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StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 05:39 PM
I took a few pictures with my camera phone. They aren't the greatest quality. I tried to get a picture of Dunn during his HR swing, but you couldn't even tell what the picture was.

As for the game, all I have to say is that Dave Williams sucked, but you all knew that. From what I could tell is that everything he threw was either up in the zone, or in the dirt.

Sat next to Cards fans from Oklahoma. They were pretty cool.

The park is beautiful, and IMHO it's what Cincinnati should have built. The only thing that was bad was that there were no speakers under the deck in LF where I sat. We couldn't hear a single thing, not even the National Anthem.

http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/2544/scoreboard2wf.th.jpg (http://img69.imageshack.us/my.php?image=scoreboard2wf.jpg)

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/3232/smokingsection6mm.th.jpg (http://img155.imageshack.us/my.php?image=smokingsection6mm.jpg)

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/7937/batmaking7gz.th.jpg (http://img155.imageshack.us/my.php?image=batmaking7gz.jpg)

http://img157.imageshack.us/img157/3615/behindscoreboard8gk.th.jpg (http://img157.imageshack.us/my.php?image=behindscoreboard8gk.jpg)

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/1241/bp5gc.th.jpg (http://img225.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bp5gc.jpg)

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/74/harangclaussenarroyo9wf.th.jpg (http://img225.imageshack.us/my.php?image=harangclaussenarroyo9wf.jpg)

westofyou
04-15-2006, 05:40 PM
http://i.realone.com/assets/rn/img/1/4/3/0/7070341.jpg

StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 05:41 PM
http://i.realone.com/assets/rn/img/1/4/3/0/7070341.jpg

Ugh, Gavin. :)

indyred
04-15-2006, 05:57 PM
Park looks great.....well done for the St. Louis faithfull.................

pedro
04-15-2006, 06:37 PM
http://www.needlenose.com/i/gb/JennaBush.jpg

pedro
04-15-2006, 06:44 PM
Having never been to GABP, what was it about the new stadiumin St Loius that you thought was better than GABP? (on the inside)

MattyHo4Life
04-15-2006, 06:54 PM
FunkyB,

How did you do with the traffic and parking?

StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 08:32 PM
Having never been to GABP, what was it about the new stadiumin St Loius that you thought was better than GABP? (on the inside)

My biggest gripe about GABP is that they just squeezed it in on the river. It was as if they rushed the whole thing. It's a nice park, but a view of the Cincinnati skyline instead of the hills of KY would have been nice. When you are at GABP, it "feels" small, at least to me. Busch seemed alot more "open" and not as cramped. I sat under the deck in LF, in the last row, and I could still see enough of the scoreboards to know what was going on. When I sat under the deck in LF at GABP, you had one lousy little scoreboard that displayed R H E.


FunkyB,

How did you do with the traffic and parking?

Got downthere around 9:30ish. I took the Eades bridge, as suggested by someone else in the other thread. I drove down Broadway towords the park and just past the gate there was a lot for $15. Got the car in there in the first spot next to the exit. Took me 15 min to get back to the hotel here in Caseyville. Thanks for giving me the tip on going early, it really paid off.

StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 09:38 PM
They also have this thing where for $2.99 you can send a text message and have it displayed on the scoreboard.

I did this twice, once said "Go Reds! -RedsZone

The other said "Nobody scores on Danny Graves!"

I saw neither message, but these two people basically had a conversation. That's one expensive conversation.

cincy4life
04-15-2006, 10:13 PM
I completely disagree, i think the view of the ohio river is beautiful, but i dont get how you feel crammed in, we hardly ever sell out a game...

KySteveH
04-15-2006, 10:24 PM
It's a nice park, but a view of the Cincinnati skyline instead of the hills of KY would have been nice.

You know, I've heard a number of folks say this, and I can't really understand it. Why would I want to look at the Cincy skyline, versus the river? I've never heard anyone say that they should have built Dodgers Stadium with a view of the skyline...

