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View Full Version : Straight-A Student Pulled From Class Over Hair Color



HotCorner
03-30-2006, 05:15 PM
After reading this story, I remembered having a "discussion" with the principal when I was in junior high about the dress code. We were not allowed to wear shorts because "it was too distracting to other students."

I countered that it was too distracting not to wear shorts because we got hot and could not concentrate. The school had no AC. Needless to say he told me too "drop it."

http://www.channelcincinnati.com/news/8335500/detail.html#

http://images.ibsys.com/2006/0329/8335759_400X300.jpg



MARSHALL, Mo. -- An eighth-grader was taken out of class Tuesday because of her hair coloring, KMBC-TV in Kansas City reported.

An administrator at Bueker Middle School said the girl's red highlights were distracting to other students.

School officials said there is a rule at Bueker that hairstyles that are distracting to the educational process are not allowed.

"Doing this is taking away from people's individuality," student Kristen McCorkle said.

The 14-year-old, who is a straight-A student, said the school's assistant principal told her she had to go to in-school suspension and that she would be there until her hair is fixed.

"I didn't think that any of this would happen," the eighth-grader said.

She said she understands that some hairstyles can be distracting, but she doesn't think hers is.

"Like colors that are totally out of the norm, blue, or green, or purple. But I think red is more normal and I don't think that many people would disagree with me," she said.

"I don't feel that her hair is out of control," said Tim McCorkle, the girl's father. "It's definitely not outside of the boundaries that we have established here in the home."

The district's superintendent, Dr. Robert Gordon, said he was alerted to the situation Tuesday afternoon.

"This, as I understand it, is a matter of interpretation. I believe the assistant principal was doing what he felt was in the best interest of the kids," Gordon said.

Tim McCorkle, who is the Bates City police chief, said the school's policy needs to be reviewed.

"As one who has written policies, some need to be updated or sometimes they're just wrong," he said.

Gordon said he plans to speak with the student's parents about the situation.

Meanwhile, Kristen said the hair coloring was an accident. She didn't expect the highlights to be so strong and she plans to tone it down as soon as possible.

Griffey4Prez
03-30-2006, 07:33 PM
Schools are getting ridiculous now....

KronoRed
03-30-2006, 07:40 PM
Am I missing what the big deal is? her hair looks fine..not like fire engine red :dunno:

Yachtzee
03-30-2006, 07:41 PM
On the one hand, I feel it's rather silly to remove a girl from class because of her hair color. On the other hand, if the girl is really intent on expressing her individuality, she should try doing so with her mind and her talents rather than through some hair styling trick that has been popular since the day someone figured out how to dye hair.

RedsManRick
03-30-2006, 07:41 PM
And the whispers in class about her being put in ISS over an auburn steak in her hair are not going to distracting at all..... what a moron.

Falls City Beer
03-30-2006, 07:41 PM
Schools are getting ridiculous now....

Public schools, 99 times out of 100, reflect the "values" of the districts they serve. For good or bad.

TeamBoone
03-30-2006, 08:09 PM
On the one hand, I feel it's rather silly to remove a girl from class because of her hair color. On the other hand, if the girl is really intent on expressing her individuality, she should try doing so with her mind and her talents rather than through some hair styling trick that has been popular since the day someone figured out how to dye hair.

Oh Yachtzee... have you been around young people lately? To tell you the truth, a lot of intelligent kids are discriminated against... it happens all the time; they are ridiculed and made fun of.

It's not like this girl dyed her hair purple with streaks of red and blue, nor does she have multiple piercings or tatoos (at least if she does, they don't show in the picture).

Kids want to fit in, be part of the crowd, while retaining their individuality. She's a cute girl with some auburn streaks in her hair. Would they have done this if she had brown hair and streaked it blond?

Reds4Life
03-30-2006, 08:09 PM
Her hair doesn't not appear "distracting" to me, the red isn't even that noticable.

