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OnBaseMachine
04-11-2006, 08:34 PM
Travis Wood struckout the side in the first inning while giving up a two out double. He just struckout the side in the second inning, too. 6 K's in two innings for Wood.

Homer threw a 1-2-3 1st inning with a strikeout, but gave up two runs on four hits in the second inning. No walks and two K's through two. Homer has still yet to walk a batter this inning.

http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com/app/milb/stats/stats.jsp?sid=milb&t=g_box&gid=2006_04_11_clrafa_sarafa_1

Update: Wood allows a double in the 3rd inning but struckout another. 3 IP, 2 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 7 K

Bailey: 3 IP, 5 H, 2 R, 0 BB, 3 K

Bailey sets them down in order in the fourth. 4 K's in 4 innings.

OnBaseMachine
04-11-2006, 09:03 PM
Wood fires a scoreless fourth inning while recording his 8th punchout. T Wood now has 13 strikeouts in 7.2 innings this year vs just one walk.

http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com/app/milb/stats/stats.jsp?sid=milb&t=g_box&gid=2006_04_11_lanafx_dayafx_1

OnBaseMachine
04-11-2006, 09:23 PM
Update on Wood:

5 innings, 4 hits, 0 runs, 1 walk, 10 strikeouts

Bailey: 5 innings, 6 hits, 3 runs, 0 walks, 5 strikeouts

Guevara at Chattanooga: 7 up, 7 down with 4 strikeouts. Could he help the Reds pen later in the year?

Aronchis
04-11-2006, 10:38 PM
Wood has great stuff and his mechanic's make Howington's look like he never thrown a ball. He still needs to become more efficient and such, but he is only 19 years old.

Hopefully the injury bug to talented arms left with Bowden's drafts............

TOBTTReds
04-11-2006, 11:03 PM
Travis Wood was NASTY tonight. His changeup made Lansing look foolish. His FB was coming in at 88 and his change was between 68 and 72. His stuff was real good today. He struck out most of his batters with the change.

redsfan30
04-11-2006, 11:04 PM
If I remember correctly, Wood is racking up these strikeout totals without even using a fastball that breaks 90MPH. Is this correct?

If so, that doesn't project too well into the Majors, but it's still nice to see these kind of numbers from a Reds farmhand.

danforsman
04-12-2006, 12:11 AM
If I remember correctly, Wood is racking up these strikeout totals without even using a fastball that breaks 90MPH. Is this correct?

If so, that doesn't project too well into the Majors, but it's still nice to see these kind of numbers from a Reds farmhand.

Not to bicker, but I would think that a fastball/changeup combo with a 20+ MPH differential could be very effective in the majors, assuming that the mechanics are consistent and deceptive.

M2
04-12-2006, 12:13 AM
Wood so far in his career has been something special. It's impossible to look four years down the road with any sort of clarity, but the kid delivers practically every time he takes the mound. As a fan, you can't ask for than that.

ochre
04-12-2006, 12:16 AM
As long as he continues to pump out the rate stats he projects. What you have to watch for is him hitting a wall at a particular level. K rate will be the biggest ongoing indicator of his 'stuff', particularly if it stays below the 'toolsy' level.

Sounds like he is again handling the higher level quite well. Good news.

WebScorpion
04-12-2006, 12:42 AM
Not a lot of pitchers in low A throwing a really effective change ... I think that contributes to his success. I expect the same in High-A and AA. At the AAA level he'll meet hitters who've seen a lot of change-ups, so I'd expect that to show whether he's got a possible Major League change-up. A great change up can be effective in the Major Leagues ... Mario Soto? Hey, does anyone know if Soto has worked with Wood this season? Is Wood's a straight change or a circle change? Regardless, a really good change can make Albert Pujols look silly...it can be a viable big league pitch, but hitters will sit on it if you don't mix your pitches better at the higher levels. I loved watching hitters flail at Chris Reitsma's change when he first came up, but then hitters knew he'd throw a 75mph pitch as his out pitch and they pounced on it.

CTA513
04-12-2006, 01:15 AM
I was checking out the box scores and seen that Carlos Guevara pitched tonight for Chattanooga. I know its early into the season for them, but hes off to a good start.

Hes pitched 2 games out of the bullpen. 3 2/3 Innings, 0 Hits, 0 R, 1 BB, 7 K.

