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Reds4Life
01-24-2006, 11:27 AM
From todays bird cage liner.


Johnny Almaraz: The Reds' director of international scouting and player development since the end of the 2003 season.

Chris Antonetti: Entering his fifth season as assistant general manager with the Indians.

Jim Beattie: Former Expos general manager served as the Orioles' executive vice president of baseball operations last season. He is expected to join the Reds as a special adviser this week.

Paul DePodesta: Spent the past two seasons as Dodgers general manager. Fired in October.

Michael Hill: Assistant general manager with the Marlins since 2002 was born and raised in Cincinnati.

Wayne Krivsky: Twins assistant general manager interviewed for the Reds' job after the 2003 season.

Brad Kullman: Reds director of major-league operations was promoted to interim GM on Monday. He worked as co-assistant general manager for the Reds after Jim Bowden was fired in July 2003.

Dayton Moore: Director of player personnel for the Braves.

Tim Naehring: The Reds' director of player development since October 2000.

Dave Wilder: Originally hired by the White Sox in 2003 as an assistant general manager, he is entering his third season as director of player development for the defending World Series champions.

Frank Wren: Former Orioles general manager has been a vice president and assistant general manager with the Braves since October 1999.

Joseph
01-24-2006, 11:33 AM
On XM this morning it was stated there was some legit interest in Kim Ng. Would make sense for us to be the first team with a female GM as long as she knows her stuff.

Red Leader
01-24-2006, 11:35 AM
I like Antonetti, DePodesta, and Kullman. Michael Hill intrigues me, but I don't know enough about him to say that I do or do not like him as a candidate. With RCast's "experience" a big theme here, I'm thinking he's not going to have a real shot anyway.

If Naehring is hired, I'm going to change my user name to Team O'Brien.

Krusty
01-24-2006, 11:41 AM
If they are looking for previous GM or assistant GM experience, then Beattie and Wren would be the front runners. But if Kullman can impress ownership by swinging a deal or two for pitching, he just might sneak it and take it all.

KronoRed
01-24-2006, 11:43 AM
If they let him make a deal.

I was hoping to see some other names on this list.

Unassisted
01-24-2006, 11:45 AM
Lance McAlister suggested that a couple of assistant GMs for the Cards would be on the short list. Although Lance named names, the concept is so obvious that I'm surprised that the beat writers working on short lists didn't use it in compiling their short lists.

Krusty
01-24-2006, 11:46 AM
If they let him make a deal.

I was hoping to see some other names on this list.

Any deal has to be run through the boss. So if it improves the Reds pitching staff, I think Castanelli would approve any deal Kullman makes.

M2
01-24-2006, 11:56 AM
I figure Wren's got to be the guy with the pole position.

westofyou
01-24-2006, 12:05 PM
Meanwhile Hal throws out other names... making me think that both lists are awash with some nonsense.


CINCINNATI | Owner/CEO Bob Castellini has a list of candidates to become general manager of the Cincinnati Reds and plans to send out invitations for interviews.

The invitations are not gold-embossed, but several candidates consider the job a golden opportunity and emerged quickly after general manager Dan O'Brien was fired Monday morning.

Names surfacing immediately included Brad Kullman, Wayne Krivsky, Gary Hughes, Jack McKeon and Michael Hill, among others.

Reds4Life
01-24-2006, 12:10 PM
Jack McKeon? Some folks around here will get out of the pitchforks if that happens. :lol:

M2
01-24-2006, 12:13 PM
Jack McKeon? Some folks around here will get out of the pitchforks if that happens. :lol:

Just because you find yourself single at the moment is no excuse to go calling old girlfriends.

MWM
01-24-2006, 12:13 PM
I put a little more credence in the Enquirer list because I have a hard time believing they're considering either Hughes or McKeon. Hal mentioned Hughes during the last GM search as well. I think he's Hal's buddy.

savafan
01-24-2006, 12:18 PM
Since there are only 8 names on the real list, I doubt either of those are official lists.

Puffy
01-24-2006, 12:30 PM
Just because you find yourself single at the moment is no excuse to go calling old girlfriends.

Unless you are horny.

Just sayin'

Falls City Beer
01-24-2006, 12:42 PM
I figure Wren's got to be the guy with the pole position.If I'm betting, this is who I'm taking too.

CrackerJack
01-24-2006, 12:56 PM
Hal is already pimping McKeon - *Sigh*

I can't imagine he is even on the radar. But that won't stop the local writers from pushing his candidacy no matter how silly. They are still in love with the guy for whatever reason.

KronoRed
01-24-2006, 01:01 PM
Hal is already pimping McKeon - *Sigh*

I can't imagine he is even on the radar. But that won't stop the local writers from pushing his candidacy no matter how silly. They are still in love with the guy for whatever reason.
They like old guys.

savafan
01-24-2006, 01:02 PM
Hal is already pimping McKeon - *Sigh*

I can't imagine he is even on the radar. But that won't stop the local writers from pushing his candidacy no matter how silly. They are still in love with the guy for whatever reason.


Jack was accessible to the sports writers. After the last two years of Dan O'Brien, you know they are going to want someone who will give them a story.

westofyou
01-24-2006, 01:04 PM
After the last two years of Dan O'Brien, you know they are going to want someone who will give them a story.After two years of O'Brien you know they'll want someone who can stay awake.

Jack as GM these days would be like Mortie Seinfeld working at J. Peterman.

Bill
01-24-2006, 01:11 PM
I think most of these guys would axe the tandem rotation disaster so we can't go wrong, right?

Antonetti and Farrell both received interest from Boston, but ,iirc, Antonetti was not keen on the Boston job.

Kc61
01-24-2006, 01:19 PM
I tend to doubt these lists. For one thing, virtually nobody on the lists (perhaps except McKeon and Beattie) have had substantial experience as a major league GM. RCast doesn't strike me as a guy who wants a young wiz kid. Rather, I would guess he wants someone who has been a GM or held a similar top position.

From the Enquirer list, I can see Krivsky (because he was so highly thought of last time) and Beattie being considered.

I don't see Wren (one year as Oriole GM) and Moore seems wedded to the Bravos. I doubt that Kullman, Naehring or Alvaraz is a serious candidate. Other assistant types (Wilder, Antonetti) wouldn't seem to fit Cast's description. The candidate who is from the Cincy area won't get a lot of credit for that under this ownership (it seemed essential when Lindner hired DanO).

If an assistant is to be included, my guess is that the Cardinal guys are most likely because ownership probably knows them. But other than Beattie (already mentionied by Cast) and perhaps Krivsky, I doubt that the most serious names have surfaced yet.

Az. Reds Fan
01-24-2006, 03:17 PM
Two guys I'd consider for the job, although I'm sure they won't get any run, are Mike Rizzo and Peter Woodfork, both of the D'backs.

Rizzo has completely turned around the D'backs farm system, from one of the worst to arguably one of the best in just a few years. While he didn't get much of a chance at the D'backs GM gig before Josh Byrnes got the job, I know the fans out here were hoping he'd be considered.

Woodfork was an integral part of the Red Sox contingent, along with Byrnes and Epstein, who led the Red Sox front office. He came out to Arizona to ba an assistant to Byrnes, after Boston finally relented and let him go. He probably would be the Red Sox GM right now if he'd stayed there.

With all that being said, I gotta believe that Jim Beattie will be our next GM.

TeamBoone
01-24-2006, 03:56 PM
As I mentioned on another thread, Castellini declined to name individuals on his 6-8 name list. He said he'd identify them as they came in for interviews. Therefore, I doubt he's shared his list with the media. This is nothing but speculation.

ramp101
01-24-2006, 04:08 PM
a little something on Marlins Assistant GM Mike Hill:

He is a fantastic guy with a real knowledge of the game(obviously). He has been the main guy behind alot of the Marlins trades. He has a unique style of GMing, going with both the statheads way and the "watch with your eye" way. If he gets the GM job, I might soon be working for your Reds. I have known Mike for a little over 2 years and I speak to him on the phone about 3 times a month, while emailing him every other day. Ill be rooting for you guys to pick him up, for he is one of the great baseball minds out there that hasnt gotten a shot at really running a team.

Puffy
01-24-2006, 04:10 PM
Thanks for the info Ramp - you guys are going to be really bad this year (I think) but the trades made have insured that the bad years will be short and the Marlins future appears really, really bright

:thumbup:

ramp101
01-24-2006, 04:46 PM
Thanks for the info Ramp - you guys are going to be really bad this year (I think) but the trades made have insured that the bad years will be short and the Marlins future appears really, really bright

:thumbup:
Id rather watch these guys with no expectation who are gonna bust their asses every single night, than endure last years debacle of showing no heart with very high expectations

registerthis
01-24-2006, 05:53 PM
Anybody know anything about Dave Wilder? Anyone associated with player development from the White Sox intrigues me.

