PDA

View Full Version : Commonly misused words and phrases



max venable
02-27-2006, 08:46 PM
Maldonado and a couple others on the cliche thread brought up some phrases that are commonly misused. For example: "I could care less," should be, "I couldn't care less.

I thought that these were worthy of their own thread. Here are some of the ones that "get under my skin" (cliche) :cool:

Should of ---- It's should have

People always misspell the word collectibles. I see signs in front of stores all the time that read: collectables.

I have a friend who says "That's power for the course." Drives me crazy. It should be par for the course (as in golf).

I had a boss who used to say, "It doesn't take a brain scientist." Yeah boss, and obviously you're not one.

One of my favorites from 'Friends'...Joey: Supposably.

I'd just assume. People say that all the time. :bang: It's I'd just as soon.

Irregardless is a word that many mistakenly believe to be correct usage in formal style, when in fact it is used chiefly in nonstandard speech or casual writing. Coined in the United States in the early 20th century, it has met with a blizzard of condemnation for being an improper yoking of irrespective and regardless and for the logical absurdity of combining the negative ir- prefix and -less suffix in a single term. Although one might reasonably argue that it is no different from words with redundant affixes like debone and unravel, it has been considered a blunder for decades and will probably continue to be so.

Wet my appetite. Should be whet.

How 'bout one from the department of redundency department...
at this point in time ... at this point or at this time is sufficient

literally: does not mean very; means according to the literal meaning of words, not the figurative; if someone is literally a jackass then he has actually taken the form of donkey

I know I've opened myself up for scrutiny with this post. I expect one or more of you to point out all my grammatical errors and misspellings. But, oh well, that's power for the course. :D

Falls City Beer
02-27-2006, 09:31 PM
Nonplussed.

The above word does not mean "unfazed" or "unmoved by." The word means "confused" or "confounded."

Here it is used properly:

I was nonplussed by the jury's decision to acquit him, particularly when three eyewitnesses testified to seeing him with a gun in his hand at the scene of the crime.

Incorrect usage:

He was nonplussed by the low score on his test; he seldom cares about academic failure.

Incidences :angry: :angry: :angry:

NO SUCH THING as INCIDENCES (at least not in the way this word is misused).

The plural form of "incident" is "incidents." Incident is a count noun.

The word "incidence" means "frequency"

Correct usage:

The incidence of cancer in the U.S. rose sharply with the advent of mass production of cigarettes.

The two incidents of theft occurred years apart.



These two words are so brutally and commonly misused that I'm sure they'll be "accepted" usage in five years.

RBA
02-27-2006, 10:06 PM
cite, site, sight--A reference is cited. A site is a place. Sight is vision

pedro
02-27-2006, 10:10 PM
My dad says irregardless all the time. Drives me nuts.

Gainesville Red
02-27-2006, 10:11 PM
It hurts my brain when I have to read "there" when someone meant "their" or "they're"

Falls City Beer
02-27-2006, 10:25 PM
"Enthuse" and "enthused" aren't words.

They're back-formations of the word "enthusiastic." "Enthusiastic" is an adjective only.

UKFlounder
02-27-2006, 10:38 PM
"Past history" (as opposed to what other kind of history?)

"I could care less" when you mean I could NOT care less

UKFlounder
02-27-2006, 10:40 PM
How 'bout one from the department of redundency department...
at this point in time ... at this point or at this time is sufficient


Or how about simply "now" :D

SunDeck
02-27-2006, 10:45 PM
People who use "that" instead of "who".
Or, to use it the way they do...People THAT use "that" instead of "who".

This one makes me crazy, too: "That peaked my interest".

And I once had an office manager who referred to the "physical year". I just felt too sorry for her to make the correction.

UKFlounder
02-27-2006, 10:54 PM
People who use "that" instead of "who".
Or, to use it the way they do...People THAT use "that" instead of "who".


And a similar one that I probably use too often (or offen :) ) is using "who" or "whose" for non-people.

I think it came to may attention on a college football game when they had a stupid trivia question that began like "Who are the schools that..." and Keith Jackson pointed out that it should be something like "Which schools are the ones that..."

Or "The team whose manager...." though, admittedly saying something like "the team, the manager of which..." is rather awkward.

I guess that really doesn't bother me much, as it is pretty awkard to try to correct, but it does seem to be a misuse to me.

alex trevino
02-27-2006, 10:54 PM
Drives me nuts when someone says "I could care less" That being the case I guess it is atleast somewhat important to you if you could care less.

I think you mean "I couldn't care less"

I had a law professor who used "irregardless" all the time....I wanted to shake him!

alex trevino
02-27-2006, 10:59 PM
Also, people who use the word "basically" every other sentence. Sports figures are bad about this....I just want to say " It is OK, you can give me the complex version of the story I think I can comprehend it." :rolleyes:

UKFlounder
02-27-2006, 11:07 PM
Also, people who use the word "basically" every other sentence. Sports figures are bad about this....I just want to say " It is OK, you can give me the complex version of the story I think I can comprehend it." :rolleyes:

That's like, a great point, and, uh, likesometing worth repeating. I hate it when people like use filler words like ;) that, when they can't like think of anything to say.

Red in Chicago
02-27-2006, 11:22 PM
i have lots of trouble with these:

to vs too
who vs whom
suppose to or supposed to??
ask vs ax...just kidding:evil:

Falls City Beer
02-27-2006, 11:29 PM
And a similar one that I probably use too often (or offen :) ) is using "who" or "whose" for non-people.

I think it came to may attention on a college football game when they had a stupid trivia question that began like "Who are the schools that..." and Keith Jackson pointed out that it should be something like "Which schools are the ones that..."

Or "The team whose manager...." though, admittedly saying something like "the team, the manager of which..." is rather awkward.

I guess that really doesn't bother me much, as it is pretty awkard to try to correct, but it does seem to be a misuse to me.

It's usually acceptable usage to say "The team whose manager...."

max venable
02-27-2006, 11:49 PM
As to whether. Whether is sufficient.

Needless to say... If it's needless to say, then why are you saying it?

He is a man who... redundant
wrong: He is a man who is very ambitious. correct: He is very ambitious.

Most. Not to be used for almost.
wrong: Most everybody correct: Almost everybody

Here are some more from the Department of Redundency Department"
That was my actual experience.
Let's do some advance planning.
That was a nice unexpected surprise!
The bag suddenly exploded.
It's part of my regular routine.
I've never understood this one: pre-recorded. Duh!
Based on my past experiences.
I'll meet you at 12 noon.
Let's all meet together.
I made advance reservations.
She gave birth to a healthy baby boy. Really? It was a baby?
We're in close proximity.
Yeah, I commute back and forth.
It's just a natural instinct.
This one drives me absolutely crazy and I see it in stores and banks all the time: Free gift.
This place is filled to capacity.
The end result is...
It's a difficult dilemma...

Help me out with some other redundant phrases that are repetitive. :D

max venable
02-27-2006, 11:52 PM
Oh...just thought of another redundant one...

ATM Machine.

...and one that goes with it...

PIN Number.

gonelong
02-28-2006, 12:58 AM
For all intensive purposes ... gah ... it is for all intents and purposes.

