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Hap
05-16-2006, 11:00 PM
LINK (Bonds hit in shoulder to end wild at-bat against Astros' Springer)

May 16, 2006

HOUSTON (AP) -- Barry Bonds was plunked in the right shoulder to end a wild at-bat against Astros right-hander Russ Springer on Tuesday night.

With the San Francisco slugger leading off the fifth inning, Springer's first pitch sailed behind Bonds' back, drawing a warning from plate umpire Joe West.

The next four pitches all came inside, including one that hit Bonds' bat handle on the third delivery for strike one. The fifth pitch hit Bonds as he turned to protect himself.

That's when Springer and manager Phil Garner got ejected -- and the Houston crowd gave Springer a standing ovation.

Bonds was unhurt and trotted down the first-base line and later scored on Jose Vizcaino's RBI single to give the Giants a 12-3 lead.

The 41-year-old Bonds had already singled twice and driven in a run in San Francisco's five-run first. He also flied out at the warning track in right.

Bonds was playing for the eighth straight game in as many days in his pursuit of Babe Ruth's 714 home runs for second place on the career list.

Springer relieved Houston starter Wandy Rodriguez, who lasted only 3 2-3 innings.

savafan
05-16-2006, 11:01 PM
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/baseball/2010AP_BBN_Bonds_Plunked.html

HOUSTON -- Barry Bonds was plunked in the right shoulder to end a wild at-bat against Astros right-hander Russ Springer on Tuesday night.

With the San Francisco slugger leading off the fifth inning, Springer's first pitch sailed behind Bonds' back, drawing a warning from plate umpire Joe West.

The next four pitches all came inside, including one that hit Bonds' bat handle on the third delivery for strike one. The fifth pitch hit Bonds as he turned to protect himself.

That's when Springer and manager Phil Garner got ejected - and the Houston crowd gave Springer a standing ovation.

Bonds was unhurt and trotted down the first-base line and later scored on Jose Vizcaino's RBI single to give the Giants a 12-3 lead.

The 41-year-old Bonds had already singled twice and driven in a run in San Francisco's five-run first. He also flied out at the warning track in right.

Bonds was playing for the eighth straight game in as many days in his pursuit of Babe Ruth's 714 home runs for second place on the career list.

Springer relieved Houston starter Wandy Rodriguez, who lasted only 3 2-3 innings.

CTA513
05-16-2006, 11:02 PM
Im sure the Giants will hit an Astros player tomorrow. :)

Matt700wlw
05-16-2006, 11:02 PM
I shouldn't laugh...

kyle1976
05-16-2006, 11:03 PM
That's great.....:clap:

CTA513
05-16-2006, 11:04 PM
That's great.....:clap:

Astros fans wont be cheering when someone like Ensberg or Berkman get plunked.

:evil:

edabbs44
05-16-2006, 11:05 PM
Good...Barry will probably come to the plate in full body armor tomorrow, instead of that ridiculous thing he wears on his elbow.

savafan
05-16-2006, 11:11 PM
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20060517/capt.bc09a1a4c14a4dddb26e6a9a4304c282.giants_astro s_baseball_hta123.jpg

http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/rids/20060517/i/r3840921951.jpg

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20060517/capt.055bdf156d9643a3ac284c4334655db9.giants_astro s_baseball_hta122.jpg

kyle1976
05-16-2006, 11:16 PM
nice pics!

KronoRed
05-16-2006, 11:18 PM
I like that Springer guy

traderumor
05-16-2006, 11:20 PM
Gotta be related to Jerry

CTA513
05-16-2006, 11:26 PM
Im guessing that a Giants pitcher will get tossed tomorrow for plunking someone in the head.

:beerme:

oneupper
05-16-2006, 11:29 PM
Springer for MVP! (Most Valiant Plunker)

kheidg-
05-17-2006, 02:23 AM
money shots

CTA513
05-17-2006, 02:39 AM
Bonds should be able to throw his bat at Springer.

:thumbup:

dman
05-17-2006, 06:32 AM
It's about time. I figured it would be a Houston pitcher that did this but I thought it would've been Oswalt.

Strikes Out Looking
05-17-2006, 08:12 AM
I have no problem with what Springer did. Someone should have done this about 5 years ago.

EKURed
05-17-2006, 08:14 AM
If anyone saw the at-bat, it was ridiculous. Be a man and go get him out, don't throw 6 pitches way inside hoping to hit him. I'm not much on Bonds, but I do give him credit for how he handled the situation. It's pretty ridiculous for a major league pitcher to throw at a hitter so many times in the same at-bat. Even more pathetic that it took him that many times to hit him. If you can't hit him after the first time or two, give it up and intentionally walk him since it was obvious he didn't want to pitch to him.

Roy Tucker
05-17-2006, 08:22 AM
I didn't see the game. Why was Springer trying to hit Bonds?

Ravenlord
05-17-2006, 08:42 AM
hit 'em again!

indyred
05-17-2006, 09:24 AM
Dumb move........I'd love to see if Springer ever gets in the box vs. SF.....

smith288
05-17-2006, 09:35 AM
Wasnt Springer a knuckleballer once?

scounts22
05-17-2006, 09:36 AM
Wasnt Springer a knuckleballer once?

