PDA

View Full Version : Pluses and Minuses for Wright-Pat



RBA
01-15-2006, 04:26 PM
Wrigth-Pat is open for me on my assignment listings. However, there is no guarentee that I would get picked for it.

What are the +'s and -'s for living in the area? Granted I will probably do 2 more years of active duty and retire. So, I'm interested in job oportunities for my career field: Law Enforcement/Security/Force Protection, etc. once I get out at the old age of 45 years old.

Me and my wife are from the west coast, so the would be a big negative as it will not close to family members.

But I have alway been interested in living in the area and having all 4 seasons for a change. I really have never experienced that.

Also my wife is a medical assistant and she would be looking for a job in that career field. Any Doctors out there who need a real good Medical Assistant?

Thanks for your help..

cincinnati chili
01-15-2006, 05:36 PM
I'm speaking about Southern Ohio, generally, rather than Dayton specifically, but:

The ONLY reasons I would consider moving back to Southern Ohio are: 1. I have family there, 2. cost of living is relatively cheap, and 3. It's relatively low stress compared to most of the country, 4. the Reds play there


However, there are a lot of negatives. Dayton/Cinci. aren't small enough to have small town charm, yet they still have many of the negatives of the big cities (high crime). Also, personally I think that the weather sucks. If you want four seasons, there are probably other spots in the country where you can get them without the extreme humid AND extreme cold. I suggest Denver if you can possibly get transferred to Buckley or one of the other bases in the metro area. There's more political diversity in Denver (which I imagine you appreciate, given your posts on the other board), more to do for people of all ages, all four major sports, and it's not SUPER expensive (more expensive than southern Ohio, but not like the megacities).

Southern Ohio strikes me as a better place to be FROM than to retire TO.

guttle11
01-15-2006, 05:49 PM
Well, the area aroud Wright-Pat is growing ten-fold. If you moved in to Beavercreek, you would live in a pretty nice, growing town. Also, the area down by Springboro/Centerville/Miamisburg is growing quite a bit.

Sports wise there is plenty to do. UD, the Dragons, the Bombers, lot's of good HS teams/events, and even Wright State. Pretty close to the Reds/Bengals as well.

The crime thing is a bit off. If you live in the suburbs it's not anything more than anywhere else. But because of the city of Dayton itself, the area gets a rep hit.

Picture your average surburban area and you've got the greater Dayton area.


Also my wife is a medical assistant and she would be looking for a job in that career field. Any Doctors out there who need a real good Medical Assistant?

There are plenty of good local doctor's offices that are always looking for help. Not to mention quite a few hospitals as well.

RBA
01-15-2006, 06:55 PM
I suggest Denver if you can possibly get transferred to Buckley or one of the other bases in the metro area.

Well, it's not on the list. Hill AFB, Utah, Edwards (Palmdale, CA), Beale (Marysville, CA), Travis, CA (outside San Fran), Washington D.C. and New Jersey are the best of the list I got.

wheels
01-15-2006, 07:52 PM
That's where Hangar 18 is located.

I'd would soooo be there.

paintmered
01-15-2006, 10:26 PM
That's where Hangar 18 is located.

I'd would soooo be there.

You'd soooo be disappointed.

Reds4Life
01-15-2006, 10:33 PM
You'd soooo be disappointed.

You mean there aren't alien bodies on the shelf, along with that uber cool Roswell spacecraft?

;)

Redsland
01-15-2006, 10:40 PM
Of course not.

They're in Hanger 19 now.

cincinnati chili
01-15-2006, 10:59 PM
Well, it's not on the list. Hill AFB, Utah, Edwards (Palmdale, CA), Beale (Marysville, CA), Travis, CA (outside San Fran), Washington D.C. and New Jersey are the best of the list I got.

Gotcha. Well, personally I'd rather live in suburban Dayton than D.C. or NJ. I don't think you get what you pay for in DC. There are some parts of NJ that aren't all bad (e.g. Princeton and the stuff along the Penn. border). I can't speak from experience about the other areas.

M2
01-16-2006, 02:31 AM
RBA, wild guess here, but are you talking about McGuire AFB in Jersey?

It's a fairly decent suburban area in that neck of the woods (just south of Trenton, not too far from Philly). Your wife shouldn't have any trouble landing a job, though the price of living can be pretty high in some of the better towns around there. When I was a kid, I had a friend whose brother was stationed at Fort Dix (right next to McGuire) and I remember hearing that the guy's family was trapped in base housing because they couldn't afford the going rate in the area (the wife was at home with wee ones).

