuated the air as the truck cabs -- minus their trailers and container loads -- straggled into Coconut Grove for several hours. Most of the drivers haul containers to and from the Port of Miami-Dade and the large majority of them are immigrants from Cuba and Central America.

Even when shippers pay a fuel surcharge, the money often is not passed along to the drivers.

''This isn't fair,'' Teamsters Local 769 President Mike Scott told the noontime rally. ``But nothing about this business is fair when it comes to the way truck drivers are treated.''

SURCHARGES

Trucker Pedro A. Ramos showed a Department of Energy fuel surcharges schedule showing fuel surcharges of 28 percent when the price of diesel is at $2.45, as it is today. But such surcharges are not mandatory. ''Companies might pay us 5 percent instead of 28 percent,'' Ramos said. Other truckers might receive the full amount or no surcharge payment at all.

The protest convoy along state roads 836 and 826 and down Southwest 27th Avenue to Coconut Grove created bottlenecks on several main highways throughout South Florida.

The situation could have been a lot worse, said Rory Santana, a traffic operations manager for the Florida Department of Transportation in Miami.

Santana said the truckers would have caused much lengthier delays if they had decided to leave Hialeah Gardens around 6 a.m. or 7 a.m. instead of 10 a.m., after the morning rush hour was over.

They arrived at Miami City Hall just before the lunchtime rush. The convoy of semis then headed to their work at the port after lunchtime was over.

HUGE CONVOY

Ron Carver, assistant director of the Teamsters' port division, said that 639 trucks left Okeechobee Road but many of them were turned away by police before arriving in Coconut Grove.

''We delivered petitions with thousands of signatures to Commissioner Tomas Regalado who said he would deliver them to the congressional delegation for South Florida, including the two U.S. senators, and urge them to sponsor legislation that would create a mandatory fuel surcharge,'' Carver said.

Truck drivers for the port are identified as independent contractors because they own the truck cabs that haul the trailers. But they work for trucking companies that receive contracts from shippers for the containers they want transported.

The drivers staged a nearly two-week work stoppage in July 2004 to protest delays at the port and other problems.

While the port confrontation has ended, Wednesday's protest convoy showed that truck drivers still have complaints that they don't benefit more from the recent U.S. trade boom.

MrCinatit
08-13-2005, 12:04 AM
also for you oil heads - map of crude oil locations determined by the department of energy.....
http://energy.er.usgs.gov/products/papers/World_oil/oil/

intresting that it seems the area covered most by oil reserves is the U.S. - unless i was just looking at i wanted to look at.

that said, it is times like this when i am very glad i walk to and from work, and i mean that with all honesty.

Roy Tucker's earlier post about Florida and the look in the future might not only be prophetic, but also a leap into a dark past few of us want to remember, during the oil embargos of the 1970s - who remembers the long gas lines of that period, and the make-shift "out of gas" signs hanging on pumps. our family lived in Dayton at the time, and as a child, i actually thought it was status quo for the whole family to jump in the station wagon, then sit in the car for hours, waiting for a tank of gas - i thought everyone did this, i thought it had always been like that, and i thought it was going to be like that forever in the future.
here, we got another glimpse of that on Sept. 11, 2001, when people panicked that night, filling up on as much gas as they could. i remmeber one guy rushing into our store, buying every gallon gas container he could find. naturally, the gasoline companies being the helpful, honest, ungreedy souls they are hiked prices that night as a result.
someday, though, this will end. the oil reserves are not eternal. it might not happen in our lifetime, or the next generation, but it will happen. i only hope we are better prepared than now.

Caveat Emperor
08-13-2005, 01:55 AM
Now that it has been established that consumers will pay $2.50 a gallon for gas, there is no way that the price will ever drop much lower than this.

The scary thing is, once gas hits $3.00-$3.50 a gallon (which some are predicting it will within the next year or so), it'll actually become cheaper for me to buy a more fuel-efficient car and carry a car payment than it will for me to continue to drive around my paid-off Jeep Cherokee.