That's probably why he got hit. He was mesmerized by the dancing ball! :ughmamoru

traderumor
05-17-2006, 09:41 AM
If anyone saw the at-bat, it was ridiculous. Be a man and go get him out, don't throw 6 pitches way inside hoping to hit him. I'm not much on Bonds, but I do give him credit for how he handled the situation. It's pretty ridiculous for a major league pitcher to throw at a hitter so many times in the same at-bat. Even more pathetic that it took him that many times to hit him. If you can't hit him after the first time or two, give it up and intentionally walk him since it was obvious he didn't want to pitch to him.
Would being a man include relying on one's own hard work and talent to accomplish great things rather than the use of chemicals? Personally, I look forward to the day when pitchers are not robbed of one of their most important weapons by body armor and rules about purpose pitches.

kbrake
05-17-2006, 10:10 AM
I dont see how everyone claims that Springer was in fear of pitching to Bonds. Yeah I know I saw Baseball Tonight too and because he hit him in an AB after a homerun he must fear him, but seriously maybe he just thinks Bonds is a cheat and wanted to hit him. I do agree that it shouldnt have taken 5 pitches but I have no problem with someone throwing at Bonds, he is a bum and has no place in the game.

savafan
05-17-2006, 10:45 AM
Throwing at Bonds is good old fashioned baseball. Not the Selig-light version.

remdog
05-17-2006, 11:40 AM
I've stated before that if I were a professional ball player I would be disgusted with Bonds for the harm he's done to the game (their livelyhood) as well as the cloud of suspicion that he's hung over every player.

Based upon that I have no problem with anyone putting his d... in the dirt like pitchers used to be able to do. In fact, I personally feel strongly enough that, if it were me, I'd go after him every time he came to bat against me. However, I wouldn't be throwing at his noggin, I'd be going for his knees. And, once he got to first base, I'd throw over there relentlessly just to put him in the dirt and create as much pain as possible for him.

I know many of you won't/don't like that viewpoint and that's OK with me---you are all welcome to your viewpoint but, personally, that's how much I despise Barry Bonds.

Rem

CTA513
05-17-2006, 11:46 AM
Matt Morris is pitching today and the last time Bonds was plunked Morris plunked 2 or 3 guys in a game.

Go after Ensberg and Berkman.

:thumbup:

KoryMac5
05-17-2006, 12:07 PM
From watching it on TV replays I think Springer was pissed that Bonds stands right on top of the plate with all that body armor on he really has no repect for any pitcher out on the field because he is so well protected. Too bad Bob Gibson wasn't still pitching.

savafan
05-17-2006, 12:45 PM
Too bad Bob Gibson wasn't still pitching.

If he were, I doubt Barry would still be alive to care.

saboforthird
05-17-2006, 12:49 PM
Bonds is a ...fill....in....the....blank....

savafan
05-17-2006, 12:55 PM
...fill....in....the....blank....

Is this like a madlib? I'm guessing we need a noun here. How about:

"Bonds is a milkshake."

EKURed
05-17-2006, 01:08 PM
Throwing at Bonds is good old fashioned baseball. Not the Selig-light version.

Then hit him the first time. Continuously throwing at him in the same at-bat looked absolutely ridiculous. How many pitches did it finally take to hit him...5 or 6? Once you throw the 2nd and don't hit him, move on. Springer will never have to have an at-bat against the Giants....good thing for him...

And, for the record, I am far from a fan of Barry Bonds...not even close. But, let's not forget, he was GREAT before he ever "allegedly" used a single steroid. It was all the fascination with the "wonderful" McGwire that made him change his body the way he did.

BenHayes
05-17-2006, 02:01 PM
Why not bean him instead of intentionally walking him? It will save pitches. It's lucky for Bonds that Gibson is not pitching because no amount of armor would protect his steroid swelled gord from a 95+ fastball every time he came up.

guttle11
05-17-2006, 02:14 PM
I have no problem with plunking anyone that crowds the plate with a space suit on, but if you miss the first time, stop. Russ Springer looked like an idiot. He should be suspended 10 games for that crap.

CTA513
05-17-2006, 02:14 PM
Why not bean him instead of intentionally walking him? It will save pitches. It's lucky for Bonds that Gibson is not pitching because no amount of armor would protect his steroid swelled gord from a 95+ fastball every time he came up.

People can keep on beaning him, but all that means is that the star player on your own team is going to get plunked and you better hope its not in the head.

"Morris only threw eight pitches but hit two batters and was ejected Sunday in the first inning against Colorado at Coors Field"... I believe that is after Vizquel was plunked by Mesa.

:thumbup:

TOBTTReds
05-17-2006, 02:15 PM
You can see the AB on the Astros homepage. Go to the 3rd picture in the series of stories and you can click on the highlight there.

http://houston.astros.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/index.jsp?c_id=hou

OldXOhio
05-17-2006, 02:16 PM
Would being a man include relying on one's own hard work and talent to accomplish great things rather than the use of chemicals? Personally, I look forward to the day when pitchers are not robbed of one of their most important weapons by body armor and rules about purpose pitches.

