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creek14
02-05-2006, 01:43 PM
When you read some of the numbers at the bottom of the article it sounds like a good idea.

'Animal Houses' clean up act

By Dan Sewell

Associated Press

CINCINNATI | Potential pledges to Phi Delta Theta held cans of Coca-Cola during rush week, with no beer kegs in sight. For a date night activity, the fraternity's University of Cincinnati chapter organized a hayride, not a toga party.

It's an alcohol-free house, part of an effort by a smattering of fraternities nationally to battle student binge drinking while cleaning up the Animal House image of campus Greek life.

"There's not parties going on all the time, people stumbling over themselves," said Matt Deger, a fourth-year accounting student and a leader of the UC chapter.

Oxford-based Phi Delta Theta was one of the first national fraternities to go dry, making the move in 2000. But most fraternities have resisted outright alcohol bans, contending that drinking socially is part of college and fraternity life and that it's better to stress education and drinking responsibly than to take away individual choice.

Out of 70 national fraternities, at least 11 ban alcohol in their campus houses. The Association of Fraternity Advisors says individual chapters in campuses across the country have adopted similar policies, and some 20 percent of fraternity members now live in alcohol-free housing (sororities have been traditionally alcohol-free).

Some fraternity houses were forced to go dry because of university bans for all campus housing. About a third of universities and colleges now have such policies to combat problem drinking among students.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism says studies link alcohol use to more than 1,700 student deaths (including drinking-related car crashes) a year. Surveys have found that estimates of the number of students who say they have done binge drinking (five or more alcohol drinks in a row for men, four for women) in the prior two weeks have consistently been about 44 percent, despite anti-drinking initiatives.

There have also been crackdowns on alcohol at sporting events, but much of the alcohol abuse has been associated with fraternities and a culture of alcohol-dominated parties and hazing initiations for pledges.

"I think you can probably go to about any large campus with a Greek community and look at discipline issues that have involved fraternities, and probably 99 percent of them are based on alcohol," said Edward G. Whipple, vice president for student affairs at Bowling Green State University.

However, some national fraternities have preferred to stress alcohol education while guarding against underage drinking and alcohol abuse.

"Generally speaking, the approach is self-governance and personal responsibility, as opposed to an outright ban on alcohol," said Tom Olver, director of communications for Beta Theta Pi, also Oxford-based. He said 16 of the fraternity's 122 chapters nationally have alcohol bans.

The University of Oklahoma barred drinking in its fraternities and residence halls one year ago, after a Sigma Chi pledge was found dead of alcohol poisoning inside the fraternity house in Norman, Okla.

The school also can suspend students after the third alcohol-related offense on or off campus, places a variety of restrictions on fraternity rushes, and requires alcohol education for incoming students.

"I hope that I will never again have the sad duty to discuss the tragic loss of a son or daughter due to alcohol abuse with grieving parents and family members," university President David Boren said when he announced his plan.

Alcohol abuse study

Studies have shown the costly toll alcohol abuse has taken on the nation's college campuses. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reports these annual estimates based on findings of various studies in recent years of college drinking:

Some 1,700 college students, ages 18-24, die each year from alcohol-related injuries, including motor vehicle crashes.

More than 696,000 students are assaulted annually by another student who has been drinking.

More than 97,000 students are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape.

About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class and receiving lower grades overall.

More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem.

About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol.

About 5 percent of four-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking. An estimated 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested on an alcohol-related charge such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence.

deltachi8
02-05-2006, 01:52 PM
If you can guess by my screen name (delta chi) i have a bunch to say, but will just leave it at this:

The quicker alcohol is moved out of the greek system, the faster we (Greeks) will be able to actually fulfill what we are suppose to be doing.

LoganBuck
02-05-2006, 02:44 PM
When I was in school, I was a member of a dry house at OSU. The biggest reason behind it was respect for each other. We lived in a clean house that didn't have beer spilled everywhere, and vomit encrusted into the carpet. We had a garage that was basically treated as the rompus room. Anything went in there, but not in the house. It was a $50 fine for bringing alcohol into the house the first time, the second was expulsion from the fraternity. I don't remember it cutting into any of our social drinking at all. The only people that didn't like it were those that were underage, because they really couldn't go to a bar. I don't think they missed out to often either.

