PDA

View Full Version : Kullman on with Lance



Jaycint
02-02-2006, 06:41 PM
Anybody else just hear Brad Kullman on Lance's show? I was really impressed with a lot of what he had to say. In a nutshell he would like to bring in pitcher's that miss bats as opposed to the dreaded pitch to contact model. He talked up OBP as being one of the most important things he looks for in an offensive player. He spoke in normal language as opposed to the political speak of his predecessor. He is the anti-DanO. :)

As far as philosophy he said that a melding of the sabremetric philosophy along with the scouting philosophy would probably be the way he would describe himself. I thought overall he came off very well and he may have swayed me a little bit from my Krivsky position. Of course I haven't heard a half hour convo with Krivsky either.

CrackerJack
02-02-2006, 07:05 PM
He also mentioned Votto as being the most likely minor leaguer to have an impact in 2006 at the ML level, that they can't give up on Ryan Wagner because of his slider as a future closer, and that he'd like to get more power pitchers in the org., and feels the offense, due to the poor pitching, has to be even better and more "efficient" this year if they want to win games.

Kullman should've served as O'Brien's interpreter at least, it was nice to hear someone speak their mind, without the defensive corporate rhetoric O'Brien used constantly.

Doc. Scott
02-02-2006, 07:38 PM
I appreciate Kullman's forthrightness and enthusiasm, but I don't think he would be any better for PR than Jim Bowden. I just have this feeling that Brad would talk himself into trouble fairly quickly.

TOBTTReds
02-02-2006, 07:41 PM
I think he and the Reds might be getting ahead of themselves with the Joey Votto bandwagon. Two seasons ago when he was raking at Dayton, the Reds target was '07 (after Casey's contract). Last season he took a step back at high-A and somehow moved up to '06?

I am certainly on the JV bandwagon, but I also saw him play about 50 games in Dayton two years ago, and do not think he will be ML ready, unless he explodes in AA the first few months. I don't look for him until September 1st. I can not wait for the day he makes it in the lineup because I really like the guy as a player, and a solid individual, but I would have to say 'not so fast my friend.'

membengal
02-02-2006, 07:50 PM
Did Lance ask him about the EE/Aurilia deal?

Or about the 5th starter spot?

Or how Hudson's health is?

Jaycint
02-02-2006, 08:29 PM
Did Lance ask him about the EE/Aurilia deal?

Or about the 5th starter spot?

Or how Hudson's health is?

As far as I remember they didn't discuss EE/Aurilia or the fifth starter spot. I think Hudson was mentioned in passing as being a guy that could make the team with a good spring, not sure though so don't quote me on that.

Other tidbits:

Lance asked him if he had been interviewed for the permanent spot yet and Kullman said he didn't want to comment on anything relating to the GM hiring process.

Lance asked him about LTC for Dunn and he said they had spoken to the agent a few times but nothing had come to fruition there. Said they really want to avoid going to arbitration with Adam because when they go there the team is going there with the express purpose of winning and sometimes there are hurt feelings that linger from that process when the player hears the club talking about their negatives. Brought up Adam's K's as something the club would present at an arbitration hearing although he did say that in the grand scheme of things he didn't think strikeouts were a big deal.

Said Paul Wilson looked great the other day and should be ready to go this spring.

Very bluntly said that losing contact guys and good situational hitters like Casey and Randa hurts the team.

As Crackerjack mentioned he made the comment that he would go to Chambliss and tell him to find ways to make the offense even more efficient than it was lat year.

Said he would like to be a part of this organization and stay on even if he didn't get the permanent GM position.

RFS62
02-02-2006, 08:31 PM
Very bluntly said that losing contact guys and good situational hitters like Casey and Randa hurts the team.

As Crackerjack mentioned he made the comment that he would go to Chambliss and tell him to find ways to make the offense even more efficient than it was lat year.



More efficient. Best offense in the league.

Doesn't sound too saberific to me.

CrackerJack
02-02-2006, 08:36 PM
Did Lance ask him about the EE/Aurilia deal?

Or about the 5th starter spot?

Or how Hudson's health is?

None of that unfortunately. Said Wilson looked "great" when he saw him today (for whatever that's worth in a rehab clinic) but didn't really go into any of the above honestly.