GL

halcyon
02-28-2006, 01:41 AM
I love this thread since so many of these things annoy me as well. I admit that I am occasionally guilty of some of these things, however, and like to try to eliminate things like the redundant phrases. I'm also a poor public speaker since I tend to use a lot of filler words out of nervousness. I don't even hear myself doing it. Not good.

One mistake that I see people make in print quite often is screwing up your/you're. I'm consistently surprised at the type of people who make this mistake, since its fairly basic. I always cringe when I read something like: "Your going to go to the store later, right?"

RedFanAlways1966
02-28-2006, 09:03 AM
States...

There is not an "R" in Washington. It is not Warshington, it is Washington. My own mother is very guilty of this one. I never correct her (she's my mom), but it makes me think my "ma" should take the "root" on down to the holler to sit by the "crick" do do some "warsh" in the water, y'all.

Should the "S" in Illinois be pronounced? I don't think so. Some people think it should. According to every dictionary that I have seen it should not be pronounced. Which leads me to ask... if it is not pronounced, then what in the world is it doing there? Did there used to be a bunch of singular Illnoi areas that were combined into one area called Illinois?

Red Heeler
02-28-2006, 09:07 AM
Ignorant means lacking education or knowledge. It is not a synonym for stupid or dumb. Tremendous irony when it is used incorrectly.

Also, it is a long row to hoe.

Red Heeler
02-28-2006, 09:10 AM
States...

There is not an "R" in Washington. It is not Warshington, it is Washington. My own mother is very guilty of this one. I never correct her (she's my mom), but it makes me think my "ma" should take the "root" on down to the holler to sit by the "crick" do do some "warsh" in the water, y'all.

Should the "S" in Illinois be pronounced? I don't think so. Some people think it should. According to every dictionary that I have seen it should not be pronounced. Which leads me to ask... if it is not pronounced, then what in the world is it doing there? Did there used to be a bunch of singular Illnoi areas that were combined into one area called Illinois?

Xenia and Xavier begin with a "Z" sound, too...not "ex".

Blimpie
02-28-2006, 09:16 AM
I am shocked at the many times on this board I see "Your" used in place of "You're"....well, I guess that I shouldn't say SHOCKED.

I also can't stand it when people pronounce Social Security as "Sosal Security"

max venable
02-28-2006, 10:27 AM
More redundancies...

Come on guys, that's just basic fundamentals.
No, it's completely opposite.
What's the current status?
Well, first and foremost...
foreign imports Is that different than a domestic import? :rolleyes:
Football announcers use this one all the time: forward progress...of course it's different than the player's backward progress.
I swear--it's the honest truth...which, of course, is different from the dishonest or false truth.
How 'bout this one when people write you notes: "Just wanted to drop you a note to say..." Yeah, we get that it's a note already...
He might possibly...
There's been a new development...
I am personally responsible. Just say, I'm responsible.
We'll have to postpone it till later. Oh, okay, I thought we might postpone it till now. :rolleyes:
One in honor of the Olympics: It's a new world record! :thumbup:

Blimpie
02-28-2006, 10:38 AM
I forgot about the one that athletes seem to have great difficulty with these days...when somebody experiences a flip-flop on their positions, they are said to have "done a 180"

They have not "done a 360"...that is, unless, you want to supplement that with the phrase, "they have come full circle..." which is another phrase I have a problem with....

Hap
02-28-2006, 11:00 AM
a whole nother (another whole)

RBIs (The R stands for "runs" which is already plural)

vertebraes (the word vertebrae is plural for vertebra)

alumnis (alumni is plural for alumnus)

Danny Serafini
02-28-2006, 11:53 AM
Ignorant means lacking education or knowledge. It is not a synonym for stupid or dumb. Tremendous irony when it is used incorrectly.

Speaking of which, it's amazing how many people use the word "ironic" incorrectly. It's not ironic that something odd or coincidental happened, it's just odd or coincidental.

Another one that drives me up a wall is "unanswered points", as in announcers saying something like "The Bengals scored 17 unanswered points before the Texans kicked a field goal." Um, that means the Texans just answered.

RedsManRick
02-28-2006, 12:08 PM
"Enthuse" and "enthused" aren't words.

They're back-formations of the word "enthusiastic." "Enthusiastic" is an adjective only.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=enthuse

Apparently Enthuse is in good company as a back formation. I see no problem with it.

SunDeck
02-28-2006, 12:44 PM
"Thought Process"

As in "What was your thought process as you came around the last turn?"
"What were you thinking?" is sufficient.

princeton
02-28-2006, 12:51 PM
Sure, you can smoke near that tank. See? The sign says that it's inflammable...


kablooie.

max venable
02-28-2006, 01:29 PM
More redundancies:

I'll repeat it again. :rolleyes:
The sum total. Total is sufficient thank you. And related to this is total number.
That's their usual custom.
What are the weather conditions?
It was brief in duration.
Have you reached a final conclusion?
Oh, it's adequate enough.
News reporters: An armed guman walked in to the store...
And...as an added bonus...
We have the building completely surrounded. As opposed to just partly surrounded, I guess.
I just completed my doctorate degree... Oh really, guess it wasn't in English ;)
The President made a statement saying...
None at all. As if none doesn't cover it. C'mon, none means none, folks.

RedFanAlways1966
02-28-2006, 01:33 PM
None at all. As if none doesn't cover it. C'mon none means none, folks.

What if a person says... "I ain't got none"? Then none, in conjunction with ain't, must mean that that person has some. ;)

WHAT!??! Danny Graves says that the above is not grammatically correct and only people from Kentucky talk that way!?!? :devil:

guttle11
02-28-2006, 01:41 PM
When people say or write "supposively", I get angry for some reason.

CincyRedsFan30
02-28-2006, 01:58 PM
Affect vs. effect

It's "a lot," not "alot"

"alright" isn't a word. It's actually "all right."

Among= used with more than two items
Between= used with exactly two items

Anxious= worried
Eager= excited or looking forward to something

Bad= an adjective that modifies a noun
Badly= an adverb that modifies a verb

Can= capbable of doing something
May= permission or the chance to do something

Complement= to complete
Compliment= to flatter or praise

"Consenus of opinion"= redundant(just use consenus)

Criteria= factors
Criterion= only one factor

Desert= a barren place
Dessert= something to eat

Embarrassment= spelled like that
Harassment= spelled like that

Farther= distance
Further= length of time, quantity or intensity

Feel= a state of being or a sense of touch.

Fewer= a specific number of items you could count
Less= a collection of items, a period of time or a quantity

Goes without saying= Do NOT say it

It's= It is
Its= a possessive word meaning belonging to it

Join= correct
Join together= incorrect (nothing can be joined apart)

Judgment= No e

Media= plural when talking about all forms
Medium= just newspapers

Stationary= something stays the same
Stationery= paper you use for letters

Than= used for comparison
Then= used for time

Toward= correct(not towards)

Unique= one of a kind, incomparable. You cannot have something "more" or "most" unique

Who= the subject and does the action
Whom= the object and receives the action

max venable
02-28-2006, 03:30 PM
Anxious= worried
Eager= excited or looking forward to something


Yes! Anxious may be THE most misused word in the English language.

creek14
02-28-2006, 03:34 PM
Alright, Im ascared too post hear alot four feer im gonna cey sumthin rong.

vaticanplum
02-28-2006, 04:14 PM
Yes! Anxious may be THE most misused word in the English language.

