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View Full Version : Ladies and Gentlemen, introducing your new $10 bill



savafan
09-28-2005, 01:45 PM
http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050928/capt.nybm10109281556.new_ten_dollar_bill_nybm101.j pg

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050928/ap_on_bi_ge/new_ten;_ylt=Ap1eMAKkRQ6TiKF731rpb7ADW7oF;_ylu=X3o DMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl



By MARTIN CRUTSINGER, AP Economics Writer 1 hour, 28 minutes ago

WASHINGTON - The color of money is getting more varied. A newly designed $10 bill was unveiled Wednesday featuring splashes of orange, yellow and red to go with the traditional green.

The $10 bill note became the third bill denomination to be jazzed up with colors as part of the government's effort to thwart counterfeiters and the ever-more sophisticated devices at their disposal.

"Thanks to the changes we've made in currency design, thanks to aggressive law enforcement led by the U.S.
Secret Service and thanks to an informed public, we've been able to stay ahead of the counterfeiters," Treasury Secretary
John Snow said during the unveiling ceremony on Ellis Island in New York harbor.

The location was selected to highlight one of the new features of the bill a red image of the Statue of Liberty's torch on the left side of the portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of the Treasury.

The $10 makeover followed changes to the $20 bill in 2003 and the $50 bill last year.

Don't look for the more colorful $10 to show up at your local ATM machine right away. The bills will not actually go into circulation until early next year. But the government was eager to publicize the new design so that people can prepare for the changes.

The $10 redesign was similar to the changes made to the $20 and the $50 but the colors were different because each denomination is being given its own set of colors to make finding the right bill in your wallet easier.

The orange, yellow and red colors for the $10 bill included the red torch on Hamilton's left and the phrase "We the people" in red on Hamilton's right. The background is a subtle shade of orange and there are small yellow 10s surrounding the torch.

Other security features that are included, some of which were first introduced in the 1990s during an earlier makeover, include a plastic security thread woven into the note that repeats "USA Ten" in tiny print. There is also a watermark that can be seen when the bill is held up to the light and color-shifting ink that makes the numeral "10" in the lower right-hand corner on the face of the bill change color from copper to green when the bill is tilted.

For the $20, the additional colors were blue, peach and a different shade of green while the $50 bill featured the added colors of blue and red.

Alexander Hamilton, the nation's first Treasury secretary, remains on the face of the bill but he is now outside of his old portrait frame with more of his shoulders showing. The other side of the bill still features the U.S. Treasury building in Washington.

Officials promised that America's currency will undergo makeovers every seven to 10 years to keep ahead of counterfeiters armed with the latest advances in computer technology that make digital counterfeiting easier.

"The ability to reproduce photographic images at work or at home on computers has really raised the bar as far as our challenges," said Thomas A. Ferguson, director of the engraving bureau.

The next bill to get the color treatment will be the $100 bill, which is expected to be redesigned in 2007.

At present, there are no plans to add color to the $1, the $2 or the $5 bills.

cumberlandreds
09-28-2005, 01:48 PM
The Feds should send everyone a sample $10 bill just so we can get used to it. :D

RedsBaron
09-28-2005, 02:00 PM
I'd be in favor of honoring some of our Twentieth Century Presidents (all deceased) on our currency, say the $10, $20 and $50 bills, but while the Presidents I have in mind include some from each major political party, I won't name any names, for fear of stirring up things again. I just think it would be appropriate to recognize some more recent leaders.

savafan
09-28-2005, 02:18 PM
I'd be in favor of honoring some of our Twentieth Century Presidents (all deceased) on our currency, say the $10, $20 and $50 bills, but while the Presidents I have in mind include some from each major political party, I won't name any names, for fear of stirring up things again. I just think it would be appropriate to recognize some more recent leaders.

Roosevelt's on the dime, Kennedy the half dollar, Eisenhower was on the silver dollar (think that may be out of circulation) and Woodrow Wilson was on the $100,000 bill (also out of circulation).

Blimpie
09-28-2005, 02:18 PM
At least Alexander Hamilton's cranium on the new $ 10 bill doesn't creep me out like the one on the new $ 20 bill did a few year ago. I couldn't quite figure out who Andrew Jackson's coif reminded me of... :confused:

http://www.joshie.com/~jlevitsk/blog/images/new20.jpg

That is...until I turned on Sportscenter that night....

http://www.capecodbaseball.org/News/HOFame/Hall2001/HoFext2002_PeterGammons.jpg

or, maybe it was when I watched that footage from the Stones concert... :eek:

http://www.albonico.net/images/nicolas/Keith_Richards.jpg

RedsBaron
09-28-2005, 02:22 PM
Roosevelt's on the dime, Kennedy the half dollar, Eisenhower was on the silver dollar (think that may be out of circulation) and Woodrow Wilson was on the $100,000 bill (also out of circulation).
There are several other 20th Century Presidents, all deceased, and from each party, I'd consider......but I'm not naming them here.

KronoRed
09-28-2005, 02:24 PM
Looks good.

I'm not in favor of changing who is on the money.

