PDA

View Full Version : Walk off ?



Hubba
04-20-2006, 02:46 PM
Why is a walk off homer called a walk off homer? Where did it start?

Caveat Emperor
04-20-2006, 02:48 PM
Why is a walk off homer called a walk off homer? Where did it start?

I'd imagine because the minute it goes yard, everyone walks off the field because the game is over.

NJReds
04-20-2006, 02:50 PM
I knew why it was called a walk-off, but didn't know about Eck.

According to Wikipedia:

Walk-off home run
A walk-off home run is a term coined by famous relief pitcher Dennis Eckersley to signify a home run that immediately ends the game, so named because after the run is scored, the players can "walk off" the field. In order for this to happen, a member of the home team must hit a home run in the bottom of the last inning to either come from behind or break a tie.

vaticanplum
04-20-2006, 02:51 PM
I believe it is a relatively recent term. I remember reading an article about a year ago that said people treated it as a common term but it wasn't even widely used until about 10 or so years ago. Who's the word columnist, is that William Safire? i think it might have been one of his.

edit: Oh well, there you go, thanks NJReds.

vaticanplum
04-20-2006, 02:55 PM
A-ha!

halfway down:
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2005/05/08/2003253712

NJReds
04-20-2006, 02:57 PM
Maybe this is why the Eck coined the term...

http://sportsmed.starwave.com/media/mlb/2001/0421/photo/s_gibson_i.jpg

Danny Serafini
04-20-2006, 02:59 PM
I don't know about how it started, but it needs to stop. It's just one of those things that really annoys me.

KronoRed
04-20-2006, 03:00 PM
Like the hop.

oneupper
04-20-2006, 03:21 PM
In Latin America the opposite term is used.
The visiting team that loses in the bottom of the ninth (or in Extra Innings) is said to have been "left on the field" (dejado en el terreno).

Hubba
04-20-2006, 05:32 PM
A-ha!

halfway down:
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/editorials/archives/2005/05/08/2003253712
Thanks all and VP

2001MUgrad
04-20-2006, 06:49 PM
I hated it at first, but got used to it. Very descriptive IMO. It started being widely used around 99 or 2000 if memory serves me correct. When ESPN started using it a lot is when it caught on.

jmcclain19
04-20-2006, 10:16 PM
I just remember a couple of years ago I had never heard of the term and suddenly ESPN was using it seemingly every night on Baseball Tonight thanks to a string of game winning hits and homers. Now they use it relentlessly - and other media outlets have picked up on it. I don't mind "walk off homer" but when I hear like tonight Chris Welsh using "Walk off Bunt" or "walk off single" it starts to grate.

TOBTTReds
04-21-2006, 02:59 AM
Why would you hate "walk-off" anything. It is what it is. An EdE double in the 9th to end the game is still a walk off whether it left the park or not.

But my favorite made up word by ESPN: Trickeration; occurs when a football team, most likely, does a trick play like a flea-flicker or a WR pass play. Doesn't get much better.

knuckler
04-21-2006, 06:04 AM
But how could EdE have hit a "walk off double"? I thought a game-ending hit was always either a single or a home run, because there is no way to determine how many bases the hitter would have gained due to defensive indifference once the run scores.

Hubba
04-21-2006, 09:06 AM
But how could EdE have hit a "walk off double"? I thought a game-ending hit was always either a single or a home run, because there is no way to determine how many bases the hitter would have gained due to defensive indifference once the run scores.Ground rule maybe?

Blimpie
04-21-2006, 09:20 AM
I don't know about how it started, but it needs to stop. It's just one of those things that really annoys me.Our friend the "Game Winning RBI (GWRBI)" says :wave: