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KearnsyEars
03-27-2006, 11:38 AM
No mention of us as contending. This is just classic.

Cards contenders despite so-so offseason

By Jerry Crasnick
ESPN.com


JUPITER, Fla. -- Excitement builds and emotions crest in the weeks before a ballpark's debut. Just don't expect St. Louis manager Tony La Russa to get all Dick Vermeil-ish over something as mundane as a change of workplace. You'd have better luck tapping La Russa's sentimental side by mentioning the plight of orphaned cats and dogs.



La Russa was hanging around the batting cage with reporters Thursday when talk turned to the Cardinals' transition to the new Busch Stadium. What's he going to miss most about the old Busch?

La Russa quickly mentioned the antiquated plumbing, which sprang into action with a belching, groaning sound more typically associated with space shuttle liftoffs.



"I should have taped that noise so I could pipe it into the new place," La Russa said. "Take it to Steven Spielberg and get him to put it on Dolby for me."



The Cardinals will christen the new Busch Stadium, with its wider concourses, improved sight lines, gourmet food offerings and state-of-the art bathroom fixtures, on April 10 when the Milwaukee Brewers visit St. Louis. The local fervor is predictably high. As of two weeks ago, the team had sold about 3.4 million of the roughly 3.5 million tickets available this season.



"It'll be a very fan-friendly ballpark," La Russa said. "But they won't be too friendly if we're getting beat."



Welcome to the home of the National League's best team, where tradition reigns, expectations are high, the manager's mood tends to hinge on the results of today's game, and the players are conditioned to go along for the ride.



The Cardinals have had a nice run since 2004. They're coming off consecutive 100-win seasons for the first time since they did it three straight years from 1942 to 1944. Last year, they produced a Most Valuable Player in Albert Pujols and a Cy Young Award winner in Chris Carpenter and ranked third in the league in runs scored and first in ERA. The Cardinals scored 171 more runs than they allowed, easily the biggest gap in the majors.



Although the Braves are always a factor and the Mets are attracting plenty of attention this spring, lots of front-office people think St. Louis is still the club to beat in the National League. Still, it has been a challenging winter for the Cardinals. Fans who looked forward to a big splash weren't happy when the offseason produced only a series of ripples. The Cardinals finished second to Toronto in a bid to sign A.J. Burnett, then spent their money on reclamation projects and players with injury histories and unfulfilled potential.

"I understood people's frustration," general manager Walt Jocketty said. "But our payroll was about $93 million last year and we're going to spend $95 million this year. That's plenty of money. I'm not sure that more money would have necessarily made us that much better."



AP Photo/James A. Finley
In his first 29 spring at-bats, Scott Rolen had nine hits -- one for extra bases. The team's new acquisitions have been a mixed bag. Sidney Ponson, cut loose by Baltimore for well-documented bad behavior, beat out prospect Anthony Reyes for a spot in the rotation. Outfielder Juan Encarnacion, who signed a three-year, $15 million contract, just returned from the World Baseball Classic. The Cardinals think his 2005 numbers (.287, 16 homers, 76 RBI) will improve now that he has left spacious Dolphins Stadium for a more neutral offensive park.

Second base is more problematic. Junior Spivey hit .149 with an alarming 17 whiffs in his first 47 Grapefruit League at-bats, and the Cardinals have to determine whether he's actually that bad or simply is still kicking off the rust after missing 188 games with injuries the past two seasons.

Amid speculation linking the Cardinals to alternatives ranging from Alfonso Soriano to Tony Graffanino, Jocketty maintains that the solution resides somewhere in camp. The Cardinals have a week to decide whether the second-base job will go to Spivey, Hector Luna, Aaron Miles or some combination thereof.



The team also is monitoring left field, where Larry Bigbie's foot injury might lead to more playing time for So Taguchi.



For believers in the concept of team chemistry, this season figured to be a transitional period for the Cardinals. Larry Walker retired and spent the spring as a coach for Team Canada in the WBC. Reggie Sanders and Mark Grudzielanek are now in Kansas City, and Matt Morris signed a three-year deal with San Francisco.