If you like four seasons, the mid-Atlantic is a pretty good pick. The winters are a little warm, but most people don't really like winter that much anyway. That area still gets a decent bit of snow, then it warms up a bit and everything melts. It's far enough south to get a good spring, far enough north to get a good fall. The summer's are humid as all get out, but there's a primo bit of ocean not too far away. Arguably the best stretch of beachfront in the U.S. runs from Jersey to North Carolina.

You'd probably enjoy the bloodsport politics in the area.

Philly tends to be a bit xenophobic. I don't know how much of that bleeds over the Delaware River or how far into the northern suburbs (which are right next to McGuire) it goes.

The DC area is an odd grab bag of stuff. I'm not too wild about the city itself, at least as a place to live (too violent, rolls up too much on the weekends when the government workers are at home). The immediate suburbs around D.C. are mega-expensive, but once you get outside Fairfax County, VA and Montgomery County, MD (northern Prince George's County too) the prices drop as things get a lot less gentrified. Striking the balance between upscale and affordable is always a tricky act, though. Like the Jersey area, your wife shouldn't have an ounce of trouble finding a job.

D.C.'s got a bit more spring. The summer's a little more oppressive (90+% humidity is a mid-Atlantic staple, but D.C. runs hotter). The spring is spectacular. The fall is all right (New England's spoiled me). The winters are fairly mild, though sometimes a nor'easter blows through. One piece of advice: Your life will be a misery if it involves a daily trek along the D.C. beltway. The traffic on that road during the rush hours is a killer.

The defense industry in the D.C. area might offer more opportunities for you after you retire from the Air Force as well.

creek14
01-16-2006, 08:31 AM
The plus for WPAFB - close to the Reds.

The minus for WPAFB - you'd have to be on the same base as me.

KronoRed
01-16-2006, 08:37 AM
The plus for WPAFB - close to the Reds.

Sounds like a negative to me :evil:

RedFanAlways1966
01-16-2006, 09:13 AM
I think the Dayton area is nice. I might be biased, since I have lived here my entire life.

If you like the big-city thing, then you will not like the Dayton area. Dayton does not have any of that big-city thing. Even compared to Cincinnati & Columbus, it is much-much less of a big-city atmosphere. Traffic jams? The worst will mean an extra 10 minutes on your trip (if that).

Lots of good communites to live in and schools for the kids.... except for Dayton Public Schools which shows bad test scores year in and year out. I highly doubt that you'd be moving in the Dayton city limits though. As someone else mentioned, the Dayton city limits is where the majority of the crime is located. And it seems to usually be a situation where the victim knows the suspect (not much "random" crime if you will).

Dayton does not have an overabundance of activities itself. There is the Air Force Museum, which is quite impressive and free. If you are into theatre, they have a fairly new complex in dowtown called the Schuster Center. You are only an hour (if not less) form Cincy and Columbus as well (Ohio State, UCincy, Xavier, Ohio State Fair, REDS, Bengals, Blue Jackets, Columbus Crew, etc.). You also have Wright State and Univ. of Dayton sports (both D-1). You are not far from the Indy 500 and the Kentucky Derby if those things are enjoyable.

Car travel on a trip is made easy too. You have two major highways that intersect 7 miles north of downtown Dayton... I-70 and I-75. Whether you want to go east, west, north or south... it is easy to get started!

There are also a lot of good colleges nearby if you want the kids to be "not too far away".

Roy Tucker
01-16-2006, 11:03 AM
I'll echo the comments that RFA made.

I've always maintained that us folk here in the Midwest keep it secret that this is a great place to live. It may not be the world's most sexy and prestigious place to live, but it's a wonderful place to raise a family.

The cost of living is better than most places in the US, schools and hospitals are great, housing costs are relatively low, and our economies tend to be more recession-resistent than other parts of the country (more Cinci than Dayton though). Lots of universities around as well.

For the 4 seasons thing, getting wintry weather is hit or miss. Like this winter, we've had about 6 weeks now of relatively mild weather. Mild like highs are 40's-50's, most precip is rain, and the sky is midwest gray. The falls and springs are nice, summers are pretty good but it does get hot and humid.

WPAFB is a good place to make connections for future employment. And the people I know in medical professions don't seem to have trouble finding good work.

paintmered
01-16-2006, 11:29 AM
RBA, if you have a clearance or have the opportunity to get one at your future job, you are virtually guarenteed a job at WPAFB after you retire - especially with your veteran's preference.