I would give that prize to "nauseous".

One is not nauseous. One is nauseated.

Matt700wlw
02-28-2006, 04:27 PM
"could care less"....well if you could, you would. It's "COULDN'T care less"

Dom Heffner
02-28-2006, 07:29 PM
Judgment= No e


Judgment is preferred, but judgement is acceptable.


Anxious= worried
Eager= excited or looking forward to something


A few online dictionaries give both meanings, though the preferred usage is as you say...

anxious(p): eagerly desirous; "anxious to see the new show at the museum"; "dying to hear who won"
causing or fraught with or showing anxiety; "spent an anxious night waiting for the test results"; "cast anxious glances behind her"; "those nervous moments before takeoff"; "an unquiet mind"

Usage Note: Anxious has a long history of use roughly as a synonym for eager, but many prefer that anxious be used only when its subject is worried or uneasy about the anticipated event. In the traditional view, one may say We are anxious to see the strike settled soon but not We are anxious to see the new show of British sculpture at the museum. Fifty-two percent of the Usage Panel rejects anxious in the latter sentence. But general adoption of anxious to mean "eager" is understandable, at least in colloquial discourse, since it provides a means of adding emotional urgency to an assertion. It implies that the subject so strongly desires a certain outcome that frustration of that desire will lead to unhappiness. In this way, it resembles the informal adjective dying in sentences such as I'm dying to see your new baby.

Also found this usage note helpful in distinguishing between vs. among:

"According to a widely repeated but unjustified tradition, "between is used for two, and among for more than two." It is true that between is the only choice when exactly two entities are specified: the choice between (not among) good and evil, the rivalry between (not among) Great Britain and France. When more than two entities are involved, however, or when the number of entities is unspecified, the choice of one or the other word depends on the intended sense. Between is used when the entities are considered as distinct individuals; among, when they are considered as a mass or collectivity. Thus in the sentence The bomb landed between the houses, the houses are seen as points that define the boundaries of the area of impact (so that we presume that none of the individual houses was hit). In The bomb landed among the houses, the area of impact is considered to be the general location of the houses, taken together (in which case it is left open whether any houses were hit). By the same token, we may speak of a series of wars between the Greek cities, which suggests that each city was an independent participant in the hostilities, or of a series of wars among the Greek cities, which allows for the possibility that the participants were shifting alliances of cities. For this reason, among is used to indicate inclusion in a group: She is among the best of our young sculptors. There is a spy among you. Use between when the entities are seen as determining the limits or endpoints of a range: They searched the area between the river, the farmhouse, and the woods. The truck driver had obviously been drinking between stops."

http://www.thefreedictionary.com

Falls City Beer
02-28-2006, 07:39 PM
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=enthuse

Apparently Enthuse is in good company as a back formation. I see no problem with it.

Back-formations are as much a part of language as portmanteaus and compounds. I'm not taking issue with back-formations. I would add the words "edit" and "escalate" to the list of successful back-formations (from "editor" and "escalator" respectively).

It's just that "enthuse" is a particularly bad back-formation largely for the reasons listed in the objection on that website--it's a transitive/intransitive ambiguity. It's just kind of a silly word, either way; it doesn't add much to the language except conceptual fuzziness.

Dom Heffner
02-28-2006, 07:41 PM
Speaking of which, it's amazing how many people use the word "ironic" incorrectly. It's not ironic that something odd or coincidental happened, it's just odd or coincidental.

I used to beat up on Alanis Morrissette for destroying the meaning of the word, but when you look at its second meaning, she may have been on to something, perhaps, with one or two of her examples:

ironic - characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is;


Do any of these things count as irony then?:

Rain on your wedding day

Black fly in your chardonnay

A traffic jam when you're already late (I don't think so here at all)

A free ride when you've already paid

Good advice you didn't take (?)

Meeting the man of your dreams and then meeting his beautiful wife

An old man turned ninety-eight
He won the lottery and died the next day

Mr. Play It Safe was afraid to fly
He packed his suitcase and kissed his kids goodbye
He waited his whole damn life to take that flight
And as the plane crashed down he thought
"Well isn't this nice..."

Maybe one or two of these fit the second definition...I dunno.

max venable
02-28-2006, 07:41 PM
Ready for more redundant phrases? Hope so. Here they are:

tuna fish (this, of course, is different than tuna pork)
Easter Sunday (as opposed to Easter Thursday)
We specialize in all cars, foreign and domestic (just in case "all" leaves you wondering.)
totally destroyed (not just a little destroyed but TOTALLY destroyed).
thought to himself (I don't know, can you think to someone else?)
serious danger (is there another kind of danger?)
personal friend (what's the alternative, an impersonal friend?)
Awful Tragedy (yes, we often feel the need to distinguish between the good tragedies and the bad ones)

Falls City Beer
02-28-2006, 07:43 PM
I would give that prize to "nauseous".

One is not nauseous. One is nauseated.

Excellent one. The meal was nauseous. The man was nauseated after eating it.

Falls City Beer
02-28-2006, 07:52 PM
The word "tragedy" has been butchered in the contemporary parlance. Not all bad things that happen are "tragedies." A huge mudslide that kills 1500 people isn't a "tragedy," it's a disaster. A tragedy involves human volition.

CincyRedsFan30
02-28-2006, 07:53 PM
Judgment is preferred, but judgement is acceptable.

I should have clarified that I was referring to the usages according to AP Style.

AP Style says no 'e' there and not to use anxious when you are trying to say you are looking forward to something.

TeamCasey
02-28-2006, 08:02 PM
My Anatomy/Physiology professor wrote "*****" in huge letters across the board.

"There no such word, it's purulent."

We giggled anyway. ;)

TeamCasey
02-28-2006, 08:08 PM
Hmmmmm ..... apparently the RZ naughty word filter didn't find it funny. :)

max venable
02-28-2006, 08:24 PM
Awful Tragedy (yes, we often feel the need to distinguish between the good tragedies and the bad ones)


The word "tragedy" has been butchered in the contemporary parlance. Not all bad things that happen are "tragedies." A huge mudslide that kills 1500 people isn't a "tragedy," it's a disaster. A tragedy involves human volition.
Nobody said that all bad things are tragedies. So the question is, can you offer an example of a 'good' tragedy?

max venable
02-28-2006, 08:29 PM
Hmmmmm ..... apparently the RZ naughty word filter didn't find it funny. :)
It's okay...I can figure out which word it was. :cool:

Falls City Beer
02-28-2006, 08:30 PM
Can you offer an example of a 'good' tragedy?

I probably wasn't clear: I don't mean that tragedies fall into camps of "good" and "bad." All tragedies are bad. I only mean to suggest that the word "tragedy" applies to a limited kind of "bad thing," specifically, a bad event or reversal of fortune brought upon one's self through one's actions.