OnBaseMachine
01-24-2006, 06:10 PM
I love the Enquirer list. Antonetti, DePodesta, Krivsky, Kullman, Dayton Moore, and Hill are all guys I would be happy to have as the new GM. Just say no to Beattie and Naehring.

deltachi8
01-24-2006, 07:49 PM
After two years of O'Brien you know they'll want someone who can stay awake.

Jack as GM these days would be like Mortie Seinfeld working at J. Peterman.

Or Marv Levy as an NFL GM...oh wait, thats real...

RedsIn07
01-24-2006, 08:07 PM
a little something on Marlins Assistant GM Mike Hill:

He is a fantastic guy with a real knowledge of the game(obviously). He has been the main guy behind alot of the Marlins trades. He has a unique style of GMing, going with both the statheads way and the "watch with your eye" way. If he gets the GM job, I might soon be working for your Reds. I have known Mike for a little over 2 years and I speak to him on the phone about 3 times a month, while emailing him every other day. Ill be rooting for you guys to pick him up, for he is one of the great baseball minds out there that hasnt gotten a shot at really running a team.
Thats good to hear I've been reading up on him, he does sound intruiging:
http://www.harvardindependent.com/user/index.cfm?event=displayRegistrationPrompt&thereferer=http%3A//www.harvardindependent.com/media/paper369/news/2004/05/06/Sports/Interview.With.A.Champion-679949.shtml%3Fnorewrite%26sourcedomain%3Dwww.harv ardindependent.com

Interview with a Champion
Indy talks with Marlins assistant GM Michael Hill '93 (extended online version)
By: Victor Hu
Issue date: 5/6/04 Section: Sports
Article Tools: Page 1 of 1

So there I was. On a Saturday morning, sitting in the bleachers next to O'Donnell Field, watching the Brown Bears pound out a 9-3 lead in the fourth inning of the Harvard-Brown doubleheader. The two teams were scheduled to play another doubleheader the next day, and Harvard really needed to win three out of four to be in good shape when they play leader Dartmouth next weekend to determine the winner of the Red Rolfe Division in the Ivy League. But at this point, things were looking bleak. All of my friends took off after Brown extended the lead to six, but as I've never been one to leave a game early, I decided to stick it out and hope for a comeback. (Incidentally, I didn't have to pay for a ticket, so I wasn't trying to get my money's worth.) I figured the weather was nice, and fittingly enough, I was waiting for a return call from Michael Hill '93, assistant GM of the Marlins, and a former Crimson baseball player.

It turned out to be well worth the wait. In the eighth, Harvard scored six runs to tie it; most of the players reaching on walks, hit batsmen, or Brown errors. Then, in the ninth, they held the Bears scoreless, and Trey Hendricks '04 won it for the Crimson with a walkoff double to score Bryan Hale '04. From lost season, to tremendous victory in minutes. Absolutely amazing.

Of course during all of this, I miss Hill's call and only until after the game do I sheepishly return his call, carefully explaining the situation. He seems to forgive me gracefully, and we launch into the interview.



Indy: Tell me a little bit about your background.

Michael Hill: I graduated from Harvard in '93, and I was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 31st round. After graduation, I played two and a half years of minor league baseball, and really saw an opportunity for myself to get into the front office because of my educational background and the fact that I had played the game on a professional level. I was fortunate enough that the Tampa Bay franchise had just been awarded the expansion, and they were starting to fill their team, make their hires. I sent my resume in, and took an entry-level baseball operations position.

I: What kind of work did you do in that position?

MH: Just about everything. When you come in on any entry-level standpoint, you do everything administrative you can imagine. I was fortunate enough that I was in Tampa Bay that I went out and evaluated players. I would do scouting reports and evaluated players at the high school, college, and professional levels. So from that standpoint, it was great experience because I got to see some of the most talented players in the country come through Florida.

I: In your very first job you were able to scout players? That doesn't sound like a bad job at all...

MH: My official title was Scouting and Player Development Assistant. So obviously I had administrative duties within the office to assist our scouting director and all of our scouts in the field in doing their jobs, our minor league, our farm director and our minor league team. It was really great exposure for me to everything in baseball operations and it definitely sped up the curve in terms of my growth in the game.

I: How do you think you were able to get such a lucky break? Was it just the situation you ended up in, or were you purposely aiming for something like with the Tampa Bay organization where they were just starting up?

MH: I think you always have what your goals and aspirations are, and I've always worked towards becoming a general manager of a major league ball club. Over the course of my years in the game, you just try to prepare yourself the best that you can to eventually do that. And my first job was a great introduction because it exposed me so much and gave me experience in all of the aspects of baseball operations. I was promoted within Tampa Bay, and if you follow my development in the game, I went from Baseball Ops Assistant to Assistant Scouting Director, to Director of Player Development in Colorado. So gradually you try to build your resume and knowledge base within the game, and you hope people take notice and give you opportunities to progress within the game.

I: Going back to the beginning, how did you first get bitten by the baseball bug?

MH: I was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, so I grew up in the era of the Big Red Machine. Cincinnati's a huge sports city so I grew up playing three sports and I actually played two sports at Harvard, football and baseball. I've always been around athletics and when it came decision time when I was at Harvard as to whether I would try to pursue a career in football or baseball, it was an easy decision for me considering my love and passion for the game.

I: Who are some of your first influences?

MH: In the Big Red Machine, Tony Perez, Dave Concepcion, Ken Griffey, Sr., Pete Rose, and Joe Morgan. Those guys are all pretty special athletes and I was able to see them at the prime of their careers. I had an appreciation for Pete Rose who played the game the right way, and it made a mark as that's what I wanted to do.

I: How did you rise through the organizations you worked for so quickly to become assistant GM of the Marlins?

MH: I would really say determination, persistence, and hard work. There are a lot of sacrifices you make in this game, a lot of hours on the road traveling away from friends and family. You have to commit yourself to see as much as you can, learn as much as you can, and that's the approach I take.

I: Can you tell me about some of the things you've done with the Marlins, or the Rockies, or any of your past clubs?

MH: As director of player development as I was in Colorado, you oversee the minor leagues. You oversee two hundred players, domestically and internationally, oversee their development, and make sure they're on track for their rise into the major leagues.

I: Any specific players that you had a fondness for or particularly wanted to sign?

MH: The player I'm most proud to be associated is the starting center fielder here; his name is Juan Pierre. As soon as I came on board with the Rockies, I went through a winter league where he was actually playing left field. As part of my position, I changed his position to center field and we worked on different things with his approach offensively and defensively. The following season, he came into the league and went from A-ball to Double-A. In August of that year, 2000, he was called up to the minor leagues. I was fortunate to be a part of his development in the minor leagues and I was actually the one who was able to make the phone call to tell him he was coming to the major leagues.

I: That's real nice. Were you involved in his trade to Florida?

MH: That's another story. I had just come over to Florida in October of 2002. Just as you go through your off season planning and your team evaluation of what your needs are, it was a good fit with Colorado in terms of what Colorado needed to do in terms of getting a power-hitting center fielder in Preston Wilson, and what Florida wanted to do, in terms of building the team around speed and defense. It was a pretty easy assessment, and it worked out nicely that there was a fit between the two clubs.

I: Before we go on to more Harvard-related questions, let me sneak a few more baseball questions. What do you think were some of the keys to the Marlins' success last year?

MH: A lot of people were maybe not expecting the Marlins to go all the way.

The so-called baseball experts, no one believed in the Marlins. But from an organizational standpoint, we knew exactly what we put together in terms of talent, chemistry and character. Obviously you give a lot of credit to the players because they go out and do the job, but we felt like we put together a mix of players, talent-wise, character-wise, that could compete with any team in major league baseball. If you pitch you're going to be in more games than not. Then we went out and filled some holes from an offensive standpoint, with Juan Pierre, with Pudge Rodriguez. After the injury to Mike Lowell, we went out and got Jeff Conine. Really, it was taking advantage of what your strengths are, and trying to build a team around that.

I: The Marlins are off to a great start this year. Do you think the loss of players like Ivan Rodriguez will hurt the team, or are they strong enough to overcome these losses?