I was born and raised in this area and work at WPAFB now. The midwest and Ohio gets a bad rep for what it's not, but it really is a great place to raise a family. And plus you are only a day's drive from the majority of the country.

creek14
01-16-2006, 11:59 AM
Lots of good communites to live in and schools for the kids.... except for Dayton Public Schools which shows bad test scores year in and year out.
Near the base, I would also stay away from Fairborn and Xenia schools if at all possible. Problem is some of the base housing goes to Fairborn schools. The rest go to Mad River, which is better.

Personally, I would only send my child to Beavercreek, Bellbrook/Sugarcreek, Centerville, Oakwood or Springboro schools. And Springboro is iffy due to current funding issues.

cincinnati chili
01-16-2006, 12:04 PM
Arguably the best stretch of beachfront in the U.S. runs from Jersey to North Carolina..

This gave me a chuckle.

Arguably, the best neighborhood in metro-Boston runs from Dudley Square Roxbury to Brookline Village.

The North Carolina beaches kick the Jersey beaches' ass. If it's too cold to swim in 6+ months of the year, then it ain't a beach.

I went to Boynton Beach last summer in Jersey. It's nice, despite the proximity to scummy Atlantic City. But IMO, there's no comparison to the non-touristy beaches in the Carolinas.

westofyou
01-16-2006, 12:06 PM
Arguably the best stretch of beachfront in the U.S. runs from Jersey to North Carolina..Ughh.... there is a ocean over on my side of the country, all of it allows public access too.

I'll take that everyday and Sunday over a Virginia or Carolina beach.


If it's too cold to swim in 6+ months of the year, then it ain't a beach.

Pshaww... the beach is more than getting wet.

M2
01-16-2006, 01:14 PM
This gave me a chuckle.

Arguably, the best neighborhood in metro-Boston runs from Dudley Square Roxbury to Brookline Village.

The North Carolina beaches kick the Jersey beaches' ass. If it's too cold to swim in 6+ months of the year, then it ain't a beach.

I went to Boynton Beach last summer in Jersey. It's nice, despite the proximity to scummy Atlantic City. But IMO, there's no comparison to the non-touristy beaches in the Carolinas.

Jersey's got a mix of beaches, though a lot of 'em are the crowded, touristy type. Frankly, most people don't go in the water before Memorial Day and after Labor Day anyway, even in NC. IMO that's a big equalizer. The summer's the same length in both places. If you want to go swimming in the winter then you better get down to Florida.

Anyway, there's something to be said for having a bustling boardwalk at your back. That's why I picked the whole mid-Atlantic stretch. The atmospherics vary, but invariably you've got a broad stretch of sand and a warm, ocean with a moderate surf (wave sets generally run between two and six feet).


Ughh.... there is a ocean over on my side of the country, all of it allows public access too.

I'll take that everyday and Sunday over a Virginia or Carolina beach.

True, private beaches do stink. I'm no fan of for-pay public beaches either (which are the rage in Jersey). Honestly, the best spot in the mid-Atlantic is the Delmarva penninsula. The beaches are glorious and free (though the parking usually isn't - an unpleasant detail easily conquered with a bicycle).


Pshaww... the beach is more than getting wet.

Well, it has to be when you've got a bone-chiller like the Pacific in front of you. You can actually spend the day in the water in the Atlantic and not need a wetsuit. What I've seen of the beaches on the Pacific north of San Francisco (admittedly it's not a ton) reminds me of Maine and Nova Scotia -- cold and rocky. It's pretty, but fun in the sun it's not. Went to the beach in Sausalito on the 4th of July once. For an easterner it was nothing short of horrifying how cold it was (air temp of 45 degrees if memory serves).

Even in southern Cali the water's cold by Atlantic standards. I'm no tenderfoot. I'll swim in cold water, but having to get out to warm up sucks (at least it does if you've grown up without that thought ever crossing your mind).

westofyou
01-16-2006, 01:18 PM
Went to the beach in Sausalito on the 4th of July once

Tourist.... no one goes to the beach in July, September is better.

M2
01-16-2006, 06:27 PM
Tourist.... no one goes to the beach in July, September is better.

I was there. It was July. How did I know it was the devil's workshop?

Until that moment I thought July the 4th on the beach was in the Bill of Rights.

eupher
01-16-2006, 08:21 PM
We just moved out to the Dayton area in July, from Seattle. I will say, coming from the west coast to the east coast has been a BIG culture shock. We're adjusting, it's taking a little bit, but it's happening.

