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Jaycint
04-14-2006, 09:58 AM
Along the lines of our best pitcher ever thread, I came across this article:

http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/article/the-real-chase/


The Real Chase
by Aaron Gleeman
April 12, 2006

One of the biggest, most-hyped storylines of the 2006 season is Barry Bonds' pursuit of Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, and the all-time home run record. Throughout spring training Bonds made headlines for whatever he did, and sometimes even for what he didn't do. There were frequent updates on everything Bonds, from his batting practice schedule and whether or not he jogged in the outfield before a game to how far he ran to field a fly ball and how ridiculous he looked impersonating Paul Abdul.

However, while Bonds chasing perhaps the sport's most prestigious record receives all the attention, another remarkable chase is going completely unnoticed. Despite being in just his 11th season in the majors, Cubs infielder Neifi Perez has a chance to become arguably the single worst hitter in baseball history. Perez, whom I once compared to the worst doctor in the world, currently holds the record for worst career Runs Created Above Average (RCAA) total among active players:

RCAA
NEIFI PEREZ -329
Royce Clayton -288
Rey Sanchez -247
Mike Matheny -222
Brad Ausmus -207

Much like Bonds, Perez has distanced himself from the rest of the field, coming in at an astounding 329 runs below average during his career while the next-worst hitter, Royce Clayton, is at just -288. When it comes to ineptitude at the plate, beating Clayton is no easy task. That Perez is able to blow him out, along with the rest of the horrible hitters around baseball, is something that should not be overlooked. He is truly a boy among men.

Having a level of incompetence that is unmatched among your peers is impressive, but the real test of offensive inferiority comes in a comparison to the elite out-makers in the sport's history. Like any true great, Perez's resume stands up to the test, as his career RCAA is among the worst in modern baseball history:

RCAA
Ski Melillo -355
Tommy Thevenow -351
NEIFI PEREZ -329
Bill Bergen -312
Tim Foli -309
Larry Bowa -307
Alfredo Griffin -306
Ozzie Guillen -305
Don Kessinger -305
Ed Brinkman -300

Ladies and gentlemen, The Negative 300 Club.

Whereas the spotlight has been on Bonds' climb up the home run leaderboard for years, Perez has quietly crept past the game's most impotent hitters. In fact, with his -27 RCAA in 2005, Perez leaped over Don Kessinger, Ozzie Guillen, Alfredo Griffin, Larry Bowa, Tim Foli, and Bill Bergen. It was a season for the ages, much like when Bonds' 73 homers in 2001 propelled him past all-time greats Eddie Murray, Mel Ott, Eddie Mathews, Ernie Banks, Ted Williams, Willie McCovey, Jimmie Foxx, Mickey Mantle, Mike Schmidt, and Reggie Jackson.

Bonds being within striking distance of Ruth and less than two healthy, productive seasons away from passing Aaron has been well-documented, but Perez has stealthily put himself in a similar position. His RCAA totals for the past three years are -20, -23, and -27, which means all Perez needs to overtake Tommy Thevenow and the immortal Ski Melillo for the top spot is a typically awful season of -26 RCAA. With manager Dusty Baker's help, Perez can get there.

Unfortunately, he's off to a good start. After being benched in favor of Todd Walker early on, Perez found himself in the Cubs' starting lineup for the first time Friday. He responded by going 3-for-4 with a double against the Reds, and afterward told reporters:

It was a lucky day. Any time I get three hits it's a lucky game. I'm not a great hitter.


I've yet to come across an official list of the biggest understatements in the history of mankind, but I've got to think that would crack the top five. Hypothetically, I believe it would rank just slightly ahead of me telling someone, "I think Jessica Alba is kind of cute," and just slightly behind the person replying, "Your chances of dating her are pretty slim."

Now that bolded quote is laugh out loud funny my friends.

max venable
04-14-2006, 10:07 AM
All-time best hitter:

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/images/players/mugshot/ph_276520.jpg

M2
04-14-2006, 10:30 AM
Career OPS+

Neifi Perez - 65
Juan Castro - 59

Sure, Neifi owns the counting stats, but Castro's a monster on the percentages.

macro
04-14-2006, 10:37 AM
What?! No mention of this guy?!

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/mario_mendoza_autograph.jpg

Jaycint
04-14-2006, 11:07 AM
What?! No mention of this guy?!

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/mario_mendoza_autograph.jpg


Wow, Mario hit every single branch on the long fall down out of that ugly tree didn't he? Benito Santiago even thinks that guy is ugly.

RedFanAlways1966
04-14-2006, 11:23 AM
What?! No mention of this guy?!