REDREAD
02-07-2006, 11:28 AM
Actually, a huge reason a lot of Frats are going dry is because of the liability laws. They don't want some 19 year old getting drunk and then getting sued when that student is in a DUI. Remember the case of the bartender and bar getting sued becuase they served someone too much? That's the reasoning.

deltachi8
02-07-2006, 11:50 AM
Liability is the business reason, personal responsibility are the ethical reasons. Even if there wer no law suits involved, whne people get hurt, die or damage their academics, its a valid issue to fight for.

I have been advising my Fraternity for a number of years and have hammered away at alcohol. I am not always a popular guy with the undergrads because of this, but I would not be able to live with myself if one of these guys - and I care for the all - did something stupid because I didnt do enough to try and prevent it.

A friend of mine has worked for my international fraternity and has told me the worse day of his life was waking up to a phone call form his boss telling him had to get on a plane because "we have a dead Delta Chi."

REDREAD
02-08-2006, 11:34 PM
Just my opinion, but the whole reason I joined a fraternity was to pool my beer money with other guys, have parties and get girls. There's plenty of other ways to intellectually stimulate yourself on campus.

We always took care of each other, never hazed pledges, etc. If the group is really friends, they won't let someone get to the point of alcohol poisoning. Whenever someone passed out, we always woke them up and made them puke for safety sake.

I really see no problem with beer in fraternities, but I think the drinking age should be reduced to 18. Better for the kids to learn responsible partying in college than in the real world.

MWM
02-09-2006, 01:01 AM
College in general has become WAY too easy. People who go through college in a dunken stupor should not be able to still do the work required to obtain a degree. Our higher education system is broken, IMO.

Caveat Emperor
02-09-2006, 01:23 AM
Actually, a huge reason a lot of Frats are going dry is because of the liability laws. They don't want some 19 year old getting drunk and then getting sued when that student is in a DUI. Remember the case of the bartender and bar getting sued becuase they served someone too much? That's the reasoning.

I was a Delt (Delta Tau Delta) down at Tulane, and it was exactly that type of lawsuit that shut down our chapter back in the early/mid 70s. When they re-colonized the chapter when I was there, there was a renewed effort to keep the house dry and, at the very least, keep things and events in moderation.

I'm not much of a drinker, personally, but I recognize that it's going to probably be impossible to sell any large number of people in college on the idea of a completely dry house. 18-22 year olds in college just aren't going to buy that, in the long run. With the way houses are so quickly defined and pigeonholed (the "Jock" house, the "party" house, the "rich kid" house, etc.) it's an uphill battle to get most chapters to do anything that would even have the chance of labeling them the "dork" house.

The key, with all things in life, is teaching undergrads moderation and understanding their own limitations and how to make responsible choices when it comes to drinking. That's a far more valuable life skill than just banning alcohol and pretending that it isn't a part of life for college students.

Cedric
02-09-2006, 01:41 AM
I was a Delt (Delta Tau Delta) down at Tulane, and it was exactly that type of lawsuit that shut down our chapter back in the early/mid 70s. When they re-colonized the chapter when I was there, there was a renewed effort to keep the house dry and, at the very least, keep things and events in moderation.

I'm not much of a drinker, personally, but I recognize that it's going to probably be impossible to sell any large number of people in college on the idea of a completely dry house. 18-22 year olds in college just aren't going to buy that, in the long run. With the way houses are so quickly defined and pigeonholed (the "Jock" house, the "party" house, the "rich kid" house, etc.) it's an uphill battle to get most chapters to do anything that would even have the chance of labeling them the "dork" house.

The key, with all things in life, is teaching undergrads moderation and understanding their own limitations and how to make responsible choices when it comes to drinking. That's a far more valuable life skill than just banning alcohol and pretending that it isn't a part of life for college students.


Most frat guys are labeled dorks around campus, with or without drinking these days. Not saying I agree, just what is said.

MWM
02-09-2006, 01:47 AM
pretending that it isn't a part of life for college students.

