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huber14
04-30-2006, 09:59 PM
So i am sitting at the game today, trying to enjoy it, then all of sudden 3 boys from elementry school sit behind me and start makeing these wierd sounds and laugh the entire game and would not shut there mouths. It really bothers me when im trying to enjoy somthing and i have these turds sitting behind me. Sorry if i sound like a butt, but i paid $17 to watch the reds, not listen to little bratts give me a headache. I guess i just wish parents would do more.

Falls City Beer
04-30-2006, 10:01 PM
So i am sitting at the game today, trying to enjoy it, then all of sudden 3 boys from elementry school sit behind me and start makeing these wierd sounds and laugh the entire game and would not shut there mouths. It really bothers me when im trying to enjoy somthing and i have these turds sitting behind me. Sorry if i sound like a butt, but i paid $17 to watch the reds, not listen to little bratts give me a headache. I guess i just wish parents would do more.

Did you tell them to shut their traps?

I know they're just kids, but I'm not at all shy about telling people of any age to shut their traps.

Shaknb8k
04-30-2006, 10:03 PM
It was still better than any day at the office im sure....Its just part of the game....i feel the same way sometimes but hey...ur at a baseball game...it doesnt get much better than that.

StillFunkyB
04-30-2006, 10:08 PM
So i am sitting at the game today, trying to enjoy it, then all of sudden 3 boys from elementry school sit behind me and start makeing these wierd sounds and laugh the entire game and would not shut there mouths. It really bothers me when im trying to enjoy somthing and i have these turds sitting behind me. Sorry if i sound like a butt, but i paid $17 to watch the reds, not listen to little bratts give me a headache. I guess i just wish parents would do more.

I have had the same thing happen, except substitute Cubs fans in place of the kids. No, I'm not trying to be funny. I had Cubs fans sitting behind me that talked loudly and didn't give a rats behind about what was going on down on the field.

huber14
04-30-2006, 10:12 PM
Did you tell them to shut their traps?

I know they're just kids, but I'm not at all shy about telling people of any age to shut their traps.


i glared at them every time they would say somthing and they would say they are sorry, then 3 minutes later it would start again. oh well it was better than sitting around all day like my usuall sundays.

Newman4
04-30-2006, 10:13 PM
all of sudden 3 boys from elementry school sit behind me and start makeing these wierd sounds and laugh the entire game and would not shut there mouths. It really bothers me when im trying to enjoy somthing and i have these turds sitting behind me.

Sounds like me when I'm at my desk trying to catch some Reds day game action on ESPN Gamecast at school with my 6th graders in the afternoon. :evil:

Just kidding! :D

SeeinRed
04-30-2006, 10:47 PM
Sounds like me when I'm at my desk trying to catch some Reds day game action on ESPN Gamecast at school with my 6th graders in the afternoon. :evil:

Just kidding! :D

Kidding..... right. ;)

Reminds me of the good old days, throwing a ball at the trash can. Good times.

George Foster
04-30-2006, 10:48 PM
It was still better than any day at the office im sure....Its just part of the game....i feel the same way sometimes but hey...ur at a baseball game...it doesnt get much better than that.

I always get the guy who is 6' 10" sitting infront of me..it never fails.

SeeinRed
04-30-2006, 10:52 PM
I always get the guy who is 6' 10" sitting infront of me..it never fails.

This is kind of sad in a way, but three times I have sat next to a guy that couldn't fit in one seat, or at least shouldn't try. Its one of those things where you don't know what to say about it, but it makes for a difficult time at the ball yard. It was so unconfortable, and I didn't want to say anything. Just sad though.

indyred
04-30-2006, 10:56 PM
does GAB have a guest services..........I would have told and usher and requested to be moved....I did this at NBA game in Minnesota.....and went from upper deck cheap seats..to some nice lower level seats....not sure if GAB does this..........

Newman4
04-30-2006, 10:59 PM
Kidding..... right. ;)

Reminds me of the good old days, throwing a ball at the trash can. Good times.

Shhhhh! :D

Newman4
04-30-2006, 11:03 PM
I always get the guy who is 6' 10" sitting infront of me..it never fails.