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/mario_mendoza_autograph.jpg

My first thought too, macro, after reading the article! Hell, when you get a futility-line named after ya... that has to count for something!

Moosie52
04-14-2006, 11:30 AM
Whoever he is, the worst hitter in baseball history can't be that bad, because if he were, he wouldn't have lasted long enough to be remembered.

westofyou
04-14-2006, 11:46 AM
Worst vs the league in RC/27 since 1900(in a season)

The second one has higher standards

The First one
AVERAGE < .200
OBA < .300
SLG <= .350
AT BATS >= 400

RUNS CREATED/GAME YEAR DIFF PLAYER LEAGUE AVG OBA SLG AB OPS
1 Jim Levey 1933 -3.51 1.77 5.28 .195 .237 .240 529 .477
2 John Gochnauer 1902 -3.41 2.17 5.59 .185 .247 .237 459 .485
3 Bill Hallman 1901 -3.23 1.92 5.15 .185 .238 .235 464 .473
4 Frankie Crosetti 1940 -2.83 2.70 5.53 .194 .299 .273 546 .572
5 Coco Laboy 1970 -2.64 2.26 4.89 .199 .254 .299 432 .552
6 Eddie Zimmerman 1911 -2.60 2.19 4.79 .185 .249 .264 417 .513
7 Pete Childs 1902 -2.48 1.94 4.42 .194 .256 .206 403 .462
8 Bob Lillis 1963 -2.47 1.64 4.10 .198 .229 .237 469 .466
9 Skeeter Webb 1945 -2.38 1.91 4.28 .199 .254 .238 407 .492
10 Ed Brinkman 1965 -2.31 1.91 4.21 .185 .251 .257 444 .508

Since 1995
AVERAGE < .250
OBA < .320
SLG <= .350


RUNS CREATED/GAME YEAR DIFF PLAYER LEAGUE AVG OBA SLG AB OPS
1 Cristian Guzman 1999 -2.99 2.41 5.40 .226 .267 .276 420 .543
2 Cesar Izturis 2002 -2.84 2.18 5.02 .232 .253 .303 439 .556
3 Alex Cora 2001 -2.73 2.54 5.27 .217 .285 .306 405 .591
4 Dave Howard 1996 -2.70 2.84 5.55 .219 .291 .305 420 .595
5 Deivi Cruz 1997 -2.67 2.45 5.13 .241 .263 .314 436 .577
6 Ozzie Guillen 1995 -2.61 2.58 5.19 .248 .270 .318 415 .588
7 Cristian Guzman 2005 -2.60 2.47 5.07 .219 .260 .314 456 .574
8 Rey Ordonez 1998 -2.56 2.53 5.09 .246 .278 .299 505 .577
9 Gary DiSarcina 1997 -2.56 2.56 5.13 .246 .271 .326 549 .597
10 Mike Bordick 1997 -2.55 2.57 5.13 .236 .283 .318 509 .601


Eddie Brinkman had his career saved by Teddy Ballgame, otherwise he would have gone the Ray Oyler route.

Ray Oyler has to be mentioned, 1265 MLB at bats and this line:

.175/.258/.251/.508

Chip R
04-14-2006, 11:48 AM
Whoever he is, the worst hitter in baseball history can't be that bad, because if he were, he wouldn't have lasted long enough to be remembered.

Good point.

Falls City Beer
04-14-2006, 11:51 AM
The de la Hoz Award.

Pat Watkins?

Motolla?

westofyou
04-14-2006, 11:53 AM
Whoever he is, the worst hitter in baseball history can't be that bad, because if he were, he wouldn't have lasted long enough to be remembered.
If most of us knew the worst player in MLB chances are pretty good that he'd be the best baseball player we ever knew.

Yachtzee
04-14-2006, 12:03 PM
What?! No mention of this guy?!

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/mario_mendoza_autograph.jpg

Didn't he cross the picket line to help Hunt Stevenson save the Assan Motors plant in Hadleyville?

chicoruiz
04-14-2006, 01:28 PM
Mention needs to be made in this thread of Casey Wise, a Braves infielder of the 1950s, who spent four years in the majors compiling this line: .174/.243/.240.

And I don't know where this fits in, but my favorite negative batting stat of all time belongs to Enzo Hernandez of the 1971 Padres: 549 ABs, 12 RBIs.

Spitball
04-14-2006, 03:27 PM
Back in the 1960's, pitcher Hank Aguirre (pronounce: ah-gary) was reputed to be the worst hitter ever. He really had a feeble swing, but I do believe he had a hit or two in his career. Dean Chance and Gaylord Perry had pretty pathetic swings, also.

BuckeyeRedleg
04-14-2006, 03:35 PM
Mike Matheny -222


This certainly takes the luster off of his two K's against me in HS, back in '88.

Typical. I owned Mike Matheny. That will get me far with the ladies.

Cyclone792
04-14-2006, 03:45 PM
Bill Bergen (catcher), 1901-1911 (http://www.baseball-reference.com/b/bergebi01.shtml)

That dude had over 3,000 PA and put up a whopping career line of .170/.194/.201, good for a career OPS+ of 20. And yes, he did play for the Reds for three seasons from 1901-1903. Apparently Brooklyn found Bergen to be productive enough to purchase him from the Reds, and they held onto to him for eight seasons.

KronoRed
04-14-2006, 03:47 PM
Who did he have pictures of?

savafan
04-14-2006, 04:45 PM
http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/ty_cline_autograph.jpg
http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/clinety01.shtml

westofyou
04-14-2006, 05:05 PM
Who did he have pictures of?
Bergen has always interested me, he couldn't hit but I don't thing anyone really cared. Bergen was a fine fielding catcher in an era that demanded fine fielders.

The game loses fielding luster when hitting is at the apex, it becomes less important and less of a need when the conditions to create runs are more than convenient. Teams in the struggle to keep up with jones will sacrifice a little fielding in todays game for any increased offense. the payoff is larger due to the current conditions.

When the parks where huge and the ball a wad of paper in a cowskin the game called for different skillsets, often making defense at a position extra important, especially when looking at the game 100 years later.

In the deadball era a catcher made more assists on average, they had a waffle iron for a glove and the pitchers were doing everything to the ball before they threw it. IMO at no time was offense less important to a catcher as it was during the deadball era, with the 60's not far behind.


CAREER
1900-1912
C
GAMES displayed only--not a sorting criteria
FIELDING PERCENTAGE displayed only--not a sorting criteria

ASSISTS A G PCT
1 Johnny Kling 1458 1105 .971
2 Bill Bergen 1444 941 .972
3 Red Dooin 1421 1034 .956
4 Billy Sullivan 1288 1096 .977
5 Lou Criger 1109 789 .975
6 George Gibson 1001 859 .978
7 Pat Moran 990 696 .976
8 Roger Bresnahan 920 763 .969
9 Ossee Schreckengost 857 677 .973
10 John Warner 816 613 .975

ERRORS E G PCT
1 Red Dooin 289 1034 .956
2 Johnny Kling 201 1105 .971
3 Bill Bergen 161 941 .972
4 Billy Sullivan 142 1096 .977
5 Roger Bresnahan 138 763 .969
6 Ossee Schreckengost 137 677 .973
7 Frank Bowerman 131 644 .967
8 Lou Criger 123 789 .975
9 Admiral Schlei 111 561 .968
10 Deacon McGuire 110 509 .963

PASSED BALLS PB G PCT
1 Billy Sullivan 134 1096 .977
2 Red Dooin 123 1034 .956
3 Johnny Kling 120 1105 .971
4 Roger Bresnahan 109 763 .969
5 Frank Bowerman 107 644 .967
T6 Pat Moran 97 696 .976
T6 Lou Criger 97 789 .975
8 Bill Bergen 84 941 .972
9 George Gibson 79 859 .978
10 Ed Phelps 72 528 .969

IslandRed
04-14-2006, 06:14 PM
I can understand why there are players like Perez and Castro in the majors; there's still a place for the slick-fielding backup middle infielder. Even in the current offensive era, there aren't enough good-hitting shortstops to go around. But unless their defense is Ozzie-like off-the-charts good, that doesn't mean you should give them a starting job or pay them like anything but the easily replaced part they are.

Guys like Neifi Perez stay in the big leagues and get paid more money because guys like Dusty Baker would rather have him than a kid who can do the same things for the league minimum but doesn't yet have the Proven Veteran Seal of Approval.

remdog
04-14-2006, 10:51 PM
Back in the 1960's, pitcher Hank Aguirre (pronounce: ah-gary) was reputed to be the worst hitter ever. He really had a feeble swing, but I do believe he had a hit or two in his career. Dean Chance and Gaylord Perry had pretty pathetic swings, also.

I saw Aguirre pitch (and, therefore, hit) a couple of times when he was with the Indians. His swing was so bad that a foul ball was known to draw a standing ovation. :laugh:

Rem

camisadelgolf
10-27-2012, 06:28 AM
Necro-bump alert. This thread's from 2006. At what point do we start to talk about Wilson Valdez? He has to be a worse hitter than many pitchers in the league. And in retrospect, it's funny to see Neifi Perez brought up seeing as how Dusty's the manager now.