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View Full Version : Pokey Reese goes from missing to unemployed



Spitball
03-05-2006, 04:01 PM
http://www.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/team/transactions.jsp?c_id=fla

Hmmm...Pokey was missing from the Marlins camp a couple of days, but I understood he was returning to the team.

Spitball
03-05-2006, 04:08 PM
Oops...I see this is old news...ignore or delete... :redface:

oneupper
03-05-2006, 04:08 PM
Marlins need a 2B. Can we send them Woemack?

Spitball
03-05-2006, 04:16 PM
Marlins need a 2B. Can we send them Woemack?

They may go with Robert Andino though I understand his status has slipped because of a horrible Arizona Fall League showing.

KronoRed
03-05-2006, 04:20 PM
They need a solid vet to handle it for awhile

A vet who knows how to play the game

They need..Rich Aurilia

WMR
03-05-2006, 04:25 PM
They need a solid vet to handle it for awhile

A vet who knows how to play the game

They need..Rich Aurilia

As young as that team is, they could REALLY use a veteran-tandem at 2nd to provide maximum leadership and game-playing-know-how:
Aurilia + Woemack

captainmorgan07
03-05-2006, 04:49 PM
heck send um aurilla womack and menechino

guttle11
03-05-2006, 04:55 PM
I could just see it now. Imagine if DanO was still here.

"Hello, Marlins? Dan O'Brien, Cincinnati Reds. How's about Rich Aurilia for Scott Olsen?"

CLICK.

Heath
03-05-2006, 10:39 PM
I could just see it now. Imagine if DanO was still here.

"Hello, Marlins? Dan O'Brien, Cincinnati Reds. How's about Rich Aurilia for Scott Olsen?"

CLICK.

No, DanO would have asked for Chuckie Carr.

If we could get rid of Womack, Aurilia, Menechino, and Aaron Herr, and his "issues" were resolved, I'd take Pokey back.

Chip R
03-05-2006, 10:43 PM
Never ceases to amaze me how Pokey can keep screwing up his career.

KronoRed
03-05-2006, 11:02 PM
Chuck Carr was great..for a year

37red
03-06-2006, 09:13 AM
Was Pokey in bad physical condition or just not able to cope. I liked him at second and thought he'd get settled in somewhere. Maybe he's older than I was thinking.

flyer85
03-06-2006, 10:52 AM
Pokey needs to take Woemack with him.

TeamBoone
03-06-2006, 10:53 AM
I do wish he'd offer some sort of explanation. It feels like a cliff hanger.

RedFanAlways1966
03-06-2006, 10:54 AM
Was Pokey in bad physical condition or just not able to cope. I liked him at second and thought he'd get settled in somewhere. Maybe he's older than I was thinking.

Pokey is 32-years-old. He'll turn 33 on June 10. I am not sure of the physical nature of this "incident". Pokey tends to be more immature than most people were thinking.

I know he had a tragedy in his life (fiancee passed away unexpectedly)... but that happened over a decade ago. Since then he has done some things in life that just don't seem too smart or mature (and some seem selfish in nature).

Whatever it turns out to be, I hope he gets his act back together. I hate to see someone self destruct for whatever reason.

Spitball
03-06-2006, 03:13 PM
Pokey is 32-years-old. He'll turn 33 on June 10. I am not sure of the physical nature of this "incident". Pokey tends to be more immature than most people were thinking.

I know he had a tragedy in his life (fiancee passed away unexpectedly)... but that happened over a decade ago. Since then he has done some things in life that just don't seem too smart or mature (and some seem selfish in nature).

Whatever it turns out to be, I hope he gets his act back together. I hate to see someone self destruct for whatever reason.

This is from a recent AP story about Pokey's disappearance:

"The 32-year-old Reese, who grew up in a depressed neighborhood in Columbia, S.C., has been forced to cope with a succession of family tragedies. His fiancee died in a car crash in 1993. Three years later, the mother of his son, Naquawan, died while delivering a child fathered by another man. Naquawan went to live with his maternal grandmother and great-grandmother. Both women were murdered on Christmas Eve 1997."

I certainly hope this isn't another Alan Wiggins type story.

Spitball
03-06-2006, 03:25 PM
Hmmm...I went back and googled Alan Wiggins and found this blip.