Mentioned Browning is working with Milton some, as he thought Browning had a 4-seamer that was successful in Riverfront, which also gave up it's share of HR balls, and that maybe Browning could help out Milton in that area since Browning was also a "successful fly ball pitcher here."

Funny comment about how his interview with Marge was a 4 hour conversation, he just chuckled about it and didn't say much more. Needless to say he must've really wanted a job. He started out in PR and eventually moved into the baseball side of things, for those unaware.

He of course had nothing to say about the other GM candidates or his own interview or the process, when asked.

At times he seemed like a guy either pleading to keep his job, or using it as a chance to boost his candidacy ("well we made changes two years ago as well, and we're still struggling, so I hope they keep that in mind, in regards to some of the people here" etc..,). And he also trumped up some of his moves aside from the Claussen and Harang deals, but didn't mention them specifically - but intimated quite clearly that it was all about cutting the budget the last 4+ years.

I wonder if Kullman wouldn't be best served to work under an experienced GM here from another successful org before moving into a GM role. He's seen how Bowden and O'Brien do things - that's it - and that can't be too good all things considered. All he knows is how the Reds have done things ultimately.

Jaycint
02-02-2006, 08:37 PM
More efficient. Best offense in the league.

Doesn't sound too saberific to me.


Yeah I didn't agree with every little thing he said but I thought overall he came off very well. I think the efficient offense thing was said more in the context of not being satisfied with where it is at and trying to wring out every last base and run that they could as a way to maybe counter the lack of pitching that this team will have to deal with.

RFS62
02-02-2006, 08:48 PM
Yeah I didn't agree with every little thing he said but I thought overall he came off very well. I think the efficient offense thing was said more in the context of not being satisfied with where it is at and trying to wring out every last base and run that they could as a way to maybe counter the lack of pitching that this team will have to deal with.



When I hear a guy say "more efficient" regarding the Reds offense, I hear "put the ball on the ground to the right side", "move the runners along", "do the little things".

That's all well and good, with different personnel and with a different skill set than we had last year.

You have to chose your offensive philosophy. We're not set up for small ball, unless Aurilia and Womak get a lot of playing time.

Look at your personnel and play to their strengths.

KronoRed
02-02-2006, 09:04 PM
Casey and Randa put the ball on the ground a lot, didn't seem to help :devil:

Brought up Adam's K's as something the club would present at an arbitration hearing although he did say that in the grand scheme of things he didn't think strikeouts were a big deal.

:luvu:

Thanks for the rundown all :)

BrooklynRedz
02-02-2006, 11:31 PM
When I hear a guy say "more efficient" regarding the Reds offense, I hear "put the ball on the ground to the right side", "move the runners along", "do the little things".

That's all well and good, with different personnel and with a different skill set than we had last year.

You have to chose your offensive philosophy. We're not set up for small ball, unless Aurilia and Womak get a lot of playing time.

Look at your personnel and play to their strengths.

When I hear a guy say "more efficient" regarding the Reds' offense, I hear a guy who's come to terms with the horrible reality that is the Reds' pitching staff. Just because we were tops last year doesn't mean there isn't room (or need) for improvement.

As for the Casey and Randa stuff...I got nothing.

WVRedsFan
02-03-2006, 01:04 AM
He also mentioned Votto as being the most likely minor leaguer to have an impact in 2006 at the ML level, that they can't give up on Ryan Wagner because of his slider as a future closer, and that he'd like to get more power pitchers in the org., and feels the offense, due to the poor pitching, has to be even better and more "efficient" this year if they want to win games.

Kullman should've served as O'Brien's interpreter at least, it was nice to hear someone speak their mind, without the defensive corporate rhetoric O'Brien used constantly.

Wait a minute. did he say earlier that Homer was the minor leaguer most likely to have an impact this year?

Sure he's not Hubert Humphrey raised from the dead?


When asked if he was wishy-washy, Humphrey replied, "Maybe I am and maybe I'm not."

TeamBoone
02-03-2006, 01:17 AM
More efficient. Best offense in the league.

Doesn't sound too saberific to me.

Me either. That piece isn't broken... fix what needs to be fixed and leave the successful piece alone.