MH: Unfortunately, we all have our parameters and our budgets that we have to work within. As great a player as Pudge is, and as he was for us last year, within our payroll constraints we couldn't keep in. We were really comfortable moving forward with our catching combination that we have in place now, and obviously it would have been nice to retain Pudge, but understand that it's a business, and you try to build a team as strong as you can. Bringing this club this year keeping the core position-wise together, and most importantly, all our pitching, we feel like we're in a position to defend our crown.

I: Well, you're definitely off to a great start.

MH: Yeah, knock on wood. Solid pitching, that's really how we're built. We're not going to score a ton of runs and hit a lot of balls out of the park, but we're going to pitch, we're going to play defense and do all of the little things to be successful.

I: Fair assessment. Now a few things about your Harvard background. Did you ever feel as though there was a stigma in baseball attached to being an Ivy Leaguer?

MH: I've never really thought about that. I know what kind of person I am, I know my abilities. The fact that I went to Harvard, I would hope that nobody would ever stereotype me or label me as anything. My experiences are different from other Ivy Leaguers within baseball. There are Ivy Leaguers who are GM's, who never played the game beyond high school or junior high. I'm proud of the fact that I played in the minor leagues, I rode on the buses, and from that standpoint, I feel like I have a perspective in dealing with players that some other people may not have.

I: You point out there are a lot of other Ivy Leaguers in baseball. Is that a relatively recent trend, or just something that people have been noticing more?

MH: I think that in any industry you want to hire the best people available. If you look at baseball, you have to look at the money involved in the game. The game will always be about what happens on the field, but in terms of building a team and putting a team together for long-term success, you have to do more than just the talent evaluation because of how much money is involved. Clubs are running their teams like Wall Street business in terms of how they operate within those budgets, and I think they are trying to find the most qualified people. In more instances than not, they feel like those people have Ivy League backgrounds.

I: Finally, what kind of advice would you have for people who are trying to get into baseball now, just like you were a few years ago?

MH: I think there are a few common denominators outside of experience and exposure to baseball, and that's really a dedication and commitment to doing whatever you need to do to get involved. There are only thirty clubs, and if you're looking to get involved on the baseball operations side, there's normally anywhere from five to ten positions within each front office. There's limited opportunity. If you are fortunate enough to get your foot in the door, just be open to any and everything. Your education doesn't necessarily prepare you for everything that you're going to come across working for a major league organization. So keep your eyes and ears open, try to absorb as much as you can, and analyze as much as you can.
Also found this:
http://archive.tri-cityherald.com/SPORTS/riley/riley475.html

GAC
01-24-2006, 08:22 PM
Betcha it comes down to either Beattie or Kullman. ;)

KronoRed
01-25-2006, 12:18 AM
Thanks for posting that RedsIn07

All I want out if a GM is past success as a GM or coming from an organization with a lot of success.

KearnsyEars
01-25-2006, 02:30 AM
I'd like DePodesta, Krivsky, or Almaraz--the guy who found Adam Dunn

Kc61
01-25-2006, 11:53 AM
Read today about Dan Jennings of the Marlins. Anyone know if he is a viable candidate?

Phil in BG
01-25-2006, 12:46 PM
It only makes sense that Jim Beattie would be the front runner. He was brought in from another organization. He obviously can't be hired until the process is completed without a fine and he's here on the job to a point.

ramp101
01-25-2006, 03:07 PM
Read today about Dan Jennings of the Marlins. Anyone know if he is a viable candidate?
I interviewed Dan Jennings last year.... if anyone wants to read it

linky poo (http://www.minorleagueball.com/story/2005/3/9/163055/6577)

cReds1
01-25-2006, 06:18 PM
I wonder why Kim Ng was not added to the list? Does she have the background to fill the position? Sounds like it...

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060125/SPT04/601250396/1071

reds44
01-25-2006, 06:49 PM
Michael Hill: Assistant general manager with the Marlins since 2002 was born and raised in Cincinnati.

That would be my choice.

gm
01-25-2006, 07:07 PM
What are Muzzy Jackson and Dijon Watson doing, these days?

Been there, done that re: deep-sea fishing for Marlins

corkedbat
01-25-2006, 07:28 PM
I like what I've heard of Hill - I'd like a young agressive type guy. Might not be what Cast is looking for though and his vote counts twice what mine does. :lol:

StillFunkyB
01-25-2006, 11:47 PM
I like what I just read about Hill...Thanks ramp!

I'm also curious about Kim Ng. That would be intresting.

Katie seems to be doing a pretty decent job at that other stadium down the street....

WVPacman
01-26-2006, 01:40 AM
Its going to very hard to get a new GM b/c they all know that the reds an't going to be willing to spend any money so that these GM's will have an easier time to sign a player or trade for one.

KronoRed
01-26-2006, 01:43 AM
I wonder why Kim Ng was not added to the list? Does she have the background to fill the position? Sounds like it...

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060125/SPT04/601250396/1071
I have some thoughts on why the press isn't giving her any print time ;)

Hopefully the owner is, she has just as good and even better qualifications then some of the other names mentioned.

traderumor
01-26-2006, 11:11 AM
I wonder how strong Castellini's requirement for prior experience is? There was a series of articles provided awhile ago that provided insight into the Indians current FO, which would have included Antonetti. My impression from those articles was a very heavy emphasis on statistical analysis using proprietary software. I'm assuming that knowledge base would travel with Antonetti. Any thoughts/opinions here?


Indians' exec fits Reds' bill
BY JOHN FAY AND KEVIN KELLY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITERS

The official field for the Reds' general manager's job remains at two, but it looks to be growing.

Brad Kullman, the team's interim GM, and Jim Beattie, a former Expos and Orioles GM, are the only ones that have expressed interest in the job and are on owner Bob Castellini's list.

The Reds had not received permission to release the names of any candidates as of late Wednesday.


Twins assistant GM Wayne Krivsky likely will be on the list, as will Cleveland assistant GM Chris Antonetti as soon as the Reds can go through official channels and clear the way. The Reds had not contacted Krivsky or Antonetti as of late Wednesday afternoon.

The 30-year-old Antonetti has spent the past seven seasons with the Indians, and the past four in his current position overseeing the information systems within the baseball operations department and handling all aspects of player arbitration.

"He is definitively a bright star," Indians GM Mark Shapiro said Wednesday. "Of all the bright young guys that have been around the game, Chris is as talented, as intelligent, with interpersonal skills as good as anybody I've been around.

"He's ready to be GM whenever he wants to be one. When he is one he won't just be an average GM. He'll be an impact GM."

Antonetti holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from Georgetown University, where he once served as a student manager for the men's basketball team, and a master's degree in sports management from the University of Massachusetts.

Citing a personal policy that any announcement about possible candidates should come from the team conducting the search, Shapiro declined to say Wednesday whether the Reds had inquired about Antonetti.

Castellini and partner Tom Williams were in New York on Tuesday and Wednesday to meet with Major League Baseball officials for a kind of "new owner's school."

Castellini hopes to have a GM in place by the start of spring training.

Hired this week as a special adviser to Castellini, the 51-year-old Beattie is viewed by many as the leading candidate. But the job simply cannot be filled immediately as Major League Baseball mandates there be an interview process and that minority candidates be considered.

BrooklynRedz
01-26-2006, 01:15 PM
Look for a definitive list of gm candidates to surface later this afternoon.

Chip R
01-26-2006, 01:19 PM
I really like Kullman but I wonder if he's been tainted by being with the Reds these many years. Bob might want to find someone who brings an entire new philosophy in with them.

halcyon
01-26-2006, 01:38 PM
Beattie makes me nervous enough just as a man who has the ear of Castellini. He might be a disaster as the Reds GM.

Reds4Life
01-26-2006, 01:41 PM
Look for a definitive list of gm candidates to surface later this afternoon.

Any previews for us, Brooklyn?

Clemson
01-26-2006, 01:46 PM
Is anyone else really hoping for krivsky? The man has learned how to build through a farm system to create a winner in minnesota and thats exactly what we need here

BrooklynRedz
01-26-2006, 02:17 PM
Any previews for us, Brooklyn?

Not really. With the new ownership in NYC this week huddled in MLB classes (I can't believe such a thing actually exists), there isn't much to really go on. However, I think the Enquirer is playing up the Cleveland guys a bit much. Not saying (a) they aren't qualified or (b) they won't get a good look, but I think Krivsky is a sleeper in all this. I, for one, would LOVE to be a fly on the wall during Krivsky's interview. It'd be particularly interesting to hear how he would have attacked the Reds' problems two years ago and what he would do now (and going forward) to turn this ship around.