And yes, the word "tragedy" is used over and over and over in the news when the word clearly doesn't apply at all.

max venable
02-28-2006, 08:34 PM
I probably wasn't clear: I don't mean that tragedies fall into camps of "good" and "bad." All tragedies are bad. I only mean to suggest that the word "tragedy" applies to a limited kind of "bad thing," specifically, a bad event or reversal of fortune brought upon one's self through one's actions.

And yes, the word "tragedy" is used over and over and over in the news when the word clearly doesn't apply at all.
Thanks for clearing that up. :)

UKFlounder
02-28-2006, 08:40 PM
"I'd like to thank you for ..."

Well, if you would like to do so, then JUST DO IT! Just say "Thank you for..."

(And probably used with words besides "thank" but that's the most common, it seems)

Yachtzee
02-28-2006, 10:22 PM
Than v. then

Red Heeler
03-01-2006, 07:55 AM
We specialize in all cars, foreign and domestic (just in case "all" leaves you wondering.)


Not only that, but you can't specialize in all cars. If you work on all cars, you are generalized.

spe·cial·ize
To make specific mention of; particularize.
To give a particular character or function to: specialized her field of research.
Biology. To adapt to a particular function or environment; cause to undergo specialization.
To specify the payee in endorsing (a check).

max venable
03-01-2006, 09:58 AM
Not only that, but you can't specialize in all cars. If you work on all cars, you are generalized.

spe·cial·ize
To make specific mention of; particularize.
To give a particular character or function to: specialized her field of research.
Biology. To adapt to a particular function or environment; cause to undergo specialization.
To specify the payee in endorsing (a check).
:) EXCELLENT point. And we've all seen signs that say stuff like that. :)

max venable
03-01-2006, 11:12 AM
Ready for more redundant phrases (or is this getting reduntant?)

successfully escaped
UPC code
a unique, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity
ACT test

I hear this one all the time, "At 8:00 a.m. in the morning."

bare naked
baby calf

Here's one that the Reds have: an advance scout. :laugh:

Dom Heffner
03-01-2006, 11:36 AM
People refer to the vehicle identification number as the "VIN number" or "PIN" as the "PIN number..."

It's like it is the vehicle identification number....number.

ochre
03-01-2006, 11:46 AM
Not only that, but you can't specialize in all cars. If you work on all cars, you are generalized.

spe·cial·ize
To make specific mention of; particularize.
To give a particular character or function to: specialized her field of research.
Biology. To adapt to a particular function or environment; cause to undergo specialization.
To specify the payee in endorsing (a check).
You'd be a fox then, not a hedgehog?

Johnny Footstool
03-01-2006, 01:13 PM
I used to beat up on Alanis Morrissette for destroying the meaning of the word, but when you look at its second meaning, she may have been on to something, perhaps

It's fairly ironic that she wrote a song about irony, yet it contains no irony.

max venable
03-01-2006, 01:14 PM
It's fairly ironic that she wrote a song about irony, yet it contains no irony.
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Johnny Footstool
03-01-2006, 04:26 PM
Here's a couple I detest:

"Where are you at?"

"Where are we going to?"

It's completely unnecessary to add the extra word at the end.

I also detest people who say "It is I" instead of "It's me".

vaticanplum
03-01-2006, 04:45 PM
I also detest people who say "It is I" instead of "It's me".

These people may be pretentious, but they are correct as this is a subject complacent. Common informal practice accepts "it's me" as well, but the older form has not been rendered obsolete.

(I tried to make that sound as stuffy as possible by the way, just to see if I could do it.)

ochre
03-01-2006, 07:26 PM
yep. To be takes the nominative form. It's the germanic roots.

UKFlounder
03-01-2006, 08:13 PM
Here's a couple I detest:

"Where are you at?"

"Where are we going to?"

It's completely unnecessary to add the extra word at the end.




It's the whole ending a sentence with a preoposition error, which reminds me of a joke.

A country boy was accepted into Harvard and went to campus.

One day, he asked a fellow student "Where's the library at?"

The student responded "At Harvard, we don't end sentences with prepositions."

The country boy thought for a minute, then replied "So where's the library at, (pause), ***hole? "

OldRightHander
03-01-2006, 11:05 PM
This is a great thread. I have many that irritate me and most of them have been addressed here, so I will spare you all the repetition. One that I don't think has been mentioned is an error of pronunciation. Why do people add the extra "i" to mischievous? It is not mischievious.

Johnny Footstool
03-02-2006, 12:13 AM
It's the whole ending a sentence with a preoposition error, which reminds me of a joke.

Actually, I'm not opposed to ending a sentence with a preposition when it clarifies meaning. It makes so much more sense to say "the person I gave the note to" than to jump through hoops to say "the person to whom I gave the note."

But saying "Where are you at?" or "Where are you going to?" is pointless when you could say "Where are you?" or "Where are you going?"

max venable
03-02-2006, 01:29 AM
This is a great thread. I have many that irritate me and most of them have been addressed here, so I will spare you all the repetition. One that I don't think has been mentioned is an error of pronunciation. Why do people add the extra "i" to mischievous? It is not mischievious.
OMG you guys, my mother in law is the all-time worst when it comes to mispronouncing words. Here are a few examples straight from her mouth:

heighthchester drawers
for all intensive purposes
drownd
duck tape
idn't... and its cousin wadn't
a whole nother (most people I know make this mistake)
perscription
sherbert

Oh and recently...she had her dog spaded.

Dom Heffner
03-02-2006, 03:07 AM
a whole nother (most people I know make this mistake)

The difference between spoken and written language. No one ever writes this out, but they sure do say it a lot.

max venable
03-02-2006, 10:40 AM
Realtor is not pronounced "REAL-ah-tor."
Jewelry is not pronounced "jewl-er-ry"

It's not Old-timer's disease. It's Alzheimer's.

It's not bob wire. It's barbed wire.

It's not a wheel-barrel. It's a wheel barrow.

How 'bout this one: A blessing in the skies. No! It's a blessing in disguise.

And it's not a doggy-dog world.

Blimpie
03-02-2006, 11:02 AM
By the way, that grassy area dividing the opposing lanes of the highway is not called the medium, either....

GoReds
03-02-2006, 12:18 PM
I definitely do not understand why people continue to spell it definately. There is no A in the word.

See it all the time.

It is definitely an ironic, awful tragedy.

max venable
03-02-2006, 06:38 PM
Not that this is a misused phrase...it's more for the category of "stupid stuff people say," anyway, here it is:

When people say "It's always in the last place you look". OF COURSE IT IS! Why the heck would you keep looking after you've found it?

OldRightHander
03-02-2006, 07:40 PM
Some candy bars have caramel in them, but I've never seen one that contains carmel.

max venable
03-03-2006, 01:18 AM
How 'bout this one from the sports world:

FORWARD LATERAL Is there really such a thing?

smith288
03-03-2006, 11:11 AM
Not that this is a misused phrase...it's more for the category of "stupid stuff people say," anyway, here it is:

When people say "It's always in the last place you look". OF COURSE IT IS! Why the heck would you keep looking after you've found it?
Easy there pardner, most say this as a ironical joke. ;)

smith288
03-03-2006, 11:13 AM
A few I dislike:

Nuh uh (meaning "no")
Yes huh (meaning "yes")
Same Difference (no, its the same thing)

max venable
03-04-2006, 01:01 AM
Oh, I hear this one all the time:

First Annual.