We just bought a house in Springboro, and though the area is a little sparse at this time, they're doing a lot of building, particularly in northern Springboro. We looked in Beavercreak, as well as Centerville. Beavercreak is a wonderful area, and is really growing. It had more a west coast feeling to it, if you will. In the end it I didn't want to have a longer commute.

Overall, we've been happy since our move. Housing is substantially cheaper than the west coast, as well as the overall cost of living. People here tend to be more sincere than out west (at least in Seattle). Also, you won't go bored, you're in close proximity to a lot of fun places for the family, as well as a weekend getaway for the grownups.

As far as weather goes...Summer was an adjustment, with the heat and humidity, but you do get air conditioner :) (Most people didn't have air conditioners in Seattle). Fall was wonderful. The changing colors and the mild temperatures were great for getting out and enjoying the many fall festivities. Winter has been very mild, we got a little worried when we got several inches of snow in early December, but since then it's been great, very much fall like. We can't wait for spring!

Granted, it's not as glamorous of a place as say Seattle or San Francisco, as mentioned above, however, it is a good place to race a family.

westofyou
01-16-2006, 11:02 PM
Until that moment I thought July the 4th on the beach was in the Bill of Rights.Oh for a dollar for every tourist I've seen in the Bay Area in shorts in August.

M2
01-17-2006, 12:03 AM
Oh for a dollar for every tourist I've seen in the Bay Area in shorts in August.

Honestly, if you're from somewhere else on the planet there's no way to know how bad the summertime weather sucks there. It's like another planet.

dman
01-17-2006, 12:27 AM
RBA, a plus for taking an assignment at WPAFB so close to retirement is the fact that, next to Honda, Wright-Patt is one of the largest civilian employers in Ohio. From my days being assigned there, I'd say that the chances of landing a good paying Federal Civil Service job are good, both for you and your wife. If nothing else, I know that DSCC here in Columbus seems to have quite a few positions available. Plus, in the area of security, DSCC uses DoD police on that installation and I know a lot of those guys are retired military LE's and MP's.

Caseyfan21
01-17-2006, 12:44 AM
We just moved out to the Dayton area in July, from Seattle. I will say, coming from the west coast to the east coast has been a BIG culture shock. We're adjusting, it's taking a little bit, but it's happening.

We just bought a house in Springboro, and though the area is a little sparse at this time, they're doing a lot of building, particularly in northern Springboro. We looked in Beavercreak, as well as Centerville. Beavercreak is a wonderful area, and is really growing. It had more a west coast feeling to it, if you will. In the end it I didn't want to have a longer commute.

Overall, we've been happy since our move. Housing is substantially cheaper than the west coast, as well as the overall cost of living. People here tend to be more sincere than out west (at least in Seattle). Also, you won't go bored, you're in close proximity to a lot of fun places for the family, as well as a weekend getaway for the grownups.

As far as weather goes...Summer was an adjustment, with the heat and humidity, but you do get air conditioner :) (Most people didn't have air conditioners in Seattle). Fall was wonderful. The changing colors and the mild temperatures were great for getting out and enjoying the many fall festivities. Winter has been very mild, we got a little worried when we got several inches of snow in early December, but since then it's been great, very much fall like. We can't wait for spring!

Granted, it's not as glamorous of a place as say Seattle or San Francisco, as mentioned above, however, it is a good place to race a family.


I have lived most of my life in Springboro, moved there in 2nd grade and I am now a sophomore in college. We live off Lytle 5 Points in Sycamore Springs but we moved there before any of the other stuff (aka Settlers Walk).

I like how you say "though the area is sparse." I come back from college and something new is built every time. It's growing so fast. I graduated in 2004 from Springboro High School with a graduating class of about 260. My little sister has a class of over 350 (last time I heard) and she's a junior. I see it now and I can still remember the days when 741 was a 2 lane road all the way into town.

As for Wright Patt, it's a nice place to work/live. I've worked there for 3 summers as an intern and I really like how everyone I met there was super friendly and helpful. Like others have said, if you work at Wright Patt, don't live in Fairborn, Trotwood, surrounding communities. I think your best bets would be Beavercreek, Centerville, Springboro, Miamisburg, and possibly a little further south in Lebanon if you don't mind a 45 minute to hour commute. Springboro is about a 1/2 hour - 45 mins from the base depending where you live in town (and how fast you drive :evil: ). I can't speak much for the other communities but they are all about 1/2 hour or less.