That's about it. Like I said, nothing but speculation until that list surfaces...

CincyRedsFan30
01-26-2006, 05:00 PM
Marc's blog is hinting that the list of candidates might be delayed until tomorrow for some reason:

"And, we wait...

Apparently, the Reds aren't going to officially release any names on the GM candidate list today, which they'd told us they would.

So, as always, stay tuned..."

Matt700wlw
01-26-2006, 05:12 PM
It wouldn't shock me if Mr. Castellini already knows who's going to get the job, but has to go through the interview process that MLB has set up.

Going into the job, he knew he was going to fire DanO....so why may he not know who's going to replace him?

Phil in BG
01-26-2006, 05:24 PM
It wouldn't shock me if Mr. Castellini already knows who's going to get the job, but has to go through the interview process that MLB has set up.

Going into the job, he knew he was going to fire DanO....so why may he not know who's going to replace him?

And that could be the reason he brought Jim Beattie in.

Aronchis
01-26-2006, 05:27 PM
And that could be the reason he brought Jim Beattie in.

But Beattie doesn't have the "vision" thing that Cast was talking about. Beattie is to obvious and DanO Jr. Huge downer if he was hired.

BrooklynRedz
01-26-2006, 05:39 PM
As CRF30 noted, there will be no list today. They hope to get it out tomorrow.

As for Beattie, I believe his current role of advisor should be an indication that he will not get the nod. I look for him to remain with the club in some capacity, but certainly not as GM.

Falls City Beer
01-26-2006, 07:08 PM
As CRF30 noted, there will be no list today. They hope to get it out tomorrow.

As for Beattie, I believe his current role of advisor should be an indication that he will not get the nod. I look for him to remain with the club in some capacity, but certainly not as GM.

I agree that the advisorship probably was the kiss of death for Beattie's shot at GM. Just a hunch I have.

GriffeyFan
01-26-2006, 10:17 PM
I like what I read about Chris Antonetti. We need one of the young up and comers.

Jaycint
01-27-2006, 12:40 AM
We all pretty much figured he'd get an interview anyways right?

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2307659

Kc61
01-27-2006, 01:33 AM
Is anyone else really hoping for krivsky? The man has learned how to build through a farm system to create a winner in minnesota and thats exactly what we need here

If no veteran winning GM is available, I would like to see Krivsky get the job. Last time around, it seemed like he was the best candidate but lacked DanO's local connection. Helping to make Minn a winner was no small feat; remember, this was a team that mlb wanted to contract out of existence because of poor fan support.

Krivsky has many years of experience. He was with Texas for 14 years before spending over 10 years in Minnesota. I would prefer an experienced guy.

Also, I like the fact that Minn has found a number of top tier starting pitchers over the past several years and found them without huge free agent spending. Santana is obviously the prime example.

KronoRed
01-27-2006, 02:55 AM
And that could be the reason he brought Jim Beattie in.
Please no.

RedsIn07
01-27-2006, 09:21 PM
Those to be interviewed from Marc Lancaster:
http://frontier.cincinnati.com/blogs/spring/

In-house emphasis

After a long day of waiting, we now have an up-to-date list of candidates for the GM's job -- most of which you're already aware of. Anyway, these six will officially be interviewed. More names are expected, but probably not until at least Monday.

Wayne Krivsky, Twins asst. GM
Jim Beattie, former Expos & Orioles GM
John Mozeliak, Cardinals asst. GM
Johnny Almaraz, Reds dir. of international scouting
Brad Kullman, Reds dir. of major league operations
Leland Maddox, Reds special assistant to the GM

Mozeliak obviously is the wild card. He's 36 and has been with the Cardinals in some capacity since the fall of 1995 -- mostly on the scouting side.

M2
01-27-2006, 09:27 PM
No Antonetti or Hill? Or have they just not finished the list yet?

rdiersin
01-27-2006, 09:35 PM
No Antonetti or Hill? Or have they just not finished the list yet?

My guess is that Antonetti turned them down, or the Indians declined (unlikely?). He turned down the Red Sox, so maybe he doesn't feel its the right fit.

marcshoe
01-27-2006, 09:37 PM
Earlier on the blog, he said that Antonetti wouldn't be interviewed.

Cyclone792
01-27-2006, 09:42 PM
An interview with Mozeliak ...

http://www.thestlcardinals.com/INVMozeliakJohn.html

CincyRedsFan30
01-27-2006, 10:02 PM
I like most of what Mozeliak has to say there. I didn't read every word of that interview, but I especially like this section:

In the first month or so, who would you say have been the positive surprises of the draft?



I think Delgado from Texas Tech (Jose, 24th round), a second baseman who has done very well for us. He shows extreme patience at the plate. He understands his strike zone, which is something that is surprising for someone that young who is that early in the development process. He’s been an exciting player to watch. Gabriel (John, 20th round), the outfielder we got from junior college, is a guy who can swing the bat. So, I am pleased with that.

He seems to understand that each player has to learn and understand their own strike zone and he seems to be big on patience based on that quote too. Even though that is one example, I like the way he seems to think.

And since he's been working with the Cards under Jocketty for about 10 years, he obviously has seen what it takes to win. He seems to be on the same page with him on many issues.

Reds4Life
01-27-2006, 10:08 PM
Perhaps it's just me, but that list is underwhelming at best, I hope they add more names next week. Cast stressed about changing things, yet half of the list is comprised of current Reds employees, Kullman is the only one I'd even entertain for the GM job.

At this point my guess is Krivsky and Mozeliak are the front runners.

Redmachine2003
01-27-2006, 10:30 PM
Wow it takes 3 weeks to interview 4 guys in your own office and 2 outside your Org. This almost sounds like DanO type of speed. This whole process should only take a week.

marcshoe
01-27-2006, 11:14 PM
An interview with Mozeliak ...

http://www.thestlcardinals.com/INVMozeliakJohn.html

Interesting interview. Mozeliak moves up on my list. I thought his comments demostrated a great deal of focus and purposefulness (yeah, that's a word:D ). He seems to be a contrast to both of the Reds' most recent GMs.

I wouldn't be upset if Kullman gets the job either, though.

KronoRed
01-28-2006, 03:54 AM
Perhaps till the Reds show they really are going to let the GM do his job and give him the tools to do so, a lot of hot candidates are going to ignore us knowing other jobs will be open in a year or so.

From this list I like Krivsky and Kullman

MattyHo4Life
01-28-2006, 10:08 AM
During the Winter Meetings, Jocketty was telling other clubs that Mozeliak would be a great GM. I really respect Jocketty, and what he's done as GM of the Cardinals. The Cardinals are not a big market team, but Jocketty has made them seem like one. I think that Mozeliak, who has worked closely with Jocketty would be a great choice for the Reds. As a Cardinal fan, I'd rather not see Mozeliak as the Reds GM. As a Reds fan, I think it's a great move.

lollipopcurve
01-28-2006, 10:18 AM
With Antonetti gone, I guess I move to Krivsky. Looking forward to seeing a couple more names emerge.

Mozeliak -- eh. His drafts as SD in St. Louis in 1999 and 2000 were bad. 2000 -- netted Yadier Molina in the 4th, marginal guys Cali and Gall in later rounds. Both first rounders failed. 1999 -- looks like they drafted Coco Crisp in the 7th (I didn't know this), but must have traded him. All 4 top picks (a late first, two supplemental 1st-2nds) and a second -- all between slots 30 and 82 -- failed (unless you want to consider Chris Duncan's cup of coffee a triumph). The interview courtesy of Cyclone has him talking up and taking some responsibility for the 2004 draft, which led with Chris Lambert (college arm) and Mike Ferris (college bat), both of whom were considered solid bets. Ferris has been a bust and Lambert hasn't really impressed. Some felt the Cards drafted well last year -- they had plenty of choices early on, so you'd expect maybe they'd finally do something right in that market. I don't really know how much influence he has had on any draft other than 99 and 00, but the Cards have generally been inept in recent years.
Sooooo -- I'm not at all impressed with Mr. Mozeliak in the area of amateur scouting, and to me that's huge. He may be competent as an administrator, but in my mind a lot of that is stuff you can delegate. I'd rather have a guy who's got some baseball instincts (show me a solid record of trades and, if he's been a scouting director, drafts) and some leadership ability.
First impression: Mozeliak = bureacrat.

MattyHo4Life
01-28-2006, 10:32 AM
1999 -- looks like they drafted Coco Crisp in the 7th (I didn't know this), but must have traded him.

Yeah, Crisp was traded to the Indians for Chuck Finley.

