PDA

View Full Version : Ok, so I was pulled over today... (requested advice)



Javy Pornstache
05-21-2006, 02:38 AM
I see some people with stories from time to time on here, and I thought I'd share mine and maybe get some suggestions.

I was traveling on my way to work this morning, on a highway going eastbound when I saw a cop passing me going westbound. We were each in the respective left lanes. I saw him spin around in the grass in my rear-view mirror after passing, make a quick u-turn but I didn't think much of it. I WAS going over the speed limit, technically, about 62 or 63 or so in a 55, but I wasn't expecting to be pulled over.

So, naturally, I get pulled over. He comes up to me and says he clocked me at 74 at the road I had passed maybe like a half mile before I even saw him coming from the OPPOSITE direction... does that make sense? First off, I thought you had to be still for a radar to register... and it does say it was a radar reading on the ticket. Secondly, I am 100000% CERTAIN I was not going 74, at least according to my speedometer. Sure, it could be wrong, but if it is 10 miles off, then I go 10 miles over everywhere, and haven't been pulled over.

He did the standard, "where ya headin', son?" and I told him I was on my way to work and explained to him what I had going on that day at work (it was important I be there at an exact time, more so today than any normal day). He said something to the extent of, "well I won't write you out a citation, but I just wanted to warn you, because that is a dangerous intersection, to take it easy".

I was quite relieved, but after he asked for my license, registration, and insurance, he went back to his car where he sat for a good 5-7 minutes....I am thinking, "gee, what's taking so long?" He comes back....with a citation in hand! I was shocked. He handed me my stuff back, just said "here's your citation", and I didn't have time to argue or anything as it was very important that I be at work in 15 minutes and I had about 12 to get there.

Does this seem weird, all things considered? He got me from a moving vehicle on the opposite side of the road, said he clocked me at 10 over what my speedometer said (I don't have a lead foot and am quite conscious of my speed at all times and recall just looking at it seconds before this all occured), said he clocked me at a road that I passed before encountering him, and the whole deal about saying he would just give me a warning, then writes one up anyway? Seems weird. I wasn't at all disrespectful toward him or anything.

To beat it all, I JUST got my latest car insurance rate a couple days ago and was very pleased with it. With things going on in my life, money is really tight for me right now. Is there anything I could do? Is this something I can possibly avoid with the circumstances? Could I call him, call the court, appear in court, do something? I am sure it would all be my word versus his word and I am sure I wouldn't win, so would it be pointless?

Sorry if this is a pointless read, but there seems to be a lot of helpful folks here, and if anyone reads this that has any suggestions, I am quite open to hearing them. Thanks much.

GAC
05-21-2006, 08:11 AM
Is there something on your record, once he checked it, that made him change his mind? Did you ask him why he decided to do so?

You can also request to see the radar reading. But I'd only ask to do that ONCE they decide to give you a ticket. Don't want to pee them off. ;)

And the cost of a lawyer to fight it in court, where your chances of winning are pretty nil, would be alot more then the citation fine.

But the lawyer, any good one, would request to see the equipment service records - when was it last calibrated, etc. - in hopes of finding a loophole.

I'd say your best bet is to go in and post the bond and move on.

dman
05-21-2006, 09:56 AM
Radars can be used both stationary and in moving modes. In the moving mode it takes the combined speeds of his patrol speed and your speed, subtracts his patrol speed and the value left is the target speed. Laser is the only device that you need to be in the stationary mode to operate. Now as far as saying he was going to give you a warning and actually wrote you a citation instead, totally unprofessional IMHO. What agency stopped you?

Dom Heffner
05-21-2006, 10:44 AM
The moment he handed you the citation was the time to ask the question. You might be pretty much out of luck at this point.

Johnny Footstool
05-21-2006, 01:55 PM
On one occasion, I was pulled over and the officer agreed to let me off with a warning. I asked how fast he clocked me, and he said he couldn't tell me, because if he told me he'd have to give me a ticket.

The laws might be different in Kansas and Ohio, but it's also possible that the officer realized he had already told you the speed and couldn't let you off with a warning.