Caveat Emperor
04-12-2006, 04:32 AM
So, are they now going to promote Wood through the system as a two pitch pitcher (fastball, change) or is he still trying to develop his breaking ball?

If he's going to proejct as a big-league starter, then he's going to have to have a 3rd pitch that is at least effective, if for no other reason than to give hitters a different look than the fastball and the change. Without that, he's Chris Reitsma v. 2.0 -- not a bad thing, but I'd certainly want more out of such a high draft pick.

Also, wasn't he touted as a high velocity guy coming out of the draft? I seem to remember him also being considered an injury risk based on mechanical difficulties.

medford
04-12-2006, 05:50 AM
So, are they now going to promote Wood through the system as a two pitch pitcher (fastball, change) or is he still trying to develop his breaking ball?

Listened to part of the Dragons game last night on my way home from work. The announcers metioned several times where Wood threw a curve ball. If memory serves me correctly, I recall them mentioning that a couple of his fastballs were getting into the low 90s.

The kid is only 19, he'll probably add a couple of MPHs to his fastball as he increases his leg strength.

OnBaseMachine
04-12-2006, 07:36 AM
So, are they now going to promote Wood through the system as a two pitch pitcher (fastball, change) or is he still trying to develop his breaking ball?

A couple of posters on here(one was flyer85) mentioned that Wood was throwing a great curveball in his first start. If true - and I have no reason to doubt it isn't - then maybe, just maybe, the Reds might have themselves a true potential ace in the organization.

MikeS21
04-12-2006, 09:05 AM
I thought Wood was supposed to have a mid-90's fastball? All the scouting reports by BA indicated that Wood was consistently throwing 91-93 mph heat and had touched 95 a few times. Why is he only throwing in the 80's?

lollipopcurve
04-12-2006, 09:35 AM
I'm sure Wood is continuing to work on his curve. And, given the great touch he's showing with his change, it's likely he's varying the speed of his fastball -- one may be a two-seamer/cutter, the other a four-seamer. The kid can pitch.

Red Leader
04-12-2006, 10:46 AM
Travis Wood was NASTY tonight. His changeup made Lansing look foolish. His FB was coming in at 88 and his change was between 68 and 72. His stuff was real good today. He struck out most of his batters with the change.


Went to the game last night. I didn't see Wood break 88mph on any pitch and I kept an eye on his pitches all night. I thought he was a hard thrower as well. :dunno: He's a lefty, so a finesse pitcher isn't necessarily a bad thing. He had a great change up last night that was killing Lansing hitters. He also was throwing a pretty decent curveball, and did a real nice job keeping hitters off balance all night.

traderumor
04-12-2006, 11:01 AM
Radar guns are nice tools. Use wisely.

KronoRed
04-12-2006, 03:30 PM
Last year on opening day the radar gun told us that Paul Wilson was throwing at 92.

Uh huh.

BrooklynRedz
04-12-2006, 06:06 PM
Travis Wood struckout the side in the first inning while giving up a two out double. He just struckout the side in the second inning, too. 6 K's in two innings for Wood.

Homer threw a 1-2-3 1st inning with a strikeout, but gave up two runs on four hits in the second inning. No walks and two K's through two. Homer has still yet to walk a batter this inning.

http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com/app/milb/stats/stats.jsp?sid=milb&t=g_box&gid=2006_04_11_clrafa_sarafa_1

Update: Wood allows a double in the 3rd inning but struckout another. 3 IP, 2 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 7 K

Bailey: 3 IP, 5 H, 2 R, 0 BB, 3 K

Bailey sets them down in order in the fourth. 4 K's in 4 innings.

I see Mr. Chris Booker made an appearance last night. Good to see. Still wish the Reds had found a way to keep him. Oh well.

As for Wood, I wouldn't get too caught up in watching the speed gun. If he gets the outs, he gets the outs. Period.

Also, it would be nice to have a hyped pitcher that other organizations covet...could be a nice carrot to dangle in a trade. We've seen other organizations get rich using such a strategy.

TOBTTReds
04-12-2006, 06:07 PM
Went to the game last night. I didn't see Wood break 88mph on any pitch and I kept an eye on his pitches all night. I thought he was a hard thrower as well. :dunno: He's a lefty, so a finesse pitcher isn't necessarily a bad thing. He had a great change up last night that was killing Lansing hitters. He also was throwing a pretty decent curveball, and did a real nice job keeping hitters off balance all night.