The Dayton area has its share of malls and entertainment options. There is lots of entertainment but I find myself doing more things down towards Cincinnati at times. Dayton does have the Schuster Center, Dragons, and every restaurant chain ever invented :laugh: . The Dayton Mall is getting a lot of new renovations to become more trendy (outside shops and restaurants including Cheesecake Factory). They are also building a new trendy shopping center with lots of high end type shops near Bellbrook. It's basically between Springboro and Wright Patt. Beavercreek also has a much nicer mall then the Dayton Mall with lots of restaurant options and stores.

Cincinnati is about 45 minutes from Springboro, about an hour or so from Dayton depending on traffic. The area between Dayton and Cincy is basically becoming one giant subaraban area. Communities like Springboro, Lebanon, Mason, and West Chester are among the fastest growing in the state and they are exploding along I-75. They are all "nice" communities with higher incomes and the white collar type of lifestyle.

Another entertainment option within an hour or so of Dayton is Kings Island.

As for colleges, Ohio is completely stacked with good in state schools within a reasonable distance of Dayton. There is Univ of Dayton (private but good scholarships) and Wright State both in the backyard. The University of Cincinnati and Xavier are both about an hour away. Ohio State is about an hour and a half outside of Dayton depending on where you are coming from (probably less from Dayton, 1.5 hrs is Springboro). There's also Miami University which is probably about an hour and a half from Dayton.

I like to brag to people in Columbus that there are 5 Div-1 basketball teams within an hour of my house (Cincy, Xavier, Dayton, Wright State, Miami) so that's why I'm crazy about college basketball.

dman
01-17-2006, 12:48 AM
The North Carolina beaches kick the Jersey beaches' ass. If it's too cold to swim in 6+ months of the year, then it ain't a beach.


I'll second that. Another beach area that we tried this past summer was Bethany Beach in Delaware. I was very impressed with the upkeep and the cleanliness. As far as the Carolinas go, I'll take the Outer Banks as opposed to Myrtle seven ways to Sunday

westofyou
01-17-2006, 12:54 AM
Honestly, if you're from somewhere else on the planet there's no way to know how bad the summertime weather sucks there. It's like another planet.
Rule #1 of West Coast Living north of Santa Barbara, in your car always have a coat/sweatshirt/hat and a pair of shorts in the summer. Micro climates, I've left 90 degree weather in San Jose and drove 25 miles north to San Francisco and had to deal with 58 degrees with fog coming over the hills like Wuthering Heights. It's creepy.

M2
01-17-2006, 01:04 AM
I'll second that. Another beach area that we tried this past summer was Bethany Beach in Delaware. I was very impressed with the upkeep and the cleanliness. As far as the Carolinas go, I'll take the Outer Banks as opposed to Myrtle seven ways to Sunday

The Delaware beaches are fantastic. Spent most every summer of my youth down there. Indian River's my favorite, it's got the best surf.

M2
01-17-2006, 04:38 AM
Rule #1 of West Coast Living north of Santa Barbara, in your car always have a coat/sweatshirt/hat and a pair of shorts in the summer. Micro climates, I've left 90 degree weather in San Jose and drove 25 miles north to San Francisco and had to deal with 58 degrees with fog coming over the hills like Wuthering Heights. It's creepy.

Those are the insider things travel guides rarely underscore the way they should. For instance, on the first page of any Boston travel guide it should read "IF YOU'RE STAYING IN THE CITY OF BOSTON DO NOT RENT A CAR."

Cars are a misery in this city and don't help you get anywhere you want to be. If people plan on taking a day trip elsewhere, then rent for that day, but I've lost count of the number of stories I've heard from folks who tried to drive to Fanueil Hall or the North End or Fenway, got hopelessly lost and then couldn't find parking.

TeamCasey
01-17-2006, 07:28 AM
We rented a car in Boston for a business meeting. We also found ourselves entering an off ramp with a gazillion headlights coming at us. :eek:

Roy Tucker
01-17-2006, 08:21 AM
I know this is not WPAFB-related, but when I take the family to cities for vacation, we use mass transit.

I've been to Boston probably over 100 times and have driven the streets. But when I brought the family there a couple years back, we stayed out in Franklin, took the commuter rail in and out, and rode the T around town.

Ditto for Washington DC and the Metro, SF and BART, and Chicago and the El. Once everyone gets used to it, the kids have a lot of fun.

Although, never mention Foggy Bottom to my youngest. She got on the wrong Metro train at 10 PM when the rest of us got on another train, and I had to do a diving stop on the closing doors to get her out. She still shudders at the memory.