Alan Wiggins; Baseball Player, 32

Published: January 9, 1991
Alan Wiggins, a once promising major league baseball player who undermined his career with drugs, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles Sunday night. He was 32 years old.

I know this isn't Pokey's story, but it wouldn't hurt to pray for the guy anyway.

Chip R
03-06-2006, 03:42 PM
Wiggins died of AIDS, IIRC. From what I've heard about Pokey, he liked to toke it up every now and then. Of course that doesn't mean he graduated to hard drugs.

Sea Ray
03-06-2006, 03:52 PM
I've read precious little about recent events in Pokey's life. His girlfriend issues happened before he left the Reds. The most recent issue for him is his shoulder injury. My guess is it's not feeling right and he just quit.

TeamBoone
03-06-2006, 07:01 PM
Would be nice if he told someone he was quitting.

Redsland
03-06-2006, 07:10 PM
Yeah.

He could've, oh, I don't know, said he had a bum shoulder or something.

;)

Sea Ray
03-06-2006, 08:04 PM
Would be nice if he told someone he was quitting.

I agree. This shows a complete lack of class and maturity.

I felt the same way when RBs Barry Sanders and Ricky Williams quit in the same manner in the NFL.

Jpup
03-07-2006, 03:02 AM
I agree. This shows a complete lack of class and maturity.

I felt the same way when RBs Barry Sanders and Ricky Williams quit in the same manner in the NFL.

Barry Sanders and Pokey Reese should never be mentioned in the same sentence. :eek: It's a little different.

jmcclain19
03-07-2006, 03:31 AM
I agree. This shows a complete lack of class and maturity.

I felt the same way when RBs Barry Sanders and Ricky Williams quit in the same manner in the NFL.

whoa there.

Barry quit long before the season began - and after 10 years of stellar play at the top of his field.

Pokey has a rep of being a quitter, this time he just decided to get it over with and do it as the season began instead of in the middle. This is just par for the course

Sea Ray
03-07-2006, 10:04 AM
whoa there.

Barry quit long before the season began - and after 10 years of stellar play at the top of his field.

Pokey has a rep of being a quitter, this time he just decided to get it over with and do it as the season began instead of in the middle. This is just par for the course

What do you mean long before the season began? Barry Sanders failed to show up to mandatory practices during the summer before the season began. He gave no explanation. He just disappeared to England. Barry took it to the 11th hour and then just didn't show up.

In this case, the season hasn't begun. The Marlins were practicing before Spring Training games started and Pokey went AWOL. Very similar circumstances.

Barry Sanders left his teammates and coaches hanging and never officially announced his intentions and he also tried to keep his signing bonus. The Lions had to take him to court and the judge had to explain to him that he can't keep a signing bonus for a multiyear contract he failed to fulfill.

No question Barry's career was much more noteworthy than Pokey's but that doesn't give him the right to walk out on his teammates.

pedro
03-07-2006, 10:24 AM
No question Barry's career was much more noteworthy than Pokey's but that doesn't give him the right to walk out on his teammates.

Sure it does. If he didn't need the money and didn;t want to play anymore why should he let himself become a cripple playing for a crappy team?

It just doesn't give him the right to keep the signing bonus.

flyer85
03-07-2006, 10:32 AM
Guys can walk out if they don't want to play anymore. Just don't expect another invite. Of course it you look at Pokey's career you have to wonder how much he really wanted to play in the first place. His career makes Reggie Sanders look like an ironman.

Sea Ray
03-07-2006, 10:56 AM
Sure it does. If he didn't need the money and didn;t want to play anymore why should he let himself become a cripple playing for a crappy team?

It just doesn't give him the right to keep the signing bonus.
I disagree. If he didn't want to play for a crappy team he could have told them he was retiring, in writing, preferably before the draft so they could properly plan. He didn't do any of that. He handled his retirement by not showing up to camp...no explanation...no communication with the Detroit Lions. Days later they tracked him down in Europe. You think being a star gives him the right to hang his team out to dry like that?

pedro
03-07-2006, 11:01 AM
I disagree. If he didn't want to play for a crappy team he could have told them he was retiring, in writing, preferably before the draft so they could properly plan. He didn't do any of that. He handled his retirement by not showing up to camp...no explanation...no communication with the Detroit Lions. Days later they tracked him down in Europe. You think being a star gives him the right to hang his team out to dry like that?

No, I think being an adult gives him the right to not do what he doesn't want to. It's just football.

I don't know what his motivations were for handling it the way he did but that's his perogative. I think he did a hell of a lot more for the Lions than they ever did for him. I sure don't feel sorry for the Lions.

pedro
03-07-2006, 11:10 AM
To play devils advocate I went and looked up the Lions 1999 season and ironically they did make the playoffs that year.

Nevertheless, perhaps the only thing Barry had decided at that point was that he wasn't going to come to training camp and that the decision to retire was a little longer coming.

KronoRed
03-07-2006, 01:22 PM
Guys can walk out if they don't want to play anymore. Just don't expect another invite. Of course it you look at Pokey's career you have to wonder how much he really wanted to play in the first place. His career makes Reggie Sanders look like an ironman.
Someone will give him another chance, he has that 99 season to fall back on and some GM will think "He'll repeat it for mE!"

Sea Ray
03-07-2006, 02:41 PM
No, I think being an adult gives him the right to not do what he doesn't want to. It's just football.

I don't know what his motivations were for handling it the way he did but that's his perogative. I think he did a hell of a lot more for the Lions than they ever did for him. I sure don't feel sorry for the Lions.

I agree that he had the right to retire but I disagree that it was his perogative to just blow off his team, not show up, and leave the country without giving his team any indication of what his intentions were

GAC
03-08-2006, 08:51 PM
I heard he has found employment as a hat model. ;)

http://www.chieftain.com/archive/2005/jan/5/sptNY169MARINERSREESE.jpg

Question:

Reese or Womack at 2B? I know, I know.... most would say neither (and I agree). But if you had to chose (at similar salaries) ;)

TRF
03-09-2006, 09:25 AM
I would go with Pokey. At least he offers otherworldly defense.

Chip R
03-09-2006, 09:41 AM
I'd go with Womack. At least he isn't a quitter.

TRF
03-09-2006, 10:50 AM
I'd rather Womack were a quitter.

MartyFan
03-09-2006, 10:54 AM
In this situation I would go with Womack.

Larkin Fan
03-09-2006, 12:12 PM
With Pokey you get great defense, but that also comes with a major attitude and overinflated ego.

KronoRed
03-09-2006, 12:28 PM
I'd rather have no SS then Pokey.

His attitude would be all over the team.

savafan
03-09-2006, 12:37 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/5391596

Ken Rosenthal / FOXSports.com


Second baseman Pokey Reese's brief stay with the Marlins ended with an unexplained disappearance, but the reason for his retirement is anything but a mystery.

Reese, 32, simply lost his passion for baseball, his agent, Mike Nicotera, said Tuesday night in an interview with FOXSports.com.

While Nicotera did not completely rule out a comeback, he said that Reese, a nine-year veteran, does not plan to play again.

"As Pokey said to me, I think it's time to go home and be with my family. When I no longer have the love for the game, then maybe it's time to move on,'" Nicotera said.

Thus, new Marlins manager Joe Girardi had it right last weekend when he said that if Reese was trying to determine his future, "maybe he doesn't want any outside influences."

Reese bolted the Marlins last Thursday and ended communication with club officials because he was contemplating the end of his career, Nicotera said.

The Marlins terminated Reese's one-year, $800,000 contract on Sunday, but the move was of little practical consequence; Reese no longer intended to play, anyway.

After leaving the Marlins, Reese drove home to Columbia, S.C., to discuss his future with his mother and grandmother, according to Nicotera. He isolated himself because, as Girardi suggested, "he wanted to see what was in his heart," Nicotera said.

Two days after Reese left camp, Marlins general manager Larry Beinfest told the team's beat reporters that he was "extremely disappointed" by Reese's lack of communication. The next day, Beinfest terminated Reese's contract.

Reese, knowing he frustrated club officials with his abrupt departure, plans to contact Girardi and Marlins assistant G.M. Michael Hill, the team executive with whom he had the most contact, Nicotera said. But as of Tuesday night, Hill said he had yet to hear from the player.

Injuries helped lead to Reese's decision; he missed all of last season with the Mariners after undergoing two operations on his right shoulder. He also missed seven weeks with the World Series champion Red Sox in 2004 due to a pulled ribcage muscle, returning in September as a reserve. Before getting injured, Reese had become a cult hero at Fenway Park while replacing the injured Nomar Garciaparra at shortstop.