TeamBoone
02-03-2006, 01:20 AM
I wonder if Kullman wouldn't be best served to work under an experienced GM here from another successful org before moving into a GM role. He's seen how Bowden and O'Brien do things - that's it - and that can't be too good all things considered. All he knows is how the Reds have done things ultimately.

That can't be all bad; he now knows what NOT to do. :p:

Crash Davis
02-03-2006, 01:59 AM
You have to chose your offensive philosophy. We're not set up for small ball, unless Aurilia and Womak get a lot of playing time.

Look at your personnel and play to their strengths.

I agree. However, don't you think the goal should be to have an offense that can play in a low scoring game just as well as it can play in a high scoring game? That's how you get to the playoffs...obviously not something this team will accomplish, but a goal nonetheless.

He's right. Losing two out of your limited supply of contact & situational hitters could really hurt this team. If enough of the returning guys improve their all around offensive skills, losing those guys won't hurt at all. If Lopez hits as well as he did last year; if Griffey stays healthy; if Kearns returns to form; if Dunn makes another leap; if Freel remains a great lead-off option; if LaRue stays out of prolonged slumps; if Encarnacion & Wily Mo can adjust to right-handed pitchers...

The Reds' offense is clearly not the problem. They can score with anybody. But if they want to win 80-85 games with this pitching staff, they're going to have to improve their situational hitting to go with their well above average mashing ability.

I know, it's silly to pick nits on the offense when the big offseason pitching solutions are Dave Williams, Rick White & Chris Hammond. Woe is us...

cReds1
02-03-2006, 02:36 AM
Anybody else just hear Brad Kullman on Lance's show? I was really impressed with a lot of what he had to say. In a nutshell he would like to bring in pitcher's that miss bats as opposed to the dreaded pitch to contact model. He talked up OBP as being one of the most important things he looks for in an offensive player. He spoke in normal language as opposed to the political speak of his predecessor. He is the anti-DanO. :)

As far as philosophy he said that a melding of the sabremetric philosophy along with the scouting philosophy would probably be the way he would describe himself. I thought overall he came off very well and he may have swayed me a little bit from my Krivsky position. Of course I haven't heard a half hour convo with Krivsky either.

OBP is great as long as you can have someone knock him in or advance him to the next base or if the player can steal a base, but unless this happens then it is meaningless to me. Sorry, just the way I feel.

StillFunkyB
02-03-2006, 06:18 AM
I wonder if Kullman wouldn't be best served to work under an experienced GM here from another successful org before moving into a GM role. He's seen how Bowden and O'Brien do things - that's it - and that can't be too good all things considered.

Then again, this could have been a good thing. Maybe by watching those two guys in front of him, he learned what NOT to do.

I don't care what nameplate is on the GM's desk, as long as the Reds turn things around.

KronoRed
02-03-2006, 08:42 AM
I know, it's silly to pick nits on the offense when the big offseason pitching solutions are Dave Williams, Rick White & Chris Hammond. Woe is us...
Maybe they feel bad for the pitchers and don't want all the blame on them, even thought they deserve it all.

creek14
02-03-2006, 12:24 PM
I noticed Lance was reading this thread yesterday. I was thinking I might logon today and see some insight from him.

SteelSD
02-03-2006, 01:44 PM
The Reds' offense is clearly not the problem. They can score with anybody. But if they want to win 80-85 games with this pitching staff, they're going to have to improve their situational hitting to go with their well above average mashing ability.

The 2005 Reds were the best situational hitting team in the National League.

SteelSD
02-03-2006, 01:47 PM
OBP is great as long as you can have someone knock him in or advance him to the next base or if the player can steal a base, but unless this happens then it is meaningless to me. Sorry, just the way I feel.

OBP gets runners on, advances runners, and drives them in.

Get more OBP, get more Runs. It's pretty near that simple.

traderumor
02-03-2006, 02:29 PM
OBP gets runners on, advances runners, and drives them in.

Get more OBP, get more Runs. It's pretty near that simple.In other words, making lots of situations to engage in aforementioned situational hitting.

It would seem if a team wants to practice situational hitting, they have to create situations in the first place, and if they create lots of situations, they would not necessarily even have to be great at hitting in those situations to score ample runs.

