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View Full Version : Luke Hudson, once counted on, now counted out



savafan
03-02-2006, 12:43 PM
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060302/SPT04/603020372/1071

BY JOHN FAY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA, Fla. - Luke Hudson has flown so far under the radar at Reds camp that he would be lucky to clear the pitcher's mound.

Hudson, a 28-year-old right-hander, is here as a non-roster player. When members of the Reds brass talk about the roster, Hudson's name doesn't come up.

Two days after Wayne Krivsky was named general manager, he made a move that could have meant losing Hudson. The Reds designated Hudson for assignment when they signed left-hander Michael Gosling off waivers.

Hudson passed through waivers and re-signed a minor-league deal.

"It's part of the game," Hudson said. "It happens to a lot of players. What can you do about it? I feel good. I'll go out and see what happens."

Hudson made his first start of the spring Wednesday in an intrasquad game. He faced four batters and threw 15 pitches. The Reds ended the inning when Hudson reached his pitch count.

He should have had a 1-2-3 inning, but a fly ball off the bat of Ken Griffey Jr. fell between left fielder Tuffy Rhodes and third baseman Edwin Encarnacion for a hit.

Hudson got ahead 0-2 on Austin Kearns, then hit him with a pitch.

"It was kind of bittersweet," Hudson said.

"It's the first time I've been healthy in the spring since '04," Hudson added.

"But to hit one of your own guys is the worst feeling in the world."

Lack of command of his pitches has left Hudson with bad feelings many times in his career. His stuff is first-rate, among the best in the organization, but he doesn't always know where his pitches are going.

"If he commands his pitches and throws strikes, he has good games," Reds manager Jerry Narron said. "When he doesn't, he struggles."

Hudson's only run of consistent big-league success came in the latter part of 2004. He went 4-2 with a 2.42 ERA over nine starts in August and September. He allowed only 36 hits and struck out 38 in 481/3 innings.

The Reds penciled him in the rotation going into last season.

"Everyone had high expectations," Hudson said.

"Then I got hurt in the spring."

That was a bad start to a bad season. Hudson, who missed 2003 after shoulder surgery, began the 2005 season on the disabled list with shoulder inflammation.

He rehabbed until June.

Once activated, he struggled through June and July. He finally found himself in August, going 4-1 with a 3.64 ERA. But after two disastrous starts in September (11 runs in 52/3 innings), he was sent to the bullpen.

He went to the Arizona Fall League after the season but didn't do much better - 0-1, 6.58 ERA in six starts.

Hudson had a sore back early in spring training. That's why he was limited to 15 pitches Wednesday.

He's behind Gosling and right-hander Justin Germano in the battle for a starting spot - and a spot will be open only if Paul Wilson isn't ready at the start of the season.

"I'm just going to go out and pitch," Hudson said. "If I pitch like I'm capable of, the opportunity will come."

westofyou
03-02-2006, 01:10 PM
Luke Hudson, once counted on, now counted out

Prime example of why the Reds have had 3 straight season's with a plus 5 ERA.

A 27 year old throws 48 innings in his first extended time in the Bigs and he becomes "someone you count on"

wolfboy
03-02-2006, 02:17 PM
Prime example of why the Reds have had 3 straight season's with a plus 5 ERA.

A 27 year old throws 48 innings in his first extended time in the Bigs and he becomes "someone you count on"

Couldn't have said it better woy. Acevedo, Hudson, Hancock, Reith, etc.. There's a long list of guys that show a glimpse of "stuff", and are suddenly annointed the savior of the staff. Most pitchers that get a whiff of the majors are going to have a glimpse of "stuff". Any realistic hope of improvement has to come from pitchers with a proven record of being above average. Instead, we've placed our hopes in mediocre pitchers that are occasionally above average. I really hope that changes with the new GM and ownership.

TRF
03-02-2006, 03:54 PM
Couldn't have said it better woy. Acevedo, Hudson, Hancock, Reith, etc.. There's a long list of guys that show a glimpse of "stuff", and are suddenly annointed the savior of the staff. Most pitchers that get a whiff of the majors are going to have a glimpse of "stuff". Any realistic hope of improvement has to come from pitchers with a proven record of being above average. Instead, we've placed our hopes in mediocre pitchers that are occasionally above average. I really hope that changes with the new GM and ownership.

Hancock and Hudson I agree with you on. Reith and Acevedo are a different matter. Both were rushed to the majors in the great Overpromotion of 2001. It isn't that they were counted on to bring the franchise back to the post season, it's that someone needed to throw the ball from the pitchers mound, and both guys (along with Lance Davis) had a pulse.

Sea Ray
03-02-2006, 04:20 PM
Supposedly we were getting the healthy Luke Hudson this Spring and before the games even start he's got a bad back. This is not a guy we can count on. Send him to AAA and let's see what he can put together.

redskirtsrgood
03-04-2006, 01:00 PM
Stuff like this happens to players all the time during a season. This isn't even considered an injury and if it wasn't the first day of spring, then I'm sure nothing would have been mentioned. I say screw sending him to AAA and keep sending him to the mound this spring and see what he can put together. Then we'll see where he goes.

Ravenlord
03-04-2006, 11:53 PM
95 MPH fourseamer with no contro, average curveball, no third pitch. 'ace stuff.' how starved we truly are.

redskirtsrgood
03-05-2006, 01:37 AM
Few things you got wrong, more like 90-92mph fastball, and how can you say an average curve??? I also hear he's been working on a new change...Like I've been saying, let's see this spring

Ravenlord
03-05-2006, 01:53 AM
so a 90-92 MPH fourseamer (that means straight) with no control is better, eh?

there's absolutely nothing wrong with the fact that the curveball is Hudson's control pitch...just that it is an average pitch. especially by power curveball standards.

as far as developing a change-up, he's 28. it should have been developed, scraped, or polished by now. not still in the work in progress stage.