If it's the first, how can it be annual? :bang:

max venable
03-06-2006, 08:19 AM
Towards

People, there is not supposed to be an "s" on the end of this word!

max venable
03-06-2006, 05:35 PM
Just heard this one, here, in the office:

He's gamefully employed. :thumbup: :laugh:

Matt700wlw
03-06-2006, 08:32 PM
A few I dislike:

Same Difference (no, its the same thing)


5 minus 4 and 4 minus 3

Same difference!!! :D :p: :D

Dom Heffner
03-06-2006, 10:14 PM
Towards

People, there is not supposed to be an "s" on the end of this word!


From dictionary.com:

USAGE NOTE Some critics have tried to discern a semantic distinction between toward and towards, but the difference is entirely dialectal. Toward is more common in American English; towards is the predominant form in British English.

Very interesting. I never knew which one to use, but since we are on this side of the Atlantic, it is toward, I guess. :)

max venable
03-12-2006, 05:21 PM
Heard this one today:

This just of it is... It's gist, people!

GAC
03-12-2006, 10:02 PM
One of my favorites from 'Friends'...Joey: Supposably.

Another one from Joey... "It's all Moo."

I always liked it when someone asks you to describe something and says "In your own words". Whose words am I gonna use? :lol:

I hate the "whatever" response from someone. What is that suppose to mean? My daughter uses it on me and the wife all the time when we show her she is wrong about something. It's like she knows she is wrong, so she throws out the "whatever" response.

From Princess Bride...

Vizzini: HE DIDN'T FALL? INCONCEIVABLE.
Inigo Montoya: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Here in Ohia... we "worsh" our clothes. And we do it back at the crick. ;)

Yachtzee
03-14-2006, 12:35 PM
My wife has noticed a tendency in Ohio for people to drop "to be" from the passive when used with modal verbs. For example, someone might say "The dishes need washed" instead of "need to be washed". She says it sounds "redneck." Personally, I've always thought it was a natural tendency of those who come from areas settled by Germans.

In German, when someone uses a modal verb in conjuction with passive voice, the modal verb pushes the "to be" verb to the end of the sentence. Of course, using passive voice in the first place pushes the original verb to the end of the sentence. Using a modal with passive voice, you can end up with three or more verbs at the end of the sentence. As a result, Germans tend to drop the "to be" part of the passive sentence, especially in spoken German. My theory is that people do it here because German immigrants just literally translated some of their manners of speaking into English. This is not based on any kind of thorough linquistic research, though.

I tend to do it more since having lived in Austria for a few years. My wife always corrects me for it too.

Of course she and her family always say "Drive safe" instead of "Drive safely."

Falls City Beer
03-14-2006, 01:04 PM
My wife has noticed a tendency in Ohio for people to drop "to be" from the passive when used with modal verbs. For example, someone might say "The dishes need washed" instead of "need to be washed". She says it sounds "redneck." Personally, I've always thought it was a natural tendency of those who come from areas settled by Germans.

In German, when someone uses a modal verb in conjuction with passive voice, the modal verb pushes the "to be" verb to the end of the sentence. Of course, using passive voice in the first place pushes the original verb to the end of the sentence. Using a modal with passive voice, you can end up with three or more verbs at the end of the sentence. As a result, Germans tend to drop the "to be" part of the passive sentence, especially in spoken German. My theory is that people do it here because German immigrants just literally translated some of their manners of speaking into English. This is not based on any kind of thorough linquistic research, though.

I tend to do it more since having lived in Austria for a few years. My wife always corrects me for it too.

Of course she and her family always say "Drive safe" instead of "Drive safely."

There may be some German hangover, but my wife's family (old Southern family--not a carpetbagger family) does the same thing: "it needs fixed," etc. It's likely that, because German and English are so closely related as languages, similar elisions occur in certain speakers. It's not redneck, exactly, it's just a tic of the language, IMO.

KySteveH
03-14-2006, 01:13 PM
I'm surprised to see that no one has mentioned:

Do you want to come with?

I never heard that until I moved to Illinois, and it really hurts my ears.

KronoRed
03-14-2006, 01:41 PM
Never heard that one..I'd just keep starring waiting for them to say the rest

RedsManRick
03-14-2006, 04:04 PM
I never heard that until I moved from PA. to MN. Everybody says it up there. After 4 years in MN and 4 in WI, now I'm a regular offender. Chalk it up laziness, but the rest of the sentence is implied. It's awkward at first, and means ending the setence with a proposition, but I use it frequently.

Red Heeler
03-14-2006, 05:32 PM
Another odd turn of speech with which I struggled after moving to the South:

In Ohio, if someone said, "I don't care to go to the store," it meant that the person did not wish to go.

In Tennessee, the same phrase is translated as, "I do not mind going to the store."

The difference in meaning caused a few misunderstandings before I caught on.

Roy Tucker
03-14-2006, 06:15 PM
I hate the "whatever" response from someone. What is that suppose to mean? My daughter uses it on me and the wife all the time when we show her she is wrong about something. It's like she knows she is wrong, so she throws out the "whatever" response.



My kids do it too. That's one of my pet peeves. It's a passive aggressive thing. It means "I disagree but I don't want to argue". They soon find out the argument is something they cannot avoid.

Others...

A mute point
duck tape

max venable
03-16-2006, 03:08 PM
Had a guy who's about to get married email me recently and ask me if I would help him write his own wedding vowels.

I replied this way:

A E I O U

and sometimes Y.

(not really)

UKFlounder
03-16-2006, 03:32 PM
Others...
A mute point
duck tape

My grandfather made fun of my grandmother for saying that, but when they went to buy some "duct" tape, all they found was "Duck brand" duct tape, which really didn't help things.

RichRed
03-16-2006, 05:29 PM
Here's one that drives me insane that seems to have really caught on with sportstalk guys:

"It is what it is."

Well, I can't argue with that but maybe that's because YOU DIDN'T SAY ANYTHING!

Another good one is laxadaisacal: a lazy way to pronounce a word that means lazy. Now that's ironic, Alanis. ;)

remdog
03-16-2006, 05:59 PM
Oh, I hear this one all the time:

First Annual.

If it's the first, how can it be annual? :bang:

Since I contract for a lot of events every year I get letters from producers and promoters about the "First annual.......". And, like you, I always laugh when I think that, if it's the 'first, how can it be annual'. In reality though, what they are saying is that this an event that is intended to be 'annual' rather than 'bi-annual' or 'semi-annual'. So, if you are going to kvetch about all the foibles that people make, you'll drive yourself crazy. :) Unless, of course this thread is your way to release steam. ;)

Rem

Matt700wlw
03-16-2006, 06:01 PM
I'm surprised to see that no one has mentioned:

Do you want to come with?

I never heard that until I moved to Illinois, and it really hurts my ears.

By the way, there's no NOISE in Illinois :D

GAC
03-18-2006, 08:32 AM
Had a co-worker just send me this! :lol:

9 Things I Hate About Everyone

1 People who point at their wrist while asking for the time.... I know where my watch is pal, where the hell is yours? Do I point at my crotch when I ask where the toilet is?