There was a guy 6'5" that got drunk and put his cup on his head and started talking about his dog "Astro" Friday night when I was there. It was the only time I liked having a tall guy sit in front of us at a Reds game. Dude was hilarious.

SeeinRed
04-30-2006, 11:16 PM
Last year, my buddy and I went to a Reds game towards the beginning of the season. Were bought bleacher seats but ended up sitting 12 rows from the field behind 1st Base because there was a rain delay. The Reds were up by a few runs and the pitcher was really struggling. A drunk guy in front of us started yelling things like "you suck" and got a little out of hand. An usher came down and told him he had to stop yelling negative comments toward the players. Probably because he was hurting the pitchers feelings, or at least thats my opinion. The guy sat there quietly for a second, and then yelled out, "Yeah, thats it, I like the way you throw your balls pitcher." He let out a few more, but that was by far the best one. The pitcher immediately gave up a homer and was taken out of the game, aparently because it was to late for the sweet talk, and his feelings were already hurt.:cry: (I made this next part up because it sounds better than "I can't really remember the rest of the game") Then the usher made the guy walk down to the wall and tell the pitcher he was sorry. Unpleased with the way he said "I'm sorry" while looking at his feet, the usher then said, "now this time, look at him and tell him your sorry like you mean it." After another weak "I'm sorry" the man was allowed to go back to his seat, but under the understanding that the usher was very dissapointed in him, that the man "knew better," and that if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all. No word on what his father had to say when the man took the note home written by the usher, or on the supposed soap in mouth punishment.

The Baumer
04-30-2006, 11:18 PM
This reminds me of when I was at a restaurant once and this couple in their thirties walked in. The host walked them over to a table near some children who were playing the video games/claw machine and the woman asked "Are there any sections without kids?" The waiter hesitated for a second, then reminded her "This is a family restaurant, m'am."

I can't identify with people who expect young kids to go to a ball game and not say a word. They're kids. Unless they are touching you, shooting spitballs at the back of your head, or yelling directly into your ear I don't see what the big deal is. It's a ballgame, not the opera.

Unassisted
04-30-2006, 11:41 PM
Too bad you weren't seated behind them, huber14. You could have "accidentally tripped" on the way back to your seat and spilled a beverage on them. ;)

KronoRed
04-30-2006, 11:44 PM
Smack em :evil:

Wheelhouse
05-01-2006, 12:42 AM
I once told a woman at Starbucks to silence her child, whatever the cost. She argued with a sense of entitlement that being a parent brings, and I told her politely, but firmly, that she needed to apply punishment to her child or the world will someday, and that if she loves the thing, she needs to suck it up and let the hammer fall. She failed to heed the wisdom of my words, but the austere tone of the conversation shut the kid up, so I had a temporary victory.

SeeinRed
05-01-2006, 01:04 AM
Best thing I have ever heard is that in some schools, teachers aren't allowed to say no or other "negative words." I don't know, but that would seem to confuse a kid more than help. I can't imagine politely saying a phrase like "Please refrain from doing that" while a kid was doing something that could hurt themselves or someone else. A kid needs a firm no every once in a while. Crazy how people have to be all "positive" and by the book when it comes to kids. Its a wonder any of us turned out to be anything but hard criminals.

scounts22
05-01-2006, 08:04 AM
Best thing I have ever heard is that in some schools, teachers aren't allowed to say no or other "negative words." I don't know, but that would seem to confuse a kid more than help. I can't imagine politely saying a phrase like "Please refrain from doing that" while a kid was doing something that could hurt themselves or someone else. A kid needs a firm no every once in a while. Crazy how people have to be all "positive" and by the book when it comes to kids. Its a wonder any of us turned out to be anything but hard criminals.


It's funny you say that, I was just having a similar conversation the other day. I teach 7th graders, which I love, but every now and then they just won't stop talking. I can say "Please stop talking" or "Quiet down" and they don't respond to what I'm saying. Every now and then I gotta break out that horrid "Shut up" and then they get quiet right away. I have a good rapport with my kids, but for whatever reason, that carries a more serious tone. I don't use it often, but it gets the point across.

