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TeamBoone
03-11-2006, 02:05 PM
Saturday, March 11, 2006

Redsí Wilson sick and tired of being injured
Jim Massie / THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

SARASOTA, Fla. ó Paul Wilson needed only a moment yesterday to decide that patience never has been one of his particular virtues.

Eight and a half months removed from shoulder surgery that cost him most of the 2005 season with the Cincinnati Reds, Wilson has yet to pitch in an exhibition game this spring and can sense the clock ticking toward opening day.

He knows that setbacks are part of any rehabilitation. Wilson has traveled the same road before after surgeries to his shoulder in 1996 and right elbow in í99. Yet one part hasnít changed. He didnít like the view from the sidelines then. He likes it less now.

"I thought it would be different," Wilson said. "Itís not. Itís actually harder because I want to hurry up and be part of what these guys are going to start doing in a little while. I want to help out. Youíd think I would have more patience because Iím older now. I donít. The impatience is the same. In that regard, I havenít matured at all."

Beneath a wry smile, his face showed the frustration of a man stuck in a traffic jam two hours away from where he needs to be in 15 minutes. Blowing the horn wonít speed the pace.

"I feel fine," Wilson said. "Itís coming. Itís not going as fast as Iíd like it, but itís coming. Iím on a five-day schedule ó pitch, day off, side day, day off, day off, pitch. The last month has been up and down. Weíve had a bad week. Then weíve had a decent week. Weíre waiting on my strength to get better."

The wait is complicated by the state of the Cincinnati starting rotation. Aaron Harang missed his scheduled start Thursday with inflammation in the right shoulder, and Eric Milton continues to try to quiet down a sore right calf.

Reds manager Jerry Narron has said he wonít begin to worry until after March 15, but contingency plans already are chugging along. Tommy Phelps, Ben Kozlowski, Justin Germano, Michael Gosling and Phil Dumatrait are among the pitchers getting looks as potential fill-ins for Wilson or the others.

"Thatís a lot of starters," Narron said. "Until (Wilson) is back, you move on and try to get somebody to step up and fill that role. Itís a great opportunity for these guys to get a chance to pitch this spring. It doesnít happen very often where youíve got guys that you donít plan on starting spring training games starting for you."

Wilson knows what has to improve before his name returns to the mix.

"My body is in great shape," he said. "Iím ready to go. Iím just waiting on my arm strength. You build it just by throwing. Weíre doing our Jobe weights. Weíre doing our specific muscle weights and every other weight known to man. But mostly weíre just throwing."

To that regimen, Wilson followed a long bullpen session yesterday by pitching two innings of live batting practice for teammates Dewayne Wise, Jacob Cruz and Andy Abad.

"This was a good day," Wilson said. "After the roller coaster ride Iíve been on, Iíll take all the good days I can get."

He hasnít given up on being ready by April even if the prospects are slim. Patience, easy or not, is the only available road.

"I will know when my arm is strong enough by how the hitters are reacting to the ball," Wilson said. "Itís not going to be 95 mph. But I have to be able to compete. I may be 70 percent right now. I donít know. I canít put a number on it. But Iíll know when Iím competitive."


jmassie@dispatch.com


http://www.columbusdispatch.com/reds/reds.php?story=dispatch/2006/03/11/20060311-E9-02.html

Falls City Beer
03-11-2006, 02:06 PM
Hey Paul, I bet if you retire, a lot of those injuries would go away.

Aronchis
03-11-2006, 03:04 PM
Paul needs to retire and the Reds need to shift through the fluff(guys like Germano). Goodbye Paulie. Ditto for Milton.

flyer85
03-11-2006, 07:41 PM
Amazing how pitchers tire of injuries but not of getting paid big money for poor performance.

captainmorgan07
03-11-2006, 07:43 PM
exactly flyer85

IslandRed
03-11-2006, 08:06 PM
Edit: Never mind, it's not worth arguing over.

Ravenlord
03-11-2006, 08:14 PM
Amazing how pitchers tire of injuries but not of getting paid big money for poor performance.
that's more of the team's fault. say Jeff D'Amico was offered a 2-year, $13,000,000 contract from the Yankees, do you really think he would turn that down for the minor league contract and non-invitation to spring training that he's received?

IslandRed
03-11-2006, 08:20 PM
that's more of the team's fault. say Jeff D'Amico was offered a 2-year, $13,000,000 contract from the Yankees, do you really think he would turn that down for the minor league contract and non-invitation to spring training that he's received?

OK, you said it nicer than I did in the edited post. :thumbup: I don't think flyer85 really meant to insinuate that Paul Wilson had some sort of character flaw, but that's how it came across.

flyer85
03-11-2006, 08:23 PM
that's more of the team's fault. as BP has pointed out about the Reds, they seem to have a fascination with mediocre performance and below.