MWM
04-15-2006, 10:29 PM
the problem is that you don't see the river unless you're in the upper level. And considering most games are night games, you can't see it at night. Cincinnati has a great skyline, especially at night time. Opening up to that would add a certain ambiance that the river doesn't. I think that's the biggest mistake they made with the stadium. They should have found a way to open it up to either the city or to Mt. Adams. From what I understand, they couldn't do it because they of space limitations related to Riverfront. They wouldn't have been able to build it that way and still have Cinergy to play in. They were pretty much forced into it opoening up to the river.

But they should have built on Broadway Commons anyhow. The stadium is OK, but it has John Allen written all over it. It could have been so much better without much more money.

KittyDuran
04-15-2006, 11:02 PM
the problem is that you don't see the river unless you're in the upper level. And considering most games are night games, you can't see it at night. Cincinnati has a great skyline, especially at night time. Opening up to that would add a certain ambiance that the river doesn't. I think that's the biggest mistake they made with the stadium. They should have found a way to open it up to either the city or to Mt. Adams. From what I understand, they couldn't do it because they of space limitations related to Riverfront. They wouldn't have been able to build it that way and still have Cinergy to play in. They were pretty much forced into it opoening up to the river.

But they should have built on Broadway Commons anyhow. The stadium is OK, but it has John Allen written all over it. It could have been so much better without much more money.

Wasn't there a problem [MLB regulations] of having the park open up to the skyline? Riverfront was not aligned with the skyline.

George Foster
04-15-2006, 11:03 PM
the problem is that you don't see the river unless you're in the upper level. And considering most games are night games, you can't see it at night. Cincinnati has a great skyline, especially at night time. Opening up to that would add a certain ambiance that the river doesn't. I think that's the biggest mistake they made with the stadium. They should have found a way to open it up to either the city or to Mt. Adams. From what I understand, they couldn't do it because they of space limitations related to Riverfront. They wouldn't have been able to build it that way and still have Cinergy to play in.

But they should have built on Broadway Commons anyhow. The stadium is OK, but it has John Allen written all over it. It could have been so much better without much more money.

This is all a moot point because MLB determines were home plate must be in relation to east-west. The only way to have the sky line visible from home plate is to have built GABP north of the skyline. No one wanted GABP built anywere but on the river. However land would have been pretty cheap in "Over the Rhine." :D You could go see the Reds and buy some crack on the way back to your car...if your car was still there.

MWM
04-15-2006, 11:08 PM
Wasn't there a problem [MLB regulations] of having the park open up to the skyline? Riverfront was not aligned with the skyline.

Yeah, from it's current location, it would have to face either due north or northwest to open up to the city, and MLB wouldn't permit that. It could have opened up to Mt. Adams, which would have been OK, but nothing special, IMO. There were so many limitations as to what they could do with the stadium once they decided it had to be between PBS and Cinergy.

Actually, the biggest mistake they made was sitting on their thumbs for so long and allowed the Bengals to snatch up the premier location for a stadium. Personally, I don't see why they were so adamant about it being on the Riverfront. The presence of F. Washington Way makes the riverfront a less than optimal location. Although, I know the City of Cincinnati never would have let it happen, a stadium across the river closer to Covington would have been the best of both worlds, similar to what Pittsburgh has.

MWM
04-15-2006, 11:11 PM
No one wanted GABP built anywere but on the river.

Well, not n NO ONE. There was a lot of people who wanted it somewhere other than the riverfront. I was one of them. I had no problems with the Broadway Commons location. And personally, as I mentioned above, I don't see why a riverfront location is so desirable. If there wasn't a freeway separating the riverfront from the city, it would be a great location. But because there is one, you have to cross back over to the city to do anything anyhow. It's not like there's anyting else on the river other than the stadium.