RBA
09-28-2005, 02:28 PM
With so many Presidents, why do we have to limit just one President per bill? Why don't we do something like a Mount Rushmore and put 4 or 5 on a bill at a time?

savafan
09-28-2005, 02:30 PM
You are aware that it doesn't have to be a president on the currency, right?

Obviously Hamilton is on the $10
Salmon P. Chase was on the $10,000 bill
And Sacagawea is on the gold dollar
also, Susan B. Anthony was on the silver dollar

RedsBaron
09-28-2005, 02:31 PM
You are aware that it doesn't have to be a president on the currency, right?

Obviously Hamilton is on the $10
Salmon P. Chase was on the $10,000 bill
And Sacagawea is on the gold dollar
also, Susan B. Anthony was on the silver dollar
Yeah, I knew that. How about Natalie Wood on the $10 bill? ;)

WVRed
09-28-2005, 02:31 PM
Nice, another counterfeit bill to spot.

savafan
09-28-2005, 02:33 PM
Yeah, I knew that. How about Natalie Wood on the $10 bill? ;)

I'm surprised there haven't been movements to put people such as Thomas Edison, Martin Luther King or General Patton on money.


Can't believe I forgot Ben Franklin in my list of non-presidents...doh!

Reds/Flyers Fan
09-28-2005, 02:36 PM
At least Alexander Hamilton's cranium on the new $ 10 bill doesn't creep me out like the one on the new $ 20 bill did a few year ago. I couldn't quite figure out who Andrew Jackson's coif reminded me of... :confused:

http://www.joshie.com/~jlevitsk/blog/images/new20.jpg



Andrew Jackson looks like the Headless Horseman from the movie "Sleepy Hollow." I always thought he looked particularly creepy on the $20 bills.

RBA
09-28-2005, 02:39 PM
I say keep the Non-Presidents on stamps. Limit the money to Presidents and the ones that have already been honored.

RBA
09-28-2005, 02:40 PM
Speaking of stamps, I do like the John Wayne ones.

Chip R
09-28-2005, 02:49 PM
You are aware that it doesn't have to be a president on the currency, right?

Obviously Hamilton is on the $10
Salmon P. Chase was on the $10,000 bill
And Sacagawea is on the gold dollar
also, Susan B. Anthony was on the silver dollar

Bert Convy's on the $1,000,000 bill. ;)

macro
09-28-2005, 03:09 PM
I had always hope to see this currency...

http://www.nflnut.com/store/media/PeteRose$.jpg

...but now I fear that it will never come to pass. Instead, I'll have to settle for the one below, which will be very popular come early February... :D

http://www.banginbux.com/ProdImages/Dollars/h-bengals.jpg

OldRightHander
09-28-2005, 03:23 PM
Looking at that picture, I don't think I like it much. There's no way something that big will fit in my wallet, and I have no idea how the atm machines are going to dispense it as well. Maybe this is a ploy to get people to use their debit cards more and not carry as much cash around.

Redsfaithful
09-28-2005, 07:37 PM
There are several other 20th Century Presidents, all deceased, and from each party, I'd consider......but I'm not naming them here.

I agree to an extent, but I also think that the President should be deceased for a certain length of time, and it should be quite awhile. Make it say ... 50 years or so, then you'll have the true hindsight of history to see if the guy was worth honoring.

savafan
09-28-2005, 08:52 PM
Here's a better view.

http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050928/capt.nyr10209281636.new_ten_nyr102.jpg


I like the fact that the word "specimen" is going to be written on there twice.

RedsBaron
09-28-2005, 09:04 PM
I agree to an extent, but I also think that the President should be deceased for a certain length of time, and it should be quite awhile. Make it say ... 50 years or so, then you'll have the true hindsight of history to see if the guy was worth honoring.
Under that criteria, a couple I'd consider are Theodore Roosevelt and Harry Truman, neither of whom appear on any currency, though each has an aircraft carrier named after him. I'm hoping that their presidencies were so long ago that this post is safe.
Kennedy is only President who served within the last 50 years who appears on any money, and his image was on the fifty cent piece within a few years of his murder. The Eisenhower dollar was initially minted in the early 1970s, shortly after his death, and only a little more than a decade after his presidency.
As far as 19th century Presidents (surely this is old enough to be safe) who haven't appeared on money and who might deserve the honor, I'd guess that their number is few. James Madison maybe, but really for his role in drafting the Constitution rather than for his presidency itself. John Adams perhaps, but again for accomplishments other than as President. Who else? Once Jefferson left office, and his second term was no roaring success, Jackson and Lincoln were about the only Presidents of the first rank for the rest of the century, and quite a few people would contest Jackson's ranking. Grover Cleveland might be the best of the rest.
I'll stay away from suggesting anyone after Truman.

KronoRed
09-28-2005, 09:42 PM
I agree to an extent, but I also think that the President should be deceased for a certain length of time, and it should be quite awhile. Make it say ... 50 years or so, then you'll have the true hindsight of history to see if the guy was worth honoring.

I'd extend that to Naval vessels as well.

It used to be that you had to be dead to have a ship named after you, now we have a Jimmy Carter Submarine sailing around and a George HW Bush aircraft carrier due in a few years.