Please don't think I'm a horrible teacher. :D

Falls City Beer
05-01-2006, 08:12 AM
This reminds me of when I was at a restaurant once and this couple in their thirties walked in. The host walked them over to a table near some children who were playing the video games/claw machine and the woman asked "Are there any sections without kids?" The waiter hesitated for a second, then reminded her "This is a family restaurant, m'am."

I can't identify with people who expect young kids to go to a ball game and not say a word. They're kids. Unless they are touching you, shooting spitballs at the back of your head, or yelling directly into your ear I don't see what the big deal is. It's a ballgame, not the opera.

An out of control kid is an out of control kid. Yelling, clapping, asking daddy questions is fine. Screaming, kicking the back of the seat, crying--then you need to find a babysitter for that thing, or at least have the common decency to take it out to the pop stand and calm it down.

What I can't stand are people who think that just because they have a kid, they have some special dispensation to turn it loose like a lawn mower in a crowded room.

minus5
05-01-2006, 09:38 AM
Pretty much any time that there is someone annoying in front of, behind or beside me, at a ballgame or any other type of entertainment, it is an adult....usually in their 20s (though not always) and thinking that they are much funnier than they really are and that the entire venue should be captivated with what they are saying and/or doing. Of course, I am always the jerk for asking them to be a little quieter (not so much at the ballpark) or less profane (usually at the ballpark) if my kids are there. I like beer as much as the next guy but as Clint said, a man's got to know his limitations.

membengal
05-01-2006, 09:40 AM
If that happens where I am sitting, I simply move on my own to a set of empty seats (of which, sadly, there are usually plenty)

Roy Tucker
05-01-2006, 09:54 AM
If that happens where I am sitting, I simply move on my own to a set of empty seats (of which, sadly, there are usually plenty)
My family does that to me when I take them to the game.

Blimpie
05-01-2006, 12:26 PM
Last season, my best friend found himself sitting next to Damian Thorne personafied at a game versus the Pirates. After about three innings of full-blown romper room, he decided he could take no more and used the kid's lower calf as a napkin to remove gobs of excess mustard from his pretzel.

The kid's shreiking caused his mom to promptly confront my friend....who, of course, informed her that her son "had bumped into him several times" and that he was "surprised he hadn't had a drink spilled on him too."

The evil spawn and his surrogate soon departed their seats to tidy up a bit. They were never seen or heard from again.

vaticanplum
05-01-2006, 12:48 PM
I have had the same thing happen, except substitute Cubs fans in place of the kids. No, I'm not trying to be funny. I had Cubs fans sitting behind me that talked loudly and didn't give a rats behind about what was going on down on the field.

That's just about half of Wrigley. Cubs' fans are all or nothing -- either die-hard and polite, or ignorant and obnoxious. The people who scream the loudest at the opposing team at Wrigley are usually the ones who never heard the players' names before. They drive me bananas, obvs. If you're going to be a jerk, at least be a smart one.

jhiller21
05-01-2006, 01:06 PM
I was at the game yesterday, and there was a baby near us howling and screaming the entire game. This I don't understand, not only is it dangerous to bring a baby to a ballgame (foul ball screamers were hit at our section several times), but it's unnecessary seeing as the baby doesn't want to be there at all. Every time I see a baby at a ballgame they are crying.

Please folks, get a babysitter or stay home.

KittyDuran
05-01-2006, 01:15 PM
I was at the game yesterday, and there was a baby near us howling and screaming the entire game. This I don't understand, not only is it dangerous to bring a baby to a ballgame (foul ball screamers were hit at our section several times), but it's unnecessary seeing as the baby doesn't want to be there at all. Every time I see a baby at a ballgame they are crying.

Please folks, get a babysitter or stay home.I went to my first ML baseball game in 1971, and seriously do not remember any kids under 5 or 6 and certainly no infants (dangerous and someone has to mind them - so that person is not enjoying the game).

