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Dom Heffner
02-02-2006, 06:54 PM
I think that awful commercial that uses "Crum-believable" might be the most atrocious destruction of a song ever.

Everytime I see this thing I am waiting for Simon Cowell to interrupt it with a "Thank you. Thanks. That was appalling."

pedro
02-02-2006, 06:55 PM
That one was so bad that I called WOY to tell him about it.

westofyou
02-02-2006, 06:56 PM
Sunkists bastardization of Good Vibrations was not only criminal but branded a can of corn syrup and flavoring with one of the greatest pop songs of all time.

Falls City Beer
02-02-2006, 07:34 PM
Sunkists bastardization of Good Vibrations

Nothing else comes close. That's like taking a dump on the Gioconda.

Doc. Scott
02-02-2006, 08:15 PM
How about Carnival Cruise Lines using Iggy Pop's "Lust for Life", a song about drug abuse?

pedro
02-02-2006, 08:19 PM
How about Carnival Cruise Lines using Iggy Pop's "Lust for Life", a song about drug abuse?

Have you ever seen the clothes they call "cruise wear"? You'd have to be on drugs to dress like that IMO.

Dom Heffner
02-02-2006, 09:47 PM
I have to mention "Crumb-believable" again.

It is awful. Awful, awful, awful.....

SteelSD
02-02-2006, 09:56 PM
MIA's "Galang" is currently being used in a Honda ad.

Anyone who's ever actually listened to that song in full knows that it actually gives a shout-out to BMW.

Obviously there's no mention of BMW in the Honda ad, but my wife and I laugh at it all the same.

Yachtzee
02-03-2006, 01:06 AM
"When a problem comes along, you can 'Swiff' it"

KronoRed
02-03-2006, 08:47 AM
The Cars in a circuit city ad.

Makes me cry :cry:

Roy Tucker
02-03-2006, 11:18 AM
I used to love Led Zeppelin's "Rock and Roll" till it got played 80 bazillion times in those Cadillac ads.

Ravenlord
02-03-2006, 11:20 AM
not really commercialization, but on Dragonfly TV (PBS Kids), they usually use the intro to Megadeth's "Peace Sells" when they're seging into something involving athletics.

vaticanplum
02-03-2006, 11:50 AM
Believe it or not, there are times when I think commercialization of a song is a good thing. If an artist is largely unknown (or even sometimes if he is), a well-made commercial can give great exposure. This is the first example that comes to mind, a little-known artist named Jose Gonzalez whose "Heartbeats" was used for a gorgeous Sony ad:

http://www.bravia-advert.com/

Ironically, this was a cover of a song by The Knife, when Gonzalez's own stuff is very good...but still, an ad like this helps both the advertisers (because it's a good ad) and the artist. Pink Moon by Nick Drake in the Volkswagon ad is another one that comes to mind. Beautiful song, beautiful ad.

There are people who think inherently that using music to sell something is selling out. I see the point, but I don't agree. This assumes that commercialization should stick to being commercialization and that's it. I say, if you can get a little great art in there and elevate it, why not?

That said, I agree that most of the examples already mentioned are horrid.

TeamBoone
02-03-2006, 11:59 AM
I really liked the Stones' "Start Me Up" used in the promo for Microsoft's Windows XP. It fit the commercial like a glove.

I also love the Kinks' "Picture Book" used for the photo printer commercial (HP?). Actually, I like all those commercials; they're cleverly done and catch your eye, as the music catches your ear.

"Who Are You" is also great as the theme song for CSI.

I'm trying to think of some I don't like... I know there are some, but nothing's coming to mind at the moment. I think I tend to remember the ones I like and forget about the ones I don't like.

Danny Serafini
02-03-2006, 12:00 PM
Hearing Quiet Riot's "Cum On Feel The Noize" in an Ore-Ida commercial was disturbing.

Johnny Footstool
02-03-2006, 12:10 PM
not really commercialization, but on Dragonfly TV (PBS Kids), they usually use the intro to Megadeth's "Peace Sells" when they're seging into something involving athletics.

Ugh. I can remember when that bass line was the theme song for MTV News with Kurt Loder.


Believe it or not, there are times when I think commercialization of a song is a good thing. If an artist is largely unknown (or even sometimes if he is), a well-made commercial can give great exposure.

Soul Coughing's excellent song "Super Bon Bon" appeared in a Heineken ad a few years ago. It would have been great except for the fact that the band broke up about three years prior to the commercial.

Tony Cloninger
02-03-2006, 12:34 PM
I think the sell out thing has gone by the boards............selling out in the 60's-70's and even 80's was tied to anything a band did to promote themselves, other than the usual avenues.

Madison avenue is consider the corp world......and anything to do with corp/establishment was downgraded by the counterculture.