KittyDuran
03-30-2006, 08:15 PM
Who's being distracted the girls or the boys (or both)? She's cute, maybe the boys find the streaked hair more appealing and were distracted...:confused:

Reds4Life
03-30-2006, 08:40 PM
Who's being distracted the girls or the boys (or both)? She's cute, maybe the boys find the streaked hair more appealing and were distracted...:confused:

Girls don't have to do much to distract guys, especially those of the teenage varity. I think some light hair coloring should be the least of their concerns. ;)

Yachtzee
03-30-2006, 09:20 PM
Oh Yachtzee... have you been around young people lately? To tell you the truth, a lot of intelligent kids are discriminated against... it happens all the time; they are ridiculed and made fun of.

It's not like this girl dyed her hair purple with streaks of red and blue, nor does she have multiple piercings or tatoos (at least if she does, they don't show in the picture).

Kids want to fit in, be part of the crowd, while retaining their individuality. She's a cute girl with some auburn streaks in her hair. Would they have done this if she had brown hair and streaked it blond?

Kids were the same when I was in high school. If you wanted to be accepted, you had to hide the fact that you were intelligent and could think for yourself. I did it too after a "friend" in the 6th grade told me, after I got an A on an exam, that he would hate to be me because I was "too smart." The next thing you know, you start shooting for A minuses and B pluses just to avoid being "too smart." Then you start making fashion choices you will later regret because you see other kids wearing the same stuff. Yet when your parents object to those choices, you claim that you are just "expressing yourself." Repeat this cycle through grades 6-12 and you have the American Youth Experience.

I really don't have a problem with her hair and I think it's silly that they pulled her from class for it. But I also think she is misguided in believing that putting a red streak in her hair is somehow a mark of individuality. If anything, it's a symbol of the herd mentality of kids in general. But the school's reasoning is just as lame. Since when is a dye job distracting? And from the picture, the red streak is barely noticeable.

TeamBoone
03-30-2006, 09:35 PM
Isn't it sad, Yachtzee, that intelligent kids get ostracized? Makes me sick.

I totally agree about her hair... heck, maybe she didn't even do it to be accepted. Maybe she did it just because she thought she was going to like it!

I'm sure that school has a whole lot more serious stuff to be concerned with... but who knows if they are. Some schools tackle the easy stuff "to set an example" and don't deal with the other stuff.

Caseyfan21
03-30-2006, 10:32 PM
So does this school make natural red-haired kids dye their hair another color such as brown or blond. This is absolutely ridiculous IMO. To reflect the opinions of others, if this is the most pressing issue at this school, then that's pretty pathetic.

I sat in a college class today where one student had hair dyed purple. It really distracted me so much that I think I will complain. :bash:

Johnny Footstool
03-30-2006, 11:51 PM
My wife's hair is streaked like that. She works for an ultra-conservative employer with a strict dress code (business suits and ties for the men, conservative business attire for the women), but they allow it.

That girl's hairstyle is pretty much mainstream.

GAC
03-31-2006, 05:24 AM
Public schools, 99 times out of 100, reflect the "values" of the districts they serve. For good or bad.

Yep. There has to be a "balance" somewhere on this issue. And we also have to realize that these are kids (going through adolescence), inwhich some are searching for identity/individuality (and attention).

This girl's example is pretty tame compared to some that I have seen with the body peircings and especially the full blown Goth look.

My oldest boy (a junior) goes to JVS (which supports several neighboring school districts). When I look at the way some of these kids are dressed, I just shake my head that their parents let them out of the house looking like that.

I can remember in my day when schools frowned on Beatle haircuts. ;)

Roy Tucker
03-31-2006, 07:59 AM
Yeah, I agree with GAC, looks pretty tame to me. Don't understand the big deal made.

I've given my kids fairly free reign in clothing and style as long as it isn't permanent (tatoos and piercings). But they pretty well stick to polo shirts, khakis, and jeans. My son even gets haircuts without me telling him to.

Funny, but we don't see smart kids getting ostracized in our schools. You['ve always got your cliques, but smart kids seem to do just fine. Talking to my son last night (he's a HS senior), a 4.3 GPA gets you in the last slot in the top 10% of a 650 kid class.

Ravenlord
03-31-2006, 08:18 AM
oh God...i rember being this kid. i could write pages of stupid crap like this that's happened to me in school. let's jsut going over the silliest....