Caseyfan21
04-15-2006, 11:12 PM
I completely disagree, i think the view of the ohio river is beautiful, but i dont get how you feel crammed in, we hardly ever sell out a game...

I think I can elaborate a little here for him. It's not the amount of people in the park (at least for me) or the level of crowdedness inside the concourse, bathrooms, or concessions (although they can get crowded).

Personally, for me, it's more in the layout of the stadium. Having been to 3 or 4 of the other newer parks, the Reds stadium is just fit on less land. Where parks like Comerica (see my thread on today's visit) or Pittsburgh can build out and have a large area of seating inside the seating bowl, GABP had to build more up to fit all of the seats and areas onto the land. I never noticed this until I went to other stadiums. It's hard to describe but the seats inside other newer stadiums just appear to go more out than up. I think if the Reds had more land to play with they could have spread things out more but they didn't have that luxury for the location they selected. They were able to make up for it partly by having wider pavilion party type areas behind first base but it still feels a little taller and less wider inside the seating bowl itself.

KittyDuran
04-15-2006, 11:23 PM
Well, not n NO ONE. There was a lot of people who wanted it somewhere other than the riverfront. I was one of them. I had no problems with the Broadway Commons location. And personally, as I mentioned above, I don't see why a riverfront location is so desirable. If there wasn't a freeway separating the riverfront from the city, it would be a great location. But because there is one, you have to cross back over to the city to do anything anyhow. It's not like there's anyting else on the river other than the stadium.Whenever I think of Broadway Commons now is in relation to the riots in 2001 - I have this horrible image of it being torched or trashed...:( It would have certainly cleaned up the place - well as soon as they moved the jail...;) but it would have opened up to Mt. Adams and I-71 [for the layout given]. So either site had it drawbacks. Now if they wanted to build it around Mason or Blue Ash - :thumbup: [I could walk from work]

KittyDuran
04-15-2006, 11:26 PM
Personally, for me, it's more in the layout of the stadium. Having been to 3 or 4 of the other newer parks, the Reds stadium is just fit on less land. Where parks like Comerica (see my thread on today's visit) or Pittsburgh can build out and have a large area of seating inside the seating bowl, GABP had to build more up to fit all of the seats and areas onto the land. I never noticed this until I went to other stadiums. It's hard to describe but the seats inside other newer stadiums just appear to go more out than up.There is one advantage to that IMHO - you don't have your view blocked - at least in the upper levels and in the outfield. That's the only drawback to sitting in the lower levels - I'm short, so if a tall person is sitting a row ahead and one to two seats to the left, I'm out of luck.:(

MWM
04-15-2006, 11:27 PM
Whenever I think of Broadway Commons now is in relation to the riots in 2001 - I have this horrible image of it being torched or trashed...:( It would have certainly cleaned up the place - well as soon as they moved the jail...;) but it would have opened up to Mt. Adams and I-71 [for the layout given]. So either site had it drawbacks. Now if they wanted to build it around Mason or Blue Ash - :thumbup: [I could walk from work]

I agree, there were definite risks to Broadway Commons as well. The only perfect location was where PBS currently sits.

TeamBoone
04-15-2006, 11:27 PM
Although, I know the City of Cincinnati never would have let it happen, a stadium across the river closer to Covington would have been the best of both worlds, similar to what Pittsburgh has.

You're right... because they are the CINCINNATI Reds, not the Covington or Kentucky Reds. I don't think I or many others would have liked that either... plus, there's money involved had they done that... Ohio income vs Kentucky.

What Pittsburgh did is nice, but they didn't have any dilemma as the new ballpark is still located in Pittsburgh.

I remember when talk of a new ballpark first came up. I don't remember if I heard this or if I read it, but Bob Castellini (who used to own the majority of land that Paul Brown Stadium now calls home) was willing to DONATE that land to the Reds (but not the Bengals) if they would build the new park there. But, besides the fact that it took them forever to even put it on the ballot, following voters' acceptance, they took a long time to select an architect, make decisions, and finalize the ballpark plans (about two years, I think), he gave up and sold it to the Bengals. That was a huge mistake on the Reds part.

StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 11:30 PM
I think I can elaborate a little here for him. It's not the amount of people in the park (at least for me) or the level of crowdedness inside the concourse, bathrooms, or concessions (although they can get crowded).

Personally, for me, it's more in the layout of the stadium. Having been to 3 or 4 of the other newer parks, the Reds stadium is just fit on less land. Where parks like Comerica (see my thread on today's visit) or Pittsburgh can build out and have a large area of seating inside the seating bowl, GABP had to build more up to fit all of the seats and areas onto the land. I never noticed this until I went to other stadiums. It's hard to describe but the seats inside other newer stadiums just appear to go more out than up. I think if the Reds had more land to play with they could have spread things out more but they didn't have that luxury for the location they selected. They were able to make up for it partly by having wider pavilion party type areas behind first base but it still feels a little taller and less wider inside the seating bowl itself.

You stated my feelings perfectly.

I was in Detroit....a few months ago. I'm hoping that I will be going that way again before next month is over so I can attend a game at Comerica.

Is the Broadway Commons the area on the other side of the P&G towers where all the parking lots are?

KronoRed
04-15-2006, 11:34 PM
Like Kentucky people don't go to Reds games ;)

If they had wanted to, they could have gotten Kenton or Campbell county on board for splitting the cost, would have been cool..but I doubt Hamilton would have done that, too much ego.

KronoRed
04-15-2006, 11:35 PM
Is the Broadway Commons the area on the other side of the P&G towers where all the parking lots are?
A little farther up, near the courthouse.

Nice area :help:

StillFunkyB
04-15-2006, 11:42 PM
A little farther up, near the courthouse.

Nice area :help:

A nice new stadium might have finally been the begining of cleaning things up around there.

Newport's turning things around from way back when, why can't Cincinnati.

Poor city management is what plagues an issue like this, and why GABP is just nice, and not GREAT.

KittyDuran
04-15-2006, 11:50 PM
A nice new stadium might have finally been the begining of cleaning things up around there.

Newport's turning things around from way back when, why can't Cincinnati.

Poor city management is what plagues an issue like this, and why GABP is just nice, and not GREAT.Personally I'd rather the team be GREAT and the ballpark to be - well, just a ballpark... :)

indyred
04-15-2006, 11:50 PM
How does GAB compare to Jacobs field........

MWM
04-15-2006, 11:51 PM
How does GAB compare to Jacobs field........

It doesn't.

KittyDuran
04-15-2006, 11:52 PM
How does GAB compare to Jacobs field........I guess it's better [opens up to the city skyline]...

indyred
04-16-2006, 12:02 AM
I'm probally going to hit the Jake sometime this season.......from pictures it looks nice.......just hope it worth 5 hr drive......

KittyDuran
04-16-2006, 12:05 AM
I'm probally going to hit the Jake sometime this season.......from pictures it looks nice.......just hope it worth 5 hr drive......It's worth it... it's about a 5 hour drive for me as well - I'll be up there with the Reds in late June. The only drawback is when you're sitting in some of the lower level seats under the overhang you cannot see parts of the field or the large scoreboard.

OnBaseMachine
04-16-2006, 12:46 AM
Out of the four ballparks I've been to, I would rank them as:

1. PNC Park
2. Great American Ballpark
3. Jacobs Field(a close third)
4. Riverfront Stadium

MWM
04-16-2006, 12:57 AM
GAB over Jacobs field?

Is that just about sight lines and overall watching of the game?

OnBaseMachine
04-16-2006, 01:27 AM
I just love the view of the river, the smokestacks, and just about everything about the park. I don't think there is a bad seat in the park. The smokestacks, I don't know what it is about them but I love it. It sort of makes the park look unique, IMO.