When McCartney did the Bond song...."Live and let Die".... he was considered a sell out.

I think things changed when "Revolution" was used.... on that Nike commercial.... anything after that was fair game.

Aerosmith is by far the worst of the sell your songs to anyone who will pay.

Brutus_the_Red
02-03-2006, 11:38 PM
Polyphonic Spree can thank Volkswagen and Apple. "Light and Day" commercial was great. Saved them after being dropped by their label.

cincinnati chili
02-04-2006, 09:04 PM
Anybody see Jaguar, the quintessential car of the establishment, using "London Calling" by the Clash a few years ago?

I remember Paul Simon appearing on Letterman several years ago, discussing many of the ads he'd turned down.

Midas Mufflers actually pitched him on the idea of using "Sound of Silence" to sell mufflers ("Sound of Midas").

TRF
02-07-2006, 01:24 PM
Chevy: Like a Rock. Oh. Like a Rock.

deltachi8
02-07-2006, 01:42 PM
I dont really care if a song gets commercialized or not, I didnt write it. The way I look at it, if you wrote it, you can sell it. And yes, i know sometimes the guy who buys the rights then sells it, but ultimately, the artists sells iit somewhere.

pedro
02-07-2006, 02:04 PM
The new Pizza Hut "Bites" commercials featuring "These Boots were made for walking" make me want to vomit.

westofyou
02-07-2006, 02:09 PM
The new Pizza Hut "Bites" commercials featuring "These Boots were made for walking" make me want to vomit.
The actual bites made me want to vomit.

savafan
02-07-2006, 02:09 PM
I get upset everytime I hear a Beatles song in a commercial. They were too good for that.

westofyou
02-07-2006, 02:11 PM
I get upset everytime I hear a Beatles song in a commercial. They were too good for that.
Blame Michael Jackson

Roy Tucker
02-07-2006, 02:11 PM
The actual bites made me want to vomit.
Are you saying bites bite?

westofyou
02-07-2006, 02:11 PM
Are you saying bites bite?I'd say they looked like they bit.

I don't eat corporate pizza, life is too short.

savafan
02-07-2006, 02:12 PM
The new Pizza Hut "Bites" commercials featuring "These Boots were made for walking" make me want to vomit.

Totally agree. It was bad enough when Mrs. Nick Lachey covered that song and did a horrible job of it (nice video though), but then to use it in that manner in a commercial is just out of line.

savafan
02-07-2006, 02:14 PM
Blame Michael Jackson

I do.

TeamBoone
02-07-2006, 04:26 PM
Some car commercial uses "Slow Ride"... I like it.

KronoRed
02-07-2006, 07:19 PM
Blame Michael Jackson
Actually blame Paul and Yoko for hemming and hawing over jointly buying the catalog.

Hap
02-09-2006, 02:53 PM
Bruce Springsteen -- Born In The USA

This one is not so much a commercialization as it is a misuse and misunderstanding. This song is erroneously thought to be a flag-waving patriotic rah-rah song. It is in fact quite the opposite. It tells the tale of a down-and-out war veteran who gave his sanity to his country and has only been kicked around by the system ever since.

BuckU
02-09-2006, 03:44 PM
U2's Vertigo from the iPod commercial. Watching Bono trying to act hip. That was brutal.

Johnny Footstool
02-09-2006, 05:33 PM
Bruce Springsteen -- Born In The USA
Good call, Hap.


Born down in a dead man's town
The first kick I took was when I hit the ground
You end up like a dog that's been beat too much
Till you spend half your life just covering up

Born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.

Got in a little hometown jam
So they put a rifle in my hand
Sent me off to a foreign land
To go and kill the yellow man

Born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.

Come back home to the refinery
Hiring man says "Son if it was up to me"
Went down to see my V.A. man
He said "Son, don't you understand"

I had a brother at Khe Sahn fighting off the Viet Cong
They're still there, he's all gone

He had a woman he loved in Saigon
I got a picture of him in her arms now

Down in the shadow of the penitentiary
Out by the gas fires of the refinery
I'm ten years burning down the road
Nowhere to run ain't got nowhere to go

Born in the U.S.A.
I was born in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.
I'm a long gone Daddy in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.
Born in the U.S.A.
I'm a cool rocking Daddy in the U.S.A.

Yachtzee
02-09-2006, 08:36 PM
I'm still waiting for Pizza Hut to license "Personal Jesus."

"Your own...personal...Pan PizzaŽ"

pedro
02-09-2006, 08:54 PM
I'm still waiting for Pizza Hut to license "Personal Jesus."

"Your own...personal...Pan PizzaŽ"


something to smother with cheese
covered with meat

DoogMinAmo
02-10-2006, 01:15 AM
I have always been a fan of Mitsubishi's car commercials. Upbeat and fast, they definitey sold the cars well, and were not some bastardisation. The Benny Bennassi song for the new Wendy's commercial is fun too. Sorry, forgot the thread was negative.