TeamCasey
05-21-2006, 02:06 PM
I had a similar thing happen to me yesterday. I was on 275 and I wasn't speeding. I was in the right hand lane. Cop goes by me the opposite direction and does a U turn in the grass. He followed me off the exit and on the side roads all the way into the parking lot of the store. It was strange.

He never approached my vehicle after I parked and got out. I know I wasn't being paranoid. I figured they must have been looking for someone with the same color/model of car.

KronoRed
05-21-2006, 04:51 PM
He was checking you out TC ;)

Javy Pornstache
05-21-2006, 06:23 PM
Is there something on your record, once he checked it, that made him change his mind? Did you ask him why he decided to do so?

That was the first thing I thought, maybe he saw something about me that rubbed him the wrong way and changed his mind -- but there's nothing on my record aside from one speeding ticket from my past! I did get one going I think 67 in a 55 on a similar stretch of road in another car at another job in the past. Other than that, I am cleaner to the law than any other guy with the initials RF, namely Ryan Freel and Rafael Furcal. :D

Javy Pornstache
05-21-2006, 06:35 PM
Radars can be used both stationary and in moving modes. In the moving mode it takes the combined speeds of his patrol speed and your speed, subtracts his patrol speed and the value left is the target speed. Laser is the only device that you need to be in the stationary mode to operate. Now as far as saying he was going to give you a warning and actually wrote you a citation instead, totally unprofessional IMHO. What agency stopped you?

Thanks for the info. To be completely honest with you, I can't say for certainty what agency he was representing, but I am about 95% sure it was a city of Beavercreek car - they have silverish patrol cars and that's what it was. It was definitely not Highway Patrol.

I realize the time to ask was when he handed it to me, but honestly, with the timing of it all I just didn't have time to get into it and I was only thinking about having to get to work for my event. I was stunned by the whole thing.

Johnny Footstool, the situation you mentioned is possible, maybe that's why, since he gave me the number. I dunno, really, I am lost for answers.

Thanks to everyone who's responded so far, through here and PM as well. If anyone else has anything to add, I'd love to hear it. Thanks so much!

Yachtzee
05-21-2006, 06:42 PM
This is not legal advice, but from my own experience, I would at least make a court appearance and explain your case to the judge or magistrate. Even if you don't really want to contest it, it would give you a chance to explain your side so that they might give you the minimum penalty if the judge/magistrate has any discretion in the matter. I don't know if the speed they clocked you at would give you points on your license, but if you explain yourself, they may decide not to assess the points, which could possibly avoid raising your insurance rates. I don't think there's anything you can do about him telling you he was giving you a warning and then changing his mind though.

In any case, it will depend on the law, the person trying the case, and your insurance company, but it doesn't hurt to communicate with them to make sure they have all the info.

Also, you might want to take your car into the shop, just to make sure that your speedometer is calibrated correctly.

TeamBoone
05-21-2006, 09:06 PM
You might also ask your insurance agent (or whomever has the information) to check your record. There may be something on there that you're not even aware of. It could be something similar to what happened to me (below) or a mistake might have been made, just like on credit reports. I'm surprised that the guy didn't at least tell you that he changed his mind and why.

It happened to me when I forgot to put my parking brake on and my Eclipse rolled backward into the tire of a Suburban. No apparent damage to either vehicle, though we did exchange insurance information and telephone numbers. When my premium came due, it had risen about $200 (x 2 for the entire year). My agent checked and come to find out, the owners of the Suburban had taken their vehicle in to have the alignment checked, which I would have done too. They charged my insurance company $50 and they chalked it up to an accident. I was furious. I would have gladly paid the fifty bucks had they been decent enough to call me. I'd lost their number by the time I discovered it... so, lesson learned... never throw that stuff away even if you think an appropriate period of time has expired.

Caveat Emperor
05-22-2006, 12:21 AM
This is not legal advice, but from my own experience

Admit it -- you spent at least 15 seconds wondering if simply posting on here would subject you to sanctions under the Ohio Disciplinary Rules for unauthorized practice. :D

(My PM to Javy started out with the exact same caveat. :thumbup: )

Yachtzee
05-22-2006, 12:52 AM
Admit it -- you spent at least 15 seconds wondering if simply posting on here would subject you to sanctions under the Ohio Disciplinary Rules for unauthorized practice. :D

(My PM to Javy started out with the exact same caveat. :thumbup: )

You know it. :beerme:

So are you done yet?

Caveat Emperor
05-22-2006, 01:07 AM
You know it. :beerme:

So are you done yet?

Yup, graduated on the 9th. :cool:

Just paid my $2,300 to BarBRI for the privilege of having them re-teach me everything I've spent the last 3 years learning (classes start in a week). That's on top of the roughly $1,000 in Ohio Supreme Court and National Confrence of Bar Examiner fees I've paid this year just to register to take the bar, the $100-ish that the MPRE cost to take, and the $400 in hotel accomodations costs to stay in Columbus during the bar examination.

All you law school types -- start saving for 3rd year now, because it gets hella-expensive down the stretch.

savafan
05-22-2006, 03:29 AM
I was always under the impression that you couldn't be clocked by radar if you were traveling and the officer's car was also traveling toward you going in opposite directions.

GAC
05-22-2006, 09:41 AM
But even if you go to court, explain your situation, and the judge shows "sympathy", he'll still make you pay the court costs, which are usually around $40 or so.

So really, how much are you saving?

Puffy
05-22-2006, 11:22 AM
You know it. :beerme:

So are you done yet?

Actually, you just acquired some pro-bono hours. Friends, relatives, etc can be used (at least in Florida)

Puffy
05-22-2006, 11:29 AM
No offense GAC - but you are giving some really bad advice in this thread.

First, either go to court or hire an attorney to go to court. If the officer does not show up and you contest the speed you automatically win the case and your ticket is dropped (no court courts are accessed when you win the case).

If the officer does show up there is still a chance you win. If he said what he did you have every right to ask him about it. He will be under oath and will have to tell the truth. The judge might not care, but its still unprofessional what he did. Plus, if you say you were not going that fast it is up to the officer to prove that you were.

Most people don't fight tickets and just pay them. Most officers don't go to traffic court because its a waste of their time because most people don't contest and just pay the ticket.

Javy - if you were speeding, but just slower than what they clocked you at, you might wanna let it go. However, if the fines are based upon the amount over the speed limit then that 11 mph difference can mean $100 bucks and that might be worth your time. I'd consider hiring a young lawyer just out of school and letting him go there for you. Chances are you'll probably win.

Blimpie
05-22-2006, 11:43 AM
No offense GAC - but you are giving some really bad advice in this thread.

First, either go to court or hire an attorney to go to court. If the officer does not show up and you contest the speed you automatically win the case and your ticket is dropped (no court courts are accessed when you win the case).

If the officer does show up there is still a chance you win. If he said what he did you have every right to ask him about it. He will be under oath and will have to tell the truth. The judge might not care, but its still unprofessional what he did. Plus, if you say you were not going that fast it is up to the officer to prove that you were.

Most people don't fight tickets and just pay them. Most officers don't go to traffic court because its a waste of their time because most people don't contest and just pay the ticket.

Javy - if you were speeding, but just slower than what they clocked you at, you might wanna let it go. However, if the fines are based upon the amount over the speed limit then that 11 mph difference can mean $100 bucks and that might be worth your time. I'd consider hiring a young lawyer just out of school and letting him go there for you. Chances are you'll probably win.I agree with everything that Puffy said and would like to add:

During court cases in KY (where radar was the culprit), you may ask the officer to produce his/her certificate indicating that they have successfully completed a training course using that specific model of radar gun. Many of them either cannot produce the certificate, or have upgraded radar models several times without re-taking the courses. ;)

If that doesn't work, ask to see the radar gun calibration logs that the officer is required to maintain on a regular basis. It should have the gun serial number identical to the unit which was used in you offense.

I trust that the name Blimpie will not come up in court. Good luck!

