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WMR
12-14-2005, 04:26 PM
What do you like the most about being married?
(did)

What do you dislike?
(did)

919191
12-14-2005, 04:29 PM
I don't know- the most? Trusting someone else completely maybe. The leat? An occaisional lack of privacy.

westofyou
12-14-2005, 04:57 PM
What do you like the most about being married?
Synchronicity


What do you dislike?
The E Channel

RedFanAlways1966
12-14-2005, 05:01 PM
What do you like the most about being married?
* Having someone who loves and trusts you. Someone who will be there for you when you need a shoulder to lean on. Someone who I can share anything with and will share anything with me. A best friend... who does "more" than go to ballgames with me. Knowing that no matter how hard of a day I have had, I will go home and get a big hug and kiss. NOT HAVING TO HANG OUT AT BARS TRYING TO FIND SOMEONE.

What do you dislike?
* Just needing that occasional time alone and not being able to get it (this has something to do w/ kids too).

RedFanAlways1966
12-14-2005, 05:02 PM
The E Channel

:laugh: Ain't it true! That and shows like Entertainment Tonight, etc.

Johnny Footstool
12-14-2005, 05:24 PM
What I like about being married:
Trust
Affection (both emotional and physical)
Mutual support
Talking
Listening

What I don't like:
Nitpicking (doing it and receiving it)
Vying for the TV
Absorbing abuse when my spouse is angry at something else

KronoRed
12-14-2005, 05:41 PM
Good.

Someone to always talk to, they won't blow you off for someone else.
Snuggles :D
Support
Love that doesn't have to be earned

Bad
Privacy can be an issue, but that goes both ways.
Fights suck.

SunDeck
12-14-2005, 06:57 PM
What do you like the most about being married?

The wife. That's what I like most about being married.



What do you dislike?

Having to share the last bottle of a six pack with the wife. And after fifteen years together, I still am too dumb to check the fridge in the morning before leaving for work to see if need to make a stop on the way home.

Yachtzee
12-14-2005, 10:51 PM
WOY, I'll see your E Channel, and raise you a Lifetime Channel and a Sister-in-law with crazy get rich schemes that always put a dent in my bank account.

What I like about being married
Having someone to share with and who shares with you
Support when you need it most
Making babies, the ends as well as the means

OldRightHander
12-15-2005, 08:51 AM
What I like the most:

There's always someone there to talk to.
Mutual support
Intimacy
We encourage one another to be better in all areas, especially spiritual life.

What I dislike:

Nitpicking about little unimportant things.
HGTV, Lifetime, and Oprah
We don't like the same kinds of movies. (and she doesn't ever want to see any of them in the theater)
My golf game has suffered.

TRF
12-15-2005, 10:47 AM
What I like: her listening to me.

What I dislike: me having to listen to her.

:)

M2
12-15-2005, 11:31 AM
I've done the marriage thing wrong and right (in that order ... which beats the tar our of the reverse).

More than what I like/dislike, I'll tell you what I think is underrated and overrated.

The thing I wish somebody had told me explicitly in my youth is that what makes a strong foundation for a marriage is absolute trust and commitment. Life will throw you curves. You can be swimming in greenbacks or goofy in love and think those things will get you through anything, but you can rest assured life will test your mettle ... and in doing so it will test the mettle of your relationship.

When those challenges arise you need to be with someone on whom you can rely without qualification, someone who can step up when it's adult time.

What's overrated about marriage is the endorphin rush of being in love. Yes, I still get that rush after 10 years with my wife, but endorphins are the garnish of life, not the meat and potatoes. What's underrated about marriage is being 100% committed to each other and the life you're building together. I've got to tell you that has come to mean more to me and it touches me at a more profound level than the basic mechanics of being in love ever did. Knowing that someone's in this with you every bit as much as you're in it with them is powerful stuff and it can take you places you never imagined.

My ex and I never faced a challenge and we fell apart anyway. We were in love, but there wasn't much substance behind it. Had we faced some tough times we'd have failed each other miserably.

I now understand the difference between trying to ride the warm fuzzies and being part of something built to last.

OldRightHander
12-15-2005, 11:43 AM
I've done the marriage thing wrong and right (in that order ... which beats the tar our of the reverse).

More than what I like/dislike, I'll tell you what I think is underrated and overrated.

The thing I wish somebody had told me explicitly in my youth is that what makes a strong foundation for a marriage is absolute trust and commitment. Life will throw you curves. You can be swimming in greenbacks or goofy in love and think those things will get you through anything, but you can rest assured life will test your mettle ... and in doing so it will test the mettle of your relationship.

When those challenges arise you need to be with someone on whom you can rely without qualification, someone who can step up when it's adult time.

What's overrated about marriage is the endorphin rush of being in love. Yes, I still get that rush after 10 years with my wife, but endorphins are the garnish of life, not the meat and potatoes. What's underrated about marriage is being 100% committed to each other and the life you're building together. I've got to tell you that has come to mean more to me and it touches me at a more profound level than the basic mechanics of being in love ever did. Knowing that someone's in this with you every bit as much as you're in it with them is powerful stuff and it can take you places you never imagined.

My ex and I never faced a challenge and we fell apart anyway. We were in love, but there wasn't much substance behind it. Had we faced some tough times we'd have failed each other miserably.

