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savafan
04-17-2006, 03:04 AM
http://www.polarbearrepublic.com/images/2006/Apr/mdx02.jpg

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060415/SPT04/604150359/1071

BY KEVIN KELLY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

Fans who visited Great American Ball Park during the Reds' first home stand, and even some players, probably strained their necks checking out the franchise's new look.

The Ben-Gals now have major-league company: the Reds have cheerleaders.

"I think it's a great idea," left fielder Adam Dunn said. "It gets the fans into (the game) and gives us something to look at."

The new MDX Reds Crew, all-female cheerleading and dance troupe sponsored by Mountain Dew's new energy soda, formed this spring.

About 30 hopefuls auditioned last month for 12 spots. The majority of those selected have cheered or danced competitively at the professional or collegiate levels.

"It's the kind of thing we hope takes off and continues to be a positive and uplifting thing," said Phil Castellini, senior director of ballpark operations for the Reds.

"I think it's a fun, healthy, energetic addition to an already fun venue. We think the possibilities are endless."

Clutching red pompoms and sporting form-fitting outfits that offer a new take on the traditional baseball uniform, the Reds Crew is an offshoot of the more conservatively attired Pepsi Reds Rally Pack that launches T-shirts into the stands and dances atop the dugouts.

Three or four Reds Crew members work weekday games and four or five work weekend games. Each works under an independent-contractor agreement with the team and is paid based on the number of games worked.

"We're not here to 'flaunt,' for the lack of a better term," said Reds Crew supervisor Allison Leonard, a former Ben-Gals cheerleader. "We want the girls to be collegiate and classy and sporty.

"I really foresee this as being a huge opportunity for the girls to be involved and help make a difference in the community."

The troupe performs one choreographed dance routine on the field before the game. It joins the Reds Rally Pack atop the dugouts for more choreographed dancing between two designated innings that vary by game.

"We're being respectful of the purist nature of the game," Castellini said. "In our opinion, there's not supposed to be anybody on the field but players, umpires and grounds crew when necessary.

"So we did not look for ways to try and get them on the field in between innings, nor do we have a goal to do that."

The Reds Crew spends the rest of its time at games assisting with various in-game promotions and mingling with fans.

"With other cheerleading and professional dance teams, you're always down on the field and you're not really interacting with the crowd," said Reds Crew member Amy Livingston, 28, who cheered for the Cincinnati Swarm and Cincinnati Marshals indoor football teams and owns the Wellness Circle Inc. in Mason. "This really puts you right in the middle of the crowd.

"I think it's nice for the fans, too, because they feel like you are approachable and you are part of the Cincinnati Reds. It kind of makes them feel closer to their team."

But a concept unlike anything Reds fans have experienced before at the ballpark has drawn a mixed reaction.

Some fans snapped pictures of the Reds Crew or asked for autographs during the home stand. One fan approached Leonard during a rain delay April 7 and praised the idea.

"I think the fans are embracing it," she said. "I'm not going to lie and tell you there haven't been some negative comments, but I think it comes with the territory."

Tuesday's and Friday's broadcast of "SportsTalk" with Andy Furman on 700-WLW included discussions of the cheerleaders. The majority of the callers Tuesday did not support the idea.

"I don't think it's hurting anybody," Furman said Thursday. "But certainly there are people that are baseball purists in this town who say, 'What do we need it for?' It's almost funny and comical to have it in baseball, I think."

Mike McCafferty, a Cincinnati attorney, attended two games during the home stand.

"I think a lot of (young) people are kind of more into seeing something like that than getting a T-shirt thrown to you," he said. "(Reds chief executive officer Bob) Castellini seems in touch a little more with the fans than prior owners."

Even in a sport that operates without game clocks, television timeouts or halftimes, this is not unprecedented.

From Latin America to Asia, cheerleaders are fixtures at some baseball games.

A handful of Major League Baseball teams have tried the idea with mixed results over the past decade. The Florida Marlins, however, have made it work.

The Marlins Mermaids, a 20-member group that debuted during the 2003 season, thrive in the culturally diverse South Florida area.