Yachtzee
05-22-2006, 12:36 PM
Yup, graduated on the 9th. :cool:

Just paid my $2,300 to BarBRI for the privilege of having them re-teach me everything I've spent the last 3 years learning (classes start in a week). That's on top of the roughly $1,000 in Ohio Supreme Court and National Confrence of Bar Examiner fees I've paid this year just to register to take the bar, the $100-ish that the MPRE cost to take, and the $400 in hotel accomodations costs to stay in Columbus during the bar examination.

All you law school types -- start saving for 3rd year now, because it gets hella-expensive down the stretch.

Congratulations! :beerme:

I've already locked in my BarBRI price and I've registered to take the MPRE in August.

1 more year.

WebScorpion
05-22-2006, 01:13 PM
First, either go to court or hire an attorney to go to court. If the officer does not show up and you contest the speed you automatically win the case and your ticket is dropped (no court courts are accessed when you win the case).

If the officer does show up there is still a chance you win. If he said what he did you have every right to ask him about it. He will be under oath and will have to tell the truth. The judge might not care, but its still unprofessional what he did. Plus, if you say you were not going that fast it is up to the officer to prove that you were.

Most people don't fight tickets and just pay them. Most officers don't go to traffic court because its a waste of their time because most people don't contest and just pay the ticket.

Javy - if you were speeding, but just slower than what they clocked you at, you might wanna let it go. However, if the fines are based upon the amount over the speed limit then that 11 mph difference can mean $100 bucks and that might be worth your time. I'd consider hiring a young lawyer just out of school and letting him go there for you. Chances are you'll probably win.

Spoken like a man who has been there ... often. :laugh: Not that there's anything wrong with that, since recognition of the truth is directly related to experience as well. ;)

RedFanAlways1966
05-22-2006, 01:28 PM
In regard to Puffy's comments, I always wondered...

When going to court for a contested citation, does the officer who shows up get paid overtime for appearing in court (time-and-a-half)?

GoReds
05-22-2006, 01:43 PM
In regard to Puffy's comments, I always wondered...

When going to court for a contested citation, does the officer who shows up get paid overtime for appearing in court (time-and-a-half)?

Not a police officer, but I am under the impression that, when the officer assigns the court date it reflects the date that he will actually set aside to be available for court appearances.

Couple of notes here:
1- I agree that contacting a lawyer *might* be in your best interest in asssuring that, at the very least, you get the speed of the ticket reduced. Not sure how it is in Ohio, but in VA and NC, if you are caught going more than 10 mph over the limit, your insurance is going to go up. Considering the previous ticket (if within a couple of years) the rate it goes up could be dramatic.

2- If the lawyer is not an option, get to the courthouse early that day and talk to (in order) the DA and/or the police officer. Typically, the DA or the officer could reduce the speed logged on the ticket. The DA might also be willing to entertain "prayer for judgement", which means this ticket will be forgiven, but if you get another one within the next couple years, BOTH tickets will appear on your record.

Whatever you do, don't just pay the fine and forget it. In the long run, it's apt to cost you more.

Johnny Footstool
05-22-2006, 02:02 PM
A lawyer can also advise you about getting the ticket switched from a moving violation to a non-moving violation. The fine remains the same, but non-moving violations don't affect your insurance rates.

Puffy
05-22-2006, 02:09 PM
Spoken like a man who has been there ... often. :laugh: Not that there's anything wrong with that, since recognition of the truth is directly related to experience as well. ;)

Actually no - I am one of those who just pays the freakin ticket. Lazy bastard that I am.

However, a friend of mine did this when he got out of law school (before he found a "real" job) and told me some of the tricks of the trade. His advice was to always use a lawyer in these situations and you'll win 90% of the time.

dman
05-22-2006, 07:49 PM
In regard to Puffy's comments, I always wondered...

When going to court for a contested citation, does the officer who shows up get paid overtime for appearing in court (time-and-a-half)?

As far as the Highway Patrol is concerned, for the most part yes. If your case is scheduled during your normal working hours you don't get time and a half, since it is all part of your regular shift. However, if you have to come in on a day off or any time outside of your regular shift you get the option of getting an automatic 3 hours at time and a half or 4 1/2 hours of comp time.
If the case takes longer than 3 hours, then you are compensated in time and a half fashion either monetarily or by comp time. Our policy is set up in such fashion, with rare exceptions, that if we miss a case we get days off without pay.