The departed players had what third baseman Scott Rolen calls "big personalities," but the Cardinals have grown accustomed to a shifting clubhouse dynamic in recent years. Players from Woody Williams to Mike Matheny to ultra-chatty Steve Kline have come and gone, and the Cardinals have adapted.

"Last year, we joked around as a team and had people running around doing stuff," Rolen said. "The year before, Kline was running around doing stuff. Maybe this year nobody will be running around doing stuff. Maybe it'll be a more subdued, quiet clubhouse and we'll win 110 games. Who knows?"



The Cardinals' season ultimately could hinge on the performance of their second- and third-most productive hitters. First, there's Rolen, who played only 56 games last year after blowing out his left shoulder in a collision with Hee-Seop Choi.

Rolen received a positive report from Dr. Tim Kremchek before camp, but he knows he'll have to be diligent all season to avoid backsliding. His rehab program features a mix of stretching, strength training and periodic neck massages to work out the kinks.



In Florida, Rolen has been fine in the field and tentative at the plate. A scout observed that he's hitting a lot of balls to right field, predictable for a player recovering from two surgeries. Cardinals hitting coach Hal McRae recently told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that he doesn't expect the real Scott Rolen to emerge until June. And Rolen seems to have no idea what's in store for him.



"I can hit. I can field. I can play," Rolen said. "I'm healthy in the sense that I'm not hurt, and that's all I'm going for ask for. I sat on the shelf doing nothing for most of last year, and this is a lot better than the alternative.

"A lot of people ask me, 'Is your power going to go down?' Hell, I don't know. I hope not. I hope it goes the other way."



The other source of concern is center fielder Jim Edmonds, who woke up one day in November with a mysterious numbness in his right, or non-throwing, forearm. Doctors initially surmised that Edmonds might have tennis elbow and now attribute the problem to inflammation around the nerve in his elbow. Edmonds had a cortisone shot earlier this winter, followed by two MRIs.



Edmonds thinks the problem might be the result of too many wrist curls in the weight room. Strangely enough, the injury doesn't affect his ability to hit a baseball. It's more an issue in day-to-day life. There was a point last winter when Edmonds had problems tying his shoes or lifting a plate of food. But he's learning to cope.



"It's getting a little too much attention right now, but that's how it is when you go to the doctor," Edmonds said. "If I can't feel my forearm for the rest of my life, I'll be OK. There are worse things than that."



The common refrain is that the NL Central talent gap has narrowed, but that remains to be seen. Unless Roger Clemens returns, the Astros might not be stronger. Until Mark Prior, Kerry Wood and Wade Miller actually appear in games, the Cubs haven't improved. And Milwaukee and Pittsburgh, bottom feeders on the rise, have combined for one .500 season in 13 years and finished an aggregate 52 games behind St. Louis in 2005.



How vulnerable can the Cardinals be? They have baseball's premier stat machine in Pujols; a first-rate rotation with Carpenter, Mark Mulder, Jeff Suppan, Jason Marquis and Ponson; and a proven closer, Jason Isringhausen, backed up by new set-up man Braden Looper. Now all that's left is staying healthy and hoping the team's winning culture brings out the best in players like Ponson and Encarnacion, with their enigmatic reputations and spotty résumés.



"I heard a lot of criticism over what we did this winter, but it's not my money," Rolen said. "I don't own the club. I look around, and we still have a good team here. We just have a different mix now. We'll have to try and make it work."



They usually do. Even if the sinks and toilets are quieter in St. Louis this year, the Cardinals still should make their share of noise.

TOBTTReds
03-27-2006, 11:41 AM
That is because we wont contend. Therefore we weren't mentioned.

KearnsyEars
03-27-2006, 11:48 AM
We have every bit the shot that the Brewers and Pirates do!

I forget, do they have a baseball team in Pittsburgh? Isn't that a football town?

redsfan30
03-27-2006, 11:50 AM
We have every bit the shot that the Brewers and Pirates do!