1. being suspended for 3-days for multiple complaints about what i had written on the book cover protecter on my algerbra book. i had written on it using the Elder Futhark (Norse alphabet), but it was still in English. the script read: "No life's so short it can't turn around
You can't spend your life living underground
For from above you don't hear a sound
And I'm out here, waiting
I don't understand what you want me to be
It's the dark you're hating, it's not who I am
But I know that it's all that you see"

2. as a freshman in high school, i ran into the principal in the hall, her first words ever to me: "you need a haircut and an attitude change or you'll be sorry."

3. nearly getting suspended for having this on a notebook (and entirely in English): "Moments of reason that we hope to find
Are we a thought somewhere in God's mind
A work of art that He has never signed
Children and mirrors have no memory
They reflect us for that is all they see
They are the us that is still yet to be
And so we carry on"

4. being forced to tear the front cover off of my English notebook as it had been deemed offensive. the cover had this picutre taped to it:
http://www.rattleheadhq.com/images/picpages/Vic/Dr%20Vic.jpg

i think that's enough for now, or i might not stop writing.

Hap
03-31-2006, 10:53 AM
I would bet that if this girl's mom or dad was a teacher or was on the school board, nothing would have been made of it.

TeamBoone
03-31-2006, 11:45 AM
Wow, Raven.

I guess I can MAYBE see the Megadeath thing (really really just a maybe), but the others stink. How did you ever survive?

Sounds like teachers had it in for you, even though you got good grades. I guess there's a stereotype that academic excellence must live up to instead of realizing that not all kids are alike.

I've never been able to figure out why schools don't try harder to promote individuality, within reason of course.

Johnny Footstool
03-31-2006, 11:45 AM
Public schools, 99 times out of 100, reflect the "values" of the districts they serve. For good or bad.

I find that they reflect the "values" of the administration, or at least certain individuals in the administration, more than the district.

Johnny Footstool
03-31-2006, 11:48 AM
oh God...i rember being this kid. i could write pages of stupid crap like this that's happened to me in school. let's jsut going over the silliest....

I love how when you grow up, adults teach you not to judge people by their looks. "Never judge a book by it's cover," and all that rot.

Then you get older and realize that *everyone*, including educators, does exactly that.

Falls City Beer
03-31-2006, 11:53 AM
I find that they reflect the "values" of the administration, or at least certain individuals in the administration, more than the district.

Eh. Most school boards are voted upon by people within the district. While the cross-section may not be representative, it's pretty much a democratic mechanism.

Problem with it is that not enough people involve themselves in the process, so it ends up being the busybodies who make the rules.

But in general liberal districts have liberal administrations, conservative conservative. There's remarkable transparency in most public school districts. Private schools are another matter altogether.

GAC
03-31-2006, 12:11 PM
Isn't it sad, Yachtzee, that intelligent kids get ostracized?

That was never my problem. :mooner:

savafan
03-31-2006, 12:15 PM
Not surprised by this at all.

Ravenlord and I went to the same school, although I graduated before the principal he had was there. She became assistant principal my senior year, and took over as principal the year after.

I had been hired my senior year to be an assistant coach for the academic challenge and science olympiad teams the next year. For those who don't know, academic challenge is like HI-Q or Jeopardy.

I was always a good student, not great, but not horrible either. I used to have unique hairstyles as well, and anyone who met me at the Redszone gathering a few years back when I had the fire engine red haircolor knows this.

My freshman year of college, I believe my hair was a burgundy shade, perhaps purple...don't really recall. When I arrived for the first day of Academic Challenge tryouts in 1996, the principal stopped me in the hallway before I was able to make it to the practice. She called me into her office and asked me who I was and what I was doing there. After I told her, she told me that my services wouldn't be needed, because I was not a "proper role model" for the students of that school.


After the Columbine incident, she also targeted Ravenlord as a potential danger for no apparent reason than the fact that he had long hair and liked heavy metal music. She threatened to suspend him from school for this reason alone.

registerthis
03-31-2006, 12:17 PM
I found a number of girls in my school very distracting, but the last thing i woul dhave wanted to have happen was for them to be suspended. No, I liked them exactly where they were. ;)

savafan
03-31-2006, 12:27 PM
Wouldn't make-up also be considered distracting?