Chip and I sat below a large family yesterday - not too bad - but kids were getting up to get food a lot (and also ordering from the vendors). Mom (?) was having trouble telling the two teams apart (probably because both were wearing red) and had a few expletives to say as well. :p:

The Baumer
05-01-2006, 01:15 PM
An out of control kid is an out of control kid. Yelling, clapping, asking daddy questions is fine. Screaming, kicking the back of the seat, crying--then you need to find a babysitter for that thing, or at least have the common decency to take it out to the pop stand and calm it down.


What you're saying is totally valid. I agree. I was referring to the original poster who was annoyed at the kids for "laughing" and making "weird noises". I don't see any valid reason why a child should stop having fun with his family because an adult doesn't like the sound of their "weird" voice. That sounds like someone who just doesn't like kids period.

KittyDuran
05-01-2006, 01:23 PM
This reminds me of when I was at a restaurant once and this couple in their thirties walked in. The host walked them over to a table near some children who were playing the video games/claw machine and the woman asked "Are there any sections without kids?" The waiter hesitated for a second, then reminded her "This is a family restaurant, m'am."

I can't identify with people who expect young kids to go to a ball game and not say a word. They're kids. Unless they are touching you, shooting spitballs at the back of your head, or yelling directly into your ear I don't see what the big deal is. It's a ballgame, not the opera.If you substitute a couple in their 80s, that would describe my parents - tho' they usually avoid "family" restaurants. Anyhoo, it's one of my parents pet peeves. I didn't go to a restaurant until I was 6 and I remember dropping my little sis (who was about 3) off at my grandparents because she wasn't old enough.

Then there was a time when one of my sister and kids took my parents out to McDonald's - my niece and nephew were about 6 and 3 respectfully. Well, my nephew was acting up and throwing his food. My sister ignored him but my Dad took him outside and spanked him. Of course, he wanted to go back inside to be with mom but Dad said no. When my sister, niece and Mom get outside my Dad said, "Here's your little ----!" :laugh: My sister has never forgotten that.

KittyDuran
05-01-2006, 01:24 PM
What you're saying is totally valid. I agree. I was referring to the original poster who was annoyed at the kids for "laughing" and making "weird noises". I don't see any valid reason why a child should stop having fun with his family because an adult doesn't like the sound of their "weird" voice. That sounds like someone who just doesn't like kids period. That's one good thing about taking a walkman to the game - you can drown out unwanted noises...:)

Caveat Emperor
05-01-2006, 01:25 PM
I always get the guy who is 6' 10" sitting infront of me..it never fails.

If he was wearing an Aaron Boone jersey and a Red Sox hat turned backwards (possibly yelling something at the right fielder) -- I'm sorry. Kick me next time and I'll slump down a little more. :thumbup:

Not that it makes you feel any better, but the seats at GABP aren't exactly the most comfortable for those of us who are in the 6'10" range.

KittyDuran
05-01-2006, 01:47 PM
I always get the guy who is 6' 10" sitting infront of me..it never fails.I seem to always get a "larger" person in front of me if I'm in the lower level because of the row elevation is not so high as it is in the upper deck, bleachers and moon/sun deck.

Falls City Beer
05-01-2006, 01:56 PM
If he was wearing an Aaron Boone jersey and a Red Sox hat turned backwards (possibly yelling something at the right fielder) -- I'm sorry. Kick me next time and I'll slump down a little more. :thumbup:

Not that it makes you feel any better, but the seats at GABP aren't exactly the most comfortable for those of us who are in the 6'10" range.

At 6' 6", I always hear people behind me groaning when I sit down. I just shrug my shoulders and mumble something about "hereditary," "Grandpa," and "kissing" a certain part of my anatomy.

minus5
05-01-2006, 02:14 PM
he decided he could take no more and used the kid's lower calf as a napkin to remove gobs of excess mustard from his pretzel.


Sorry but bumping into your friend or not, if that was my kid, your friend would have left the park very bruised that day. Not cool.

Roy Tucker
05-01-2006, 02:23 PM
This is an interesting thread to read. I have a pretty high tolerance for fan behavior around me. I guess I view a ballgame as a fairly rowdy time and a community event. It's not a movie where you shush people, it's *ballgame* fer cryin' out loud.