I have no doubt that Wilson is a tough guy and a nice guy but his career has been defined by injury interspersed with below average performance. The Reds should use the season as opportunity to find out about guys like Germano, Belisle or Gosling. There is zero upside with Wilson. Does anyone truly believe he will be anything but well below average coming off another major arm injury.

flyer85
03-11-2006, 08:26 PM
OK, you said it nicer than I did in the edited post. :thumbup: I don't think flyer85 really meant to insinuate that Paul Wilson had some sort of character flaw, but that's how it came across.Wilson is obviously a good guy but in the end that doesn't help him get people out. I would have thought he would have tired of the injuries a long time ago. My point was the only reason he is still trying is because he is owed $4M+ for the upcoming season, there isn't any altruism in it.

Ravenlord
03-11-2006, 09:02 PM
Does anyone truly believe he will be anything but well below average coming off another major arm injury.
below average doesn't begin to describe what i think willl happen. however, i do think Wilson isn't pitching because he's under contract, but rather he believes he can still do it "effectively."

not sure how the weird double post happened.

flyer85
03-11-2006, 09:05 PM
but rather he believes he can still do it "effectively."if that's the case he is an eternal optimist because Wilson hasn't pitched effectively at any time in his career except maybe the first half season he pitched with the Rays.

red-in-la
03-11-2006, 09:40 PM
Just because we would all be tempted to take money we did not earn, especially the amounts we are talking, does NOT make it right.

If you spnd 5 dollars in a store, and give the clerk a 10 to pay, and he gives you 15 back, thinking you gave him a 20, is it right to keep the money and walk away?

This is probably the biggest reason I now prefer football way, way, way over baseball. Players earn their money. OK, maybe they get too much money but we aren't talking about pay scales....we are talking about pay for no work.

Oh, sorry, I forgot to put in the little and things.

flyer85
03-11-2006, 09:51 PM
I don't begrudge Wilson his money. Afterall, nobody put a gun to DanOs head(other than himself). I think the Reds would be better served giving the innings to a young pitcher.

KronoRed
03-11-2006, 10:49 PM
below average doesn't begin to describe what i think willl happen.
I just hope the Reds are smart enough to put him out of his misery if it comes to that.

Heath
03-11-2006, 10:51 PM
I think it's a well-written headline. I'm sick and tired of Paul Wilson being injured as well.

Is it worth tossing the Lizard out there every fifth day? Couldn't be worse.

IslandRed
03-11-2006, 11:01 PM
Just because we would all be tempted to take money we did not earn, especially the amounts we are talking, does NOT make it right.

If you spnd 5 dollars in a store, and give the clerk a 10 to pay, and he gives you 15 back, thinking you gave him a 20, is it right to keep the money and walk away?


No offense, but that's a terrible analogy.

A better one would be, say you worked at the store and got hurt while on the job, doing the things your job normally entails, and thus couldn't perform the job for awhile. I suppose you could argue your boss has no obligation to keep paying you while you're on the shelf, but does it make you a bad person for taking the money if he does?

On the larger issue, guaranteed contracts cut both ways. Sometimes a player gets money he doesn't earn, sometimes he doesn't get money he did. Anyway, an industry that has a draft and a reserve clause doesn't have much of a leg to stand on, morally speaking... football does some things better but there are trade-offs. If we were an NFL club, we could cut players after they're hurt but we'd have given them a lot more money up-front, and teams still have to deal with dead money counting against the cap.

Caveat Emperor
03-12-2006, 04:44 AM
Sunday, March 12, 2006

RedsZone's Caveat Emperor sick and tired of Paul Wilson (among others) (3/12)
Jim Massie / THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

TOLEDO, Oh. — Legendary (in his own mind) RedsZone poster Caveat Emperor is sick and tired of all the excuses given by Paul Wilson.

Fifteen and a half months after watching the Reds make yet another pitching blunder by signing Wilson to a guaranteed contract, Caveat is eager to see the Reds just admit failure and cut Wilson before spring training ends.

He knows that watching crummy pitching is just another part of being a Reds fan. Caveat has been watching Reds baseball for almost two decades, and has maybe seen a half dozen arms that he would characterize as worth keeping (2 of those arms were on the same guy: Jose Rijo). Yet one part hasn’t changed. He thinks the pitching last year stunk, and he thinks it stinks again this year.

"I knew it would be no different," Caveat said. "Actually, that's not accurate; there's simply no way for the team to be any worse than it was last year. Although, based on the early excuses and whining we're seeing from Paul Wilson, it might be a really long season with really awful ERAs. I mean, we're talking ballooning faster than a depressed girl in a Haggan Daaz factory."

Beneath a wry smile, his face showed the frustration of a man stuck rooting for a baseball team with a velocity-challenged rotation that seems more at home in an episode of "I Love the 80s" (Especially the mid-to-high 80s) than on a baseball diamond.

"I'd say I felt fine -- but it's hard to feel fine when you've got Paul Wilson and Eric Milton to look forward to two times per week."


:thumbup:

wheels
03-12-2006, 10:17 AM
I honsetly believe that Wilson and his injuries will be on a very short leash.

Krivsky's got a lot of trash to take out.

TeamBoone
03-13-2006, 10:05 PM
Monday, March 13, 2006

Wilson makes progress, one pitch at a time
Impatience is starter's biggest foe after surgery
BY KEVIN KELLY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA, Fla. - The crowd shifted from the bullpen, through an opening in the chain-link fence, to a nearby field where dew still clung to the grass.

There, a sinewy pitcher strolled to the mound alone with a ball in hand and a good sweat already working.

Teammates, trainers, coaches, the manager and team doctor clustered around the batting cage Friday morning at the Reds' spring training complex for the conclusion of Paul Wilson's 75-pitch workout.

Jacob Cruz split time in the cage with Aaron Holbert and Dewayne Wise attempting to smack the sinkerballs Wilson hurled at them.

"The action and movement on his ball was pretty substantial. His ball was moving around everywhere," Cruz said a day later. "The speed is not there. Where he could probably get away with it, he's not quite there yet."

No timetable has been established for Wilson's return from the June 17 surgery to mend a torn rotator and frayed labrum in his right shoulder.

Recovery can range from eight to 10 months, Reds medical director Dr. Timothy Kremchek said.

"I told Paul there is no greater satisfaction for me than to be able to watch him throw like he did (Friday) and know that he's not quite there yet, but he's darn close," Kremchek said. "Is he ready to pitch in the big leagues now? No. But doggone it, he's going to be."

Reds manager Jerry Narron also was pleased.

"I really didn't expect him to have any arm speed at all," he said. "I was happy with the arm speed he was showing."

Coming back from a serious arm injury is a grueling affair that tests a patient's physical and mental limits daily.

That the Reds haven't given him a set deadline, Wilson said, has helped.

"Jerry and Wayne (Krivsky, general manager) said to do it right the first time, and we are," Wilson said. "We're walking that fine line of pushing it so hard and trying to challenge it, but at the same time not kill it. Because every time we kill it, it takes a week and a half or a week of no throwing to calm it down."

The 33-year-old knows the rehab process all too well.

A similar shoulder surgery in 1996 and "Tommy John" elbow surgery in 1999 forced the one-time Mets phenom with a 96 mph fastball to reinvent himself. Now he's a sinkerball pitcher more reliant on deception and pitch location than speed.

"You think I would be more patient," Wilson said, "because I'm older now and a little more secure in who I am as a baseball player."

But patience is an impossibility for somebody as competitive and beholden to his employer as Wilson.

After the 2004 season, when he led the Reds in starts (29), innings (1832/3) and wins (11), the team awarded Wilson a two-year contract worth $8.2 million. There is a club option for 2007.

So far the investment's return is nine starts, a 1-5 record and a 7.77 ERA over 461/3 innings.

"There's a deep desire to contribute," Wilson said. "I felt like I was just trying to survive in '96. Now I feel like I'm trying to help this team win a championship. I want to pull my weight. I want to help these guys. I want to be part of this.

"Not that I didn't want to be part of it in '96. It means more now. It just does."

Wilson punished his body this offseason and lost 20 pounds off a 6-foot-5 frame that carried 211 pounds last year. The Reds medical staff would even like to see him regain some weight.

"Aerobically he's in great shape, which is terrific," Kremchek said. "His arm strength is continuing to improve as he throws."

Wilson has followed a structured rehabilitation program since completion of the surgery. He also arrived at the spring complex in mid-January to begin on-field workouts.

There are resistance exercises with rubber tubes and 5-pound weights. There is conditioning - long distance running, abdominal and back work - and lots of stretching.

Wilson's throwing regimen depends on how his arm feels and responds after every mound session.

His next scheduled date against hitters is Thursday, when he'll start mixing in a few breaking balls.

"We're trying to get off the mound as many times as we can," Wilson said. "At the same time giving it enough rest in between to get stronger. That's the thing right now.

"My body is ready to go. We're just waiting on my arm strength. The only way to do that is by throwing off the mound. Throwing off the mound repeatedly."

E-mail kkelly@enquirer.com



http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060313/SPT04/603130357/1071