The Jake is a beautiful place also. I've been there three or four times. Overall, I think it comes close to the Great American Ballpark but in the end I think my Reds bias and the coneys ;) win me over in favoring the GAB over Jacobs Field. You can't go wrong with either stadium, both places are fantastic. Indians and Reds fans should be proud of what they have.

StillFunkyB
04-16-2006, 10:08 AM
How does GAB compare to Jacobs field........

Well this is a tough one. I grew up outside of Cleveland, and after Cleveland Muni, going to Jacobs Field was like going to heaven. I have some sentimental value there.

My personal opinion is that the Jake is just slightly better than GABP. The only things that keep GABP close is the coney's and the smoke stacks.

Going to Busch yesterday was the first time I have been to a game at another stadium that wasn't in Cleveland or Cincinnati.

StillFunkyB
04-16-2006, 10:10 AM
Indians and Reds fans should be proud of what they have.

No doubt, and I don't dislike GABP. I just feel that it could have been much, much better.

vaticanplum
04-16-2006, 12:58 PM
Sat next to Cards fans from Oklahoma. They were pretty cool.

Wow...that's some dedication. I often wonder how my life would have been different had I not grown up in a city with a major league baseball team. I can't even imagine. I also wonder how all of our lives would have been different had the Dodgers never moved to California.


Yeah, from it's current location, it would have to face either due north or northwest to open up to the city, and MLB wouldn't permit that.

Why is this? Is this because of the home plate rule? (which not all stadiums follow, by the way)

Cyclone792
04-16-2006, 02:30 PM
Anybody been to a ton of parks? How would you rank them?

I've been to a fair amount, but clearly not enough :D Here's my rankings:

1) Tiger Stadium: Not sure what it is about this place, but I was fortunate enough to get there about three times before they closed it down. It's hard to explain, but going to a game there felt like you went back in time. The field itself was just beautiful, and when I walked around the park I just felt surrounded by an incredible aura and sense of history. The second deck RF overhang was incredible in the first few rows as it actually felt like you were floating above the field. In left field beyond the fence, there was about a 10-15 foot wide concourse sidewalk separating the fence from the section of seats, and during BP swarms of people would literally be diving on the concrete for batting practice home run balls.

2) Wrigley Field: Yes, I hate the Cubs, but the history part of me wins out with Wrigley. That and since I was able to sit in the first row behind the screen for the last three innings of that game, which was incredible. The setting of the park is just ... different. Being from Cincinnati, I'm used to having to go to a "downtown" to the stadium, but with Wrigley, it's just smack in the middle of a typical neighborhood, and you've got that neighborhood feel when walking along Sheffield and Waveland.

3) PNC Park: One of the newer, small, cozy parks that are similar to many of the other newer parks, but the location and city skyline views from the park separate it from most of the others.

4) Great American Ball Park: Most everyone reading this has been there :)

5) County Stadium (old Brewers stadium): Very similar to Tiger Stadium and Wrigley Field for me in that the history and age of the park pulled me in. Night games were unique because it felt like you were on your own little island in the park. I don't know why, but sitting along the third base line and looking out to the outfield, you felt like you in baseball heaven. Additionally, at least for the one game I went to, the home fans and ushers were extremely pleasant to be around, and despite the fact I was a Reds fan cheering for the Reds in their home yard, the Brewers fans around us pleasanty welcomed us in their park instead of wanting to spit in our faces.

6) Citizen's Bank Park: Similar park itself to GABP and PNC, but the location of the park leaves a bit to be desired. There's basically the park, vast parking lots and that's about it, unless you want to walk across the vast parking lots to one of the other Philadelphia sports teams' home venues. The food stood out to me as being particularly good, and Geno's Steaks is a classic. Just don't expect a warm welcome at all if you're cheering for the road team.