No one is suggesting it shouldn't be a part of college life. The problem is when academics becomes "part of the college experience" and drinking becomes the primary reason for being there. This is just my personal philosophy, but I think college should be VERY difficult to the point that if your life revolves around partying (as it does for many a college student), then they shouldn't be able to hack the work load. Too many people are graduating these days without being educated, IMO.

deltachi8
02-09-2006, 09:51 AM
Most frat guys are labeled dorks around campus, with or without drinking these days. Not saying I agree, just what is said.

Thats good, because I tell me guys, I have no use for frat guys, we are Fraternity Men.

I stole that from a woman we have come in and speak and conventions on how to treat women in your life (not just girlfriends, wives but your mom, co-worker, etc) and such. Her line is always "Ihave no use for Frat Boys, I am only interested in Fraternity men."

As for joing a fraternity to pool beer money - I never had a problem finding a drink or a party before I joined, so it was never a reason for me.

Johnny Footstool
02-09-2006, 10:03 AM
Phi Delta Theta
Here's to thy glorious name
Here's to thy colors white and blue
And everlasting fame
Forever and forever
We'll bow our heads to thee
Phi Delta Theta
Our fondest memories

westofyou
02-09-2006, 10:36 AM
No frats allowed at my school...... good times.

creek14
02-09-2006, 12:02 PM
No frats allowed at my school...... good times.
No frats, no sororities, no alcohol, only same sex dorms at my school. And I had a great time.

I drink. Not a lot, but I am not opposed to having a couple drinks when out for dinner.

But for the life of me I have never understood why people think they have to drink to have fun. Or to be cool. Which is pretty much the only two reasons college kids drink.

And I have really never understood why people drink at baseball games. Are you there to watch the game or get drunk?

Cedric
02-09-2006, 12:54 PM
No frats, no sororities, no alcohol, only same sex dorms at my school. And I had a great time.

I drink. Not a lot, but I am not opposed to having a couple drinks when out for dinner.

But for the life of me I have never understood why people think they have to drink to have fun. Or to be cool. Which is pretty much the only two reasons college kids drink.

And I have really never understood why people drink at baseball games. Are you there to watch the game or get drunk?

I drink at baseball games but it's not much. I'm also in college and I don't drink to be cool. I drink to have fun and relax. Play cards and shoot the ****. I think it's a little over generalized that all college kids are running around spilling beer on their shirts and acting like idiots. It happens alot, but many others aren't like that.

Doc. Scott
02-09-2006, 02:36 PM
I can assure you all of one thing: my chapter of Phi Delta Theta at Ohio University has not given up alcohol.

And while it's quite true that PDT bans alcohol in houses, it's also true that every PDT chapter I've ever heard of has one or more off-campus "annexes" where alcohol is quite emphatically not banned.

deltachi8
02-09-2006, 02:53 PM
I can assure you all of one thing: my chapter of Phi Delta Theta at Ohio University has not given up alcohol.

And while it's quite true that PDT bans alcohol in houses, it's also true that every PDT chapter I've ever heard of has one or more off-campus "annexes" where alcohol is quite emphatically not banned.

And if something hapens at these annexes?

PDT will be in just as deep if it had happened in the house.

I'm not against alcohol. I certainly had my share in my time, What bothers me is when a fraternity or the business club for that matter, which has no mention of alchol in its set of ideals and purpose becomes a drinking club with funny shaped letters on the outside. (Of course this is not directed at you or your chapter, Doc.)

Johnny Footstool
02-09-2006, 02:53 PM
Hey, Doc. I replied to your PM before I read your post. Ohio U. huh? Cool.


I'm also in college and I don't drink to be cool. I drink to have fun and relax.

I don't drink to be cool, either. I drink to quiet down the voices in my head.

Doc. Scott
02-09-2006, 03:02 PM
And if something hapens at these annexes?

PDT will be in just as deep if it had happened in the house.

I'm not against alcohol. I certainly had my share in my time, What bothers me is when a fraternity or the business club for that matter, which has no mention of alchol in its set of ideals and purpose becomes a drinking club with funny shaped letters on the outside. (Of course this is not directed at you or your chapter, Doc.)