I don't care much for it.

Yachtzee
09-28-2005, 11:06 PM
http://www.joshie.com/~jlevitsk/blog/images/new20.jpg



Jackson looks concerned about something, like "Should I be on this $20? I opposed the Second Bank of the United States for crying out loud!"




http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050928/capt.nyr10209281636.new_ten_nyr102.jpg



Hamilton seems much more at home on the $10. "It's good to be the $10."

KronoRed
09-28-2005, 11:19 PM
Thomas Jefferson wants to know when he gets a redesign
http://www.moneyfactory.com/uploads/two.jpg

macro
09-29-2005, 01:33 AM
RedsBaron, do I detect multiple sarcasms in your posts? :)

919191
09-29-2005, 02:20 AM
I wonder if George W will ever appear on Iraqi legal tender? :D

RedsBaron
09-29-2005, 06:35 AM
RedsBaron, do I detect multiple sarcasms in your posts? :)
No, I like sarcasm but none was intended.

RedsBaron
09-29-2005, 06:49 AM
I'd extend that to Naval vessels as well.

It used to be that you had to be dead to have a ship named after you, now we have a Jimmy Carter Submarine sailing around and a George HW Bush aircraft carrier due in a few years.

I don't care much for it.
I didn't realize that former Presidents Carter and Bush already had naval vessels named after them. In general I agree-let 'em die before we name stuff after them.
I didn't have too much of an issue about naming an aircraft carrier after former President Reagan since by the time that was done he was no longer really alive mentally and was just a physial shell who didn't even remember that he had ever been President.
In my city and state, it is well known that one of our current U.S. Senators has countless things named after him, but our current Congressman has a bridge and several other things named after him, a prior Governor had a portion of Interstate 64 named after him while he was in office, and a former Mayor had a municipal building named after her. Two of the officeholders I mentioned are/were Democrats and two are/were Republicans, so it appears to be a bipartisan habit.
I think you should let others honor you, and have the honors come when you are no longer in office, rather than the power of your office being used to get stuff named after you.
When it comes to a non-office holder I feel differently. For example, if someone wants to name a bridge after a holder of the Medal of Honor, as has been done in this area, I'm all in favor of doing so while the Medal of Honor winner is alive. In that instance it is not an attempt to curry political favor with anyone, and the real honor comes to the rest of us by just being able to recognize a person who has done so much for his or her country.
A final note---I absolutely am trying as hard as I can to make this a non-political post, or at least a non-partisan one. I'm not attacking any party or ideology. I'm just expressing a philosophical preference about when it is appropriate to name stuff after people.

Roy Tucker
09-29-2005, 07:42 AM
I rarely see anything over a $20 bill. All my cash comes from an ATM. And even then, I'm a debit card guy and don't carry a lot of cash around.

On the other hand, my wife (who does some part time work) cashes all of her paychecks and gets $100 bills and puts them in a brass pineapple in the dining room. She sometimes has thousands of dollars in rolls of Benjies sitting in there.

I make 20x the amount of money she does but my money is just an abstract number in the checkbook that goes up and down and feels more like Monopoly money that cold hard currency.

There is definitely an "oooohhh-aaahhh" factor when paying with a $100 bill instead of whipping out the plastic.

In general, I agree with the dead presidents rule for money. Politics can be nasty and time needs to pass and let wounds heal before putting them on a bill.

Johnny Footstool
09-29-2005, 09:33 AM
On the other hand, my wife (who does some part time work) cashes all of her paychecks and gets $100 bills and puts them in a brass pineapple in the dining room. She sometimes has thousands of dollars in rolls of Benjies sitting in there.

I'm sorry, but I seem to have lost your address. Where do you live? And what's your work schedule like? Do you own any big dogs?

RedsBaron
09-29-2005, 09:42 AM
I'm sorry, but I seem to have lost your address. Where do you live? And what's your work schedule like? Do you own any big dogs? :laugh: :laugh:

savafan
09-29-2005, 11:03 AM
When it comes to a non-office holder I feel differently. For example, if someone wants to name a bridge after a holder of the Medal of Honor, as has been done in this area, I'm all in favor of doing so while the Medal of Honor winner is alive. In that instance it is not an attempt to curry political favor with anyone, and the real honor comes to the rest of us by just being able to recognize a person who has done so much for his or her country.


What about celebrities like Pete Rose and Mark McGwire, who both have streets named after them? Do you think either Cincinnati or St. Louis (the cities, not the fans) now wish they hadn't named those streets after those guys?

RedsBaron
09-29-2005, 12:10 PM
What about celebrities like Pete Rose and Mark McGwire, who both have streets named after them? Do you think either Cincinnati or St. Louis (the cities, not the fans) now wish they hadn't named those streets after those guys?
There's always the risk that when you name something after a person who is still alive, that person may later go out and sully his or her name.

OldRightHander
09-29-2005, 12:29 PM
What about celebrities like Pete Rose and Mark McGwire, who both have streets named after them? Do you think either Cincinnati or St. Louis (the cities, not the fans) now wish they hadn't named those streets after those guys?

Think of the irony if P & G decided to put an office on Pete Rose Way.