I forget, do they have a baseball team in Pittsburgh? Isn't that a football town?
Pittsburgh and Milwaukee's pitching is light years ahead of ours. That's why it's percieved that they have shots and we don't.

KearnsyEars
03-27-2006, 11:53 AM
I dunno, I guess I just feel like it is a wide open division, a crapshoot, that we all have a shot to win it.

vaticanplum
03-27-2006, 12:06 PM
The cardinals have completely overshadowed the coverage of this division for a few years now, justifiably so in my opinion.

There is no way we are contending this year, and I do think that we have problems of a magnitude that even Pittsburgh and Milwaukee don't. That said, I do think that the Reds' strengths (which do actually exist) are sometimes overlooked on the national radar. But something like this...this is more just, can a couple of other NL Central teams come anywhere close to the Cards. And, though I think the division is more open than last year, that is the predominant question with this division.

M2
03-27-2006, 12:08 PM
We have every bit the shot that the Brewers and Pirates do!

Pittsburgh yes, Milwaukee no. The Brewers have vaulted way past the Reds.

TOBTTReds
03-27-2006, 12:13 PM
Yup M2, I think the brews get the wild card. Man those youngsters are gonna be good.

I think Kearnsy has his Red goggles on again.

vaticanplum
03-27-2006, 12:18 PM
I think the Brewers are a little overrated this year. Maybe a great first half, then a decline, chalk it up to experience and they'll be out gangbusters next year.

I'm going to go all out and say that the wild card doesn't come from the Central this year.

M2
03-27-2006, 12:21 PM
I think the Brewers are a little overrated this year. Maybe a great first half, then a decline, chalk it up to experience and they'll be out gangbusters next year.

I'm going to go all out and say that the wild card doesn't come from the Central this year.

Time will tell. The Brewers' playoff chances probably hinge on Ben Sheets' right arm. That said, I'm jealous of what that team's been able to put together. Doug Melvin's done a brilliant job out there.

Falls City Beer
03-27-2006, 12:45 PM
I agree with vatican. First the Brewers have to learn how to win (oops, there I go with the nebulous talk again). There's something just brutal, utterly brutal about keeping your perenially bad teams over .500 for long stretches. This will be the learning season, I agree, vatican. Getting to .500 last season isn't really much of a benchmark. Winning and continuing to win takes great skill and depth.

Plus, I am incredibly unenthusiastic about their offense. And frankly, their bullpen.

RedFanAlways1966
03-27-2006, 01:04 PM
I dunno, I guess I just feel like it is a wide open division, a crapshoot, that we all have a shot to win it.

I like your attitude! :beerme:

The REDS might be the George Mason of MLB this year. I won't bet money on that happening, but the REDS are tied for 1st place right now.

Remember who the favs were in the WBC. I think those countries has initials like U.S.A and/or D.R..

Okay... I am out of analogies. We expect the worse, but hope for the best.

M2
03-27-2006, 01:07 PM
Plus, I am incredibly unenthusiastic about their offense. And frankly, their bullpen.

I like the offense quite a bit. It's got OB, speed, power and depth. It was the 6th highest scoring offense in the NL last season and it's only getting better.

I also like the young heat in that bullpen.

The 2005 White Sox, 2003 Marlins and 2002 Angels didn't seem to have to learn how to win. They just went out and did it. The Brewers will be a good team this year. It's only a matter of how good. Man do I wish the Reds had that problem.

Joseph
03-27-2006, 01:09 PM
Fearless prediction sure to go wrong....the Reds will finish ahead of the Brewers this year.

SteelSD
03-27-2006, 01:19 PM
I like the offense quite a bit. It's got OB, speed, power and depth. It was the 6th highest scoring offense in the NL last season and it's only getting better.

I also like the young heat in that bullpen.

The 2005 White Sox, 2003 Marlins and 2002 Angels didn't seem to have to learn how to win. They just went out and did it. The Brewers will be a good team this year. It's only a matter of how good. Man do I wish the Reds had that problem.