About the only think that irk me are drunks and profanity and ushers help with this a lot more now than they had previously.

If there is some loudmouth blathering on about something (other than me), I'll turn around and say "really, you think Dunn is worthless?" and get into it a litte with them. I've got enough social skillz to avoid having it turn into a neck-vein bulging argument type thing.

I've taken more than my share of kids to ballgames so I am generally sympathetic to parents with kids. My kids have been to games since they were mere babes. IIRC, there was probably a gap between infant and about 2 where they didn't go, but after that, I've taken my family to many a game. Sometimes it gets a little dicey, but I just make sure I hit up the money machine on the way in and buy a lot of cotton candy, ice cream, licorice whips, etc etc to keep 'em happy.

If they are wildly out of control, I might get a little grumpy but that seems to be a very infrequent thing. I've got kids so I know kids might talk loud, make fart noises, act silly, booger jokes, spill their pop, etc etc. and that's all OK with me. Half the time I'm being silly right along with them.

But heck, half the fun of a game is the crowd around you and making fun of cell phone usage, stupid dancing on the Jumbotron, shooting hot dogs into the stands, yelling at Puffy, etc etc.

timmario66
05-01-2006, 02:24 PM
I was at the game yesterday, and there was a baby near us howling and screaming the entire game. This I don't understand, not only is it dangerous to bring a baby to a ballgame (foul ball screamers were hit at our section several times), but it's unnecessary seeing as the baby doesn't want to be there at all. Every time I see a baby at a ballgame they are crying.

Please folks, get a babysitter or stay home.

Totally agree. I have a partial season tickets to the Blue Jackets and there's a guy who has two tickets next to us and one of them is for his 2 year old kid who does nothing but jump up and down in his seat, kick the glass in front of us, throw stuff, and wipe his food on my friend sitted next to him.

I can't imagine wasting that much money on a toddler who won't even remember the game or even cares if they are there.

traderumor
05-01-2006, 02:33 PM
I have 6 kids. We take them anywhere. Seldom are they disruptive, at least for very long. We get the looks from those seated around us when we walk in. The look is "well, there goes any enjoyment of this evening." Before we leave, people are smiling and making comments about good behavior. What is sad is that this type of behavior seems out of the ordinary. I agree that there are many parents who do not enforce respectful behavior of their children, or leave their children unsupervised. But I'm not sure it is a reasonable expectation for the kids described to not be acting...like...well....kids, especially at a baseball game.

I guess all of us old farts can sit around and enjoy the game while the younger generation is too much of a bother to allow into the yard. I'm not sure how wise that is, though, as we try to pass the game onto another generation. But what happens when the fogies start making those awful coughing up goober sounds? Do we go get an usher? Or what about john 25-30 something, who is sitting behind you saying "f this, fthat, gimme another beer beerman (slurred speech and all)" then spills the beer down your back.

BTW, one thing I've found to help with other people's unruly kids is to start talking friendly to the offenders with small talk, show them a little respect, then kindly ask them if they could stop with the bad behavior, they'll usually apologize and stop, or leave. Kids, even ones acting up, deserve to be treated with respect if we want them to learn to do the same for others.

westofyou
05-01-2006, 02:36 PM
Kids, even ones acting up, deserve to be treated with respect if we want them to learn to do the same for others.yep, and I'd rather see 10,000 of them at the ballpark over some know it all with 5 beers in him and a strong voice.


that she needed to apply punishment to her child or the world will someday
Nice, really just precious.

pedro
05-01-2006, 02:41 PM
At 6' 6", I always hear people behind me groaning when I sit down. I just shrug my shoulders and mumble something about "hereditary," "Grandpa," and "kissing" a certain part of my anatomy.

That's the equivilent of giving someone a backrub in Philly.