Owning the inside part of the plate and head hunting are two different things. And if it's retaliatory in nature, plunk him once and be done with it. Repeatedly throwing at a guy like that is bush.

On another note, if Bonds were a genuinely nice guy who made an error in judgment in his decision to use steroids, would everyone be applauding Springer's actions?

BenHayes
05-17-2006, 02:25 PM
There is a big differance between a Matt Morris pitch and a Bob Gibson Pitch on Bruises the other one if desired could terminate you. I honestly can say if it came to it I would rather be remembered as the pitcher who prevented Bonds from 714 than the guy who gave it up. A couple of shots in retaliation would be acceptable to get rid of the plague that Bonds has become.

traderumor
05-17-2006, 02:35 PM
Owning the inside part of the plate and head hunting are two different things. And if it's retaliatory in nature, plunk him once and be done with it. Repeatedly throwing at a guy like that is bush.

On another note, if Bonds were a genuinely nice guy who made an error in judgment in his decision to use steroids, would everyone be applauding Springer's actions?Of course, that is the problem with making rules about such things. One must be able to judge motives. Why can't a pitcher continue to come inside when the batter does not back down and continues to lean out over the plate as Bonds does?

As for your hypothetical, see Jason Giambi and how many seem to have left him alone since he has at least shown some degree of contriteness and seems to have worked himself back to being a productive player honestly. But then, Bonds continues to exhibit anti-social behavior and insults everyone's intelligence with his denial and continued pursuit of a record he cheated to be in pursuit of in the first place, so he gets treated with the same respect he has afforded all others. That seems to be the way human nature works.

CTA513
05-17-2006, 02:37 PM
There is a big differance between a Matt Morris pitch and a Bob Gibson Pitch on Bruises the other one if desired could terminate you. I honestly can say if it came to it I would rather be remembered as the pitcher who prevented Bonds from 714 than the guy who gave it up. A couple of shots in retaliation would be acceptable to get rid of the plague that Bonds has become.

Giants should make some Astro players eat a baseball.

:D

OldXOhio
05-17-2006, 04:45 PM
As for your hypothetical, see Jason Giambi and how many seem to have left him alone since he has at least shown some degree of contriteness and seems to have worked himself back to being a productive player honestly. But then, Bonds continues to exhibit anti-social behavior and insults everyone's intelligence with his denial and continued pursuit of a record he cheated to be in pursuit of in the first place, so he gets treated with the same respect he has afforded all others. That seems to be the way human nature works.

Which is pretty much what I was trying to say and makes Springer's actions unacceptable in my mind. If being a jerk caused you to get regularly plunked, Pete Rose might be the record holder for HBP.

Cedric
05-17-2006, 06:30 PM
Which is pretty much what I was trying to say and makes Springer's actions unacceptable in my mind. If being a jerk caused you to get regularly plunked, Pete Rose might be the record holder for HBP.


YAHOOSPORTS.COMA
"It isn't just that Bonds refused to sign a ball for a cystic fibrosis charity run by former teammate Brian Fisher in honor of Fisher's young son who died from the disease. It is that Bonds snarled at the request with a "[expletive] you and [expletive] Brian Fisher."

It isn't just that Bonds refused to help with a fundraiser for the devastated families of two Pittsburgh Pirates groundskeepers who died without warning. It is that he treated the request for some memorabilia to auction with disgust and more expletives.

"The Pirates' team photographer, Pete Diana, said he wished Barry Bonds was dead," Pearlman said on Tuesday.

It isn't just the scenes of Bonds sitting in the clubhouse and purposely peeling off a pair of dirty socks and dropping them on the floor rather than tossing them in the hamper right next to him and then calling over a low-paid stadium worker to pick them up. It is that when the worker did pick up the socks, Bonds, a second-generation millionaire who was born and raised in extreme privilege, would then throw his underwear down and call the guy back.

The fans who believe Bonds ever would treat them any differently drawing pleasure from watching them pick up his laundry or being hurtful in the wake of their child's death are more naive than the ones who think he didn't juice. "


I know people have done the game wrong, I know many selfish people have soiled the game a bit. But nothing in my book equals the total crapping on the game that Barry Bonds does. He's the worst representative that any sport could ever have.

VR
05-17-2006, 06:52 PM
YAHOOSPORTS.COMA
"It isn't just that Bonds refused to sign a ball for a cystic fibrosis charity run by former teammate Brian Fisher in honor of Fisher's young son who died from the disease. It is that Bonds snarled at the request with a "[expletive] you and [expletive] Brian Fisher."

It isn't just that Bonds refused to help with a fundraiser for the devastated families of two Pittsburgh Pirates groundskeepers who died without warning. It is that he treated the request for some memorabilia to auction with disgust and more expletives.

"The Pirates' team photographer, Pete Diana, said he wished Barry Bonds was dead," Pearlman said on Tuesday.