"Especially in this market, sizzle sells," said Sean Flynn, Marlins vice president of marketing. "It was a pretty easy integration because of the environment here and almost kind of a no-brainer once the idea was brought up.

"We were fortunate enough to find a corporate partner, Banana Boat, which is a perfect fit. Since then, it's just taken off."

The Mermaids average 450 community appearances per year, and rival Billy the Marlin for most appearance requests.

They perform a choreographed dance routine on the field before the game and after the top of the fifth inning, dance on the dugouts three times a game, and act as emcees for in-game promotions. Afterwards, the Mermaids sign autographs and pose for pictures as fans leave the stadium.

"We've kind of developed our own way to utilize this asset, and this team is an asset," Flynn said. "Off the field is really where the big upside is. The in-game element brings added value."

The Reds hope to achieve similar success with the Reds Crew.

Plans are in the works to assist charities and represent the team at various team- and community-related functions.

"If they continue to be well-received and we're using them in various capacities," Phil Castellini said, "then I think it's something that will work and we'll continue."

MrCinatit
04-17-2006, 03:14 AM
I like the idea - as long as they do not become a large distraction. It seems right now, they actually seem to have the right idea - before the game, and between a couple of innings out of the way on top of the dugouts.
Besides...they look like a rather cute bunch.

MWM
04-17-2006, 03:19 AM
I hope this isn't the new regime's idea of good marketing. It doesn't hurt anything, but I hope they can do better than this.

KronoRed
04-17-2006, 04:05 AM
Terrible idea.

And no..if I met a cheerleader I would not feel closer to the team...gimme a break.

The Baumer
04-17-2006, 05:13 AM
I don't know what Castellini and Krivs are thinking bringing these cheerleaders on board. Their career numbers are below league average and they are taking up spots that can be better used on the unproven yet younger guy who operates the t-shirt gun. Looks like we have another DanO on our hands!

Caseyfan21
04-17-2006, 08:23 AM
"I think it's a great idea," left fielder Adam Dunn said. "It gets the fans into (the game) and gives us something to look at."


:laugh:

Perhaps now we've found the reason behind some of Dunn's left field adventures? Lack of focus?

BuckWoody
04-17-2006, 08:35 AM
As long as they're a scrappy bunch and give you a professional cheer every time out there, I've got no real problems with them.

ThatsAStrike
04-17-2006, 10:24 AM
I think it's great. The only problem I have with it is that I don't live in the Cincinnati area anymore and can't go to the games. :(

paintmered
04-17-2006, 10:26 AM
Couldn't they find a better place to take that picture? I mean, the only place available was between an SUV and a batting cage?:laugh:

Chip R
04-17-2006, 10:27 AM
Do they cheer the right way, though? Do they give the fans a professional cheer every time up?

RFS62
04-17-2006, 10:29 AM
More importantly, do they do the little things?

registerthis
04-17-2006, 10:31 AM
More importantly, do they do the little things?

I can vouch for the fact that, from personal experience, they do indeed do the "little things." ;)

Joseph
04-17-2006, 10:42 AM
My biggest complaint [not getting into the sanctity of baseball arguments] is that the name is terrible. The MDX Reds Cheerleaders? C'mon. Rosie Redlegs. Something. Anything. Just not a sponsors name. I can accept the Reds cheerleaders are brought to you by MDX, but they have MDX right on their unis if I recall correctly. [not that I looked at them at all while at the games]

ThatsAStrike
04-17-2006, 10:43 AM
Couldn't they find a better place to take that picture? I mean, the only place available was between an SUV and a batting cage?:laugh:Haha I was wondering the same thing when I saw that picture!

Jpup
04-17-2006, 10:49 AM
they certainly didn't choose them based on their headshots. :p:

how about going out and getting some pitching, they would bring the fans closer to the team.

westofyou
04-17-2006, 10:50 AM
I hope this isn't the new regime's idea of good marketing. It doesn't hurt anything, but I hope they can do better than this.