I was looking at 3 different guns the whole night.

Here are some sample speeds...88 was his fastest, and with those you have to give or take a mph or two.

FB - 88, 86, 85....consistantly between 85 and 87
Ch - 73, 72, 72, 72, 74

IslandRed
04-12-2006, 06:31 PM
There was a discussion about Wood's velocity last month:

http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44238

And I'll throw in this comment from a BP writer:



Drafted: 2005, second round
Velocity: Plus, especially for lefthander
Second Pitch: Plus-plus changeup
2005 Debut: 1.29 ERA in 49 innings with 67/20 K/BB ratio
The Good: As an Arkansas prep star Wood was seen by scouts primarily as a raw lefthander whose primary skill was the ability to throw hard, and even the Reds seem shocked at his initial success and polish. Wood began his career with 17.2 scoreless innings over six games, allowing seven hits and punching out 31. He showed little sign of slowing down when promoted to the Pioneer League, limiting opposing batters to a .174 average.
The Bad: While it is rare to find a teenager with an advanced changeup, Wood still needs a breaking ball, and he's yet to acquire a feel for the pitch. Short (6-foot) and slight of frame, he offers little projection.


He's not the flamethrower he was billed to be pre-draft, but he can throw hard enough to make his changeup effective, and his fastball will be good enough if the movement and command are there. It's also early in the season. I doubt he's at 100% velocity quite yet and it's encouraging that he doesn't seem to be overthrowing.

cincyinco
04-12-2006, 06:34 PM
He's not the flamethrower he was billed to be pre-draft, but he can throw hard enough to make his changeup effective, and his fastball will be good enough if the movement and command are there. It's also early in the season. I doubt he's at 100% velocity quite yet and it's encouraging that he doesn't seem to be overthrowing.

I agree, its early on and he may not be throwing as hard as he can. Its also possible he took a little of the fastball if he was able to get better movement at a lower speed...

Did anyone see if his fastball was moving well?

Red Leader
04-12-2006, 06:35 PM
Thanks, IslandRed.

I was very impressed with his control of his fastball and change. Saw a couple curveballs in there that I thought were pretty good, although you could tell he wasn't as confident in as his other two pitches. If he develops that third pitch, anything with a bend to it, he could be good.

And you're also right about him probably not being at top velocity this early in the season, but even so, I don't think he's going to pick up more than 2-3 mph on his fastball, most people don't anyway.

Red Leader
04-12-2006, 06:36 PM
Did anyone see if his fastball was moving well?

I didn't have the best seats to see, but it appeared that the ball was moving decently. It definately wasn't "flat"

M2
04-12-2006, 09:14 PM
Two other things to consider in terms of Woods' velo:

1) It's his second start of the year and the instructions for him might be to work at less than maximum effort.

2) The instructions for him might be to work at less than maximum effort anyway, figuring that he'll gain velo over the course of a few years with maturity and a more efficient motion.

If I were Johnny Almaraz, I'd be much more interested in what speed he's throwing at in three years than today. A good repeatable delivery of a heater with some movement, a killer change and a developing breaking ball. That's not a bad mix. We know Wood's got a quick arm and, IMO, it would actually be a good sign if he didn't try to ride that.

MWM
04-12-2006, 09:27 PM
Another positive is that Homer Bailey hasn't walked any hitters in his first two starts totaling 10.1 IP. He's allowed 12 hits, but my guess is his first priority early in the season is control after his high walk totals last season.

I think Homer is going to have a big second half this season. Hopefully the minor league pitching instruction has undergone, or is undergoing, some serious changes and we'll start to see the results with Homer this year. I think he'll spend the first half of the season working through some things and the second half he'll start to dominate. At least that's the hope, he needs to show this year at this level that he's capable of dominating minor league hitters for an extended stretch.

reds44
04-12-2006, 09:54 PM
Wagner fired 1.2 inning of scoreless ball tonight.

SirFelixCat
04-12-2006, 09:56 PM
This thread has brought a smile to my face on a otherwise dismal day at work. Thanks for all the farm-hand insight! :thumbup:

lollipopcurve
04-12-2006, 10:14 PM
I remember that the predraft reports on Wood said that he touched higher velocity closer to the draft -- up to 94-95. That may have been a fast gun, but I'd be surprised if he doesn't get over 90 as the season goes on.