2 People who are willing to get off their butts to search the entire room for the T.V. remote because they refuse to walk to the T.V. and change the channel manually.


3 When people say "Oh you just want to have your cake and eat it too". Damn right! What good is cake if you can't eat it?


4 When people say "it's always the last place you look". Of course it is. Why the hell would you keep looking after you've found it? Do people do this? Who and where are they?


5 When people say while watching a film "did you see that?". No Loser, I paid $12 to come to the cinema and stare at the damn floor!


6 People who ask "Can I ask you a question?".... Didn't really give me a choice there, did ya sunshine?

7 When something is 'new and improved!'. Which is it? If it's new, then there has never been anything before it. If it's an improvement, then there must have been something before it, couldn't be new.


8 When people say "life is short". What the hell?? Life is the longest damn thing anyone ever does!! What can you do that's longer? !


9 When you are waiting for the bus and someone asks "Has the bus come yet?". If the bus came would I be standing here, dumba$$?

GAC
03-18-2006, 08:35 AM
By the way, there's no NOISE in Illinois :D

I have always pronounced Louisiana as if it were WE-siana.

Missoura... not Missouri.

And as I stated before.... I worsh my clothes. ;)

OldRightHander
03-18-2006, 04:19 PM
I'm surprised to see that no one has mentioned:

Do you want to come with?

I never heard that until I moved to Illinois, and it really hurts my ears.

I have heard that a lot up in Minnesota, South Dakota, and parts of Wisconsin. An uncle in Minnesota told me that it was the Norwegians who started saying that. I have a cousin in South Dakota who says that as well, and our family is Irish, not Norwegian.

OldRightHander
03-18-2006, 04:31 PM
There are a couple more that get on my nerves. I'm particularly pedantic about the difference between less and fewer and it drives me nuts when I'm in the grocery and the express lane sign reads "10 items or less." I was in Meijer this afternoon and their sign reads "10 items or fewer." I told the cashier that I appreciated their sign being correct and she just gave me a funny look.

Also, one person cannot be them or they and that one person cannot drive their car. When did it become acceptable to use plural pronouns to refer to one person?

Red Heeler
03-18-2006, 09:03 PM
Also, one person cannot be them or they and that one person cannot drive their car. When did it become acceptable to use plural pronouns to refer to one person?

To further this thought, the correct pronoun when referring to a non-specific person is he/him/his. Mrs. Heeler got a lot of parenting magazines while in the hospital having Heeler, Jr. last year. Every other article uses feminine pronouns when referring to the child. Drives me nuts.

max venable
03-19-2006, 10:37 PM
It's not daylight-savings time!

It's daylight-saving time. ;)

max venable
03-19-2006, 10:38 PM
hopefully
Unless you're describing the way someone spoke, appeared or acted, do not use this one. Too many people use "hopefully," an adverb that must modify a verb only, as if it were a conditional phrase. :thumbdown

Right: I hope we can go.
Wrong: Hopefully, we can go.
Wrong: Hopefully, the report will address that issue.
Right: It is hoped the report will address that issue.
Right: She eyed the interview list hopefully.

max venable
04-21-2006, 02:22 PM
Here's one I was just reminded of:

When you see signs on peoples houses and/or mailboxes, it usually reads something like this:

The Weaver's
or
The Smith's

As if there is only ONE of them living there.

the correct way should read:

The Weavers'
or
The Smiths'

Drives me crazy...and nobody realizes they're doing it wrong.

vaticanplum
04-24-2006, 05:24 PM
Here's one I was just reminded of:

When you see signs on peoples houses and/or mailboxes, it usually reads something like this:

The Weaver's
or
The Smith's

As if there is only ONE of them living there.

the correct way should read:

The Weavers'
or
The Smiths'

Drives me crazy...and nobody realizes they're doing it wrong.

Actually, I believe there should be NO apostrophe there...but now that I think about it, I'm not sure why. You could be referring to their house or place of residence, I suppose, but my impression was that the reference was always to the family itself so it's just the name (with an 's' on the end).

Definitely for the signing of greeting cards and things of that nature, it should just be signed the Weavers or the Smiths. Apostrophes on those things drive me batty.

max venable
04-24-2006, 08:15 PM
Actually, I believe there should be NO apostrophe there...but now that I think about it, I'm not sure why. You could be referring to their house or place of residence, I suppose, but my impression was that the reference was always to the family itself so it's just the name (with an 's' on the end).

Definitely for the signing of greeting cards and things of that nature, it should just be signed the Weavers or the Smiths. Apostrophes on those things drive me batty.
I see your point. I was taking it as referring to their residence. But if you're just referring to them, as people, then no apostrophe. I could go either way if it's on a house or a mailbox...just NOT Weaver's.

Larkin411
04-24-2006, 09:34 PM
This isn't really common but I had to share because it still makes me laugh.

My friend was talking about something she thought was awe-inspiring and informed us that the thing in question completely "balled her over."

Hilarity ensued.

max venable
04-25-2006, 04:04 PM
Definitely for the signing of greeting cards and things of that nature, it should just be signed the Weavers or the Smiths. Apostrophes on those things drive me batty.
So, go batty...
http://www.ichizen.com/goat/goat_signs/images/2003_05_28_02.jpg
Vic's Caterer's what?

http://www.ichizen.com/goat/goat_signs/images/2002_10_17_09.jpg
Enchiladas, Chicken, Beef, Pork... and Rib's? Rib's what? Why is "Enchiladas" plural, but "Rib's" is possessive? And taco? What, they only have one taco?

http://www.ichizen.com/goat/goat_signs/images/2001_08_29_03.jpg
Oh...so now the taco is possessive?

How 'bout another one?
http://www.ichizen.com/goat/goat_signs/images/2000_08_22_01.jpg

Okay...one more...I just can't resist...
http://www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk/images/example51.jpg

westofyou
04-25-2006, 04:09 PM
I loath the use of english and latin words that say the same thing twice.

IE: Carne Asade Steak Burrito, Large Grande Drink.

Roy Tucker
04-25-2006, 04:15 PM
I loath the use of english and latin words that say the same thing twice.

IE: Carne Asade Steak Burrito, Large Grande Drink.
Back in the day when I was a grill cook at Frisch's, we got chili in 1 gallon containers labelled "Chili Con Carne With Meat".

vaticanplum
04-25-2006, 04:15 PM
Ahhhh....those hurt my eyes....

RichRed
04-25-2006, 04:30 PM
Ahhhh....those hurt my eyes....

Better not read these then.

http://www.banterist.com/archivefiles/cat_grammar_cop.html

(Very funny site, not just the grammar gaffes.)

Yachtzee
04-25-2006, 04:33 PM
I loath the use of english and latin words that say the same thing twice.

IE: Carne Asade Steak Burrito, Large Grande Drink.

I love those. I've always wanted to ask for a Steak Burrito with Steak and a side of Steak. Or how about the Steak, Steak, Steak, Steak, Steak, Steak, Steak, Baked Beans, Steak, Steak and Steak? ;)

vaticanplum
04-25-2006, 04:34 PM
Better not read these then.

http://www.banterist.com/archivefiles/cat_grammar_cop.html

(Very funny site, not just the grammar gaffes.)