GAC
05-22-2006, 10:05 PM
No offense GAC - but you are giving some really bad advice in this thread.

No offense taken Puffy. Just relating past experiences and how it went with me.


First, either go to court or hire an attorney to go to court. If the officer does not show up and you contest the speed you automatically win the case and your ticket is dropped (no court courts are accessed when you win the case).

That's true. I've just never been in a situation, even with a speeding ticket, where the officer didn't show up.


If the officer does show up there is still a chance you win. If he said what he did you have every right to ask him about it. He will be under oath and will have to tell the truth.

Doesn't mean he will though. I had two situations where the officers didn't. He didn't really out and out lie - just didn't offer offer up all the facts. Of course I didn't have a lawyer because my overall costs would have been more then the fine, so I simply took a chance since I was trying more to save money. It was a speeding ticket, and with zero pts on my record, I wasn't too concerned. I just went to court, explained the situation, and as you stated - the judge didn't really care what I had to say. A judge will, 99% of the time, take the arresting officer's word over yours. He did.

The other situation, is where I got a ticket for failure to stop at a stop sign (4 way stop). I went to court. I stopped at the intersection, but not at the stop sign. The stop sign was about 15 yds behind the intersection. Everyone who uses this intersection does the same. You can't see the other direction if you stop at the sign. I went back the next day and took a pic and brought it to court. The judge dismissed the ticket, but still assessed me to pay the court costs. When I got to the window, I asked them why this was so, and they said that I still must pay them (the city officials) for their time.

But my advice is based on what end result he really wants.....

to save money overall he is best to just go in and pay it. Unless he checked with his insurance and they said his rates were really going up.

Or

he didn't want it on his record because he already has pts on there.

But I'll shut up counselor! :lol:

Javy Pornstache
05-23-2006, 02:42 AM
Just checking back on here to again say thanks to everyone who's responded and weighed in with their thoughts. As far as what exactly I am interested in achieving in beating this, I would say it is both for monetary purposes and my record. I would say that money is more important, as in the interim, I'd rather not pay a fine that I feel isn't justified, but in the long haul, it is more about the insurance rates.

So, I take it that it would be wise to call my insurance and explain the situation ahead of time before even going to court? Do I understand that correctly? That way, perhaps, that softens the blow of escalating insurance rates maybe regardless of the outcome.

I obviously would prefer my record to be clean. As I say, I do have one thing on there, one ticket from the past, and as I understand it, those go away after three years and are unpointed at that time. The insurance deal is more important, but still, it'd be nice to not have it on my record.

dman
05-23-2006, 07:48 AM
Just checking back on here to again say thanks to everyone who's responded and weighed in with their thoughts. As far as what exactly I am interested in achieving in beating this, I would say it is both for monetary purposes and my record. I would say that money is more important, as in the interim, I'd rather not pay a fine that I feel isn't justified, but in the long haul, it is more about the insurance rates.

So, I take it that it would be wise to call my insurance and explain the situation ahead of time before even going to court? Do I understand that correctly? That way, perhaps, that softens the blow of escalating insurance rates maybe regardless of the outcome.

I obviously would prefer my record to be clean. As I say, I do have one thing on there, one ticket from the past, and as I understand it, those go away after three years and are unpointed at that time. The insurance deal is more important, but still, it'd be nice to not have it on my record.
Javy, I don't know that I'd call the insurance co. just yet. If you tell them, then they know it's there. Make them work for it and find it themselves. While I don't condone lying, I also don't condone giving insurance companies info that we don't have to give them neither. As we all know, insurance companies don't need much reason to hike your rates.

It's for reasons like this that when I catch a person speeding and they weren't wearing their seatbelt, most times I'll opt to warn them for speeding and cite them for not wearing a seatbelt. This actually benefits both parties. The violator is benefitted in that a seatbelt is a non-moving violation and no points are assessed, so on most occasions insurance rates won't go up. It benefits us (the OSHP) because even though we cite people for speed, they are still going to speed. If I cite someone for seatbelt, they, on most instances, will remember that seatbelt ticket and remember to buckle up next time.

