PDA

View Full Version : Worst way to lose a no-hitter?



max venable
03-16-2006, 12:27 PM
Suppose you're an MLB pitcher. And you're in the 9th inning, two outs, and one guy stands between you and a no-no. What would be the LAST way you'd want to lose your no-no?

HR that ties the game?

A walk and then an HR that wins the game?

How 'bout this: your catcher drops a pop foul that would have ended the game. On the next pitch, the batter gets a base knock.

Other ideas?

IslandRed
03-16-2006, 12:30 PM
Having two strikes on the hitter and then he lines one off my nose. That would suck.

flyer85
03-16-2006, 12:47 PM
HR that ties the game? with two out in the 9th. That happened to Soto back in his day. Hendrick of the Cards hit a 9th inning HR to tie the game. Reds won it in the bottom of the 9th.

Roy Tucker
03-16-2006, 12:49 PM
Give up a lead-off HR to Johnny Lewis in the 11th to lose the game.

Gainesville Red
03-16-2006, 01:15 PM
I think the bloop single to someone like Eckstein in the 9th would make me break the most stuff in the clubhouse afterwards. I mean if Pujols gets you, hey that happens, if Eckstein or So Taguchi gets you that's tragic. Or how about losing it on a grounder in the 9th that Aurilia just couldn't get to on account that he's a statue.

M2
03-16-2006, 01:20 PM
Give up a lead-off HR to Johnny Lewis in the 11th to lose the game.

Exactly.

Red Leader
03-16-2006, 01:21 PM
Two outs in the 9th, you look up at your wife in the stands to see her making out with some drunk fat guy that you recognize as her ex-boyfriend, who was on your rival team in the minors, and then not being able to concentrate and focus to get the last out, and end up walking a .287 OBP hitter like Tony Womack, only to give up a game losing HR to a player like Rich Aurilia batting in the lead off spot, and then see your wife and her ex-boyfriend give you the finger as you hang your head and walk off the field.

That would be the worst.

UKFlounder
03-16-2006, 01:29 PM
You're winning the game with a large lead, and somebody bunts for a hit.


Or a ground ball that is bobbled (or a bad throw) but the official scorer rules it a hit instead of an error.

Coffeybro
03-16-2006, 01:30 PM
I'd say losing it to a homer given up to a rookie relief pitcher that is only batting because no one is left to sub in. Its a very Long shot to happen but that would be the worse.

KronoRed
03-16-2006, 02:13 PM
Two outs in the 9th, you look up at your wife in the stands to see her making out with some drunk fat guy that you recognize as her ex-boyfriend, who was on your rival team in the minors, and then not being able to concentrate and focus to get the last out, and end up walking a .287 OBP hitter like Tony Womack, only to give up a game losing HR to a player like Rich Aurilia batting in the lead off spot, and then see your wife and her ex-boyfriend give you the finger as you hang your head and walk off the field.

That would be the worst.
..at least you can then bean them both with a fastball :devil:

Highlifeman21
03-16-2006, 02:26 PM
Watching something drop in front of WMP or Griffey since their defensive range is well, you get the point...

Caseyfan21
03-16-2006, 02:29 PM
You're pitching for the Dayton Dragons. You get taken out with 2 outs in the ninth because you've reached your pitch limit of 75.

Oh, that was last year...:D

princeton
03-16-2006, 02:36 PM
double to Cookie (cookie?) Lavagetto

ochre
03-16-2006, 02:38 PM
You're on the mound, eyeing the signs from the catcher when the opposing team's student section begins chanting "Veronica! Veronica!" along with your cell phone number.

max venable
03-16-2006, 03:05 PM
Nice to see all you RedsZoners thinking outside the box on this
one. :thumbup:

fun responses.

oneupper
03-16-2006, 03:10 PM
Giving up a double to Joe Adcock after 12 perfect innings.

CTA513
03-16-2006, 03:22 PM
Having someone like Pena blast a line drive that hits you in your crotch and not being able to throw the ball to first because your in so much pain?

pedro
03-16-2006, 03:27 PM
12 perfect innings

* May 26, 1959: In a singular performance, Harvey Haddix of the Pirates pitches a perfect game against Milwaukee for 12 innings, only to lose in the 13th. Felix Mantilla opens the last inning by reaching base on an error. A sacrifice and an intentional walk to Hank Aaron brings up Joe Adcock, who hits one out of the park in right-CF for an apparent 3–0 victory. Aaron pulls a "Merkle," leaving the field, and Adcock passes him on the basepaths. Both are called out as Mantilla scores. Lew Burdette goes all 13 innings for his 8th win, scattering 12 hits. As a consequence of the baserunning in the 13th, the Braves leave an National League-record one runner on base. Haddix's gem makes him the 9th pitcher to lose a no-hitter in extra innings; A combined effort of three Reds pitcher, on May 26, 1956, was the last. Making Haddix's effort even more remarkable is the fact that the Braves hitter knew what was coming. In 1993, Bob Buhl admitted that the Braves pitchers were stealing the signs from Smoky Burgess, who could not crouch down all the way. They would place a towel on the bullpen fence in such a way to signal fastball or breaking ball. From the Baseball Chronology, at Baseball Library

dougdirt
03-16-2006, 03:42 PM
hitting someone, then having them charge the mound in the 8th inning and you lose your composure? hey pedro martinez, how are ya?

max venable
03-16-2006, 03:49 PM
with two out in the 9th. That happened to Soto back in his day. Hendrick of the Cards hit a 9th inning HR to tie the game. Reds won it in the bottom of the 9th.
I totally remember listening to that game on the radio in my bedroom.