It's a corporate tie in that's for sure, and they're not the first cheerleaders the Reds have had.

http://baseballminutia.com/blog/2006/04/06/we-got-spirit-yes-we-do-we-got-spirit-how-about-you/

scounts22
04-17-2006, 12:04 PM
I can vouch for the fact that, from personal experience, they do indeed do the "little things." ;)

Yikes.

I don't know why, but I can't stand the fact that the Reds have freakin cheerleaders. It's baseball. Please don't ruin it.

smith288
04-17-2006, 12:08 PM
If Dunn likes it, who am I to complain?

macro
04-17-2006, 12:17 PM
If it means that the kids shooting the tee shirts out of the cannons are not at the ballpark anymore, then I'm all for it!

:laugh:

Red Rover
04-17-2006, 12:23 PM
Couldn't they find a better place to take that picture? I mean, the only place available was between an SUV and a batting cage?:laugh:

Is the SUV the one Freel bought off of Griffey? Maybe Freels about to give them a ride.

BCubb2003
04-17-2006, 12:34 PM
They ruined the game when they made base ball one word and let the players use gloves.

Actually, a little bit of Caribbean-style cheerleading and brass band hoopla might be nice. It was enjoyable during the games in Puerto Rico.

And westofyou's web site is awesome.

wheels
04-17-2006, 03:01 PM
I wonder if this was the secret behind Dunn getting signed.

Reds1
04-17-2006, 03:07 PM
Could we get more pictures on a thead like this. I need it to help me make my decision on what I think!

The Baumer
04-17-2006, 03:58 PM
The MDX Reds Cheerleaders? C'mon. Rosie Redlegs.

Ladies and gentleman say hello to your Cincinnati Rosie Redlegs!

http://www.tenpinleicester.co.uk/images/the%20old%20ladies.jpg

KronoRed
04-17-2006, 04:11 PM
If it means that the kids shooting the tee shirts out of the cannons are not at the ballpark anymore, then I'm all for it!

:laugh:
I liked those kids..and I always wanted to catch one of those shirts :(

Raisor
04-17-2006, 05:34 PM
I liked those kids..and I always wanted to catch one of those shirts :(


Here in Atlanta, they combine the two. The cheerleaders (though that's not what they call them) shoot the t-shirts.

They also stand around and look pretty between innings when they help with the trivia questions.

Me, I like the Home Depot tool race (the paint roller won yesterday. I thought the paint can got jobbed)

WMR
04-17-2006, 05:40 PM
I think it's lame. Maybe I'd feel differently if they had hotter chicks.

KronoRed
04-17-2006, 05:45 PM
Nobody goes to a baseball game to look at cheerleaders, if that's what they are after they go to "gentleman's" clubs and watch the game on TV ;)

Reds1
04-17-2006, 05:54 PM
Nobody goes to a baseball game to look at cheerleaders, if that's what they are after they go to "gentleman's" clubs and watch the game on TV ;)


Tell that to Adam Dunn! ;)

KronoRed
04-17-2006, 05:57 PM
Well he has to play in the game..bummer for him I guess

Marty and Joe
04-17-2006, 06:03 PM
What could be better?

Baseball... apple pie... sunny day... cheerleaders in short shorts...(the beer man can only entertain you so much...I'm with Dunn) ;)





And, no one better mention this to Mrs. M&J :D

:beerme:

Newman4
04-17-2006, 06:12 PM
"We want the girls to be collegiate."

What does that mean? "College Girls Gone Wild" is collegiate to some extent I suppose. I guess words that refer to education and cheerleaders don't quite seem to go together.

Gallen5862
04-17-2006, 06:19 PM
Will we have cheerleaders traded this year? Maybe to help Krivisky in trades we can throw in some cheerleaders to get some prospects.

smith288
04-17-2006, 06:19 PM
If it means that the kids shooting the tee shirts out of the cannons are not at the ballpark anymore, then I'm all for it!

:laugh:
I think at the BLue Jacket games, the hot chicks do the tshirt throwing.

Newman4
04-17-2006, 06:20 PM
As long as they're a scrappy bunch and give you a professional cheer every time out there, I've got no real problems with them.

From the games I been to so far, it appears the cheerleading squad correctly represents the Reds roster in that they have a couple aging veterans past their prime out on the field too much as well. :evil:

vaticanplum
04-17-2006, 06:43 PM
Their uniforms are ugly.

Superdude
04-17-2006, 06:48 PM
I don't mean to be cruel, but I could have round up a hotter group in an hour at a Home Depot!

MartyFan
04-17-2006, 07:09 PM
Big deal...I think it is different...not bad, not good.

Cheerleaders never got me into a game in any sport...I have always been a fan in the stands.

The Baumer
04-17-2006, 07:13 PM
Cheerleaders at this level are hired based on their dancing skills, whereas in high school you can be a cheerleader just by being hot and jumping around the gymnasium.

MartyFan
04-17-2006, 07:14 PM
Cheerleaders at this level are hired based on their dancing skills, whereas in high school you can be a cheerleader just by being hot and jumping around the gymnasium.

Yeah, so why didn't I make the squad?!?!

:dunno:

KronoRed
04-17-2006, 07:37 PM
Yeah, so why didn't I make the squad?!?!

:dunno:
Bad jumping? :D

KittyDuran
04-17-2006, 11:04 PM
Yeah, so why didn't I make the squad?!?!

:dunno:I didn't make the HS squad because I couldn't do the splits...:(

redsrule2500
04-17-2006, 11:15 PM
Goofy/Lame

NatiRedGals
04-17-2006, 11:43 PM
OFFICIAL NOTICE: Cheerleaders only come out during the times when the opposing team is on the field joy to the men that play on the opposing team

Phhhl
04-17-2006, 11:53 PM
"Reds Crew" is a lame name, but what's the big deal? I hear people complaining about this on the radio, and I can't imagine why anyone has an opinion about this one way or the other. It's going to be this or the dorky, peppy intramural squad that gets on top of the dugout and deploys shirts to the crowd between innings. There is nothing wrong with having a few pretty girls around.

The reason the Reds have them is because St. Louis apparently has a crew just like them. Castellini is modeling the franchise after the Cards, and not just from a baseball point of view. A guy called up on Lance's show this afternoon and mentioned the Cardinals have been doing it for quite a while.

macro
04-18-2006, 02:27 AM
I liked those kids..and I always wanted to catch one of those shirts :(

Okay, well, so maybe it wasn't so much the shirt shooters that annoyed me as much as the people who clobbered each other and spilled $5.50 beers and $4.00 hot dogs in an effort to get a $3.00 tee shirt. I just didn't get it. Game used baseball? Maybe. Tee shirt with Pepsi logo screened on? No.

WMR
04-18-2006, 03:06 AM
http://www.fortgreenepups.org/99/images/cheerleader.jpg

"WOOF"

KronoRed
04-18-2006, 04:03 AM
Okay, well, so maybe it wasn't so much the shirt shooters that annoyed me as much as the people who clobbered each other and spilled $5.50 beers and $4.00 hot dogs in an effort to get a $3.00 tee shirt. I just didn't get it. Game used baseball? Maybe. Tee shirt with Pepsi logo screened on? No.
Well yeah I wouldn't do that..nor would I pay 4 bucks for a hot dog ;)

creek14
04-18-2006, 09:25 AM
They aren't cheerleaders, they are Pepsi people with shorter shorts and better bodies. They run around with the Pepsi people before the game shooting tees to the crowd and do a couple dance numbers. They are there to appeal to the 13 - 29 male age group and to the middle age men who think they are hot enough to get a chick like that.

And for Adam, I watched him in the dugout when the girls were dancing between innings. I'm sure he needed a chiropractor after the game.

macro
04-18-2006, 11:39 AM
Well yeah I wouldn't do that..nor would I pay 4 bucks for a hot dog ;)

:lol:

What? You wouldn't lay down $4 for a roll of ground up animal lips?

westofyou
04-18-2006, 11:40 AM
They aren't cheerleaders, They're the Mountain Dew Flag Team, the Majorettes of corn syrup.

flyer85
04-18-2006, 11:42 AM
And for Adam, I watched him in the dugout when the girls were dancing between innings. I'm sure he needed a chiropractor after the game.Obviously Adam knows nothing about real women.



the middle age men who think they are hot enough to get a chick like that.
I can't believe I'm not hot enough to get a 20 something cheerleader babe ... especially if I leave some, er, green hanging outta my pocket.

scounts22
04-18-2006, 02:43 PM
From the games I been to so far, it appears the cheerleading squad correctly represents the Reds roster in that they have a couple aging veterans past their prime out on the field too much as well. :evil:

:ughmamoru

scounts22
04-18-2006, 02:47 PM
They're the Mountain Dew Flag Team, the Majorettes of corn syrup.

:bowrofl: :clap:

KronoRed
04-18-2006, 03:06 PM
:lol:

What? You wouldn't lay down $4 for a roll of ground up animal lips?
It's tempting..but I'm cutting down on the lips ;)

foxfire123
04-18-2006, 04:35 PM
Oh Puhleeze. No. Resoundingly NO. Get rid of 'em.

foxfire123

savafan
04-19-2006, 02:01 PM
For those who wanted pics, scroll to the end of the article.

http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060419/SPORTS01/604190343/1002

Gannett News Service
April 19, 2006
CINCINNATI - The first professional baseball franchise updated its look this year.

Some fans who visited Great American Ball Park during the Cincinnati Reds' first homestand, and even some players, probably strained their necks noticing.

The new MDZ Reds Crew is giving the Ben-Gals, who cheer for the local NFL team, some major-league company.

"I think it's a great idea," Reds left fielder Adam Dunn said. "It gets the fans into (the game) and gives us something to look at."

The Reds' new majority owners aim to improve the overall fan experience at Great American Ball Park and increase the team's community presence. Most of the 12 women selected have cheered or danced competitively at the professional or collegiate levels before.

"It's the kind of thing we hope takes off and continues to be a positive and uplifting thing," said Phil Castellini, senior director of ballpark operations for the Reds. "I think it's a fun, healthy, energetic addition to an already fun venue."

Clutching red pom-pons and sporting form-fitting outfits that offer a new take on the traditional baseball uniform, the Reds Crew is an offshoot of the more conservatively attired Pepsi Reds Rally Pack, which launches T-shirts into the stands and dances atop the dugouts during games.

Three to four Reds Crew members work weekday games and four to five work weekend games. Each works under an independent contract agreement with the team and is paid based on the number of games worked.

"We're not here to flaunt, for the lack of a better term," said Reds Crew supervisor Allison Leonard, a former Ben-Gal. "We want the girls to be collegiate and classy and sporty."

The troupe performs one choreographed dance routine on the field before the game.

It joins the Reds Rally Pack atop the dugouts for more choreographed dancing between two designated innings, but will not go on the field.

Even in a sport that operates without game clocks, television timeouts or halftimes, this is not unprecedented. From Latin America to Asia, cheerleaders are fixtures at some baseball games abroad.

A handful of Major League Baseball teams have tried the idea with mixed results over the past decade.

The Florida Marlins, however, have made it work. The Marlins Mermaids, a 20-member group that debuted during the 2003 season, thrive in the culturally diverse South Florida area.

"Especially in this market, sizzle sells," said Sean Flynn, Marlins vice president of marketing. "It was ... almost kind of a no-brainer once the idea was brought up."

The Mermaids average upwards of 450 community appearances per year, rivaling mascot Billy the Marlin for most appearance requests.

The Reds hope to achieve similar success with the Reds Crew.

"If they continue to be well-received and we're using them in various capacities," Castellini said, "then I think it's something that will work and we'll continue."

http://www.polarbearrepublic.com/images/2006/Apr/mdx01.jpg

KronoRed
04-19-2006, 03:59 PM
Even worse then I thought.