But, if a team is good at getting on base, chances are that they'll be good at it regardless of the situation...regardless of whether our memories tell us that so and so strikes out too much with men on base. What was Dierker's book called? "This Isn't Rocket Science?" :evil:

Chip R
02-03-2006, 02:58 PM
I noticed Lance was reading this thread yesterday. I was thinking I might logon today and see some insight from him.

He was on with the Angry Guys this morning and it seems he's got a case of man-love for Kullman. Probably not to the degree George Grande has for Jim Edmonds but he's crushing for him big time.

SteelSD
02-03-2006, 04:14 PM
In other words, making lots of situations to engage in aforementioned situational hitting.

It would seem if a team wants to practice situational hitting, they have to create situations in the first place, and if they create lots of situations, they would not necessarily even have to be great at hitting in those situations to score ample runs.

But, if a team is good at getting on base, chances are that they'll be good at it regardless of the situation...regardless of whether our memories tell us that so and so strikes out too much with men on base. What was Dierker's book called? "This Isn't Rocket Science?" :evil:

Why yes. You are correct sir. Teams that are good at not making outs tend to make outs less and tend to score more runs. You are a smart man.

And not only that, players and teams actually tend to hit better with Runners on Base than they do with none on.

Seems to me that if you want to protect a hitter, get on base in front of him. If you want to make yourself a better hitter, ask that someone proficient at getting on base hit ahead of you in the lineup.

The key to having a good situational hitting team is to go find a bunch of guys who don't make outs all that often. Do the opposite and you're counting on an assist from fairy dust and magic jelly beans.

Yep. Not rocket science.

Ravenlord
02-03-2006, 04:16 PM
And not only that, players and teams actually tend to hit better with Runners on Base than they do with none on.is that from pitching in the stretch?

KronoRed
02-03-2006, 05:15 PM
Probably not to the degree George Grande has for Jim Edmonds but he's crushing for him big time.
To be fair, Grande's love for Edmonds is one of those once in a lifetime loves ;)

SteelSD
02-03-2006, 08:26 PM
is that from pitching in the stretch?

Probably from a number of things including pitching from the stretch.

Infielders cheating for the DP rather than using straight-up positioning, less ability to "nibble", pitcher distraction, etc. etc.

Yachtzee
02-03-2006, 08:32 PM
To be fair, Grande's love for Edmonds is one of those once in a lifetime loves ;)

"Nobody puts Jimmy in the corner."

Doc. Scott
02-03-2006, 08:34 PM
More speak-first, think-later and poorly chosen terminology from Kullman about Adam Dunn and the strikeouts. That really didn't sound good.

Look, I don't want Non-Stop Say-Nothing DanO Diplomacy in the front office either, but is there not a happy medium between candor and leaving a couple of things to the imagination?

buckeyenut
02-04-2006, 11:44 AM
When I hear a guy say "more efficient" regarding the Reds offense, I hear "put the ball on the ground to the right side", "move the runners along", "do the little things".

That's all well and good, with different personnel and with a different skill set than we had last year.

You have to chose your offensive philosophy. We're not set up for small ball, unless Aurilia and Womak get a lot of playing time.

Look at your personnel and play to their strengths.

I didn't get that at all. I came away with the idea that a batter had to make adjustments to the pitcher within an at bat. And those adjustments were what many of the Reds were not good at and it was a cause of some of the strikeouts.

I did not sense a need to change managerial philosophy to a small ball philosophy. No rise in hitting behind the runners or bunting or anything like that. I sensed that the overall approach is good for the team, but that each individual at bat can be more effecient and effective, which will make the team overall more effective. So understanding that in a situation with a fast runner on first as a left handed hitter, the pitcher is not likely to throw you changeups (because it makes stealing easier) and the pitcher is not likely to throw you pitchs on the inside half of the plate (where it will be easier to pull the ball into the hole). As a hitter we need to adjust better to those situations so that we can get the pitchs we want to hit and drive with power, versus maintaining the exact same plate approach no matter what the situation.

I don't know what he is thinking at the plate, but having watched him over the last several years, this is the one way I see Adam Dunn cutting down the strikeouts without negatively impacting the rest of his game. This is the balance of micro versus macro. It is Chambliss's job to understand help dunn with the micro. It is a GMs job to manage the macro while at least understanding the impact of the micro.