Yep. J.J. Hardy's got a full season under his belt now. Weeks and Fielder are ready to contribute. Koskie should improve his 2005 numbers and Jenkins, Lee, Clark, and Gross are a pretty decent OF. Looking around that offensive team, it's very disciplined. VERY disciplined.

Nice collection of ready-now top prospect talent and underrated offensive vets. If this isn't the year they end up in the top two or three NL offensive clubs, next year should be.

M2
03-27-2006, 01:26 PM
Yep. J.J. Hardy's got a full season under his belt now. Weeks and Fielder are ready to contribute. Koskie should improve his 2005 numbers and Jenkins, Lee, Clark, and Gross are a pretty decent OF. Looking around that offensive team, it's very disciplined. VERY disciplined.

Don't forget about Corey Hart in that OF mix too.

Strikes Out Looking
03-27-2006, 01:53 PM
The Reds won't finish last in the division. Two years ago, the Reds led the division until mid-June with a worse pitching staff then they have now (some of you may disagree, but I think the present staff has a much better upside than that one did).

I'm not ready to pick the Reds to win the division, but if the Cubs are contenders, so are the Reds. The Cubs best arms (Prior and Wood) are huge question marks to even pitch this year. While they still have Zambrano and aging Greg Maddux, their closer is Reds castoff Ryan Dempster.

Failing to mention the Reds was an insult by a writer who'd just like to put the Cards in the playoffs today and not play the season. For me, hope springs eternal...

Falls City Beer
03-27-2006, 02:08 PM
Teams like the Brewers (the real rust belt) have been finding ways to lose, though, over the past several decades.

This Brew Crew incarnation puts me in mind of the mid-90s Expos clubs--statistically gifted; spiritually enervated.

Sure, Chicago fluked its way, but a fluke is a fluke, correct?

Until the Astros show they don't know how to dominate the rest of the division with their pitching, I'm stickin' with the Houston club. Brewers should finish third, maybe second--they might leapfrog the rather flatfooted Cardinals. But no way in hell they've got the guns to overcome Pettitte, Oswalt and five months of Clemens.

As an aside, I thought the hard-throwing Capellan was going into the rotation this year? (well, if he doesn't, he should; Sheets is a gimp once again). That's why I distrust their bullpen--I was operating under the above assumption. Count me among the Turnbow non-believers.

KronoRed
03-27-2006, 02:13 PM
Pitching is key, we don't have it while the rest of the division has guys with a lot more past success and potential for future success, our only hope is they all have down years.

Falls City Beer
03-27-2006, 02:32 PM
Fearless prediction sure to go wrong....the Reds will finish ahead of the Brewers this year.

I'm not sure I'd go that far. But I don't think the Brewers'll be the logical extension of what their stats say they should be. Something will break down, and they won't know how to fix it.

The Reds should be looking to finish ahead of the Pirates and Cubs. They aren't getting past anyone else.

M2
03-27-2006, 02:41 PM
Teams like the Brewers (the real rust belt) have been finding ways to lose, though, over the past several decades.

This Brew Crew incarnation puts me in mind of the mid-90s Expos clubs--statistically gifted; spiritually enervated.

Sure, Chicago fluked its way, but a fluke is a fluke, correct?

Until the Astros show they don't know how to dominate the rest of the division with their pitching, I'm stickin' with the Houston club. Brewers should finish third, maybe second--they might leapfrog the rather flatfooted Cardinals. But no way in hell they've got the guns to overcome Pettitte, Oswalt and five months of Clemens.

As an aside, I thought the hard-throwing Capellan was going into the rotation this year? (well, if he doesn't, he should; Sheets is a gimp once again). That's why I distrust their bullpen--I was operating under the above assumption. Count me among the Turnbow non-believers.

Capellan's headed to the pen where he'll be throwing scorchers alongside Turnbow (and maybe you don't like Turnbow much, but Capellan's one hell of a nice failover switch).