Falls City Beer
05-01-2006, 02:42 PM
I have 6 kids. We take them anywhere. Seldom are they disruptive, at least for very long. We get the looks from those seated around us when we walk in. The look is "well, there goes any enjoyment of this evening." Before we leave, people are smiling and making comments about good behavior. What is sad is that this type of behavior seems out of the ordinary. I agree that there are many parents who do not enforce respectful behavior of their children, or leave their children unsupervised. But I'm not sure it is a reasonable expectation for the kids described to not be acting...like...well....kids, especially at a baseball game.

I guess all of us old farts can sit around and enjoy the game while the younger generation is too much of a bother to allow into the yard. I'm not sure how wise that is, though, as we try to pass the game onto another generation. But what happens when the fogies start making those awful coughing up goober sounds? Do we go get an usher? Or what about john 25-30 something, who is sitting behind you saying "f this, fthat, gimme another beer beerman (slurred speech and all)" then spills the beer down your back.

BTW, one thing I've found to help with other people's unruly kids is to start talking friendly to the offenders with small talk, show them a little respect, then kindly ask them if they could stop with the bad behavior, they'll usually apologize and stop, or leave. Kids, even ones acting up, deserve to be treated with respect if we want them to learn to do the same for others.

I seldom have issue with the kids themselves, but rather the parents--the ones arguing with each other or who are on a cell phone while their little anklebiters are busy destroying property value.

And, obviously, drunk idiots are equally, if not more, annoying.

It's just that some people think they get special permission to be irresponsible because they have kids.

vaticanplum
05-01-2006, 02:43 PM
When I see kids acting up around me, their parents reactions (or lack thereof) usually bug me a heck of a lot more than the kids. Kids are kids, they make noise, and baseball games are long. But the kids who are acting up seem to rarely have parents who properly deal with it. Funny that.

Kids should be at ballgames, and restaurants and plays and the opera and wherever. They will never learn to behave in public if you never take them anywhere. But they will also never learn if their parents don't teach them.

EDIT: or, alternatively, what FCB said as I was posting.

bucknutdet
05-01-2006, 02:44 PM
FYI, babies/kids aren't "thing(s)" they are human beings.

Falls City Beer
05-01-2006, 02:47 PM
FYI, babies/kids aren't "thing(s)" they are human beings.

Oh, please spare me your righteous indignation. Have a sense of humor. And as a grade school student, I can tell you, unequivocally, I was more "thing" than "boy."

Caveat Emperor
05-01-2006, 02:51 PM
FYI, babies/kids aren't "thing(s)" they are human beings.

I dunno -- I've seen kids as old as 10 do things and create destruction that no human being should be capable of.

Besides, I don't think kids attain "human being" status until they learn that saying/doing the first thing that pops into their mind isn't a proper way to behave in society. Before that point, they're just really advanced stimulus-response creatures. :evil:

vaticanplum
05-01-2006, 02:53 PM
FYI, babies/kids aren't "thing(s)" they are human beings.

One of my best friends doesn't mind kids, but hates babies. She has no patience for anything that can't hold a conversation with her, and refers to all babies as "thing" and "it". But in a charming way, like.

bucknutdet
05-01-2006, 02:55 PM
Oh, please spare me your righteous indignation. Have a sense of humor. And as a grade school student, I can tell you, unequivocally, I was more "thing" than "boy."

Is that still the case?:laugh:

The laugh is how you know the post is in jest. If it's not there how is one to know your post is serious or not.


As for babies not being human until they learn what they are doing, that is simply ridiculous. I surely hope that statement was meant in jest.

Falls City Beer
05-01-2006, 03:02 PM
One of my best friends doesn't mind kids, but hates babies. She has no patience for anything that can't hold a conversation with her, and refers to all babies as "thing" and "it". But in a charming way, like.

The cult of the baby. Ack!

I love my two daughters more than anything in my life excepting my wife--but my wife and I don't treat them like Tiffany lamps or live hand grenades. They're kids; they need limitations, and they need to be aware that gratification MUST be delayed. Therefore, they're not going to get what they want even an 1/8th of the time.

The parents run the show in the Beer household. And the kids are the kids. This isn't that Twilight Zone episode where the creepy kid turns his family into jacks-in-the-box.

Hap
05-01-2006, 03:52 PM
I once told a woman at Starbucks to silence her child, whatever the cost.