It isn't just the scenes of Bonds sitting in the clubhouse and purposely peeling off a pair of dirty socks and dropping them on the floor rather than tossing them in the hamper right next to him and then calling over a low-paid stadium worker to pick them up. It is that when the worker did pick up the socks, Bonds, a second-generation millionaire who was born and raised in extreme privilege, would then throw his underwear down and call the guy back.

The fans who believe Bonds ever would treat them any differently drawing pleasure from watching them pick up his laundry or being hurtful in the wake of their child's death are more naive than the ones who think he didn't juice. "


I know people have done the game wrong, I know many selfish people have soiled the game a bit. But nothing in my book equals the total crapping on the game that Barry Bonds does. He's the worst representative that any sport could ever have.

Look up some of the comments/ treatment he gave his ex-wife sometime. Precious stuff. I had the pleasure of a close interaction w/ him at Spring training several years ago in Scottsdale. His vulgarity around kids is pathetic, a classless act from the word go.

Caseyfan21
05-17-2006, 07:20 PM
That video was great. I don't ever wish physical harm against another human but seeing Bonds get pluncked is about as close as I come. Maybe if every pitcher started pitching at him like that he would retire at 713. It's too bad Berkman will probably have to pay the price tonight.

traderumor
05-17-2006, 11:26 PM
Which is pretty much what I was trying to say and makes Springer's actions unacceptable in my mind. If being a jerk caused you to get regularly plunked, Pete Rose might be the record holder for HBP.I thought you were worried about the cheering because he got plunked? :confused:

Marc D
05-18-2006, 12:06 AM
Bonds didn't know he was taking steroids and Springer had a momentary lapse of control. Both are equally plausible in my book. ;)

savafan
05-18-2006, 02:31 AM
What does it say that the Giants didn't hit a single Astro player tonight?

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12842986/

HOUSTON - The San Francisco Giants completed their first three-game series sweep of the season with Barry Bonds on the bench.

The slugger received some much-needed rest, and watched Ray Durham hit a three-run homer and single in a run for a season-high four RBIs and Matt Morris win for the first time in seven starts in a 10-1 victory over the Houston Astros on Wednesday night.

Pedro Feliz, who has played every inning this season for the Giants, hit a two-run homer and a run-scoring single to give him 10 RBIs in the series.

Mark Sweeney doubled and drove in three runs and a Giants offense that had been so stagnant at times is suddenly clicking. San Francisco outscored Houston 34-5 at hitter friendly Minute Maid Park, jumping to big leads each day on the way to matching its longest winning streak of the season.

“Sometimes you play well in some ballparks,” Jose Vizcaino said. “We play well here. Too bad we only come once a year.”

Manager Felipe Alou’s take: “Maybe they like Minute Maid oranges.”

Bonds remained the buzz of the ballpark a day after being plunked by Astros reliever Russ Springer — and he wasn’t even in the starting lineup.

Springer? He was out of the state.

Major League Baseball on Wednesday had already begun reviewing Bonds’ at-bat leading off the fifth inning Tuesday night against Springer, in which the pitcher’s first offering sailed behind Bonds’ back to draw a warning from plate umpire Joe West.

The next four pitches all came inside, including one that caromed off Bonds’ bat handle on the third delivery for strike one. On the fifth pitch, Springer hit Bonds in the right shoulder as he turned to protect himself.

After being ejected, Springer left to a standing ovation — something that deeply disturbed Alou.

“It bothered me a lot, because a lot of children were watching,” Alou said. “Find another way to express your feelings, whatever they are — not in front of millions of people.”

Bonds, meanwhile, barely reacted to being hit, calmly taking first base without a word or a glance toward the right-hander. Springer took off immediately after the game to be with his wife when she underwent surgery Wednesday morning in Louisiana.

Bonds didn’t address it with the media after the game or again beforehand Wednesday, when he entertained himself by playing cards with trainer Greg Oliver — perhaps a brief distraction from the pressure surrounding his pursuit of Babe Ruth.

After the game, he sat in the office of visiting clubhouse manager Steve Perry staring at a collection of about 300 bobblehead dolls and doing a TV segment for his show “Bonds on Bonds” before being driven away on a cart.

The chase resumes Friday at Oakland, and Bonds should be fresh following an off day.

The seven-time NL MVP was stalled at 713 homers, one shy of tying Ruth for second place on the career list behind home run king Hank Aaron’s 755. Bonds is homerless in eight games and 26 at-bats since a 450-foot shot to right at Philadelphia on May 7.

Bonds had played eight straight days, his longest stretch in the starting lineup without a break since playing 10 consecutive days from June 18-27, 2004, though he was available to pinch hit in the finale of a three-game series with Houston. Alou expects Bonds to play designated hitter in all three games against the A’s.

“Hopefully this kind of gets us going,” Sweeney said. “The good thing, too, is Barry gets two days to relax and then he gets to DH.”

Astros manager Phil Garner said he didn’t expect the Giants to retaliate and reiterated that he believes Springer did not intentionally hit Bonds.

Morris (3-4) certainly couldn’t afford to get in trouble.