Oh my Lord, that site is amazing!

max venable
04-25-2006, 06:52 PM
Better not read these then.

http://www.banterist.com/archivefiles/cat_grammar_cop.html

(Very funny site, not just the grammar gaffes.)
Great site...I bookmarked it!

Here's a link it had on it (this one's especially for vaticanplum):

http://www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk/

Larkin411
04-25-2006, 08:35 PM
Had a co-worker just send me this! :lol:


3 When people say "Oh you just want to have your cake and eat it too". Damn right! What good is cake if you can't eat it?

It's surprising how many people are confused by that phrase. I think the word order just throws people off.

Benny-Distefano
04-27-2006, 05:37 PM
More redundancies...

Come on guys, that's just basic fundamentals.
No, it's completely opposite.
What's the current status?
Well, first and foremost...
foreign imports Is that different than a domestic import? :rolleyes:
Football announcers use this one all the time: forward progress...of course it's different than the player's backward progress.
I swear--it's the honest truth...which, of course, is different from the dishonest or false truth.
How 'bout this one when people write you notes: "Just wanted to drop you a note to say..." Yeah, we get that it's a note already...
He might possibly...
There's been a new development...
I am personally responsible. Just say, I'm responsible.
We'll have to postpone it till later. Oh, okay, I thought we might postpone it till now. :rolleyes:
One in honor of the Olympics: It's a new world record! :thumbup:



I know this was way back on page one, but this one had me cracking up. :thumbup:

max venable
05-02-2006, 10:52 AM
Saw this last night when I was watching the Yankee/Red Sox game (had to include it in this thread):

Big sign held up by about five guys in the bleachers when Johnny Damon was at bat ...it read: TRADER!

No, guys, your GM, Theo, would be a "trader." Johnny Damon is a traitor. Let's get it straight. :rolleyes:

Larkin411
05-04-2006, 12:56 AM
Saw this last night when I was watching the Yankee/Red Sox game (had to include it in this thread):

Big sign held up by about five guys in the bleachers when Johnny Damon was at bat ...it read: TRADER!

No, guys, your GM, Theo, would be a "trader." Johnny Damon is a traitor. Let's get it straight. :rolleyes:

Classic! I admit I pay very little attention to grammer and punctuation but I do like homophones spelled correctly(although I don't actually pronounce trader and traitor the same way). I also wince when I hear someone use "good" instead of "well." It's like fingernails on a chalkboard.

max venable
05-27-2006, 02:04 PM
Okay...just had one used on me...

I emailed a friend of mine who get me tickets for events in Columbus...my kids want to go see the American Idol tour, so I asked her about it. Here's what she sent back to me:

Unfortunately, the Idols show is completely sold out.

Which, obviously, is different than "partially sold out."

Yachtzee
05-28-2006, 03:12 PM
Unfortunately, the Idols show is completely sold out.

Which, obviously, is different than "partially sold out."

"Well, there is completely dead and then there is mostly dead. If he's completely dead, then there's nothing you can do, other than go through his pockets for loose change. If he's mostly dead, then he's still just a little bit alive, which means there's still hope..."

max venable
05-28-2006, 05:34 PM
"Well, there is completely dead and then there is mostly dead. If he's completely dead, then there's nothing you can do, other than go through his pockets for loose change. If he's mostly dead, then he's still just a little bit alive, which means there's still hope..."
good point.

My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.

saboforthird
05-31-2006, 12:02 AM
"I Heart" should be "I love" (seeing this garbage A LOT on the Internet)

"Dis and Dat" should be "This and That"

"Cuz" should be "Because"

BCubb2003
05-31-2006, 03:24 AM
"Begs the question" is misused almost as much as "ironic."

I've never figured out why people who spell every other word right online spell lose as loose.

Alanis Morrisette's brilliance was in her use of Socratic irony: By playing dumb and asking a string of questions that gave the appearance that she didn't know anything, she taught a new generation the definition of irony.

English folks, when they say things like,"Cincinnati are playing at home today," it makes my ears hurt.

vaticanplum
05-31-2006, 11:41 AM
"Begs the question" is misused almost as much as "ironic."

I never thought much about this one. What's wrong with it? "Poses the question" I guess makes more sense...hmm. What about "beggars belief"? Are any of these correct and if not, why?

Red Heeler
05-31-2006, 02:05 PM
English folks, when they say things like,"Cincinnati are playing at home today," it makes my ears hurt.

Technically, this sentence is correct. In this case, Cincinnati refers to a group of people (the Reds team). Since it refers to a group, the pleural verb is correct. If you were going to use a pronoun for the Cincinnati Reds, you would say "They did..." not "It did..."

Roy Tucker
05-31-2006, 02:30 PM
I never thought much about this one. What's wrong with it? "Poses the question" I guess makes more sense...hmm. What about "beggars belief"? Are any of these correct and if not, why?
The term has its roots in deductive logic. There is a classic meaning and then there is a evolving-yet-incorrect usage. This explains it better than I can...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question

vaticanplum
05-31-2006, 02:41 PM
The term has its roots in deductive logic. There is a classic meaning and then there is a evolving-yet-incorrect usage. This explains it better than I can...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question

In logic, begging the question is the term for a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises.

Ah.

Seriously, though, that was very interesting. I had no idea that phrase referred to something so specific...I'm sure I've been using it incorrectly too.

See Mom, baseball does make you smarter!

SandyD
05-31-2006, 03:21 PM
Technically, this sentence is correct. In this case, Cincinnati refers to a group of people (the Reds team). Since it refers to a group, the pleural verb is correct. If you were going to use a pronoun for the Cincinnati Reds, you would say "They did..." not "It did..."

Group nouns can take a singular verb, if the group is acting singularly. The team travels today. A family goes to the beach. A class rides the bus. Not sure exactly where the line is drawn, though.

Red Heeler
05-31-2006, 09:11 PM
Group nouns can take a singular verb, if the group is acting singularly. The team travels today. A family goes to the beach. A class rides the bus. Not sure exactly where the line is drawn, though.

Good point, Sandy. You are correct.

I got a good laugh one morning at the expense of a well known national talk radio personality. I don't remember the particulars, but the personality was just hammering a politician from the "other side" about something he had said in a speech. The "wrong sided" politician had correctly used a pleural verb in conjunction with Congress, House, or something like that. Anyway, the personality just kept going on and on about how stupid the politician was because he couldn't even use proper English. Oh, how I wish I had had a cell phone handy so I could call in and tell him that, uh, "In this case you are wrong."

Falls City Beer
05-31-2006, 09:38 PM
Not sure exactly where the line is drawn, though.

It merely depends on what you, the writer, intend to say in the sentence.

SandyD
05-31-2006, 09:40 PM
That's what I thought. The power of language. So much more meaningful than "right" and "wrong."

OldRightHander
06-01-2006, 12:20 AM
Group nouns can take a singular verb, if the group is acting singularly. The team travels today. A family goes to the beach. A class rides the bus. Not sure exactly where the line is drawn, though.

If you watch enough European soccer like I do, you will see that the English almost always use the plural verb in this instance. I think it's a Brit thing.

Nugget
06-01-2006, 12:48 AM
Actually most english speaking countries follow this grammatical rule.