I now understand the difference between trying to ride the warm fuzzies and being part of something built to last.

That pretty much sums it up.

Yachtzee
12-15-2005, 03:35 PM
The question is, what is the real purpose behind the post? Is WilyMoRocks planning on following Raisor down the aisle?

Blimpie
12-15-2005, 03:46 PM
She had better like watching UK Basketball, or I'd drop her like a sack full of doorknobs.

Danny Serafini
12-15-2005, 04:03 PM
I'd like to know why you're holding a sack full of doorknobs in the first place.

Blimpie
12-15-2005, 04:05 PM
I'd like to know why you're holding a sack full of doorknobs in the first place.I have been married for eleven years. It is for the protection of BOTH of us.

WMR
12-15-2005, 04:19 PM
The question is, what is the real purpose behind the post? Is WilyMoRocks planning on following Raisor down the aisle?

Oh no, not me. I've been dating a girl for a while now; but I'm nowhere close to being at a stage in my life where I'm ready to settle down. I guess what I really want is to get the perspective of other people (outside of the marriages I have observed firsthand) as to what goes into making a marriage great.

I'm following my Dad's advice (advice earned the hard way, I should add): "Any man living in today's times who gets married before he is 30 is absolutely insane."

I'm sure as soon as you meet "the one," however, all that is quickly tossed out the window.

My mom and dad married right out of college. I think they would both concede now that it was too early for both of them, however, they got me and my sister out of it, so it ain't all bad!! :evil:

westofyou
12-15-2005, 04:23 PM
"Any man living in today's times who gets married before he is 30 is absolutely insane." I didn't get married until I was 36. Of course by then I'd been with the same woman for 13 years so I guess it really didn't matter.

WMR
12-15-2005, 04:27 PM
I didn't get married until I was 36. Of course by then I'd been with the same woman for 13 years so I guess it really didn't matter.

HAhahahahhahah; well you were very well aware of what you were getting into by that point; LOL or you were already well into it, I should say. ;)

OldRightHander
12-15-2005, 04:28 PM
I got married at 32. I think there are advantages to marrying later, but also disadvantages as well. The longer you live by yourself, the more time you have to get set in certain habits that have to change when there's someone else in the house. I spent so many years reading in bed until I fell asleep, and the first time I tried that with a wife in the bed I heard, "Can you turn that lamp off. I'm trying to sleep." Of course it didn't take me long to figure out that there are better things to do there than read.

westofyou
12-15-2005, 04:43 PM
HAhahahahhahah; well you were very well aware of what you were getting into by that point; LOL or you were already well into it, I should say. ;)7 years of living together in California makes you more or less married in the eyes of state. We just stomped out the question that everyone always asked.

deltachi8
12-16-2005, 09:10 AM
[QUOTE=WilyMoROCKS]What do you like the most about being married?
Being divorced

What do you dislike?
being married.

OK, maybe I'm just still a bit bitter. Its only been 7 years, i just need alittle more time I suppose.

M2
12-16-2005, 11:07 AM
I'm following my Dad's advice (advice earned the hard way, I should add): "Any man living in today's times who gets married before he is 30 is absolutely insane."

It's not bad advice. For whatever reason modern Americans seem to go haywire at 27. Having some sort of handle on who you are helps in that whole process of finding the right mate.

Though I'll add that my experience is that you don't want to get too old before you have kids. My wife and I originally figured we'd get rolling on that front at age 35, but it worked out that we started at age 30 and finished at age 33. I'm glad it worked out that way because babies can take the starch right out of you. I don't have the battery power I did eight years ago.

It's a tricky rope to walk, not getting married when you're too young or waiting to breed until you're too old.

Blimpie
12-16-2005, 11:50 AM
It's not bad advice. For whatever reason modern Americans seem to go haywire at 27. Having some sort of handle on who you are helps in that whole process of finding the right mate.

Though I'll add that my experience is that you don't want to get too old before you have kids. My wife and I originally figured we'd get rolling on that front at age 35, but it worked out that we started at age 30 and finished at age 33. I'm glad it worked out that way because babies can take the starch right out of you. I don't have the battery power I did eight years ago.

It's a tricky rope to walk, not getting married when you're too young or waiting to breed until you're too old.M2: I couldn't have said it any better myself. Most couples NEED that early marital bonding period without children--regardless of whether or not that couple shacked up together prior to marriage. Marriage is definitely different than simple cohabitation.

Everybody who is planning a family THINKS they know what precise impact the pitter-patter of little feet will have on their humble abode. I did as well. You think you know how much time, effort and money that children will require...then you have them and the truth soon becomes known.

On the flipside, if you decide to wait until you can afford kids to have them, then you will never have any children at all. My kids are everything to me, but I am sooooo damn grateful that my wife and I had almost two years of marriage under our collective belts prior to the arrival of our first child.

Those few years should be spent getting to know one another REALLY well. Those days should not be without the requisite bumps in the road--for that is the only way a couple can be certain that they made the proper life decisions. I'm not talking about kicking the tires here, I'm talking about ensuring an adequate home foundation that will allow you to better deal with the onset of stress from children. The last thing a newlywed ever needs to do is catch a sideways glimpse of their mate staring at them...knowing full well that they don't have their heart in the tasks that lie ahead with raising their children.

Okay, now everybody can send me their vasectomy bills.