Reds Nd2
03-16-2006, 04:39 PM
Giving up a single to a guy named Deb Garms in the 4th inning.

max venable
03-16-2006, 05:06 PM
Giving up a single to a guy named Deb Garms in the 4th inning.
Duh! Why didn't I think of that? :confused:

Reds Nd2
03-16-2006, 05:14 PM
Duh! Why didn't I think of that? :confused:

Vander Meer is the only pitcher in major league history to have thrown back-to-back no-hitters. The Cincinnati hurler no-hit the Boston Bees 3-0 on June 11, 1938 and followed by no-hitting the Dodgers 6-0 on June 15. The latter contest was the first night game ever played at Brooklyn's Ebbets Field. In his next start, Vander Meer did not allow a hit until Boston's Deb Garms singled in the fourth inning, ending Vander Meer's string of hitless innings at a National League record 21.

http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseballlibrary/ballplayers/M/Meer_Johnny_Vander.stm

klw
03-16-2006, 05:14 PM
1. opposite field single to EE :) or

2. Hit that could have been called a hit or error. If it is a hit you subconsciously blame your teammate and have also been robbed, it is ruled an error then your game will be cheapened.

3. Baseball changes the definition of what qualifies for a no-hitter and years after you retired and got the "NOHTTR" vanity plate you realise it was all a fraud. You then have to explain to your 5 yr old grandson that you didn't lie to them about having thrown a no-hitter. The brat then kicks you in the shin and runs away crying.

minus5
03-16-2006, 05:42 PM
Remembering after the second pitch that you're Eric Milton:explode:

klw
03-16-2006, 05:51 PM
Remembering after the second pitch that you're Eric Milton:explode:


Or make that 125 pitches.
http://www.baseball-almanac.com/boxscore/09111999.shtml

Hap
03-16-2006, 08:00 PM
http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B08240CHN1983.htm

Giving up a single to Eddie Milner.

Falls City Beer
03-16-2006, 08:49 PM
On a first inning grand slam following two walks and hit batsman.

paintmered
03-16-2006, 08:50 PM
Career ending injury by blowing out an arm.

Heath
03-16-2006, 08:54 PM
Giving up a single to a guy named Deb Garms in the 4th inning.

What about a 9th inning single to Wallace Johnson.....

Ugh.

Heath
03-16-2006, 08:55 PM
Having two strikes on the hitter and then he lines one off my nose. That would suck.

I'd score it an error :D

dman
03-16-2006, 10:01 PM
If we're just talking no-hitters and not perfect games here, for me it would be having command through a 0-0 tie and losing control in the 9th to eventually walk 4 in a row, thereby walking home the winning run.

RFS62
03-16-2006, 10:12 PM
» June 22, 1947: Ewell Blackwell just misses pitching back-to-back no-hitters when Eddie Stanky of the Brooklyn Dodgers singles with one out in the ninth inning. Blackwell then gets Al Gionfriddo before Jackie Robinson bangs out a second single. Blackwell wins 4-0, his ninth straight win to improve to 11-2. Stanky's hit ends Blackwell's hitless-inning skein at 19.

Coffeybro
03-16-2006, 11:22 PM
In 1993, Bob Buhl admitted that the Braves pitchers were stealing the signs from Smoky Burgess,

After seeing Smoky Burgess name, I thought some of you may find this interesting. Some may already know that our grandfather, A.T. Coffey pitched in the minors for the Forest City Owls in the Western Carolina League back in 1948 and '49. Smoky Burgess was one of the catchers during this part of this time and a friend of our Grandfather's. I first heard about this when I was in high school still collecting baseball cards and showed a classic reprint that was of Smoky because he was from Caroleen which is about 3 miles from our old house.

Yachtzee
03-17-2006, 01:31 AM
Getting hit in the crotch on a comebacker to the mound.

Yachtzee
03-17-2006, 01:31 AM
with two out in the 9th. That happened to Soto back in his day. Hendrick of the Cards hit a 9th inning HR to tie the game. Reds won it in the bottom of the 9th.

I was at that game. Stupid George Hendrick.

SteelSD
03-17-2006, 01:41 AM
12 perfect innings

* May 26, 1959: In a singular performance, Harvey Haddix of the Pirates pitches a perfect game against Milwaukee for 12 innings, only to lose in the 13th. Felix Mantilla opens the last inning by reaching base on an error. A sacrifice and an intentional walk to Hank Aaron brings up Joe Adcock, who hits one out of the park in right-CF for an apparent 30 victory. Aaron pulls a "Merkle," leaving the field, and Adcock passes him on the basepaths. Both are called out as Mantilla scores. Lew Burdette goes all 13 innings for his 8th win, scattering 12 hits. As a consequence of the baserunning in the 13th, the Braves leave an National League-record one runner on base. Haddix's gem makes him the 9th pitcher to lose a no-hitter in extra innings; A combined effort of three Reds pitcher, on May 26, 1956, was the last. Making Haddix's effort even more remarkable is the fact that the Braves hitter knew what was coming. In 1993, Bob Buhl admitted that the Braves pitchers were stealing the signs from Smoky Burgess, who could not crouch down all the way. They would place a towel on the bullpen fence in such a way to signal fastball or breaking ball. From the Baseball Chronology, at Baseball Library

That's the worst lost No-Hitter ever for sure. I can't even imagine a pitcher retiring 36 straight hitters in a game to begin with. But to do it and lose? Unfathomable. Someone may eventually break Vander Meer's record of 2 straight no-no's. But Haddix did something that no one will ever again achieve in a single MLB game.