MWM
04-12-2006, 10:24 PM
I remember that the predraft reports on Wood said that he touched higher velocity closer to the draft -- up to 94-95. That may have been a fast gun, but I'd be surprised if he doesn't get over 90 as the season goes on.

I think it's a GREAT sign that he's getting guys out, and striking out so many hitters, without a lot of velocity. That's my concern about Homer. He's already throwing mid-90s consistently and still getting hit in single-A.

TOBTTReds
04-12-2006, 11:13 PM
Did anyone see if his fastball was moving well?

Has fastball had a little bit of cut on it. He definitly was throwing a two-seamer yesterday.

As far as his curve goes: I feel he can develop that into a plus pitch. Right now his change projects to be plus pitch, if it isn't there already, that is really going to help along his fastball and ability to mix in his developing curve.

Aronchis
04-12-2006, 11:44 PM
I think it's a GREAT sign that he's getting guys out, and striking out so many hitters, without a lot of velocity. That's my concern about Homer. He's already throwing mid-90s consistently and still getting hit in single-A.

That is because he doesn't throw his breaking ball with enough consistancy and his changeup is still not developed. Considering that you just can't make it on mid-90's heaters(even with the quick arm release Bailey has), Homer will not do overly well to he finds consistancy.

I personally feel high A is a good place for Bailey to build up his value this year. He should get more comfortable as he settles in that warm Florida sun. Considering he is King 1 per inning so far without a consistant breaking ball, that portends to better things.............however:
The Reds have 5 pitching prospects that I am really interested in the lower minors:
1.Bailey
2.Wood
3.Ward
4.Lecure
5.Val
Some of these guys may turn out to be future MLB starters. Some of them won't and dealing them at the right time is critical. I think if Bailey puts up high number of K's in A+ along with a 3-3.50ERA, his value will rocket as I said on these boards last year. But to do that, he needs to cut out the walks. SO FAR, evidence is mounting that he has cured, or is curing that problem. Thus, the value will tremendously rise as I suspect his starts will become more refined as the season forges on piling up K's.

Krivsky should move Bailey this winter. IMO Bailey's desire's and makeup aren't what I consider valueable. He has some serious issues about what it takes to improve and fullfill his immense physical gifts. I would take a shot on aquiring another modestly older arm, but one that has had success at the major league level that is a 2. My opinion is Bailey will most likely quit rather than succeed.

Homer's the first kicked off the island.

icehole3
04-13-2006, 08:15 AM
Why on earth would you give up on a pitcher. I say ride it out

M2
04-13-2006, 12:07 PM
Why on earth would you give up on a pitcher. I say ride it out

There's a difference between giving up on a pitcher and cashing in on one whose trade value may be a lot higher than his actual value (which is what Aronchis is suggesting). This same argument was made concerning Ty Howington once upon a time and, without question, trading him proved to be the wiser (though unrealized) course of action.

As an aside, in looking over the top 15 picks from the 1990-1999 drafts, two things jumped out at me about the HS pitchers. One was the well-worn topic of how infrequently they ever materialize into something useful for the team that drafts them. The other was that of all the prep arms who didn't make it, none were moved for any talent of consequence. I'm talking about a big, fat zero on that front.

It's curious because college arms, prep players and college players from the top 15 in the '90s all managed to find their way into multiple trades of consequence. It would seem that organizations are unwilling to trade highly drafted prep arms when their value is high, hang onto them hoping for a rebound when their value drops and then can't get anything for them when their value hits nil. The interesting part in there is that if the industry treats these prep arms with such reverence then a team should be able to cash one in for an extremely handsome return.

Red Leader
04-13-2006, 01:27 PM
There's a difference between giving up on a pitcher and cashing in on one whose trade value may be a lot higher than his actual value (which is what Aronchis is suggesting). This same argument was made concerning Ty Howington once upon a time and, without question, trading him proved to be the wiser (though unrealized) course of action.

As an aside, in looking over the top 15 picks from the 1990-1999 drafts, two things jumped out at me about the HS pitchers. One was the well-worn topic of how infrequently they ever materialize into something useful for the team that drafts them. The other was that of all the prep arms who didn't make it, none were moved for any talent of consequence. I'm talking about a big, fat zero on that front.