Saying that to someone can possibly bring about unwanted consequences. Remember when Hawkeye Pierce said that to the Korean woman on the bus when they were trying to pass through enemy lines?

minus5
05-01-2006, 03:56 PM
Saying that to someone can possibly bring about unwanted consequences. Remember when Hawkeye Pierce said that to the Korean woman on the bus when they were trying to pass through enemy lines?

Wait, that wasn't a chicken she was holding....

Blimpie
05-01-2006, 04:35 PM
Sorry but bumping into your friend or not, if that was my kid, your friend would have left the park very bruised that day. Not cool.I was actually sitting in another part of the park that day with my son, but my friend's wife had a tendency to agree with you. She ended up leaving him there and coming to sit with me for the duration of the game. Alcohol has a tendency to bring out the worst in people.

FWIW, I didn't really think it was too cool either--though, I was merely adding to the litany of things that have been discussed in this thread regarding what happens when people become frustrated with inconsiderate fans in the stands.

minus5
05-01-2006, 04:59 PM
[QUOTE=Blimpie] Alcohol has a tendency to bring out the worst in people.
QUOTE]
Are my friends and I the only ones left that just laugh a little more while imbibing (and not at the expense of others)? It really is a shame that people get so belligerent while they are out. Kudos to your friend's wife...mine probably would have hit me with something heavy...:bash:

red-in-la
05-01-2006, 05:01 PM
Did you tell them to shut their traps?

I know they're just kids, but I'm not at all shy about telling people of any age to shut their traps.

That makes us old farts FCB.:help:

Benny-Distefano
05-01-2006, 05:32 PM
In 1987 I was 12 years old. That year and the next 2 or 3 years after, a good friend of mine and I probably went to 30 games a year on average. Even though we were pretty young, mom would let us take the bus downtown and we'd leave in time to catch the last bus home.

We'd get down there early for autographs and to watch BP. When asking for autographs it was always "Mr. Larkin, Mr. Davis, Mr. Oester," etc etc etc. During the game, eyes always intent on the action of the game, I was even prone to quite a few cheesy "hey batta batta batta SWING!" Other than that, we came early, bought a pretzel and coke, watched the game, and when the game was over, we picked up our trash and went home.

I know I'm going to sound 90 years old by saying this but... where did kids like THAT disappear to?

This has been an educational thread for me, because it is nice to learn that I am not the only one who notices these things. From the 12 year old trapped in a drunk 25 year old's body, to the 12 year old himself, every time I catch a ballgame I wonder "when did people forget how to conduct themselves in a respectful manner?" I dunno, maybe I just never noticed when I was younger, but nowadays, every Bengals/Reds game I go to, I am never more than a beer's throw away from some loudmouth jerk, young or old.

huber14
05-01-2006, 10:17 PM
In 1987 I was 12 years old. That year and the next 2 or 3 years after, a good friend of mine and I probably went to 30 games a year on average. Even though we were pretty young, mom would let us take the bus downtown and we'd leave in time to catch the last bus home.

That sounds like the life. I wish i didnt live over 150 miles away sometimes. To the people that said i hate kids, i dont hate kids, just being 18 i get annoyed with them, i would rather study the game and really focus than to listen to them.

BUTLER REDSFAN
05-01-2006, 10:26 PM
So i am sitting at the game today, trying to enjoy it, then all of sudden 3 boys from elementry school sit behind me and start makeing these wierd sounds and laugh the entire game and would not shut there mouths. It really bothers me when im trying to enjoy somthing and i have these turds sitting behind me. Sorry if i sound like a butt, but i paid $17 to watch the reds, not listen to little bratts give me a headache. I guess i just wish parents would do more.


he said turds :)

Deepred05
05-02-2006, 07:44 AM
That sounds like the life. I wish i didnt live over 150 miles away sometimes. To the people that said i hate kids, i dont hate kids, just being 18 i get annoyed with them, i would rather study the game and really focus than to listen to them.
18??:D Say no more

huber14
05-02-2006, 10:11 AM
18??:D Say no more
Dont worry im not a punk teenager