Dom Heffner
03-31-2006, 01:14 PM
found a number of girls in my school very distracting, but the last thing i woul dhave wanted to have happen was for them to be suspended. No, I liked them exactly where they were.

Oh dear god, this is true. And still happens today, close to twenty years later. :)

These stories just keep coming, and I've never failed to shake my head at them. School districts confuse themselves with business owners.

I mean, here this girl is, at the only point in her life where she can express some individuality and her school officials treat her like this. Meanwhile, the faculty with perfect hair and acceptable dress codes are cheating on their spouses, beating their kids, having sex with students, cheating on their taxes, and breaking traffic laws every day.

Also- this girl's intelligence has nothing to do with how far she can go with style. She has the same rights as the laziest as well as the hardest working student.

It is advantageous to the argument, though, that stuff like personal style has no effect on anything given how smart she seems to be.

pedro
03-31-2006, 01:17 PM
Wouldn't make-up also be considered distracting?

I always found girls themselves distracting. let's take them out of school too.

Roy Tucker
03-31-2006, 01:49 PM
Meanwhile, the faculty with perfect hair and acceptable dress codes are cheating on their spouses, beating their kids, having sex with students, cheating on their taxes, and breaking traffic laws every day.


Not to mention taking the tags off their mattresses.

Dom Heffner
03-31-2006, 02:39 PM
Not to mention taking the tags off their mattresses.


This could be another thread by itself, but this one has always puzzled me. Is it the manufacturer and retailer that are not allowed to remove the tag, or is it the consumer?

I had one of those "myth" books that dispelled common notions over a variety of topics, and this was one of them. It indicated that the rule on the tag was meant to apply only to the manufacturer or retailer, not the person who buys the mattress.

I used to read that book all the time and went around correcting people whenever they would say something the book said was incorrect (what a little jerk I must have seemed like, eh?) and then as I got older I found the book to be incorrect on all sorts of things. It's tough trying to dump that knowledge out of my mind, because I used to read that thing constantly.

My point: I don't trust the book's explanation on the removal of mattress tags, so if anyone could help out (max?) it would be appreciated.

Matt700wlw
03-31-2006, 02:53 PM
I was more distracted with shorts, mini-skirts, and tank tops than I was with a girls hair color...

Larkin411
03-31-2006, 02:54 PM
It's pretty laughable how uptight some people can be about the way kids dress or style themselves. And I agree with what everyone said about teenagers always being distracted. My friend just found some old letters from when she was twelve and couldn't believe that she and her friends could have thought so much about so many boys. In fact they don't even have to be present in the classroom, I'm sure I spent many school hours daydreaming about Keanu Reeves(lame, I know, but I was only 14) while I should have been thinking about algebra.


Also, about the mattress tags: http://www.harpercollins.com/global_scripts/product_catalog/book_xml.asp?isbn=0060740922&tc=cx

But maybe you were kidding.

Roy Tucker
03-31-2006, 03:04 PM
Also, about the mattress tags: http://www.harpercollins.com/global_scripts/product_catalog/book_xml.asp?isbn=0060740922&tc=cx

But maybe you were kidding.


Also http://ask.yahoo.com/20040726.html

And never kid about a topic as serious as mattress tags. I accidently tore one off when I was a kid and lived in mortal fear that the Mattress Tag Police were going to come get me. They were in cahoots with the Library Police.

:mooner:

Dom Heffner
03-31-2006, 03:07 PM
But maybe you were kidding.


I wasn't kidding and it's good to know that that stupid myth book got something right.

That thing made an idiot of me (not that I needed any help) in high school one day. Someone was talking about seeing lightning come down from the sky and I told them- based on my book- that lightning only strikes from the ground up. A few science books later and I now realize lightning can strike from the ground up, the sky down, and cloud to cloud.

Chip R
03-31-2006, 03:13 PM
Also http://ask.yahoo.com/20040726.html

And never kid about a topic as serious as mattress tags. I accidently tore one off when I was a kid and lived in mortal fear that the Mattress Tag Police were going to come get me. They were in cahoots with the Library Police.