It's curious because college arms, prep players and college players from the top 15 in the '90s all managed to find their way into multiple trades of consequence. It would seem that organizations are unwilling to trade highly drafted prep arms when their value is high, hang onto them hoping for a rebound when their value drops and then can't get anything for them when their value hits nil. The interesting part in there is that if the industry treats these prep arms with such reverence then a team should be able to cash one in for an extremely handsome return.

Very interesting post, M2.

Going forward with this, wouldn't this make establishing a value for these players difficult? Maybe none of those players were traded because no one thought they could get fair value for those players, both when the teams that drafted them put a value on them for trade, and after they seemingly failed to live up to the original value (basically overvaluing those players in both instances). I guess what I'm trying to say is maybe the reason none of those players were traded originally was because the drafting team was asking for the stars and the moon in return for them, and then after their value fell, they felt they were better off praying that the player would rebound in some way, making them more valuable than the dreck of players that they were being offered in return for them after their value fell.

Puffy
04-13-2006, 01:36 PM
Going back for a minute to Wood's velocity - I am not too concerned about it even if it is the high 80's neighborhood. A lefty with good movement and a good offspeed can be a dominant big league starter. See Sid Fernandez in the mid to late 80's as Exhibit "A"

M2
04-13-2006, 01:40 PM
Very interesting post, M2.

Going forward with this, wouldn't this make establishing a value for these players difficult? Maybe none of those players were traded because no one thought they could get fair value for those players, both when the teams that drafted them put a value on them for trade, and after they seemingly failed to live up to the original value (basically overvaluing those players in both instances). I guess what I'm trying to say is maybe the reason none of those players were traded originally was because the drafting team was asking for the stars and the moon in return for them, and then after their value fell, they felt they were better off praying that the player would rebound in some way, making them more valuable than the dreck of players that they were being offered in return for them after their value fell.

I think you have to apply a certain amount of realpolitik. If you're going to trade a blue chip prospect for major league talent, chances are it will be for distressed inventory (e.g. a major leaguer who is either getting too costly or too close to free agency for his current team). My guess is teams tend to not make those deals because they're risk averse. They either don't want to spend the money or don't want to trade a top prospect for a short window. The Cardinals have been a notable exception, constantly pawning off top prospects for distressed inventory that they then keep around.

The Reds can't afford to make a habit of such a practice at this moment, but a one-time deal might make some sense.

Red Leader
04-13-2006, 01:59 PM
I think you have to apply a certain amount of realpolitik. If you're going to trade a blue chip prospect for major league talent, chances are it will be for distressed inventory (e.g. a major leaguer who is either getting too costly or too close to free agency for his current team). My guess is teams tend to not make those deals because they're risk averse. They either don't want to spend the money or don't want to trade a top prospect for a short window. The Cardinals have been a notable exception, constantly pawning off top prospects for distressed inventory that they then keep around.

The Reds can't afford to make a habit of such a practice at this moment, but a one-time deal might make some sense.

I think the A's have done this a couple times as well, although moreso with position players (Hinske, Griffin, etc) than with starting pitchers (Bonderman). Although, in the Reds defense, it's much easier to trade top pitching prospects when you've got a solid rotation in the majors, and other pitching prospects of worth in the minors, which obviously, for a long period of time, the Reds had neither of.


The Bonderman trade is interesting to use as a measure. The Yankees got Jeff Weaver from Detroit in a three-team trade that saw four major prospects change addresses. Detroit got Carlos Pena, Franklyn German and Bonderman from Oakland, which received Ted Lilly, John-Ford Griffin and Jason Arnold from New York.


So, at least using that measure, if you get a third party to take that "distressed inventory" player you mention, the team dealing the H.S. first round pick SP is capable of getting a good deal of minor league talent along with an established major league player. Of course, it helps if you have other minor league talent to package with that first round HS SP, which the Reds don't.

icehole3
04-14-2006, 07:08 AM
I guess what Im really saying is, I have no problem with trading prospect pitchers, just not our top 5 and for the love of God of all the pitchers we got not Bailey. Does anyone remember the spring training performance

M2
04-14-2006, 10:24 AM
I guess what Im really saying is, I have no problem with trading prospect pitchers, just not our top 5 and for the love of God of all the pitchers we got not Bailey. Does anyone remember the spring training performance

Well, it was sure a good thing the Reds didn't trade Ty Howington, Ricardo Aramboles, Dustin Moseley, Chris Gruler, Bobby Basham, Ryan Wagner and Richie Gardner while they were still highly-coveted top five prospects inside the organization. I mean imagine the hole the Reds would be in if they had done that instead of holding onto to their best young arms?