The right-hander, in his first season with San Francisco, received a fine last month along with pitching coach Dave Righetti for their actions during a game at Colorado a day after Jose Mesa plunked San Francisco shortstop Omar Vizquel.

Morris was fined for intentionally throwing at Matt Holliday in the first inning. The right-hander was ejected after throwing only eight pitches and plunking two of the five batters he faced.

This time, Morris pitched eight strong innings after losing his previous four decisions and also added a pair of singles. He allowed one run and three hits, struck out four and walked three in a 118-pitch performance.

“The situation last night is what it is,” Morris said. “Right now, we’re trying to get this team back on track and our priority was to win the game. It’s something you’re not going to forget, but sometimes that works better ... rather than sticking up for guys or getting into the beanball game.”

Astros pitching coach Jim Hickey made a visit to the mound in the first inning for the third straight night after Houston’s starters fell behind in a hurry.

The way this series went for the defending NL champions, thousands of fans had to be hoping for a return from Roger Clemens — not to mention the Astros finding some offense.

Fernando Nieve (1-2) was knocked out of the game after 3 2-3 innings.

Orlando Palmeiro hit an RBI single in the second for Houston. Garner used Palmeiro in right field in place of struggling Jason Lane in a move to try to generate more offense, but the Astros lost for the 10th time in 13 games.

It’s the first time since July 1962 — the inaugural year of the franchise — that the Astros have allowed double-digit runs in three consecutive games.

“This is about as bad a series as I can recall,” Garner said. “We didn’t pitch it, we didn’t hit it, we didn’t catch it. That about sums it up. I can’t recall being beat this badly three games in a row.”

Notes: In the three games, San Francisco scored nine total runs in the first inning. The Giants scored 10 or more runs in three straight games for the first time since Aug. 3-6, 2002, two games at Pittsburgh and a home contest with the Cubs. ... All three Houston starters in the series failed to make it through the fourth inning. Reliever Trever Miller struck out the side in the fifth, one of few bright spots for Houston pitchers. ... Morris has 68 career hits, three this year all against the Astros. ... Feliz hit his ninth homer of the year. ... The Giants batted around in each game.

TC81190
05-18-2006, 08:43 AM
YAHOOSPORTS.COMA
"It isn't just that Bonds refused to sign a ball for a cystic fibrosis charity run by former teammate Brian Fisher in honor of Fisher's young son who died from the disease. It is that Bonds snarled at the request with a "[expletive] you and [expletive] Brian Fisher."

It isn't just that Bonds refused to help with a fundraiser for the devastated families of two Pittsburgh Pirates groundskeepers who died without warning. It is that he treated the request for some memorabilia to auction with disgust and more expletives.

"The Pirates' team photographer, Pete Diana, said he wished Barry Bonds was dead," Pearlman said on Tuesday.

It isn't just the scenes of Bonds sitting in the clubhouse and purposely peeling off a pair of dirty socks and dropping them on the floor – rather than tossing them in the hamper right next to him – and then calling over a low-paid stadium worker to pick them up. It is that when the worker did pick up the socks, Bonds, a second-generation millionaire who was born and raised in extreme privilege, would then throw his underwear down and call the guy back.

The fans who believe Bonds ever would treat them any differently – drawing pleasure from watching them pick up his laundry or being hurtful in the wake of their child's death – are more naive than the ones who think he didn't juice. "


I know people have done the game wrong, I know many selfish people have soiled the game a bit. But nothing in my book equals the total crapping on the game that Barry Bonds does. He's the worst representative that any sport could ever have.

Bonds is lucky I'm not a gas throwing MLB pitcher. If so, well, eheheheh...right at the head. :angry: :thumbdown

traderumor
05-18-2006, 08:53 AM
“It bothered me a lot, because a lot of children were watching,” Alou said. “Find another way to express your feelings, whatever they are — not in front of millions of people.”Eh, Felipe, a lot of children are watching Barry cheat his way to success in a field, also. I guess that one slipped by you.

traderumor
05-18-2006, 08:55 AM
I watched the video, and were it not for the pitch behind him, the remainder of the pitches were legitimate inside pitches. I wish a few of the Reds pitchers would be so bold to make guys a little less comfortable in the box against them.

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 09:03 AM
I watched the video, and were it not for the pitch behind him, the remainder of the pitches were legitimate inside pitches.

He followed up the "behind him" with one right into the middle of his back???

traderumor
05-18-2006, 09:09 AM
He followed up the "behind him" with one right into the middle of his back???Um, no, there were three pitches between the one behind him and the one that finally plunked him.

tsj017
05-18-2006, 09:25 AM
He must be the most hated man alive. And with good reason, if this stuff is accurate. He's a modern-day Ty Cobb, despised by all. It should be a big deal, a player closing in on one of the game's most hallowed numbers. Instead, it's . . . him. :thumbdown

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=dw-victimbarry051606&prov=yhoo&type=lgns


Unsympathetic figure

By Dan Wetzel, Yahoo! Sports
May 16, 2006


HOUSTON Victim Barry is tired. He said he sleeps all the time, and occasionally a mistress isn't even involved.