:mooner:

And the phone cops

http://archer2000.tripod.com/wkrp/images/fever.jpg

Yachtzee
03-31-2006, 03:42 PM
I was more distracted with shorts, mini-skirts, and tank tops than I was with a girls hair color...

Let's face it. When it comes to girls, boys can be distracted by just about anything. If you've ever gone to a Catholic school, you know that even plaid uniforms and saddle shoes can be highly distracting.

traderumor
03-31-2006, 05:00 PM
Here I am hoping my kids make it through adolescence and the early 20s without a teenage pregnancy, or being hooked on drugs, or alcoholic, not commit suicide or be killed by a stray bullet, finding an interest and going for it, and following Jesus Christ (maybe put that first), and these "educators" are worried about a few streaks, or nose rings, or tatoos, or whatever the latest fad is.

Ravenlord
03-31-2006, 10:00 PM
After the Columbine incident, she also targeted Ravenlord as a potential danger for no apparent reason than the fact that he had long hair and liked heavy metal music. She threatened to suspend him from school for this reason alone.
i had almost forgotten about that. though i was in Jr. High when Columbine happened, i did get to have some fun on the first year memorial of it.

i was called into the principal's office and told i was going to be put on a 'watch list.' apperently middle class kids with long hair and listen to metal are considered at risk despite good grades, baseball, and Science Olympiad.

as part of the memorial, the school was going to hold a tribute/memorial/fund raising thingy for Columbine. they were holding it in the auditorium..it was going to be held after classes ended that day. i'm walking on my to go to the Jr. High to work on a couple of my Olympiad events, and from where i started in the building, i had to pass by the auditorium main doors. i'm not even looking into the auditorium, but as i passed it, one of the vice principals popped out, stopped me, and told me that it would be entirely inappropriate for one such as i to attend something like that. i told him i had no intentions of doing so and that i was on my way to the junior high for Olympiad. i walk away from him to hear him call me an 'evil callous bastard.' needless to say that didn't end well.

i'll continue with the end of that story once the lightning passes.

Ravenlord
04-01-2006, 01:47 AM
i told him i had no intentions of doing so and that i was on my way to the junior high for Olympiad. i walk away from him to hear him call me an 'evil callous bastard.' needless to say that didn't end well.


once he said that, it started a wave of profranities from me. it lasted about 5 minutes. by the end i had a crowd around me. it was probably good for him i hadn't had improv training yet. i don't remember what exactly i had said, but the administration pretty much left me alone for the rest of my freshman year after that.

sophmore year, and the incorporation of 'the safe school hotline,' is entirely another story.

westofyou
04-01-2006, 10:54 AM
Word on the street is that Jill Carroll's captors released her due to the streak in HER hair.

http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/WORLD/meast/04/01/carroll.video/newt1.03.carroll.ap.jpg

GAC
04-01-2006, 11:10 AM
My hair has been streaked for the last several years! :lol:

manic-depressed
03-07-2011, 06:55 PM
Ok, if they did this at my school, 1/10 of people would be at in school suspension for life. Including teachers.

paintmered
03-07-2011, 07:44 PM
Holy thread bump, Batman!

The Operator
03-08-2011, 12:19 AM
Holy thread bump, Batman!Heh, no kidding.

I thought this was a current event until I noticed the posts all had "2006" by them.

Slyder
03-08-2011, 12:42 AM
After the Columbine incident, she also targeted Ravenlord as a potential danger for no apparent reason than the fact that he had long hair and liked heavy metal music. She threatened to suspend him from school for this reason alone.

First off cases like this is why I am not teaching right now. I would get black listed for pointing out the stupidity. And the hair actually looks good I think. Its not "outrageous".

2nd a Columbine story.

A few friends of mine always wore long black trench coats when it got cold, not a problem. Well after Columbine we had an unseasonably cold couple days which they wore them like everyone else had some sort of jacket. I must have been stopped by at least a dozen classmates, 6 teachers, 2 administration members, and the vice principal freaking out for the simple fact they wore trench coats. Called them morons for even making that distinction and left it at that.