Red Leader
04-14-2006, 10:56 AM
Also, for those interested, I heard the other day that Travis Wood has been instructed to work on his curve ball, so he's going to throw that pitch a lot more often than he normally would to get more feel for it and develop it further. Also has been instructed to not "air it out" right away, which is why his velocity peaked at 88mph the other night. Was told that his velocity can reach 94-95 and if he doesn't hit that mark for the next 4-5 starts, not to worry, he's not injured, he's just "pacing himself" because of instructions to do so.

M2
04-14-2006, 11:14 AM
Also, for those interested, I heard the other day that Travis Wood has been instructed to work on his curve ball, so he's going to throw that pitch a lot more often than he normally would to get more feel for it and develop it further. Also has been instructed to not "air it out" right away, which is why his velocity peaked at 88mph the other night. Was told that his velocity can reach 94-95 and if he doesn't hit that mark for the next 4-5 starts, not to worry, he's not injured, he's just "pacing himself" because of instructions to do so.

That makes sense. He doesn't need to prove he can crank up the heat. I think it's encouraging that the Reds are willing to take a measured approach to a kid like Wood, to actually teach him instead of feeling compelled to push him as far as his stuff will carry him.

lollipopcurve
04-14-2006, 11:40 AM
it's encouraging that the Reds are willing to take a measured approach to a kid like Wood, to actually teach him instead of feeling compelled to push him as far as his stuff will carry him.

Here's a question about development. How much is the teacher, and how much is the learner? For sure, having good instruction is crucial. But what's that saying, "when you are ready to be taught, a teacher will appear..."? Something like that....

In Wood's case, I sense the kid not only has the physical stuff, but the aptitude to pitch. It appears he recognizes what an improved curve ball will do to help him cripple hitters. He's already cleared an important first hurdle -- knowing he can succeed as a pro. Based on that, he will be willing to sacrifice some at-bats in the interest of learning his curve. It may hurt his numbers here and there, but in the long run he'll be better. No doubt in my mind that some pitchers would take the "individualized program" handed to them by the organization and fight it every time they go to the hill because, for one reason or the other, they're just not ready to change anything. I think we have a tendency to blame the instruction/the organization all the time, where it's really a two-way street.

I am also encoraged that Bailey may be working hard on throwing strikes. I have no idea what he's been told to work on, but fewer BBs is a great place to start in 2006.

Chip R
04-14-2006, 11:44 AM
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060414/SPT04/604140352/1071

Browning and Wood: Striking similarities

BY KEVIN KELLY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

DAYTON - Tom Browning struck out more batters in 1986 than any other Red on the pitching staff that season.

It stands as the last time a left-handed pitcher drafted and developed by the Reds led the team in that category.

Travis Wood is a ways from pitching in the major leagues, but 16 games into his pro career, the Reds' second-round draft pick last year already has posted some impressive strikeout totals.

Entering Thursday, the Single-A Dayton pitcher was tied for the Midwest League lead with 15 strikeouts in 82/3 innings. In 571/3 innings overall in the minors, Wood is 3-0 with a 1.57 ERA and has struck out 82 batters while walking only 22.

"You never can expect strikeouts," said Wood, a 19-year-old from Alexander, Ark. "You just expect to have a good game and do your best."

In his second start this season, against Lansing on Tuesday at Fifth Third Field in Dayton, Wood allowed four doubles over five scoreless innings in a 2-1 win.

His struck out 10 and walked one.

"I was impressed with the way he pitched inside," Dayton manager Billy Gardner said afterward. "He went inside for effect, which helped his changeup. His changeup had real good deception, and it makes his fastball better."

Baseball America rated Wood as the third-best prospect in the Reds' farm system after a solid debut in rookie ball last season.

In 14 appearances with the Gulf Coast League Reds and Billings Mustangs, Wood went 2-0 with a 1.29 ERA and 67 strikeouts to just 20 walks in 482/3 innings.

Opponents batted .166 against him.

"Last year definitely gave me the confidence to know what I can do and what my limits are," Wood said. "I know I can compete out there."

Wood throws a two-seam and four-seam fastball that tops out in the low 90s. He also throws a changeup and a curveball.

"The curveball is the pitch that has needed the most work from high school to last year," Wood said. "I need to keep working on all my pitches but emphasizing the curveball."