MattyHo4Life
01-28-2006, 10:37 AM
I don't really know how much influence he has had on any draft other than 99 and 00, but the Cards have generally been inept in recent years.

I don't know how much influence he has had on the drafts either. The Cardinals have made some good picks in recent years. Daric Barton for one was a good first round pick in 2003.

MikeS21
01-28-2006, 11:00 AM
With Antonetti gone, I guess I move to Krivsky. Looking forward to seeing a couple more names emerge.

Mozeliak -- eh. His drafts as SD in St. Louis in 1999 and 2000 were bad. 2000 -- netted Yadier Molina in the 4th, marginal guys Cali and Gall in later rounds. Both first rounders failed. 1999 -- looks like they drafted Coco Crisp in the 7th (I didn't know this), but must have traded him. All 4 top picks (a late first, two supplemental 1st-2nds) and a second -- all between slots 30 and 82 -- failed (unless you want to consider Chris Duncan's cup of coffee a triumph). The interview courtesy of Cyclone has him talking up and taking some responsibility for the 2004 draft, which led with Chris Lambert (college arm) and Mike Ferris (college bat), both of whom were considered solid bets. Ferris has been a bust and Lambert hasn't really impressed. Some felt the Cards drafted well last year -- they had plenty of choices early on, so you'd expect maybe they'd finally do something right in that market. I don't really know how much influence he has had on any draft other than 99 and 00, but the Cards have generally been inept in recent years.
Sooooo -- I'm not at all impressed with Mr. Mozeliak in the area of amateur scouting, and to me that's huge. He may be competent as an administrator, but in my mind a lot of that is stuff you can delegate. I'd rather have a guy who's got some baseball instincts (show me a solid record of trades and, if he's been a scouting director, drafts) and some leadership ability.
First impression: Mozeliak = bureacrat.
Interesting, but as I read Mozeliak interview that Cyclone linked us to, it seems to me that Mozeliak has embraced the introduction of sabermetrics to the Cards' organization and has seen the great value that it adds to the drafts. He seems fairly innovative and open to new ideas.

Ironically, Krivsky is the one who strikes me as the bureaucrat. The Twins are obviously a successful organization, and I confess my ignorance about their philosphy. But "innovative" is not usually a word I hear associated with the Twins.

Someone educate me. Do the Twins actively use sabermetric principles in scouting? Or do they rely soley on scouting reports? Does Krivsky see the value of sabermetric evaluation to the point he is willing to make it a major part of scouting?

TeamBoone
01-28-2006, 12:24 PM
Do scouts get together occasionally and review/hash over their reports with each other? Do they have educational seminars on occasion (e.g., sabermetrics)? (IMHO, this should be required and transferred into yet another tool of their trade.)

Or do they each work in a vacuum, reporting their assessments only to the GM?

Just curious how it works.

westofyou
01-28-2006, 12:35 PM
Do scouts get together occasionally and review/hash over their reports with each other? Do they have educational seminars on occasion (e.g., sabermetrics)? (IMHO, this should be required and transferred into yet another tool of their trade.)

Or do they each work in a vacuum, reporting their assessments only to the GM?

Just curious how it works.

No team operates in a vaccum, all teams have pow wows and brainstorm sessions.

TeamBoone
01-28-2006, 12:41 PM
No team operates in a vaccum, all teams have pow wows and brainstorm sessions.

Thanks, that's good to know.

And as far as continuing education? How does that work, or doesn't it occur?

cincinnati chili
01-28-2006, 12:46 PM
Wow it takes 3 weeks to interview 4 guys in your own office and 2 outside your Org. This almost sounds like DanO type of speed. This whole process should only take a week.

Are you aware that sometimes these can be 8 hour affairs?

You interview a guy for an entire day, then you spend a significant part of the next day talking about him. Meanwhile, you still have other issues to deal with (arbitration cases, getting ready for spring training, trying to convince players not to play in the wBC without Bud finding out about it, etc.)

The time frame sounds reasonable to me.

westofyou
01-28-2006, 12:48 PM
Shopping for a GM should be more like shopping for a home than for a car.

westofyou
01-28-2006, 12:51 PM
And as far as continuing education? How does that work, or doesn't it occur?

When Billy Beane signed on as a scout for the A's he was handed a stack of Baseball Abstracts by Bill James as he left the room.

Some organizations attempt to expand their knowledge and others not so much, but that's changing around the board. The fact is the game has had a problem with the egghead approach since Branch Rickey showed up in 1914.

cincinnati chili
01-28-2006, 01:02 PM
Interesting, but as I read Mozeliak interview that Cyclone linked us to, it seems to me that Mozeliak has embraced the introduction of sabermetrics to the Cards' organization and has seen the great value that it adds to the drafts. He seems fairly innovative and open to new ideas.

Ironically, Krivsky is the one who strikes me as the bureaucrat. The Twins are obviously a successful organization, and I confess my ignorance about their philosphy. But "innovative" is not usually a word I hear associated with the Twins.

Someone educate me. Do the Twins actively use sabermetric principles in scouting? Or do they rely soley on scouting reports? Does Krivsky see the value of sabermetric evaluation to the point he is willing to make it a major part of scouting?

Last question, first. The Twins have been commended by Gary Huckabay (consultant to the Oakland A's and founding member of Baseball Prospectus) for not blabbling to the media about exactly what their methods are. It's PRESUMED that they lean more heavily on drafting athletes, rather than sabermetrics, based on the guys they have promoted aggressively (Torii Hunter, Jacque Jones) v. the guys who they promoted slowly/gave up on (David Ortiz, Lew Ford, Matt LeCroy). However, not a lot of people know for sure.

I feel the same way about Krivsky that I did about DanO, Dean Taylor, and Tim Purpura. That is, I just don't know what to think. All of these guys spent significant time in successful organizations prior to becoming GM. But in all cases, it was unclear (at least to me) what their philosophies, demeanors, strengths/weaknesses were.

DanO and Dean Taylor were disasters. Tim Purpura is off to a great start. I think Krivsky is in this group. It's tough to know if he was "the seasoning" or "the meat" in a great organization. That's why they have the interview.

There are other Assistant GMs/farm directors whose value systems are very well known: Ned Coletti, Dan Jennings, Paul DePodesta, Mike Arbuckle.

You knew that DePodesta was going to have a sabermetric bent. If Dan Jennings or Mike Arbuckle ever get a GM job, you'll know they have a tools-over-history-of-results bent. I know that Ned Coletti worries a LOT about a player's "makeup," and has a jones for over-the-hill veterans.

I'm very uninformed about Mozeliak. I'm reading up on him.

cincinnati chili
01-28-2006, 01:19 PM
An interview with Mozeliak ...

http://www.thestlcardinals.com/INVMozeliakJohn.html

This interview is very informative.

I like the fact he doesn't draft based on "positional need." That's the type of approach that leads to drafting Chad Mottola instead of Derek Jeter.

I do like the checks/balances on scouts' subjective evaluations.

I also like this:

Q: What factors go into your decisions as to whether a player is ready to be promoted or in some cases, sent back down for more seasoning?

The movement question is a great one in terms of what is the proper way to do that. Bruce and myself, we tend to like to see players have some success to a certain degree. In other words, you don’t want them to be in one of those situations where you promote just to promote - just because the guy got a lot of money or he did this or that. You want there to be some rationale so everybody around understands “So, if I do ‘x’, then I have a chance to move up.” That’s kind of the basic thinking behind it.

This one is very interesting. I wonder if this means he didn't support the Mulder trade (the interview is before the trade):

Q: Don’t you have to have a pipeline of low cost players like the Roy Oswalts coming up to balance out the roster of superstars?

True. And my background is more in financial stuff, anyway. So, I tend to want to find as many “300s” to put on the team as possible to make it all work. I mean a player making the minimum. Like a Danny Haren. For us to move him I think is nuts. (emphasis mine) It would just have to be a “blow you away” deal.

MikeS21
01-28-2006, 01:23 PM
Last question, first. The Twins have been commended by Gary Huckabay (consultant to the Oakland A's and founding member of Baseball Prospectus) for not blabbling to the media about exactly what their methods are. It's PRESUMED that they lean more heavily on drafting athletes, rather than sabermetrics, based on the guys they have promoted aggressively (Torii Hunter, Jacque Jones) v. the guys who they promoted slowly/gave up on (David Ortiz, Lew Ford, Matt LeCroy). However, not a lot of people know for sure.