Administrators don't use common sense they go to kill a fly with a nuclear warhead regardless of the case. Give me 25 minutes in a school and they will have to shut down because I will have emptied the building of everything because of the 0 tolerance for weapons policy many schools adhere to (suspending kids for bringing butter knives to school to cut their sandwhichs for example).

bucksfan2
03-08-2011, 09:20 AM
I don't have any issues with a dress code and encourage one. I went to a private school with a pretty strict dress code. You had to wear slacks, button downs, and school logoed polo's in the summer. I went to an all boys school and there were limits on piercings and hair length. You also were required to wear a belt and not allowed to wear gym shoes or sandals. You had to wear I guess business causal shoes. I never thought it was a big deal. Even my grade school had a dress code which was less stringent but you also had to follow it.

dougdirt
03-08-2011, 10:28 AM
Administrators don't use common sense they go to kill a fly with a nuclear warhead regardless of the case. Give me 25 minutes in a school and they will have to shut down because I will have emptied the building of everything because of the 0 tolerance for weapons policy many schools adhere to (suspending kids for bringing butter knives to school to cut their sandwhichs for example).

But then you have issues arise like when my brother was threatened at lunch that if he came out for recess some kid and his friends were going to beat him up. So my brother took a spork from lunch out to recess with him and when the kid got in his face, my brother stabbed him in the face a bunch of times with it. What if my crazy brother had a butter knife instead of a plastic fork?

Sure, not everyone is crazy like the 5th grade version of my brother, but some of them are, especially under stress and fear.

Redsfan320
03-08-2011, 10:30 AM
Good for your brother Doug! Did the kid keep on bullying?

Yeah I know...

320

dougdirt
03-08-2011, 10:39 AM
Good for your brother Doug! Did the kid keep on bullying?

Yeah I know...

320

Ha. That would have been one tough/crazy bully if he had. My brother was a bit crazy until he was about 16. Glad he calmed it down, he is a big dude now and could truly hurt someone if he wanted to.

Redsfan320
03-08-2011, 10:51 AM
he is a big dude now and could truly hurt someone if he wanted to.

Ha... sounds like he was figuring out how to do that when he was younger... a spork...lol.

320

Slyder
03-08-2011, 10:54 AM
But then you have issues arise like when my brother was threatened at lunch that if he came out for recess some kid and his friends were going to beat him up. So my brother took a spork from lunch out to recess with him and when the kid got in his face, my brother stabbed him in the face a bunch of times with it. What if my crazy brother had a butter knife instead of a plastic fork?

Sure, not everyone is crazy like the 5th grade version of my brother, but some of them are, especially under stress and fear.

Theres 2 different distincts in knives in my opinion. By butter knife I mean the knives with the rounded edges (or look like mini spatula) that cant cut anything (beyond bread) if your life depended on it. My definition of a butter knife would have cause blunt trauma but not likely to penetrate any deeper because theyre not made for it.

Examples of Butter knifes
http://muranoworks.com/Images/Butter%20Knives.JPG
http://ny-image2.etsy.com/il_fullxfull.130820262.jpg

Sorry about the size if anyone can feel free to edit them.

Larkin Fan
03-08-2011, 12:07 PM
Theres 2 different distincts in knives in my opinion. By butter knife I mean the knives with the rounded edges (or look like mini spatula) that cant cut anything (beyond bread) if your life depended on it. My definition of a butter knife would have cause blunt trauma but not likely to penetrate any deeper because theyre not made for it.

Any knife, regardless of whether it's sharp or blunt, can penetrate the skin if enough force is applied to it.

pahster
03-08-2011, 02:10 PM
Any knife, regardless of whether it's sharp or blunt, can penetrate the skin if enough force is applied to it.

So can a pencil or pen.

bucksfan2
03-08-2011, 03:55 PM
So can a pencil or pen.

So can a sword!

Ravenlord
04-24-2011, 11:18 PM
So can a sword!

so can paper, cardboard, and anything else with adequete force and angle.

Kingspoint
04-25-2011, 05:46 AM
It's silly that there are so many Straight-A students. It doesn't mean anything anymore.