The Astros? They've got two starting pitchers and that's about it. Clemens still hasn't uttered a peep about returning. Lidge just got Schiraldied in last year's playoffs. The 3-4-5 starters are batting tees and there is no offense. Basically the pitching staff has to have another career year without Clemens around to pull his full load. Last year was that team's shot.

And if the Cardinals were flatfooted then the Astros were in the fetal position this past offseason. St. Louis gets back the best 3B alive and it made a host of smaller signings that may not have sent the sportspage yahoos buzzing, but that should put that club on course to win 90+ wins like it does pretty much every season.

Spiritually enervated? Wow that's bunk. I could understand if you had a team full of guys who'd spent the better part of a decade taking a beating in Milwaukee, but the only guys who fit that description are Jenkins and Sheets and I doubt they'll be bringing down the mood in the clubhouse. They've got quality at eight positions and quality on the bench. They've got the fifth-best pitching staff in the NL coming back with the addition of Dave Bush (a guy who's ready to and should step up this season) and Capellan to the bullpen.

Milwaukee's totally stolen the seat Reds fans have coveted for years, that of the small market wunderkind in the NL Central. Not only will the Reds have to catch the money teams in the division, they're going to have figure out how to reel in the Brewers who've beaten the Reds to the oozing-with-young-talent punch.

M2
03-27-2006, 02:46 PM
Two years ago, the Reds led the division until mid-June with a worse pitching staff then they have now (some of you may disagree, but I think the present staff has a much better upside than that one did).

I think it has better upside too, but this board was literally full of folks who thought the 2004 Reds pitching looked good on paper even after it had started to collapse.

Roy Tucker
03-27-2006, 02:51 PM
Yeah, I'd say the Cards are the class of the division this year. I think the Astros and Cubs are in for a big fall with the Brewers coming up. I wouldn't be surprised to see them finish second. They learned how to win last year. The Pirates are hard to get read on.

I think if Krivsky could have been GM for he whole winter season, the Reds' prospects may so have looked so dim. The Reds can put a very competitive starting 8 on the field, but their bench is paper-thin, the bullpen looks shakey, and the starters are the starters.

Krivsky might have been able to address some of that in the off-season (he doesn't appear to be trigger-shy) but he got to the market too late and the shelves were bare. DanO was either handcuffed or gunshy, take your pick.

Caveat Emperor
03-27-2006, 03:04 PM
Milwaukee's totally stolen the seat Reds fans have coveted for years, that of the small market wunderkind in the NL Central. Not only will the Reds have to catch the money teams in the division, they're going to have figure out how to reel in the Brewers who've beaten the Reds to the oozing-with-young-talent punch.

The Brewers have tons of young talent and have done a fantastic job at moving overpriced veterans and/or veterans pricing themselves out of the city for younger players (the Overbay trade and the Sexson trade are the kinds of deals the Reds should've been making for the past decade) -- but the great manuvering has to result in winning baseball. Until I see it, everything about the Brewers remains speculative.

Thy SHOULD be a much improved team this year and SHOULD contend for a postseason opportunity, but a lot of castles built on shoulds and coulds tend to crumble once they start batting the ball around for real. As you said, a lot hinges on Ben Sheets' right arm.

My "fearless" prediction is that the Cardinals win the division in a walk, and Milwaukee fades in the wild card race in early August. Astros, Pirates, and Cubs will fight for #3, and the Reds will languish in last place for the majority of the summer before finishing at about the 90 loss mark.

Falls City Beer
03-27-2006, 03:32 PM
Capellan's headed to the pen where he'll be throwing scorchers alongside Turnbow (and maybe you don't like Turnbow much, but Capellan's one hell of a nice failover switch).

The Astros? They've got two starting pitchers and that's about it. Clemens still hasn't uttered a peep about returning. Lidge just got Schiraldied in last year's playoffs. The 3-4-5 starters are batting tees and there is no offense. Basically the pitching staff has to have another career year without Clemens around to pull his full load. Last year was that team's shot.