Victim Barry is haunted. He said the ghost of Babe Ruth is hovering over him, shaking his concentration as he tries to hit his 714th home run that will tie him with Ruth for second on the all-time list.

Victim Barry is old. Being 41 is taking a toll. "It's harder when you get older," Bonds said the other day. In fact, he is so physically unimposing now that an anonymous Houston Astros middle reliever had no fear of beaning him Tuesday, essentially daring him to do something about it. Not that there was going to be any cavalry charge from the San Francisco Giants' dugout.

Victim Barry is hurt. Those bum knees are grinding as he tries to get around on a fastball or chase a fly ball. "My knees get sore," he said. "As you go on, as the innings go on, I get tireder and tireder."

Victim Barry is sick of the sideshow. He's tired of all the fans dressed as syringes or holding signs that say nasty things about him. He's tired of all the media waiting to chronicle history. He's tired, we presume, of the cracks about his expanding head and shrinking, well, you know what they warn about steroids.

"I'm trying to send you home," Victim Barry said before Tuesday's game at Minute Maid Park. We appreciated the fact he was thinking of the media, what with perjury charges, IRS investigations and a mega-slump hanging over him.

He didn't hit No. 714, though, failing to homer for the eighth consecutive game. However, he did go 2-for-4 in the Giants' 14-3 demolishing of the Astros.

Poor Victim Barry. All this adversity and frustration is enough to make you cry harder than the ESPN executives who thought "Bonds on Bonds" was a sure-bet ratings winner.

Of course, Barry Bonds is so bad at public relations that even his victim whine won't work with anyone but the softest of hearts.

Everyone knows Victim Barry is no victim but rather the master of his completely bizarre present existence. The fact is that Bonds wouldn't be in this situation without performance-enhancing drugs, which even the Flat Earth Society no longer alleges but takes as near-irrefutable fact.

We aren't talking about the drugs drawing the catcalls and "cheater" signs. The reality is that without the syringe shots, he wouldn't be anywhere near Babe Ruth and Henry Aaron.

It was, according to the best-selling book "Game of Shadows," the drugs designed for AIDS patients, infertile women and narcoleptics (among other illegal substances) that made him go from slugging a homer every 16.1 at-bats to every 8.5 at-bats. (Bonds currently hasn't hit a home run in 26 at-bats.)

Without the drugs, Bonds would have been a Hall of Fame player and one of the all-time great sluggers. But right now, he'd be sitting quietly on 575 home runs, or 602, or maybe even 638. He sure wouldn't be at 713. He wouldn't be close.

The 700 club is rarified air for two reasons physical skill and mental toughness. Henry Aaron had both. Babe Ruth, too. Bonds? He was a pretender to begin with one who now is crumbling from the weight of trying to fake it without Victor Conte cooking him up a fresh cocktail.

Bonds is on an island now, with nowhere to hide and no one to blame but himself as the past smacks him in the face like a bleacher "steroid" chant.

In "Love Me, Hate Me," the new Bonds biography by Jeff Pearlman, story after story of Bonds' crassness is detailed in a portrait of the truly pathetic.

It isn't just that Bonds refused to sign a ball for a cystic fibrosis charity run by former teammate Brian Fisher in honor of Fisher's young son who died from the disease. It is that Bonds snarled at the request with a "[expletive] you and [expletive] Brian Fisher."

It isn't just that Bonds refused to help with a fundraiser for the devastated families of two Pittsburgh Pirates groundskeepers who died without warning. It is that he treated the request for some memorabilia to auction with disgust and more expletives.

"The Pirates' team photographer, Pete Diana, said he wished Barry Bonds was dead," Pearlman said on Tuesday.

It isn't just the scenes of Bonds sitting in the clubhouse and purposely peeling off a pair of dirty socks and dropping them on the floor rather than tossing them in the hamper right next to him and then calling over a low-paid stadium worker to pick them up. It is that when the worker did pick up the socks, Bonds, a second-generation millionaire who was born and raised in extreme privilege, would then throw his underwear down and call the guy back.

The fans who believe Bonds ever would treat them any differently drawing pleasure from watching them pick up his laundry or being hurtful in the wake of their child's death are more naive than the ones who think he didn't juice.

"He was worse than I thought when I started [reporting the book]," Pearlman said. "He learned at an early age that if you are a good athlete, you can do whatever you want."

Until now, it seems. His public image isn't coming back. Not even ESPN's apologists can save him. His intimidation is gone, leaving Astros pitcher Russ Springer to go high and inside Tuesday until he nailed Bonds in the shoulder to receive an ejection from the home-plate umpire and a standing ovation from the hometown fans.

All that is left is Victim Barry, whining about creaky knees and exhaustion and the unyielding pressure of a life he so willingly, wantonly chose.

It would be so pathetic, if it wasn't so perfect.


Dan Wetzel is Yahoo! Sports' national columnist. Dan is the author of two new books.

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 09:33 AM
Um, no, there were three pitches between the one behind him and the one that finally plunked him.