7) Comiskey Park (new Comiskey): Been 10 years since I've been there, so it's possible it's a bit different now. Overall, I'd rate it about average. It wasn't great, and is probably one of the less impressive of the stadiums built in the last 15-20 years, but I don't think it's as terrible as others have stated. The surrounding neighborhoods, at least in 1996, weren't the safest, but hopefully that's changed a bit in the last 10 years.

<--- Massive gap between 7 and 8 --->

8) Riverfront Stadium: I've hated the cookie-cutter stadium designs more than any other park design. Being there felt like you were entrapped in a dungeon, and the hassles fans without blue seat tickets would go through to get down to the field level blue seats were aggravating. I'll never forget the time I was wandering around the stadium and stumbled upon the Reds HOF plaques, lonely and hidden behind a wall out in center field. When they installed the grass and ripped part of the outfield out to accomodate the building of GABP, the park experience became a bit more enjoyable because it finally felt like you were at a baseball game, but still, I consider GABP a significant improvement over Riverfront.

9) Three Rivers Stadium: Same as Riverfront. Pittsburgh did itself a huge favor by abandoning Three Rivers and building PNC Park.

MWM
04-16-2006, 02:34 PM
Agree on Comerica. It's the best ballpark I've been to. It came so late in the game, that it doesn't get the publicity some others have received, but it's a phenomenal park. I'll be there a week from Saturday watching the Reds.

westofyou
04-16-2006, 02:53 PM
The field itself was just beautiful, and when I walked around the park I just felt surrounded by an incredible aura and sense of history.

Especially in the bathrooms, I swear Henry Ford used them.

vaticanplum
04-16-2006, 04:29 PM
Thanks for the list, Cyclone, I enjoyed that.

I don't know if I could rank the stadiums I've been too, but it's fun to remember them...I've always considered myself as having an odd fondness for the enormous cereal bowl stadiums, much more so than these new ones being retro for the sake of being retro. Riverfront Stadium et al. were pretty much uniformly ugly, but they were very much representations of their time rather than trying to imitate another time, which I appreciate even despite my love of baseball history. But when I started to think about it, I realized that I haven't actually been to any of the new retro cookie-cutter stadiums. So that might have something to do with it.

I think my favorite might have been Candlestick. I can't think of anything that was particularly notable about it aesthetically, but somehow seeing baseball there was like seeing baseball at its purest. One of the reasons I don't trust basketball is because it is a sport unrelated to and unaffected by weather. That's great in the world of professional sports and all, but the GAMES, as they were, were developed outside and I love it when elemental factors playing into things. Candlestick was cold, it was foggy, it was windy; you never knew exactly what would happen with a ball that would have been a routine pop-up anywhere else. It felt like those guys had to work that much harder out there and there was an element of excitement to it. Plus the location is unbeatable. A lot of ballparks are by the river, but the bay and the city itself are just so beautiful. I also remember the seats being quite steep, does anybody know if this is true?

I genuinely loved Riverfront too. It was, of course, the ballpark of my early childhood, my first exposure to baseball (and the team was good too), and those are pretty much my only reasons for loving it because it was indeed pretty nondescript. I remember being scared of the bathrooms though.

Yankee Stadium is an experience unique in baseball -- I think any true baseball fan should go there at least once (I know the same could probably be said about Fenway, but Fenway is the one stadium I will never go to). I know that some people complain about its size and general outdatedness, but I actually think it straddles quite a nice line between paying homage to the team's history without trying too hard or making it too much of a focus -- which I think is quite reflective of the team itself. There's Monument Park, of course, and the numbers on the wall, and the (replica) white facade which has to be one of the most recognizable features of any ballpark. But the history doesn't seem to overshadow the game itself. And it's just such a great freaking place to watch a game, the view is beautiful, and you can be guaranteed that almost every fan in the stadium lives and dies with the team. You can talk to anybody about anything and you will rarely come across someone who isn't extremely well-educated about the team and the sport. It's also such a great representation of the city, with a type of crowd you really don't see anywhere else, especially these days -- whites, blacks, Hispanics, a very large population of Orthodox Jews (they love the baseball). I once sat next to a kid who showed me the scorecard he was keeping with Hebrew notations. He was about 7. And the neighborhood is great too, loud and racuous.