Pizza Hut commercials always suck, and if any camera company tries to use the song "Photograph" by Nickelback, I will vomit.

StillFunkyB
02-10-2006, 08:31 AM
Yeah, the crumbalievalbe is absolutely hideous.

cincinnati chili
02-11-2006, 04:02 PM
"Pink Houses" by John Cougar Melonhead was as misused/understood as the Springsteen song.

The Republican National Party contacted him about using it as a campaign song.

Green Day's "Holiday" is another one that wouldn't get used for jingoistic events, if people would listen more closely to the words.

Hap
02-11-2006, 04:06 PM
"Pink Houses" by John Cougar Melonhead was as misused/understood as the Springsteen song.

I do not like Melon Squishins and I can't stand his music, especially that song.

That being said, could you please elaborate a little on what the song means?

Dom Heffner
02-11-2006, 04:38 PM
That being said, could you please elaborate a little on what the song means?

I think it shows Mellencamp's cynicism about consumption and the misplaced ideals of the Reagan era.

cincinnati chili
02-12-2006, 11:04 PM
That being said, could you please elaborate a little on what the song means?

I'm guessing Dom made that comment with tongue in cheek. But if not, I don't think that he meant it as an attack on any particular political party. I could be wrong, but I saw Bob Costas interview him years ago, and he said he didn't consider himself a Repub. or a Dem.

Each verse tells the story of a person or two and discusses how the American dream didn't turn out so well for them.

There's a black man with a black cat
Livin' in a black neighborhood
He's got an interstate runnin' through his front yard
You know he thinks that he's got it so good


And there's a woman in the kitchen
Cleanin' up the evenin' slop
And he looks at her and says, "Hey darlin'
I can remember when you could stop a clock"


{Refrain}
Oh, but ain't that America, for you and me
Ain't that America, we're somethin' to see, baby
Ain't that America, the home of the free
Little pink houses for you and me


There's a young man in a T-shirt
Listenin' to a rockin' rollin' station
He's got greasy hair, greasy smile
He says, "Lord this must be my destination"

'Cause they told me when I was younger
"Boy you're gonna be President"
But just like everything else those old crazy dreams
Kinda came and went

{Refrain}

Well there's people and more people
What do they know know know
Go to work in some high rise
And vacation down at the Gulf of Mexico, ooh yeah

And there's winners and there's losers
But that ain't no big deal
'Cause the simple man baby pays for the thrills
The bills, the pills that kill

{Refrain}

Dom Heffner
02-13-2006, 02:30 AM
I'm guessing Dom made that comment with tongue in cheek. But if not, I don't think that he meant it as an attack on any particular political party. I could be wrong, but I saw Bob Costas interview him years ago, and he said he didn't consider himself a Repub. or a Dem.

This is from a Washington Post article from December 2004:

"(Mellencamp is) A lifelong Democrat -- "I've always been a liberal. I grew up in the '60s. I like Jane Fonda," he says -- Mellencamp took part in the Vote for Change tour, the recent gathering of music-biz heavyweights hoping to retire George W. to Texas. The left-leaning collective of rock stars failed in its main objective, of course, primarily because so many of Mellencamp's fellow midwesterners opted for the status quo. Indiana was about 60 percent pro-Bush. Mellencamp says he was "disappointed" in the results. His new song "Walk Tall" ("The simple-minded and the uninformed can be easily led astray") says "disappointed" is an understatement."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A41894-2004Dec6.html

Pink Houses is one of those songs that came out during Reagan's presidency that showed how it wasn't necessarily "morning in America" for many. Sure, it was the culmination of different administrations, but for many in middle America, Reagan's policies meant death to their way of life.

Listen to the Scarecrow album and see the way Mellencamp skewered Reagan's farm policies.

Chili- I think you are referring to a few years back when Mellencamp said he didn't care who won between Bush and Gore because they were essentially the same- which was pretty much Ralph Nader's line.

After seeing the current administration in action, he quickly recanted his feelings about both guys being the same.

NJReds
02-13-2006, 01:25 PM
I think that awful commercial that uses "Crum-believable" might be the most atrocious destruction of a song ever.

Everytime I see this thing I am waiting for Simon Cowell to interrupt it with a "Thank you. Thanks. That was appalling."

I saw the commercial this a.m., and I have to agree with you 100%.

NJReds
02-13-2006, 01:32 PM
Actually, some jeans company used CCR's "Fortunate Son" (I forget which, but I'm thinking Tommy Hilfiger) in a commercial. The selective editing of lyrics to totally change the songs meaning was distrurbing to say the least.