I feel the same way about Krivsky that I did about DanO, Dean Taylor, and Tim Purpura. That is, I just don't know what to think. All of these guys spent significant time in successful organizations prior to becoming GM. But in all cases, it was unclear (at least to me) what their philosophies, demeanors, strengths/weaknesses were.

DanO and Dean Taylor were disasters. Tim Purpura is off to a great start. I think Krivsky is in this group. It's tough to know if he was "the seasoning" or "the meat" in a great organization. That's why they have the interview.

There are other Assistant GMs/farm directors whose value systems are very well known: Ned Coletti, Dan Jennings, Paul DePodesta, Mike Arbuckle.

You knew that DePodesta was going to have a sabermetric bent. If Dan Jennings or Mike Arbuckle ever get a GM job, you'll know they have a tools-over-history-of-results bent. I know that Ned Coletti worries a LOT about a player's "makeup," and has a jones for over-the-hill veterans.

I'm very uninformed about Mozeliak. I'm reading up on him.
Good analysis, chili.

This might sound strange, but the very fact that Carl Lindner and John Allen had Krivsky on their short list of GM candidates tells me that the Reds need to steer clear now. I think they were only interested ininterviewing old school conservative baseball men. You could tell that by the names they had on their list. They didn't want an innovative GM. SinceKrivsky was on that list, I'm thinking that ought to be a warning sign.

Hopefully, the only reason Krivsky is on the list now is because John Allen liked him then. I'm hoping Casteliinin passes. The more I read about Mozeliak, the better I like him.

M2
01-28-2006, 01:46 PM
One area where I'd probe Krivsky is around why the Twins went turtle last season. They had the best pitching in the AL and let a horrible offense ground them. Was he in favor of the team's do-nothing strategy? If not, what sorts of moves would he have been willing to make? Can he explain why the Twins haven't been able to produce top-tier hitters?

From Mozeliak I'd want to know why the Cardinals system sputtered for so many years and what he's learned from that experience. Walt Jocketty did a masterful job of turning nothing into something, but the Reds will have to more judicious in making those types prospects for superstar deals due to budget constraints.

Bill
01-28-2006, 03:42 PM
I seriously hope Kullman is only getting an interview due to his present interim status. Anyone that would propose using braintyping as a tool for personnel moves should not be anywhere close to a sports front office. His 4 man rotation idea did not prove effective either.

westofyou
01-28-2006, 03:44 PM
His 4 man rotation idea did not prove effective either.Kinda hard when hardly anyone is behind it, from the trainers to the PA.

Reds Nd2
01-28-2006, 03:50 PM
His 4 man rotation idea did not prove effective either.

Weavers 7th Law
It's easier to find four good starters than five.

gonelong
01-28-2006, 03:50 PM
I seriously hope Kullman is only getting an interview due to his present interim status. Anyone that would propose using braintyping as a tool for personnel moves should not be anywhere close to a sports front office. His 4 man rotation idea did not prove effective either.

We certainly wouldn't want to try anything innovative. <faints at the thought>

GL

Kc61
01-28-2006, 03:54 PM
I think DanO got the job because he had local roots. This was very important to Lindner.

Seems pretty clear that this decision will be made solely on merit. That's a big step in the right direction.

I really doubt it will go to an in-house guy. I could live with whomever they pick after extensive interviews as long as the "local guy" factor is eliminated. Krivsky or Mozeliak both seem fine. I'm less sure of Beattie although he seems very well respected too. Kullman has done good things when given the opportunity so he's a decent candidate too.

MattyHo4Life
01-28-2006, 04:28 PM
the Reds will have to more judicious in making those types prospects for superstar deals due to budget constraints.

That's true, especially at first, but who says that the new owners won't invest more money into the team. When Dewitt and company bought the Cardinals, the Reds payroll was higher than the Cardinals payroll. The Red owners have long complained about small market woes, and conning their fans believing that the Reds couldn't compete financially. As a city, Cincinnati is small compared to other cities, but there are a lot of good sized cities within a couple hours of Cincinnati. That's not true for St. Louis. As far as nearby cities, St. Louis is an island. The Reds can draw from a large area and then be able to spend more on payroll by drawing the crowds, but they have to convince their fans that the team can and will make an effort to win.

cincinnati chili
01-28-2006, 05:03 PM
I seriously hope Kullman is only getting an interview due to his present interim status. Anyone that would propose using braintyping as a tool for personnel moves should not be anywhere close to a sports front office. His 4 man rotation idea did not prove effective either.

The brain typing thing is kooky sounding to me too. Otherwise, is there any major knock against him?

traderumor
01-28-2006, 05:07 PM
I've got to believe that Mozeliak comes in with strong consideration as someone Castellini is very likely familiar with.

Unassisted
01-28-2006, 05:13 PM
I've got to believe that Mozeliak comes in with strong consideration as someone Castellini is very likely familiar with.That's the biggest reason why I think that any other candidate is going to have to bowl Castellini over to move past Mozeliak on the list.

lollipopcurve
01-28-2006, 08:02 PM
I like the fact he doesn't draft based on "positional need."

I beg to differ. Here's a quote from the Mozeliak interview:

"Then, when we moved right into the second round, I was looking for an offensive player. That was obviously a college hitter named Ferris. That made that pick very easy. Then, rolling out our next great need was left-handed pitching. And there was one sitting there. So, it kind of worked out how we planned in terms of the position and the talent, but not necessarily the age."

Seems to me he did draft for need in rounds 2 and 3, at least in a general sense, in 2004.

This guy is a finances guy. Contracts. Behind the scenes, being pragmatic. He's an assistant GM, not a GM, at least from what I see so far.

MattyHo4Life
01-28-2006, 08:22 PM
I beg to differ. Here's a quote from the Mozeliak interview:

"Then, when we moved right into the second round, I was looking for an offensive player. That was obviously a college hitter named Ferris. That made that pick very easy. Then, rolling out our next great need was left-handed pitching. And there was one sitting there. So, it kind of worked out how we planned in terms of the position and the talent, but not necessarily the age."

Seems to me he did draft for need in rounds 2 and 3, at least in a general sense, in 2004.

This guy is a finances guy. Contracts. Behind the scenes, being pragmatic. He's an assistant GM, not a GM, at least from what I see so far.

That sounds like a blueprint for the draft. It doesn't mean that they wouldn't have strayed from that plan if they had found a better player that didn't fit the criteria that they had set.

In 2003, Daric Barton was the Cardinals 1st round pick even though Yadier Molina was set to be the Cardinals catcher for years to come. Catching was not a big need for the Cardinals, but Barton was the best player available. I don't know what involvement he had in that draft though.

Bill
01-28-2006, 08:41 PM
Other knocks? Well his Williamson deal to the sox for a kid in rookie ball (and not Lester) left much to be desired . The four man rotation idea was his as well which produded this (yes, I recognize it was a small sample under poor circumstances, but still): The Reds tried a four-man rotation for the 13 games leading up to the All-Star break, and they went 4-9. Two weeks later, manager Bob Boone was fired.

westofyou
01-28-2006, 09:28 PM
Well his Williamson deal to the sox for a kid in rookie ball (and not Lester) left much to be desired . Everyone but Reds fans seemed to know that his arm was going to explode, I've always thought that the money was probably the best thing offered, it's also something that an organization like Boston can afford over bodies. The man has pitched only 64 innings since he left the Reds, considering that the return looks good.

Even if it was just cash.

RedsIn07
01-28-2006, 09:32 PM
Other knocks? Well his Williamson deal to the sox for a kid in rookie ball (and not Lester) left much to be desired . The four man rotation idea was his as well which produded this (yes, I recognize it was a small sample under poor circumstances, but still): The Reds tried a four-man rotation for the 13 games leading up to the All-Star break, and they went 4-9. Two weeks later, manager Bob Boone was fired.
Actually it was for a kid in A ball too.