Red Leader
04-14-2006, 11:49 AM
Good points, lollipop, and I agree with M2, it is encouraging that the Red's are taking this approach with Wood, and also encouraging that Wood is accepting of the instruction. I'm definately keeping my eye on him as he moves up. I really like his attitude and make up and am hoping the success can continue as he rises through the system.

Deep down, I've always wanted to be Team Wood. :laugh:

icehole3
04-14-2006, 04:08 PM
Well, it was sure a good thing the Reds didn't trade Ty Howington, Ricardo Aramboles, Dustin Moseley, Chris Gruler, Bobby Basham, Ryan Wagner and Richie Gardner while they were still highly-coveted top five prospects inside the organization. I mean imagine the hole the Reds would be in if they had done that instead of holding onto to their best young arms?

Not a thing can be done about those guys getting hurt. The thing we know for sure is unless you come up with some pitching you will not win anything. Imagine if Wayne Gretzky traded Bailey, maybe not you but this forum would turn into Bagdad.

:p:

M2
04-14-2006, 04:28 PM
Not a thing can be done about those guys getting hurt. The thing we know for sure is unless you come up with some pitching you will not win anything. Imagine if Wayne Gretzky traded Bailey, maybe not you but this forum would turn into Bagdad.

Wayne Gretzky?

Think you've go to re-calibrate your personal sport identification compass there.

Anyway, I imagine the kneejerk to any trade of Homer Bailey would be the same as every other trade I've seen the Reds make this century -- namely that the majority of fans would be in favor of it.

Frankly I'd expect there to be little to no wailing whatsoever if Bailey got dealt for a guy who could help in the majors today.

And something can be done about those guys getting hurt. Someone could do the quick math that, hey, young pitchers sure tend to get hurt and/or flameout a lot. Golly, what if you traded a few while their value was high instead of hanging onto to such a consistently undeperforming commodity? Not a thing can be done about those who live comfortably inside a box.

Red Leader
04-14-2006, 04:34 PM
Wayne Gretzky?


You didn't hear?

Pete Rose bet Gretzky's wife, Janet Jones, that Wayne could never become the GM of the Reds. Pete lost, on his birthday.

IslandRed
04-14-2006, 06:05 PM
M2 and icehole3 have essentially covered the dilemma of pitching prospects -- trade them all and you'll never have cheap, good pitching; never trade any and you'll get no value from most of them. So it comes down to knowing when to hold and when to fold. We can only hope that Krivsky has the right touch there.

icehole3
04-14-2006, 06:43 PM
Wayne Gretzky?

Think you've go to re-calibrate your personal sport identification compass there.


Krivsky....Gretzky. Whatever you want to call him.

Every trade gets scanned over and over on this forum, to say no one would mind if Bailey is traded is well... I wont say. Once again I dont really mind if Wayne Gretzky trades a pitching prospect, just not Bailey and if he does I will post here in disbelief Im sorry.


:p:

M2
04-14-2006, 07:55 PM
Krivsky....Gretzky. Whatever you want to call him.

Every trade gets scanned over and over on this forum, to say no one would mind if Bailey is traded is well... I wont say. Once again I dont really mind if Wayne Gretzky trades a pitching prospect, just not Bailey and if he does I will post here in disbelief Im sorry.

I'm sure Wayne Krivsky might like it if Janet Jones shared you displacement dilemma. In the meantime, I'll make sure to don some shades to shield myself from the searing glare of your intellect.

Of course a few people would gripe about dealing Bailey, though the dissenters are almost always overwhelmed by the assenters on Reds deals (even the really bad ones). Just go back a season to when the vast majority of folks thought DanO had a stellar offseason leading into the '05 campaign. Maybe you'd complain, but your disbelief would be overwhelmed by those impressed by the team making a bold move and those happy to have a bird in hard rather than one in the bush.

icehole3
04-15-2006, 08:01 AM
Youre right, Im wrong. We should trade some of our top 5 pitchers because its a good chance they'll blow their shoulders right out of their sockets. I agree.

:p:

M2
04-15-2006, 12:18 PM
Youre right, Im wrong. We should trade some of our top 5 pitchers because its a good chance they'll blow their shoulders right out of their sockets. I agree.

No amount of information or number of years of scratching your head over why other folks figure out things that remain a constant mystery to you is going to get you outside your box, is it?