I'm not trying to defend the concept. Just stating the truth. It was what it was and is what it is. Where I come from, Greek organizations are a way for under-21s to get easy access to a built-in Network of Sinful Vices and get out of a two-year dorm residency requirement. I personally didn't fall in to that category, not joining until my junior year and only then because several of my closest friends were already members, but that's why 95% of OU students that join do it. (Especially in the past five years since OU has dramatically clamped down on Halloween guests and there's no underage-serving bar left.) Membership there is only around 15-20%, so it doesn't run campus life like it does/did at Miami or Bowling Green.

I do know that the insurance premiums each chapter has to pay its HQ are going through the roof. It's one reason why Greek organizations cost so much in dues.

vaticanplum
02-09-2006, 04:47 PM
No frats allowed at my school...... good times.

Me too, and that's a primary reason why I chose it. Plenty of drinking and co-ed dorms, but with everyone on an equal footing. If you squinted and tilted your head to the left it looked a little like a commune (i'm halfway inspired to use an emoticon here but will refrain.)

vaticanplum
02-09-2006, 04:53 PM
And I have really never understood why people drink at baseball games. Are you there to watch the game or get drunk?

Well, you can have a couple of beers and not get drunk. I find the taste of a beer on a hot day very refreshing. Also relieves a little bit of nerves, and cools down the throat from yelling too. (This makes me sound like a real picnic at ballgames, I swear I'm not obnoxious. I like a nice beer though.)

westofyou
02-09-2006, 04:55 PM
If you squinted and tilted your head to the left it looked a little like a commune Mine looked like Tuscany if you did that.

RFS62
02-09-2006, 05:07 PM
I don't drink to be cool, either. I drink to quiet down the voices in my head.



Damn right.

Shut up!!

You shut up!!!

Dork.

paintmered
02-09-2006, 05:12 PM
Thats good, because I tell me guys, I have no use for frat guys, we are Fraternity Men.

I stole that from a woman we have come in and speak and conventions on how to treat women in your life (not just girlfriends, wives but your mom, co-worker, etc) and such. Her line is always "Ihave no use for Frat Boys, I am only interested in Fraternity men."

As for joing a fraternity to pool beer money - I never had a problem finding a drink or a party before I joined, so it was never a reason for me.


That may be your motto, but that's certainly not what I've seen from the frats in my experience. There aren't many out there anymore that can claim to be "gentlemen".

Yachtzee
02-09-2006, 08:29 PM
Theta Chi at Kent State.

Joining a fraternity was a great way for a shy person like myself to meet people, network, and break out of his shell. I was in school when the transition to dry campuses was just starting (late '80s-early '90s). When I started, everyone had keg parties. By the time I graduated, fraternities couldn't even have a common beer fund. Yet, it appeared that alcohol-related incidents seemed to increase. Everytime they tightened the rules, it seemed to drive the drinking underground. People would drink harder stuff to get drunk faster...less beer, more MD 20/20, jello shots, tequila shooters and the like. It wasn't unique to the Greek set either. I knew of way more alcohol-related problems going on in the dorms and the apartments than at the fraternity houses. By senior year, we couldn't have open parties with alcohol at the fraternity house, but at German Club meetings, held at the Ratskeller in the basement of the Student Center, I could buy beer by the pitcher on my food card.

Personally I think it's wrong-headed. By imposing more rules on college students regarding social behavior, it just results in infantilization of people who should be acting like adults. If they want college students to act responsibly, they should give them responsibility.

deltachi8
02-10-2006, 10:45 AM
That may be your motto, but that's certainly not what I've seen from the frats in my experience. There aren't many out there anymore that can claim to be "gentlemen".

Your dead on right. Its not common and its unfortunate. With increased attention, insurance rates, etc, I think the animal house image of fraternities will start to collapse under its own dead weight.

I was lucky in the sense that I was a faounding father of my chapter. We chose the group to affiliate with based on the ideals they presented. We set from the beginning a set of expectations. Of course, its has not always been followed, there are bumps and lumps along the way. Howevere, because the tone was set early and good people (far better than I) have stayed involved with mentoring the group, as a whole, they have stayed quite true to the mission.

There are people fighting to bring sanity back to it all, its a tiring fight though most of the time. I'm just not ready to give up on it.

Johnny Footstool
02-10-2006, 11:46 AM
One thing I will say, the friendships and even casual acquaintences I made during my brief time in Phi Delta Theta are enduring. I met some truly great people there -- people I never would have met if I hadn't joined the fraternity.