What difference does that make? You said all of the other pitches besides the one behind him were legit. Putting one in the middle of a guy's back is not what i'd call legitimate, regardless of whether it was one or four pitches later.

Look, I'm not trying to defend Bonds or his actions here. I just think what Springer did was bush and if not for the fact that Bonds was such a jerk, people wouldn't be wildly supporting his actions. Being a jerk off the field should have nothing to do with what transpires on the field, so therefore, I have a difficult time condoning what happened.

scounts22
05-18-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm so sick of hearing anything about him. What a jerk. The last thing I want to see is him of all people breaking the record. Pitchers need to keep pitching him the same way Springer did. Wouldn't it be funny if every team refused to pitch to him no matter what and just intentionally walked him every time, regardless of how many outs or runners on base?? :laugh:

IowaRed
05-18-2006, 09:39 AM
I thought it hit him in the upper armor, not the middle of the back

scounts22
05-18-2006, 09:39 AM
Look, I'm not trying to defend Bonds or his actions here. I just think what Springer did was bush and if not for the fact that Bonds was such a jerk, people wouldn't be wildly supporting his actions. Being a jerk off the field has nothing to do with what transpires on the field, so therefore, I have a difficult time condoning what happened.

But are all of Bonds' actions on the field legit? Is everything Bonds does on the field ok even though he's been using steroids for God knows how long? In my opinion, no, solely because he broke the rules.

Oh wait, has it been proven yet??? :rolleyes:

traderumor
05-18-2006, 09:47 AM
What difference does that make? You said all of the other pitches besides the one behind him were legit. Putting one in the middle of a guy's back is not what i'd call legitimate, regardless of whether it was one or four pitches later.

Look, I'm not trying to defend Bonds or his actions here. I just think what Springer did was bush and if not for the fact that Bonds was such a jerk, people wouldn't be wildly supporting his actions. Being a jerk off the field should have nothing to do with what transpires on the field, so therefore, I have a difficult time condoning what happened.Hit batters happen all the time, and occasionally non-intentional pitches behind someone occur. The only reason that the one behind him was shown to be intentional was because of the subsequent pitches that continued inside. The one that finally hit him was either the fifth or sixth pitch.

As you claim to not be defending Bonds, nor am I defending Springer, but I think it is overstating the case to what actually occurred and that the high and tight pitches were legitimate and legal.

Actually, it was more like an old gun fighter who had total control over Bonds for that one little moment in time, shooting a warning shot (one behind his back), making him dance with a few bullets at his knee and high and tight, before he finally hit the target.

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 09:48 AM
But are all of Bonds' actions on the field legit? Is everything Bonds does on the field ok even though he's been using steroids for God knows how long? In my opinion, no, solely because he broke the rules.

Oh wait, has it been proven yet??? :rolleyes:

So if Pete Rose were still playing the game when the investigation into his gambling came out, it would have been okay to throw at the guy?

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 09:57 AM
Hit batters happen all the time, and occasionally non-intentional pitches behind someone occur. The only reason that the one behind him was shown to be intentional was because of the subsequent pitches that continued inside. The one that finally hit him was either the fifth or sixth pitch.

As you claim to not be defending Bonds, nor am I defending Springer, but I think it is overstating the case to what actually occurred and that the high and tight pitches were legitimate and legal.

Actually, it was more like an old gun fighter who had total control over Bonds for that one little moment in time, shooting a warning shot (one behind his back), making him dance with a few bullets at his knee and high and tight, before he finally hit the target.

Total control over the guy by having the ability to repeatedly throw at him? Come on, anyone can stand up there and do that. Total control in my mind would have been offering a warning shot or two forcing Bonds to back off the plate, followed then by Springer painting the outside, taking Barry out of his comfort zone. Instead, Bonds seemed to stand his ground the entire time until he finally did get plunked.

And if it was Springer's intention to hit him all along, which after watching the sequence of events it's hard to not think it was, then do it and be done.

Probably best to simply agree to disagree on this one. We've already tied up this thread with our back and forth enough as it is.

registerthis
05-18-2006, 10:21 AM
Total control over the guy by having the ability to repeatedly throw at him? Come on, anyone can stand up there and do that. Total control in my mind would have been offering a warning shot or two forcing Bonds to back off the plate, followed then by Springer painting the outside, taking Barry out of his comfort zone. Instead, Bonds seemed to stand his ground the entire time until he finally did get plunked.

And if it was Springer's intention to hit him all along, which after watching the sequence of events it's hard to not think it was, then do it and be done.

Probably best to simply agree to disagree on this one. We've already tied up this thread with our back and forth enough as it is.

I'm curious, OdX...would you have as big of a problem with it if he'd plunked him on the first pitch?

RedFanAlways1966
05-18-2006, 10:38 AM
Russ... Jose Mesa'd him. I don't like it regardless of who is getting hit ON PURPOSE. Causing bodily harm to another person is the wrong way to handle a situation. Even B*A*R*R*Y************

scounts22
05-18-2006, 11:12 AM
So if Pete Rose were still playing the game when the investigation into his gambling came out, it would have been okay to throw at the guy?