I do love Wrigley Field as well, Cubs notwithstanding. It's gorgeous, well-kept and little, and not overdone with luxury boxes or too many frivolities. It helps that it's a five minute walk from my house -- I'm not crazy about the neighborhood, but that can't be beat for convenience's sake. The improvements have been well done, and the scoreboard is amazing as are the signs on both the front and back of the stadium. It's generally a happy place to watch a ballgame.

New Comiskey/Cellular (or Comiscular, as a lot of people call it): I was appalled the first time I went, but it's grown on me. There are a lot of diversions there which probably makes it great for kids. The scoreboard is awesome, and throughout the stadium they pay good homage to the teams past (murals on the walls, that ridiculously wonderful song they play during the seventh-inning stretch -- in general the quirkiness factor of the Veeck days still hangs over pretty strongly). I've had some problems with bad sightlines a couple of times, and the neighborhood isn't great.

Shea is huge, huge, huge and blue, blue, blue. It's a really fun place to watch a ballgame, rowdier and less tense than Yankee Stadium. There is always a large populations of Queens teenagers there and they're usually good, friendly kids. The home run apple is a riot. It's not the most "baseball" of experiences, but it certainly is a lot of fun and the stadium is humbling in its ginormousness.

Oakland Coliseum (I think it was network Coliseum when I was there, but nobody called it that) is ugly and pretty unnotable. But I like the surrounding area, and I used to go on dollar night (dollar tickets, dollar hot dogs) so they could have played in a pile of manure for all I cared. Poor fan representation. I wonder if this has changed at all the last few years, what with Moneyball and the team being perenially just on the cusp.

I took a tour of the outside of Safeco, so I can't comment on the park itself, but it's beautifully placed, like San Francisco, and I'd like to see a game there. Same with Olympic Stadium, which looked humongous, and I regret not seeing a game there. I went to Memorial Stadium (Bawlmore) once when I was a kid, but I don't remember anything except my cousin getting a beer spilled on him.

I think that's all I've been to. This summer I am going to Citizens Bank aka the Money Pit, PNC, and, for the first time, Great American, so I am looking forward to finally seeing some of the little parks.

westofyou
04-16-2006, 04:34 PM
Oakland Coliseum (I think it was network Coliseum when I was there, but nobody called it that) is ugly and pretty unnotable. But I like the surrounding area, and I used to go on dollar night (dollar tickets, dollar hot dogs) so they could have played in a pile of manure for all I cared. Poor fan representation. I wonder if this has changed at all the last few years, what with Moneyball and the team being perenially just on the cusp.

I like that park, I saw Bo Jackson have the game of his life there, plus I saw the Dead, Bowie, Dylan, The Stones and The Who there too. Nice park for sunny days... in fact I'm going to try and get there before June.

indyred
04-16-2006, 04:50 PM
Park I've been in.......
1. PNC Park
2. Miller Park
3. GAB
4. Yankee Stadium
5. Wrigley Field
6. Tropicanna
7. Metrodome

vaticanplum
04-16-2006, 04:58 PM
Oh also, speaking of other ballparks, I have updated my shot of the Wrigley scoreboard from Tuesday's game. who needs a box score when you can just count the homers?

I have better handwriting in real life.

KronoRed
04-16-2006, 05:02 PM
They should update that thing.

reds44
04-16-2006, 05:30 PM
Oh also, speaking of other ballparks, I have updated my shot of the Wrigley scoreboard from Tuesday's game. who needs a box score when you can just count the homers?

I have better handwriting in real life.
:laugh: