PDA

View Full Version : REDS NOTEBOOK: Coffey is staying in current relief role



Coffeybro
04-26-2006, 08:47 AM
http://www.middletownjournal.com/sports/content/sports/stories/2006/04/26/mj042606redsnotes.html


REDS NOTEBOOK: Coffey is staying in current relief role
WASHINGTON — As usual, when Todd Coffey came into Monday’s game he arrived at full sprint from the left-field bullpen, a long haul in RFK Stadium.



“Not as far as Coors Field (Denver) or Pittsburgh (PNC Park),” said Coffey. “And they have that thin air in Denver.”

The shortest run? Wrigley Field, where the visiting bullpen is at the end of the first-base dugout.

“I have to hurry to the mound in Wrigley when Coffey is coming in or he’ll beat me there,” Reds manager Jerry Narron said.

There are those who believe Coffey should be the closer instead of the seventh-inning or eighth-inning guy, but Narron doesn’t see it that way.

“Some people have the mindset that you bring in your best pitcher in the seventh or eighth inning, because that’s when the games are won or lost,” said Narron.

“I have all the confidence in the world in bringing Coffey into games with men on base. That’s what might keep him in that seventh- and eighth-inning role — his ability to do that,” he added. “It’s not easy coming in with men on base and face the middle of the order.”

Coffey giddy-upped to the mound early Tuesday. Narron summoned him in the sixth with two on and nobody out when the Reds led 6-3. He quickly got a double play.

Strangely, with three left-handers in the bullpen, Narron permitted Coffey to face left-handed pinch-hitter Daryle Ward and he singled for a run, then he struck out Alfonso Soriano to end the uprising.

Branding Brandon

Washington Nationals manager Frank Robinson apparently wasn’t that impressed with Brandon Phillips when the franchise was in Montreal. Phillips originally was drafted by the Expos, but never made it to the majors before he was traded to the Cleveland Indians.

Asked about Phillips and his National League Player of the Week award, Robby said, “Not the same guy. Stolen identity.”

Phillips considered the comment a compliment about his improvement and smiled broadly.

“He said that? A hall-of-famer said that about me? That’s some compliment because even though I only saw him in spring training and played a few exhibition games, he’s a good guy and a great baseball man. That’s only going to make me play harder.”

A calling card

When Alabama resident Chris Hammond took a tour of the empty U.S. Senate chamber Tuesday morning, he left a calling card on the desk of Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala. It looked to be an autographed baseball card of himself — in an Atlanta Braves uniform.

“It is a baseball card on the front, but it’s a testimonial on the back,” said Hammond. “I’ve met him and I thought he would get a kick out of it. I leave the cards everywhere — cab drivers, bellmen, waiters.”

Dunn not so dandy

Adam Dunn was in one of his now-and-then batting funks entering Tuesday’s game — 1-for-15 with eight strikeouts — but he isn’t coming out of the lineup anytime soon, not this guy who played 160 games last year, 161 the year before.

“Every time he goes up there, he has a chance to hit the ball out of the park,” said Narron. “It isn’t easy staying as hot as he was to start the season. When Ken Griffey Jr. comes back (Friday) it will take a lot of pressure off him. We have an off day Thursday and if there had been a left-hander pitching (for the Nationals) today I could have given him (Dunn) two days off.”

And does the guy have an eye, or what? Dunn was second in the majors with 21 walks, one less than Barry Bonds, who walks more than a postman in Manhattan.

Actually, Dunn might have a better eye because 11 of Bonds’ walks are intentional to only three for Dunn.

Dunn was third in the National League in homers with eight, behind Albert Pujols (12) and Morgan Ensberg (9).

Pujols is one home run shy of Ken Griffey Jr.’s record for home runs in April, set with Seattle in 1997. He has six games to match or break it.

Statistically speaking

Even though he hasn’t stolen a base in six games, Ryan Freel continues to lead the league with eight. And even though Dunn is entwined in a slump, he has scored 18 runs, tied with teammate Felipe Lopez for third in the league.

And here is one for you — Edwin Encarnacion’s 18 RBIs is sixth in the league and his eight doubles are the second most in the NL.

Contact this reporter at hmccoy@DaytonDailyNews.com.

BuckU
04-26-2006, 08:55 AM
“It is a baseball card on the front, but it’s a testimonial on the back,” said Hammond. “I’ve met him and I thought he would get a kick out of it. I leave the cards everywhere — cab drivers, bellmen, waiters.”

...Thats not cheesy or anything....

kbrake
04-26-2006, 09:05 AM
I know people want to see him close but I really like him in the role Narron has him in. There is no one else in this bullpen that I trust to come in with runners on. I like having Coffey there late in the game when someone else has put us in a jam.

Chip R
04-26-2006, 09:18 AM
Jerry Narron channeling Bill James?

gonelong
04-26-2006, 09:42 AM
“Some people have the mindset that you bring in your best pitcher in the seventh or eighth inning, because that’s when the games are won or lost,” said Narron.


At least he has heard the argument. Day by day my hope for this organization grows.

GL

traderumor
04-26-2006, 09:51 AM
At least he has heard the argument. Day by day my hope for this organization grows.

GLAmen. My eyes popped, then tears came (figuratively ;) ) reading that comment. The funny thing is, there is indeed nothing new under the sun. There was a day when your best bullpenners were on the mound at the point where the game was on the line, whether it be the sixth or seventh inning. They might even stay in for another inning or two if all was going well. I'm not sure how many more years it will take for managers to figure out that they are bringing in their worst pitchers too frequently and the game is lost before their best relievers are brought in. Perhaps a few more years of thinner and thinner bullpen ranks for so many teams will bring them to their senses. Glad to see Narron implementing the "new" philosophy now. Next thing you know, we'll see a 10 man pitching staff again :eek:

traderumor
04-26-2006, 09:54 AM
As I think about it some more, no Rick White for several days :thumbup:

That is a good sign that the bullpen pecking order is rounding into shape.

RedsFan75
04-26-2006, 10:31 AM
Coffey is the closer, he's just doing it in the earlier innings.

RedsManRick
04-26-2006, 10:33 AM
I actually really appreciate the comment Narron made about using Coffee in high leverage situations. When you don't have a ton of bullpen talent, using your best reliever in the high leverage situations, and then putting a solid but not spectacular guy in the closer spot makes a ton of sense. I'm glad to hear Narron thinks in those terms as well and isn't just going with the veteran for the sake of it.

paulrichjr
04-26-2006, 11:51 AM
OK I will say it. One GOOD move by DanO was the hiring of Narron. The guy if anything has made Redszone a more interesting place because every post is not about how stupid the lineups are. I love his comments about Coffey and I have never read any of the James stuff touting this. I just think it makes sense.

KronoRed
04-26-2006, 02:39 PM
Coffey is the closer, he's just doing it in the earlier innings.
Word.