And if the Cardinals were flatfooted then the Astros were in the fetal position this past offseason. St. Louis gets back the best 3B alive and it made a host of smaller signings that may not have sent the sportspage yahoos buzzing, but that should put that club on course to win 90+ wins like it does pretty much every season.

Spiritually enervated? Wow that's bunk. I could understand if you had a team full of guys who'd spent the better part of a decade taking a beating in Milwaukee, but the only guys who fit that description are Jenkins and Sheets and I doubt they'll be bringing down the mood in the clubhouse. They've got quality at eight positions and quality on the bench. They've got the fifth-best pitching staff in the NL coming back with the addition of Dave Bush (a guy who's ready to and should step up this season) and Capellan to the bullpen.

Milwaukee's totally stolen the seat Reds fans have coveted for years, that of the small market wunderkind in the NL Central. Not only will the Reds have to catch the money teams in the division, they're going to have figure out how to reel in the Brewers who've beaten the Reds to the oozing-with-young-talent punch.

Yet somehow Houston figures out a way to beat the crap out of everyone in the division. Houston has taken Milwaukee to the shed like Milwaukee takes the Reds. I really think the Milwaukee angle is skewed around here by how badly the Brewers have the destroyed the Reds since their arrival in the NL. Just follow them on a west coast or east coast swing some time in July--they get trampled. Consistently. They've got to figure out how to beat good teams consistently before I get too scared of Milwaukee as a real contender. Milwaukee's the baseball equivalent of the housing market, IMO.

BTW, I'm not the one on this thread saying the Reds will be better than the Brewers. The Brewers are clearly better than the Reds. I'm just not convinced they know how to win the major contests.

Chip R
03-27-2006, 04:06 PM
Yet somehow Houston figures out a way to beat the crap out of everyone in the division. Houston has taken Milwaukee to the shed like Milwaukee takes the Reds. I really think the Milwaukee angle is skewed around here by how badly the Brewers have the destroyed the Reds since their arrival in the NL. Just follow them on a west coast or east coast swing some time in July--they get trampled. Consistently. They've got to figure out how to beat good teams consistently before I get too scared of Milwaukee as a real contender. Milwaukee's the baseball equivalent of the housing market, IMO.


You may be right. Seems like every year there's a "sexy" team. One of those up and coming teams who have been bad for so long that it's a story. Tampa Bay was that team last year and look how they ended up. Normally I abhor NFL comparisons but the Arizona Cardinals were that sexy team last year and they were awful. This year the Brewers and the Blue Jays fit that bill. I'm more with M2 as far as the Brewers are concerned but I don't think they have a lot of margin for error. If Sheets is out for a considerable time or one of the kids gets hurt or can't hit the curve, they might be battling the Reds for last. I think a good indicator of how they will do this year and in future years is how well they do against StL. Having a good record against the Cards could go a long way towards building their self-confidence.

M2
03-27-2006, 04:38 PM
Yet somehow Houston figures out a way to beat the crap out of everyone in the division. Houston has taken Milwaukee to the shed like Milwaukee takes the Reds. I really think the Milwaukee angle is skewed around here by how badly the Brewers have the destroyed the Reds since their arrival in the NL. Just follow them on a west coast or east coast swing some time in July--they get trampled. Consistently. They've got to figure out how to beat good teams consistently before I get too scared of Milwaukee as a real contender. Milwaukee's the baseball equivalent of the housing market, IMO.

BTW, I'm not the one on this thread saying the Reds will be better than the Brewers. The Brewers are clearly better than the Reds. I'm just not convinced they know how to win the major contests.

I think you've got Houston confused with St. Louis. The Astros have won 517 games in the first six years of this century (86 a year). They've got one division title and two wild cards over that time.

St. Louis has won 575 games over that time (96 wins a year) with four division titles and one wild card (where they finished the year with the exact same record as the Astros).

So I agree that one team has been beating the holy crap out of the division in the 21st century, but that team is named the St. Louis Cardinals.

We don't need to be scared of Milwaukee or anyone else as a real contender. We're Reds fans, contention really isn't an issue for us. Though if the Reds do want to contend at some point in the next five years, they're going to have to vault over a really talented Brewers franchise.

And the Brewers don't really get much attention around here. Until last year they were generally unnoticed in these parts. Heck, when I pointed out the Brewers had some pitching talent before last season that was greeted with shock and bafflement (as I'm sure you remember). My guess is the Brewers are getting more pub as a chic sleeper picks in the sports press than they are around here. For the most part I get the feeling Reds fans are hoping Milwaukee falls flat and doesn't fully claim the title of small market powerhouse in the NL Central. I think we Reds fans tend to think of that as our birthright and of the Brewers as a bit player in our greater drama.

Falls City Beer
03-27-2006, 05:38 PM
For the most part I get the feeling Reds fans are hoping Milwaukee falls flat and doesn't fully claim the title of small market powerhouse in the NL Central. I think we Reds fans tend to think of that as our birthright and of the Brewers as a bit player in our greater drama.

I'm not one amongst them. I mean, I am opposed to every team in the division on a generic level. Yes, I want every Central team to fail. But I'm not delusive about who the big dogs are and who the big dogs aren't.

Honestly, I'd like to see the Brewers whip up on a Tony Larussa-managed squad. I'll pull like hell for them to win if they're around at the end of the year. Crap, anyone but the Cards, IMO.

MattyHo4Life
03-27-2006, 05:40 PM
Honestly, I'd like to see the Brewers whip up on a Tony Larussa-managed squad. I'll pull like hell for them to win if they're around at the end of the year. Crap, anyone but the Cards, IMO.

I think most Reds fans would agree with that.

ochre
03-27-2006, 05:43 PM
I think most Reds fans would agree with that.
nah. Mark me down for anyone but the cubs. You guys can finish 5th. I want the cubs to be the cellar dwellars :)

TeamBoone
03-27-2006, 07:25 PM
Seeing as how every team in the division, except the Reds, was mentioned, it was a bit of a glaring omission.

They could at least say the Reds led the league in runs scored, have a great offensive lineup, but are still not expected to contend. To say nothing is a huge snub, like the title of the thread says "are we in this division?".

Caveat Emperor
03-27-2006, 08:34 PM
They could at least say the Reds led the league in runs scored, have a great offensive lineup, but are still not expected to contend.

"This breaking news just in: Generalísimo Francisco Franco is still dead!"

KearnsyEars
03-27-2006, 09:45 PM
we'll compete for the central.

KronoRed
03-27-2006, 11:37 PM
we'll compete for the central.
Sure we will, all the teams that play the game are competing.

We just won't be close to winning it ;)

OnBaseMachine
03-28-2006, 06:56 AM
The only way I see the Reds even competing for the NL Wildcard this year is if they get off to another lucky start like they did in 2002 and 2004, and then Castinelli gives Krivsky the OK to go out and make a deal for a couple GOOD arms or so. I really emphasise the word good. A Ryan Dempster or Shawn Estes will not get the job done.

KearnsyEars
03-28-2006, 09:27 AM
I think we have a better chance at the Division than the Wildcard

vaticanplum
03-28-2006, 10:06 AM
I think we have a better chance at the Division than the Wildcard

It's such a fine line between optimism and delusion ;)

Hey, you never know. This time of year, all gates are open. Four days into the season last year, the Reds had the best record in baseball.

KearnsyEars
03-28-2006, 10:12 AM
It's such a fine line between optimism and delusion ;)

Hey, you never know. This time of year, all gates are open. Four days into the season last year, the Reds had the best record in baseball.

and it was the best feeling in the world. Thats why I love this game. Spring equals hope. :beerme:

Johnny Footstool
03-28-2006, 02:48 PM
Heck, when I pointed out the Brewers had some pitching talent before last season that was greeted with shock and bafflement (as I'm sure you remember).

The great Doug Davis debate.