Red Sox got:
RHP Scott Williamson

Reds got:
LHP Phil Dumatrait, Sarasota (A) Stats (http://www.thebaseballcube.com/players/D/phillip-dumatrait.shtml)
LHP Tyler Pelland, GCL Red Sox (R) Stats (http://www.thebaseballcube.com/players/P/tyler-pelland.shtml)

What BA said about Pelland:

8. TYLER PELLAND , lhp Age: 22 B-T: R-L Ht: 6-0 Wt.: 200
Drafted: HSóBristol, Vt., 2002 (9th round) Signed by: Ray Fagnant (Red Sox)



Background: Cincinnati acquired lefties Phil Dumatrait and Pelland from the Red Sox for Scott Williamson at the July 2003 trade deadline. While Dumatrait has been waylaid by Tommy John surgery, Pelland quickly emerged as the top lefty in the Reds system. After posting an 8.66 ERA in low Class A in 2004, he made a successful transition to full-season ball, jumping to high Class A, in 2005.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Strengths:
Pelland throws his four-seam fastball at 92-93 mph and can dial it up to 95 at times, and he also has a lively two-seamer. He commands his fastball well, and shows the ability to spin a plus curveball. Heís a good athlete who has dominated in spurts.
Weaknesses:
Pellandís curve is inconsistent. When itís not on, hitters can sit on his fastball because his circle changeup is below average and hasnít developed as expected. At 22, heís still far from a refined product, as his control numbers suggest, although as a Northeastern pitcher, he doesnít have many innings on his arm.
The Future:
Pelland has a fresh arm, but needs to take a significant step forward as he approaches Double-A. If he canít improve his secondary pitches, a future in the bullpen awaits him.




2005 Club (Class) W L ERA G GS CG SV IP H HR BB SO AVG
Sarasota (Hi A) 5 8 4.05 30 15 0 0 102 103 5 63 103 .270

M2
01-28-2006, 10:53 PM
Everyone but Reds fans seemed to know that his arm was going to explode, I've always thought that the money was probably the best thing offered, it's also something that an organization like Boston can afford over bodies. The man has pitched only 64 innings since he left the Reds, considering that the return looks good.

Even if it was just cash.

And he almost put the Red Sox in the World Series. Might have done it if they handed him the ball when they still had the lead in Game 7 of the ALCS.

I'd trade any number of never-going-to-have-an-impact players for that.

Bill
01-29-2006, 01:46 AM
Exactly. Williamson is what the sox needed at that point and he gave it to him. It's irrelevant how many surgeries he has had since but rather what the demand of his services were at that point to a playoff team. Kullman needed some players nearer the bigs then whom he accepted in return. Terrible deal then and terrible deal now- and the cash was never spent. Was a good deal for Lindner I suppose.

westofyou
01-29-2006, 02:14 AM
It's irrelevant how many surgeries he has had since but rather what the demand of his services were at that point to a playoff team.

But who was also bidding for him? if the market was thinner for Willy because of the possible and probable arm troubles maybe the cash was the best offer on the table?

But unless we know what the other offers were then it's all conjecture.

Bill
01-29-2006, 03:14 AM
I am not saying he chose the wrong deal, but rather Kullman needed to get a better return when providing a contending team with a then healthy guy capable of closing out big games. Other offers are irrelevant. The Hummell deal is more impressive than his deal with the sox.

KronoRed
01-29-2006, 06:31 AM
What if that was the only offer? what if the Sox said take it or leave it, and Kullman was under order to do deals?

MikeS21
01-29-2006, 07:54 AM
What if that was the only offer? what if the Sox said take it or leave it, and Kullman was under order to do deals?
Bill, everybody in baseball knew the Reds were in a dumping mode. Kullman and Maddox were given a list of players they had to dump. Williamson was on the list. Because of that everybody was low-balling Williamson's value.

Part of what bothers folks about that Williamson deal is the same thing that bothers us about the recent Sean Casey deal. It hurts our pride that our favorite Reds players aren't held in the same high esteem by other teams as we fans hold them.

We moaned and whined around here for years about Casey's weaknesses and how terrible his numbers were. We were persistent in pointing to his low SLG numbers on how he was the weak link in the whole lineup. Then we complain because every other team in baseball saw the same numbers we did and drew the same conclusions we did. Yet we expected a prime prospect in return for the guy we wanted dumped because he led the world in double play grounders. Other teams are not stupid. They are not going to overpay for players we consider junk.

We moaned and complained about Corey Lidle the whole time he was here. Then we moaned and whined about the low retrurn he brought in trade. We moan and complain about Eric Milton, but if the Reds somehow managed to dump him, there would be a vocal group who would wonder why we didn't get prime talent in return.

It's a pride thing. We overvalue our players. In fact, the sad truth is that right now, there are only about five players in this entire organization who have actual value that would net a decent return in trade. Those players are Dunn, Lopez, Encarnacion, Harang, and Claussen. Kearns and Pena have far too many question marks for teams to give up quality players for. And with the possible exception of Jay Bruce, there is no one currently in the farm system who would command a decent return in a trade. Homer Bailey has been all hype, but has not dominated even low level minor league hitters like an "ace" is supposed to. Travis Wood's success is smoke and mirrors because he is a lefthander with a 95 mph fastball - and that's ALL he's got. (Plus Bruce and Wood can't be traded until they have been in the organization for at least 12 months)

Given Scott Williamson's arm troubles, inconsistency on the mound, and the fact he was due a hefty pay raise, I think Kullman and Maddox got the best deal they could.

MattyHo4Life
01-29-2006, 10:51 AM
But who was also bidding for him? if the market was thinner for Willy because of the possible and probable arm troubles maybe the cash was the best offer on the table?

But unless we know what the other offers were then it's all conjecture.

I don't remember the players offered, but I do remember that Jocketty was very interested in him, and made a lot of effort to trade for him. I remember that Jocketty was on KMOX radio the next Sunday morning and was disapointed. He said that he felt the Cardinals made the best offer for Williamson, but was told that they weren't interested in dealing within the division unless the Cardinals blew them away with an offer.

M2
01-29-2006, 12:35 PM
But who was also bidding for him? if the market was thinner for Willy because of the possible and probable arm troubles maybe the cash was the best offer on the table?

But unless we know what the other offers were then it's all conjecture.

The Mariners could have used him. In fact the Mariners had a desperate need for a closer at that time. We know what the Marlins paid for Ugy Urbina that season. The Phillies were trying to chase a playoff berth with Joe Table and his 6.52 ERA. The Expos were in the hunt with Rocky Biddle. The Giants were riding Tim Worrell, who had a good season, but how far is Tim Worrell going to take you? Toronto turned from Cliff Politte to Aquilino Lopez that season. Billy Koch had failed as the closer for the ChiSox. Mike MacDougal was blowing games left and right by midsummer for the Royals.

There was a market out there.

I know Kullman and Maddox were under orders to dump salary. I appreciate the bind it put them in. They did some great work, but this deal was a dog. The Reds have limited resources. They can't afford to trade a closer for two guys who might grow up to be LOOGYs. It's always conjecture as to what you might have gotten instead of what you got, but given that return and the way the money got frittered away almost any other deal would have been better.

Bill
01-29-2006, 02:18 PM
Thanks guys for refreshing my memory on the Williamson trade front back then. My memory is better on the Boone offers (seattle again), but I had assumed there had to be interest in what Williamson offered down the stretch (given that he was not signed to a LTC, the risk of injury was small for any trade partners).

Beyond his trade abilities, I also find Kullman's public speaking leaving much to be desired (sure he is better than what was there). Cleveland's GM Shapiro likes to operate in the quiet as any GM should as openly naming players in talks disrespects players involved and does not endear them to the organization if the deal never happens. Shapiro was irate over the Boston leaks and next thing I see is Kullman openly discussing Westbrook in talks with Cleveland. He did not impress in his interim time either publicly.

The braintyping scheme he supports though is most worrisome as it is pseudo scientific psychobabble (my graduate degree is in psych) packaged to sports GMs that consider themselves clever but are rather very unsuccessful. Other GMs that have championed braintyping are Kevin McHale, Danny Ainge, Gabriel (orlando magic) and Syd Thrift. I would not want any of those gms running the Reds. Let Kullman sit in the stands and do his metrics.

Falls City Beer
01-29-2006, 02:32 PM
The braintyping scheme he supports though is most worrisome as it is pseudo scientific psychobabble (my graduate degree is in psych) packaged to sports GMs that consider themselves clever but are rather very unsuccessful. Other GMs that have championed braintyping are Kevin McHale, Danny Ainge, Gabriel (orlando magic) and Syd Thrift. I would not want any of those gms running the Reds. Let Kullman sit in the stands and do his metrics.

So what traces in the trades Kullman's made do you see of this "psychobabble?" It's like calling Yeats a bad poet because he was into mysticism (actually, that would be a better argument). Does this "psychobabble" completely cloud his analytical judgment of players? If so, where do you see it? In what ways has it manifested itself in Reds trades, drafting?

My impression, consistently, is that people "just don't like" Kullman and will look to blow every fault he may possess into every eye they see--to the exclusion of his strengths.

For the record, I think Shapiro should have been listening to something (maybe psychobabble) when he resigned Boone. What the hell was he thinking?