Reese's happiest times were with the 1999 Reds, a team that won 96 games. The club, a tight-knit group, featured several high-character players with whom Reese became close, Nicotera said.

"That's what he thought baseball was like," Nicotera said. "Since then, for a number of reasons, I don't know that it ever got back to that for him. In Boston, he definitely enjoyed himself, but then he pulled the ribcage muscle. He didn't complain about being a bench player (after he returned). It was just different. I'm sure that stuff wore on him."

Reese signed with the Marlins in part because his mother could make the trip from Columbia to Miami to watch him play, Nicotera said. He grew up in extreme poverty and endured tragedies in his life, including the deaths of two of his children's mothers. He views his career as a gift.

"Pokey looks at it like, 'I came from nothing. I got more out of the game than I ever thought I'd get. When it's time, it's time. I can step down and know the game has been very good to me,"' Nicotera said.

"That's really the way he sees it. He's at peace with it. I don't want to portray it like he's in major turmoil. This was a very difficult decision for him. But he feels like he did the right thing."

37red
03-09-2006, 01:57 PM
thanks SAF, I wanted to know more........... and I understand more now.

TeamBoone
03-09-2006, 03:55 PM
I think it time I went home to be with my family.

Fine, but TELL SOMEONE!! I expected my daughter to do that when she was twelve... he's an adult.

37red
03-09-2006, 04:17 PM
TB, I understand your parental instincts but he's over 18 and may have more problems than just being worried about getting grounded. Sounds like life changing decisions, not just skipping out of work if ya know what I mean.

Chip R
03-09-2006, 04:27 PM
Fine, but TELL SOMEONE!! I expected my daughter to do that when she was twelve... he's an adult.

Some people are mature beyond their years. An 18 year old can have the maturity of a 30 year old. Unfortunately the opposite is true and Pokey is a prime example of that. A truly mature person would tell the team he's leaving camp to tend to some personal problems. He would let them know where he's going to be and that he will be OK. Zack Grienke left Royals camp because of some emotional issues he was going through this spring. The Royals knew why he was leaving and where he was going. That's the way to handle something like that and not go AWOL.

Sea Ray
03-09-2006, 04:38 PM
TB, I understand your parental instincts but he's over 18 and may have more problems than just being worried about getting grounded. Sounds like life changing decisions, not just skipping out of work if ya know what I mean.

It's even more easy for a ballplayer. All Pokey had to do was tell his agent and have the agent dump the bad news to the Marlins. He didn't even have to see anyone face to face. Tell the agent via e-mail, IM or phone answering machine at 3am. He chose the worst most immature way to handle this.

One more thing. How immature is it for him to leave $800,000? I know Pokey thinks he has plenty of money but I bet the day will come when he'll need that.

TeamBoone
03-09-2006, 04:57 PM
TB, I understand your parental instincts but he's over 18 and may have more problems than just being worried about getting grounded. Sounds like life changing decisions, not just skipping out of work if ya know what I mean.

Personal problems or not, he did skip out of work, 37. All I'm saying is that he should have notified his team that he was leaving, not just walk out with absolutely no communication with ANYONE!

Baseball is his job. Would you just leave your place of work for several days with no communication to them, even if you had personal issues to deal with? That what I thought.

37red
03-09-2006, 06:49 PM
He might have been having communication with his family.... He might have been having emotional problems or serious depression. Obviously you haven't experienced that type of situation or you would opt to give him a little room. When someone is having certain intense problems the job is the least of their worries, minimum wage to millions of dollars there are somtimes things that are more important. I don't know if he was thinking he'd rather deliver newspapers as opposed to working in professional baseball, I'm sure someone will tell me when they learn the answer to that. If he was just feeling that he would rather go fishing than show up for work then of course he should have given them notice, and get a bad reference. If it turns out to be more than that it's completely understandable, some would never understand that, but it's true.

GAC
03-09-2006, 08:36 PM
I'd rather Womack were a quitter.

:lol:

TeamBoone
03-09-2006, 09:10 PM
When my father died, I was devastated. But I called my work.

37red
03-10-2006, 09:32 AM
When my dad died I was devastated too, but self employed :)

Redsland
03-10-2006, 08:48 PM
One more thing. How immature is it for him to leave $800,000? I know Pokey thinks he has plenty of money but I bet the day will come when he'll need that.
Not only that, but after the contract expired, he'd have 10 years of service time and be eligible for the major league pension. Now, not so much.