Falls City Beer
06-01-2006, 10:40 AM
MLB.com, on their ticker, follow this grammatical form as well. "Detroit score in the 2nd inning" etc.

I think it's largely one's preference. However, there are some cases when using a group noun and a singular verb/pronoun makes no sense: "The group put their heads together" makes no sense if stated as "The group puts its head(s) together."

max venable
06-01-2006, 01:48 PM
Just found this online test THE MOST COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS TEST (http://okcupid.com/tests/take?testid=14457200288064322170). Here's what it said about me:


You did so extremely well, even I can't find a word to describe your excellence! You have the uncommon intelligence necessary to understand things that most people don't. You have an extensive vocabulary, and you're not afraid to use it properly! Way to go! :D

RFS62
06-02-2006, 09:26 AM
It ain't easy being me.


English Genius
You scored 100% Beginner, 100% Intermediate, 93% Advanced, and 93% Expert!
You did so extremely well, even I can't find a word to describe your excellence! You have the uncommon intelligence necessary to understand things that most people don't. You have an extensive vocabulary, and you're not afraid to use it properly! Way to go!

minus5
06-02-2006, 10:36 AM
Has anyone mentioned "Prolly" yet? It goes right through me every time I hear someone say it or see someone type it.

max venable
07-27-2006, 05:07 PM
Heard this one today: It's a far-gone conclusion... :thumbup:

Ltlabner
07-27-2006, 05:26 PM
You scored 92% Beginner, 92% Intermediate, 93% Advanced, and 93% Expert!
You did so extremely well, even I can't find a word to describe your excellence! You have the uncommon intelligence necessary to understand things that most people don't. You have an extensive vocabulary, and you're not afraid to use it properly! Way to go!


Now if I can only learn how to spell.......

ThornWithin81
07-27-2006, 05:31 PM
Has anyone mentioned "Prolly" yet? It goes right through me every time I hear someone say it or see someone type it.

I have a very bad knack of saying probably in this manner. I don't even know where I picked up the habit, considering I'm usually very good about saying words properly.

Benny-Distefano
07-28-2006, 03:35 PM
"Well, there is completely dead and then there is mostly dead. If he's completely dead, then there's nothing you can do, other than go through his pockets for loose change. If he's mostly dead, then he's still just a little bit alive, which means there's still hope..."


Princess Bride!!!! :thumbup:


Have fun storming the castle!!!!!!!

Benny-Distefano
07-28-2006, 03:44 PM
English Genius
You scored 85% Beginner, 100% Intermediate, 100% Advanced, and 86% Expert!
You did so extremely well, even I can't find a word to describe your excellence! You have the uncommon intelligence necessary to understand things that most people don't. You have an extensive vocabulary, and you're not afraid to use it properly! Way to go!
Thank you so much for taking my test. I hope you enjoyed it!





:)

vaticanplum
01-24-2008, 11:17 PM
Hit on another one today: paranoid.

People these days are paranoid about everything. Paranoid that they're going to miss lunch, paranoid that it's going to snow, everything. Paranoia refers to a specific brand of fear, a delusional state that tends to invoke fear without logic. I am perpetually paranoid that there is a leprechaun trying to start a fire in my basement. All the rest of these people are just worried.

*BaseClogger*
01-24-2008, 11:23 PM
I didn't read all 10 pages, so maybe someone mentioned it- using are in place of our: Is that are tickets?

Yachtzee
01-24-2008, 11:42 PM
Hit on another one today: paranoid.

People these days are paranoid about everything. Paranoid that they're going to miss lunch, paranoid that it's going to snow, everything. Paranoia refers to a specific brand of fear, a delusional state that tends to invoke fear without logic. I am perpetually paranoid that there is a leprechaun trying to start a fire in my basement. All the rest of these people are just worried.

I hear you. I hear people overusing psychological terms all the time without really meaning it. Like if someone is distracted by something, they have to say "Sorry, ADD kicking in." Everyone seems to want to have that one.

Or if someone is just likes to keep things clean, they blame it on OCD. Just liking to be clean doesn't make you OCD. And shouldn't it be OC, because people say "I'm OCD." Really, you're a disorder?

Danny Serafini
01-25-2008, 10:23 AM
I'm seeing dominate/dominant getting garbled a lot lately. If you dominate, you are dominant. For some reason people seem to flip-flop that a lot.

SunDeck
01-25-2008, 10:57 AM
"that" instead of "who" irritates the heck out of me.

"Thought Process", which I hear mainly with sports commentators an analysts. I cringe; it's obviously someone who thinks it makes them sound like they are asking a more intelligent question than they really are, as in,

"Hey Tiger, what was your thought process on the last three holes of the Open?".
Translation: "Hey Tiger, what were you thinking on the last three holes?"
Now, if the guy had taken some time to really think about a question relating to Tiger's, "thought process", he would ask him what his strategy was, or what he thought he needed to do on the last three holes. But thought process is practically meaningless. Just once I wish someone would reply by saying they don't know what a thought process is.


Another one just cracked me up when I heard it; an office manager where I used to work always referred to the "physical year".

SunDeck
01-25-2008, 11:00 AM
I didn't read all 10 pages, so maybe someone mentioned it- using are in place of our: Is that are tickets?

It's verb subject disagreement that gets me. :cool:

*BaseClogger*
01-25-2008, 11:10 AM
It's verb subject disagreement that gets me. :cool:

you know, I'm guilty of using "that" way too much :D

RichRed
01-25-2008, 02:16 PM
It's not real-a-tor, it's real-tor.

EDIT: I see Max Venable mentioned this one way back in aught-six. It's still annoying though.

OldRightHander
01-26-2008, 12:28 PM
I may have mentioned this before, but one that gets on my nerves is the use of "they" and "their" when referring to one person. This has become the standard way for people to avoid using masculine pronouns, but it just goes against everything I was taught about pronoun subject agreement.

sonny
01-26-2008, 01:05 PM
"So didn't I"

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAArgh!

Hoosier Red
01-26-2008, 02:01 PM
My dad says irregardless all the time. Drives me nuts.

It's not a drive, it's a short putt.
My dad said that all the time, talk about something that drives you nuts.

Ltlabner
01-26-2008, 06:33 PM
Oh and recently...she had her dog spaded.

:eek:


My dad says irregardless all the time. Drives me nuts.

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/angry021.gif

Have to agree with you there. Absolutely brutal to hear that one.

SuposiBly is another that drives me bonkers.

SunDeck
01-26-2008, 09:00 PM
"So didn't I"

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAArgh!

I think that's kind of a northeastern thing, isn't it? I have a good friend from Boston and she says, "So don't I" all the time.

I like to say "unloosen" just because it drives my wife nuts.
"Hey, can you unloosen the lid of this pickle jar?"

"Take it for granite", I find especially agonizing to endure.

Dom Heffner
01-26-2008, 09:16 PM
"So don't I" all the time.


For us southerners (albeit transplanted) use this saying in a sentence so I can share in your annoyance.

SunDeck
01-26-2008, 09:22 PM
Dom,
It's the same as "so do I".

Beats me.

Dom Heffner
01-26-2008, 09:26 PM
That is definitely annoying. Thanks, SD.