Bill
01-29-2006, 02:57 PM
He has publicly stated a strong belief in the theory behind braintyping therefore I shall assume it plays an influence. On the other hand, what are his actual qualifications for player evaluation? His degree is in accounting and he was responsible for assembling the Reds' computers and video scouting system, in addition to negotiations and such. Given his lack of talent evaluation, combined with his braintyping bent, I prefer he was not overseeing the draft or making deals for the Reds.

Bill
01-29-2006, 03:14 PM
FCB, Boone had a sub .500 OPS for the first two months while wearing away the rust. The following months it was mostly around .800 or better while playing his usual strong defense at 3B. That, and not having anyone better, is why he resigned Boone. They have an option for '07, but Marte should be ready to take over by then. Until then, Boone provides veteran leadership on a young team, steady D and a decent bat. Sounds reasonable to me and it's difficult to find fault with Shapiro given the short turnaround he has constructed.

Actually thinking of Shapiro reminds me that he learned in an environment of success. Kullman has no such experience. I think it is time for some fresh blood, preferably drawn from an organization that knows how to win.

KronoRed
01-29-2006, 03:16 PM
He said that he felt the Cardinals made the best offer for Williamson.
I usually don't trust when a GM says "well we made a better offer" it just seems like a way to say to the fans 'we tried' to me.

Falls City Beer
01-29-2006, 03:18 PM
Actually thinking of Shapiro reminds me that he learned in an environment of success. Kullman has no such experience. I think it is time for some fresh blood, preferably drawn from an organization that knows how to win.

Well, that's a very different (and better) argument than the ones you've heretofore presented.

Falls City Beer
01-29-2006, 03:25 PM
Sounds reasonable to me and it's difficult to find fault with Shapiro given the short turnaround he has constructed.

Exactly.

I'm doing exactly what you're doing with Kullman--inflating a folly or fault to the exclusion of his obvious strengths.

Everybody's got a blind spot. Maybe Shapiro's is the "veteran leadership" chimera, I don't know. But to impugn a guy's character based on a handful of interviews (and not for the substance of his talk, but for his delivery, "how he came off sounding") and a kooky predilection towards psych profiling, is to do so with a kind of ill-guided bias, IMO.

And btw, pointing to a bad two-month stretch in Boone's season and calling it "getting the rust off" is really missing the point. Boone has made a career of going through months-long stretches of non-performance; that's par for the course for him. I think Shapiro thinks he's going to catch lightning in a bottle with Boone and get the .820 OPS guy from three years back. I'm betting against that happening.

cincinnati chili
01-29-2006, 03:29 PM
Exactly.
Everybody's got a blind spot. Maybe Shapiro's is the "veteran leadership" chimera, I don't know. But to impugn a guy's character based on a handful of interviews (and not for the substance of his talk, but for his delivery, "how he came off sounding") and a kooky predilection towards psych profiling, is to do so with a kind of ill-guided bias, IMO.

This is my take on Kullman. The braintyping is worrisome, but it's not a deal-breaker.

He's not my first choice, but he deserves an interview. He certainly isn't my last choice.

MikeS21
01-29-2006, 03:40 PM
I know Kullman and Maddox were under orders to dump salary. I appreciate the bind it put them in. They did some great work, but this deal was a dog. The Reds have limited resources. They can't afford to trade a closer for two guys who might grow up to be LOOGYs. It's always conjecture as to what you might have gotten instead of what you got, but given that return and the way the money got frittered away almost any other deal would have been better.
Follow my thinking here - as warped as it may be - but, it seems a little odd, in retrospect, that Kullman/Maddox made deals with both the A's and Red Sox (think Billy Beane and Theo), and the Yankees (think $$$'s). I may have it all wrong, but it almost seems as if Kullman wanted to deal with Theo and Beane - perhaps he fancies himself in their mold.

As far as the current candidates go, on a scale of 0-10 with 10 being the best, I give:

Mozeliak-7 (and he's continuing to grow on me)
Kullman-5
Krivsky-4.5
Maddox/Alvarez-3
Beattie-2

What I would love to see is Mozeliak get the GM job and put Kullman in change of an entire sabermetrics department.

RFS62
01-29-2006, 03:46 PM
It would bother me more about Kullman if he rejected out of hand the brain typing without investigating. Sports psychology is an emerging field and a lot of things are being looked at that sound pretty crazy.

I want an open minded guy in the organization. Willingness to listen to new ideas is a good thing.

RedsIn07
01-29-2006, 07:15 PM
Arbuckle to be interviewed per Marc:
http://frontier.cincinnati.com/blogs/spring/

Add another

Thought we might get through today quietly, but it wasn't to be. There is a new name on the GM interview list -- Phillies assistant GM Mike Arbuckle.

Arbuckle, who turned 55 in November, has been with the Phillies since October 1992. He served as scouting director for eight years before adding player development duties to his title after the 2000 season. A Missouri native, Arbuckle spent 12 years as a scout for the Braves before going to Philadelphia.

cincinnati chili
01-29-2006, 07:30 PM
Arbuckle is well respected, so I'm not surprised that they're interested in him. But he's not one I'd pin my hopes on.

"What we've always done in the draft is go for the higher-ceiling players. Some years that might be a college guy like Pat Burrell, and some years it might be a high-school guy like Reggie Taylor. But we always try to take the highest-ceiling player where we pick.

For entire article, read:
http://espn.go.com/mlb/columns/neyer_rob/1485751.html

Jpup
01-29-2006, 09:08 PM
I don't want anyone associated with the Phillies front office during the Ed Wade regime.

KronoRed
01-29-2006, 10:01 PM
I don't want anyone associated with the Phillies front office during the Ed Wade regime.
Agreed, we have enough dysfunction here

M2
01-29-2006, 10:11 PM
I've been pretty open-minded about everyone on the list (or even rumored) up until now, but if Mike Arbuckle got the job I'd be throwing-stuff furious.

Falls City Beer
01-29-2006, 10:53 PM
I've been pretty open-minded about everyone on the list (or even rumored) up until now, but if Mike Arbuckle got the job I'd be throwing-stuff furious.

He's no Fatty Arbuckle:

http://www.sfmuseum.org/photos15/fatty.jpg

westofyou
01-30-2006, 12:24 AM
He's no Fatty Arbuckle:

I bet he's partied in San Francisco before.

Caveat Emperor
01-30-2006, 01:36 AM
He's no Fatty Arbuckle

Heck, given his record, I'd say he's no Jon Arbuckle either...

http://www.megsplace.com/Garfield/jon.gif

Bill
01-30-2006, 03:17 AM
I might have missed this being posted but Rosenthal states that Antonetti indeed turned down an interview offer:

Indians assistant G.M. Chris Antonetti has turned down offers to interview for three G.M. openings — with the Diamondbacks, Red Sox and Reds — in the past several months. Antonetti is happy in Cleveland, and appears content to wait for the right job. The Nationals could replace Jim Bowden after the franchise is sold, and the Mariners likely will dump Bill Bavasi if the club flops for the third straight season. ...

KronoRed
01-30-2006, 06:30 AM
http://www.megsplace.com/Garfield/jon.gif
Now..Garfield would be a good GM.

cincinnati chili
01-30-2006, 08:13 AM
I might have missed this being posted but Rosenthal states that Antonetti indeed turned down an interview offer:

Indians assistant G.M. Chris Antonetti has turned down offers to interview for three G.M. openings ó with the Diamondbacks, Red Sox and Reds ó in the past several months. Antonetti is happy in Cleveland, and appears content to wait for the right job. The Nationals could replace Jim Bowden after the franchise is sold, and the Mariners likely will dump Bill Bavasi if the club flops for the third straight season. ...

Thanks for posting this. Is a positive to know that the Reds asked him to interview.

I'm not sure where Antonetti grew up, but I know he went to Georgetown for his undergraduate studies. Just pure speculation on my part, but maybe he wants to see what shakes down there.

cincinnati chili
01-30-2006, 08:18 AM
Heck, given his record, I'd say he's no Jon Arbuckle either...

http://www.megsplace.com/Garfield/jon.gif

This won't fly. Jon would install Lyman as Ass. GM, who would surely fire Naehring, and Install Odie as farm director.

http://www.serienoldies.de/images/garfield_odie_1.jpg

Caveat Emperor
01-30-2006, 12:51 PM
This won't fly. Jon would install Lyman as Ass. GM, who would surely fire Naehring, and Install Odie as farm director.

Well, clearly if you're looking for the ideal farm hand, it's hard to go wrong with Jon's brother, Doc Boy:

http://mugsy5500.tripod.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/docboy.gif