I understand what you're saying. I should've said that to me his actions on the field are not legit (all of his home runs) because breaking rules off the field, and in a sense on the field, has contributed to his performance. He has adversely affected the game of baseball because of these actions and is about to break a coveted record because he cheated, not because he earned it. I don't necessarily agree with hitting someone, but in this case, I don't blame Springer. It sends a message that other players don't appreciate his presence in baseball because of what he's done. I agree with many others that if Springer didn't hit him on the first pitch he should have stopped, but I don't disagree with what he did.

I still maintain that all teams should intentionally walk Bonds every at bat, no matter the situation.

TeamBoone
05-18-2006, 12:41 PM
05-18-2006

Bonds' plunking under review
Post news services

Barry Bonds remained the buzz of the ballpark a day after being plunked by Astros reliever Russ Springer - and the San Francisco slugger wasn't even in the starting lineup in Houston.

Springer? He was out of the state.

Major League Baseball on Wednesday had already begun reviewing Bonds' at-bat leading off the fifth inning Tuesday night against Springer, in which the pitcher's first offering sailed behind Bonds' back to draw a warning from plate umpire Joe West.

The next four pitches all came inside, including one that hit Bonds' bat handle on the third delivery for strike one. On the fifth pitch, Springer hit Bonds in the right shoulder as he turned to protect himself.

After being ejected, Springer left to a standing ovation - something that deeply disturbed Giants manager Felipe Alou.

Bonds, meanwhile, barely reacted to being hit, calmly taking first base without a word or a glance toward the right-hander. Springer took off immediately after the game to be with his wife when she underwent surgery Wednesday morning in Louisiana.

"It's under investigation. That's all I'll say," Bob Watson, baseball's vice president for on-field operations, said in a phone interview. "I've had 45 calls today to see what I was going to do."

Bonds didn't address it with the media after the game or again beforehand Wednesday, when he entertained himself by playing cards with trainer Greg Oliver - perhaps a brief distraction from the pressure surrounding his pursuit of Babe Ruth.

The seven-time NL MVP was stalled at 713 homers, one shy of tying Ruth for second place on the career list behind home run king Hank Aaron's 755. Bonds is homerless in eight games and 26 at-bats since a 450-foot shot to right at Philadelphia on May 7.

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060518/SPT0501/605180310/1027

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 12:41 PM
I'm curious, OdX...would you have as big of a problem with it if he'd plunked him on the first pitch?

Only the players involved know the true reason why he was throwing at him, so I really can't judge why it happened. In general though, if a pitcher is repeatedly throwing at a guy like that, then yes, I have a problem with it. Likewise, if a pitcher throws at a guy for no apparent reason, then I have a problem with that too.

registerthis
05-18-2006, 01:29 PM
Likewise, if a pitcher throws at a guy for no apparent reason, then I have a problem with that too.

I believe a player crowding the plate like Bonds is asking to get some inside heat. That's one very good "apparent reason."

OldXOhio
05-18-2006, 02:15 PM
I believe a player crowding the plate like Bonds is asking to get some inside heat. That's one very good "apparent reason."

Does inside heat = throwing behind a batter? How about plunking him in the back a few pitches later?

registerthis
05-18-2006, 02:19 PM
Does inside heat = throwing behind a batter? How about plunking him in the back a few pitches later?

If he doesn't back off? Sure.

Reds Fanatic
05-19-2006, 03:00 PM
Springer got a 4 game suspension today for throwing at Bonds. Phil Garner was also suspended for a game.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2450863


Five pitches led to a four-game suspension for Astros pitcher Russ Springer.

Bob Watson, Major League Baseball's vice president of on-field operations, announced Friday that the Houston right-hander has been suspended four games and fined an undisclosed amount for intentionally throwing multiple pitches at Barry Bonds during a May 16 game at Houston.

Unless appealed, Springer's suspension would begin Friday night, when the Astros are scheduled to host the Texas Rangers.

Astros manager Phil Garner was also suspended one game and fined for Springer's actions after warnings had been issued earlier in Bonds' at-bat. Garner is scheduled to serve his suspension on Monday, when the Astros play at the Washington Nationals.

With the San Francisco slugger leading off the fifth inning, Springer's first pitch sailed behind Bonds' back, drawing a warning from plate umpire Joe West.

The next four pitches all came inside, including one that hit Bonds' bat handle on the third delivery for strike one. The fifth pitch hit Bonds as he turned to protect himself.

That's when Springer and Garner got ejected -- and the Houston crowd gave Springer a standing ovation.

Bonds was unhurt and trotted down the first-base line and later scored on Jose Vizcaino's RBI single to give the Giants a 12-3 lead.

The 41-year-old Bonds had already singled twice and driven in a run in San Francisco's five-run first. He also flied out at the warning track in right.

Johnny Footstool
05-19-2006, 03:05 PM
Isn't Springer a knuckleballer?

Did he hit Bonds with fastballs or feather-light knucklers?

traderumor
05-19-2006, 03:06 PM
Next step, everyone chip in a buck for the fine? I know Springer doesn't need it, but it will make us feel a part of it. :evil: