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Redsfaithful
09-07-2005, 06:49 PM
I wanted to show off the new puppy that I bought my wife as her wedding present. She's a Golden Retriever and we named her Larkin. = )

http://images.redreporter.com/images/admin/larkin1.jpg
http://images.redreporter.com/images/admin/larkin2.jpg

As an aside, does anyone have any tricks for getting puppies to sleep more than a couple of hours at a time? Waking up at 3 AM to "play" is getting a bit old, but she's cute enough that I can't really get mad.

KronoRed
09-07-2005, 07:00 PM
She's a cutie :)

RFS62
09-07-2005, 07:15 PM
As an aside, does anyone have any tricks for getting puppies to sleep more than a couple of hours at a time? Waking up at 3 AM to "play" is getting a bit old, but she's cute enough that I can't really get mad.


Let her listen to Air America.


:evil:

Redsfaithful
09-07-2005, 07:40 PM
Let her listen to Air America.


:evil:

:p:

Thanks Krono!

jmcclain19
09-07-2005, 08:07 PM
RF - Great looking pup.

And no, there really isn't too much you can do for a puppy only sleeping a few hours. I've had several boxer pups, and they are just go-go-go at all hours. My youngest boxer, I slept on the couch with her for the first few weeks because some nights, that bundle of energy was a need to go outside and go potty. Other times it was just a need to be up and full of energy.

It doesn't last very long though, trust me. They eventually modify their body clock to yours, and they'll sleep both when you are asleep and when you are not there to be awake when you are.

wally post
09-07-2005, 08:07 PM
try putting a tick tock style clock in a towel in her crib. mother's heart kinda thing

Rojo
09-07-2005, 08:12 PM
Wild Turkey always works for me.

dman
09-07-2005, 08:13 PM
RF, Great looking pup. I had a yellow Labrador that I had to put to sleep on July 15. Seeing your pics makes think of what I wouldn't give to have him back at that age again. His name was Storm. Anyway, enjoy your new pet. Golden's are so full of energy, that your restless days have just begun. :laugh:

SandyD
09-07-2005, 09:59 PM
Congrats on the puppy, RF. Here's to long years with Larkin.

paintmered
09-07-2005, 10:09 PM
To get puppies to sleep through the night you have to use the tough love method.

Basically, if you have a cage, you need to her in there, close the door and close the door to your bedroom. Basically, she'll cry herself to sleep. And while it sounds harsh, it's the method my parents used with their dog when I was much younger and we've never had a problem with her at night. She was out of the cage in a few months and they've never woken up to any "suprises".

The trick is getting your puppy to think that her cage is her home. Put some toys in there and possibly a dirty t-shirt for the scent along with food and water. And make sure her cage isn't so big that she can use one side of it as a bedroom and other side as a bathroom.

RANDY IN INDY
09-08-2005, 01:01 PM
We have a golden, RF, and the cage method is the way to go. He is 2 years old now, and sleeps at the foot of our bed, but whenever we're away for any length of time, we'll find him in his cage when we get home. They really work, and the dog will really consider it his/her safe haven.


And make sure her cage isn't so big that she can use one side of it as a bedroom and other side as a bathroom.

That is right on, paintmered.

Beautiful pup, redsfaithful. If it is anything like our golden, you'll have a wonderful companion whose sole goal in life is to please you.

Blimpie
09-08-2005, 02:05 PM
Echoing most of what has been mentioned previously...never let your new puppy out of his/her crate because of their yelping. At that point, they are training you--and not vice versa. It's not easy the first few nights (especially if they were not properly weaned). How old was she when she was taken from momma? In the pictures, she looks to be about 8-10 weeks old...

Also, Paintmered mentioned a dirty T-shirt to put in her kennel. If you have anything like that which came with momma's scent still on it--it will make a good transition toy.

TeamMorris
09-08-2005, 02:35 PM
Soooooo cute :luvu: Congrats!!

GIK
09-08-2005, 02:48 PM
try putting a tick tock style clock in a towel in her crib. mother's heart kinda thing

This worked for my now 6.5 mo old lab.

SunDeck
09-08-2005, 02:51 PM
As an aside, does anyone have any tricks for getting puppies to sleep more than a couple of hours at a time? Waking up at 3 AM to "play" is getting a bit old, but she's cute enough that I can't really get mad.

Don't worry about it, she'll stop when she's a year old. :evil:

And I don't know if you've ever had a retriever pup before, but I'll say these two things from experience (my old boy is going to be 14 in November):

1) Run, Run, Run- the more you run her the better dog she'll be. They are built for action, work and a lot of exercise.

2) There is NO BETTER chick magnet than a retriever puppy. Too bad your married....like I was when I got mine.

Redsfaithful
09-08-2005, 05:36 PM
1) Run, Run, Run- the more you run her the better dog she'll be. They are built for action, work and a lot of exercise.

Yeah, definitely. I run, and she'll be joining me on my daily runs when she gets old enough.


2) There is NO BETTER chick magnet than a retriever puppy. Too bad your married....like I was when I got mine.

Yeah, no kidding! I coach high school cross country and my wife brought her to our last meet. She said that just about everyone stopped to pet Larkin, so I can only imagine what it would be like to take her to the park. I might have to loan her to some of my single friends.


How old was she when she was taken from momma?

She was 8 weeks old, which I've read is the youngest they should go.

I had hoped to avoid the crate thing, although I've read that it's a good thing to do. I think I'm going to try it out though after your recommendations.

I would try the clock thing, but I think it would drive me nuts. I have to sleep with a fan on, just to have some white noise. Any other kind of repetitive noise drives me insane when I sleep, so the fan drowns it all out.

Thanks for the help everyone, I'll report back in a few weeks to let you know how it's going with her nights.

I have another question, if anyone wants to answer it. How do you stop her from mouthing and nibbling on you? I've been saying "trade" and giving her one of her toys (something I read in a book), but I'm just curious if there are other ways. Thanks again.

LoganBuck
09-08-2005, 10:56 PM
Yeah, definitely. I run, and she'll be joining me on my daily runs when she gets old enough.



Yeah, no kidding! I coach high school cross country and my wife brought her to our last meet. She said that just about everyone stopped to pet Larkin, so I can only imagine what it would be like to take her to the park. I might have to loan her to some of my single friends.



She was 8 weeks old, which I've read is the youngest they should go.

I had hoped to avoid the crate thing, although I've read that it's a good thing to do. I think I'm going to try it out though after your recommendations.

I would try the clock thing, but I think it would drive me nuts. I have to sleep with a fan on, just to have some white noise. Any other kind of repetitive noise drives me insane when I sleep, so the fan drowns it all out.

Thanks for the help everyone, I'll report back in a few weeks to let you know how it's going with her nights.

I have another question, if anyone wants to answer it. How do you stop her from mouthing and nibbling on you? I've been saying "trade" and giving her one of her toys (something I read in a book), but I'm just curious if there are other ways. Thanks again.

Use a crate that does not have open sides like a cage. If yours does hang sheets or towel around and over it so that she views that as her sanctuary.

The dog crate should not be in your room. That is your space and the dog has its space. She will recognize this. Unless you want the dog to sleep in your room.

The kind of clock they are talking about is a little wind up alarm clock, it doesn't make enough noise for you to take notice.

As for the nibbling, a stern "No" or "Bad Dog" has worked for us. Even a slight smack to the nose. Not beating the dog or anything. Dogs can go several ways, but they are looking for leadership at a young age. I am sure you give her plenty of attention, and play with her alot. She probably has figured out that you are her buddy. The next step is getting her to acknowledge you as master. This will also come in hand when it comes to dog obdience. If you want to teach her, she needs to see you as a alpha male or female, the leader of her pack (your family). Have the same person feed her. If you are going to work with her on training make sure she comes to depend on you for things like dog walking, and feeding. She will label you as the provider.

Good Luck, this is definately the most important time of your dogs life.

RANDY IN INDY
09-09-2005, 08:45 AM
Great post and great advice, LoganBuck. Agree with you on all points.

Red Heeler
09-09-2005, 06:03 PM
Just a reminder from your friendly neighborhood veterinary student. Make sure that you keep up with her vaccinations and deworming (especially heartworms). It is critically important at this age. For flea prevention, skip the pet aisle at Wal-Mart, that stuff is crap. Get Frontline, Advantage, or Revolution from you veterinarian.

Puffy
09-09-2005, 07:05 PM
I have another question, if anyone wants to answer it. How do you stop her from mouthing and nibbling on you? I've been saying "trade" and giving her one of her toys (something I read in a book), but I'm just curious if there are other ways. Thanks again.

Great looking dog RF! I am in the process ofgetting a dog myself and a Golden is at the top of my list. I am in the looking for a reputable breeder stage. And I am 100% single, so you bet your arse that I will be using it to meet chicks.

:devil:

And like Logan said, a small slap on the nose (with a finger - nothing hard enough to even marginally hurt her) and a firm no is the way to go. The touch on the nose is really just to get her attention, the "no" is the most important part.

SunDeck
09-09-2005, 09:49 PM
I should amend the point about retrievers being chick magnets. I now have a three year old, blue eyed, toe headed daughter. I'm thinking of renting her to a frat....no wait, that's a VERY bad idea, isn't it? I am so not cut out for this. Stupid Dad!

paintmered
09-09-2005, 10:29 PM
RF, have any updates on the pup?

WMR
09-09-2005, 10:40 PM
Retrievers are great dogs, but I wouldn't trade my Corgi Teddy for anything. I will never own another breed of dog, I have had such a great experience with my Corgi.

Cute Corgi picture... fairly similar to what Teddy looked like as a puppy.

http://corgi.ncn.com/ALBUM/members/bran_holmes.htm

I have never encountered a friendlier, better-natured, intelligent dog than the Corgi. I've had retrievers, and they are def. great dogs too, but my Corgi experience has been unparalleled.

Redsfaithful
09-09-2005, 11:02 PM
RF, have any updates on the pup?

She's getting better! About biting anyway, and she's sleeping longer at night. We've still got her in a basket next to our bed, and I'm not going to lie, she jumps in bed with us sometimes. We're going to wait a week to start crating her though, because right now we're in an apartment and moving to a house next weekend. I don't want her crying/barking to wake up the neighbors here, but at the new place it won't be an issue.

I'm also finding it amazing how much she's grown in just the week that we've had her. It's insane.

jmcclain19
09-09-2005, 11:27 PM
RF - and remember, no matter how well trained your pup is, there are some days when you will come home to this

http://www.offcenter.us/humor/sophiemess.jpg

Good luck man

BoydsOfSummer
09-09-2005, 11:45 PM
LMAO! "Private Chaos reporting for duty,Sir!"

paintmered
09-09-2005, 11:48 PM
She's getting better! About biting anyway, and she's sleeping longer at night. We've still got her in a basket next to our bed, and I'm not going to lie, she jumps in bed with us sometimes. We're going to wait a week to start crating her though, because right now we're in an apartment and moving to a house next weekend. I don't want her crying/barking to wake up the neighbors here, but at the new place it won't be an issue.

I'm also finding it amazing how much she's grown in just the week that we've had her. It's insane.


That sounds good RF. Just remember that the sooner you get her in the crate, the less time it will take to train her and the less crying you'll have to sleep through. :laugh:

Every morning you wake up, she'll be a little bigger. When they are this young, they grow noticably every day, so take lots of pictures. :)

Congrats on the pup and may you have many happy years together.

Red Heeler
09-10-2005, 02:33 PM
A couple of more things, RF. First, you want to limit the amount of dog food she gets. Faster growing puppies have more joint problems as they get older. Also, spring for the good stuff (Purina ProPlan, Hill's Science Diet, Eukanuba) they really are better for your dog. You don't have to feed as much, so they aren't really that much more expensive. Don't let her get overweight once she is mature. Retriever breeds are prone to cruciate ruptures and being overweight just makes it worse.

As an adult, don't forget about annual check-ups. Unfortunately, Goldies are very prone to getting cancer, especially lymphoma. It can, however, be managed pretty well if it is caught early.

Goldies are really wonderful dogs, among the best for families with kids. Good luck!

Edskin
09-11-2005, 09:41 AM
Awesome looking dog!!! How anyone can't just adore dogs is beyond me. Here's some shots of my pooch (Vinny). They are just so fun!!! We even took him to a baseball game :)