GAC
05-23-2006, 10:07 AM
Just checking back on here to again say thanks to everyone who's responded and weighed in with their thoughts. As far as what exactly I am interested in achieving in beating this, I would say it is both for monetary purposes and my record. I would say that money is more important, as in the interim, I'd rather not pay a fine that I feel isn't justified, but in the long haul, it is more about the insurance rates.

So, I take it that it would be wise to call my insurance and explain the situation ahead of time before even going to court? Do I understand that correctly? That way, perhaps, that softens the blow of escalating insurance rates maybe regardless of the outcome.

I obviously would prefer my record to be clean. As I say, I do have one thing on there, one ticket from the past, and as I understand it, those go away after three years and are unpointed at that time. The insurance deal is more important, but still, it'd be nice to not have it on my record.

The first thing I would do then, if that is really your main concern, is call your insurance company and see if it will impact your rate.

I guess it really depends on your agent and how well you know them too.

If they say it won't, then you have to make the decision as to whether you want to invest monies above and beyond what the bond on the ticket would cost you, to possibly win or not in court.

Have you thought of even getting consultation from a lawyer on the situation?

But if you're wanting to go the cheaper "path" because of monetary constraints, your best bet is probably to just pay it.

TRF
05-23-2006, 03:48 PM
Well in this situation, I do know the the best thing you can do when asked to step out of the vehicle is not say "why don't you come in and get me?"

Allegro
05-23-2006, 04:00 PM
Here in the beautiful Bluegrass, we have the option (once a year) of attending traffic school. You plead guilty, but it's not on your record (supposedly) for insurance purposes and the cost is about the same as paying the ticket. It's 4 hours of bliss. I have been so often (about every 2 years for the last 25), I could teach the class, but you should see my pristine driving record.

Red Leader
05-23-2006, 04:12 PM
DO NOT CALL THE INSURANCE CO. AND TELL THEM

If you do, don't say "hey, I got a ticket and I wanted to know if this is going to increase my rates."

Instead say, "I got a ticket 3 or so years ago and I was wanting to know if it was still on my record, and if my rates relfect that ticket, if so, when will it come off? If no, do rates automatically increase with each ticket?

You don't want to just volunteer information to insurance companies. If you are trying to save money, that's the worst thing you could do.

acredsfan
05-23-2006, 05:07 PM
The first thing I would do then, if that is really your main concern, is call your insurance company and see if it will impact your rate.

I guess it really depends on your agent and how well you know them too.

If they say it won't, then you have to make the decision as to whether you want to invest monies above and beyond what the bond on the ticket would cost you, to possibly win or not in court.

Have you thought of even getting consultation from a lawyer on the situation?

But if you're wanting to go the cheaper "path" because of monetary constraints, your best bet is probably to just pay it.Calling your insurance agent is not the way to go, I've grown up with an insurance agent as a parent, and if you alert them that you have a citation, then they can turn it in against you as they are supposed to do. Any citation where points are added to your license will make your rates jump. Its just a question of how much. Insurance companies do run motor vehicle reports periodically and whenever you rewrite an existing policy or even ask for a quote. So if you ticket does stand do not tell your agent, they would much rather be ignorant to the whole thing and let the companies find things out on their own. Now if you do go to court in my expierence, the judge just changed the citation from speeding to something a little less like parking alongside the road or something like that where no points were put on my record and all i paid were court costs which were less than the fine would have been and best of all it does not affect my insurance.

GAC
05-23-2006, 10:22 PM
I guess I must have a trusting insurance agent. I've been with him for years, and he's a good friend. When I have gotten a ticket in the past I've talked with him about it and he has always told me that there was nothing to worry about. And there wasn't.

But I understand all insurance agents are not created equal. ;)

I guess I was working on the premise that they are gonna find out sooner or later.

Sorry for the advice above.

gonelong
05-24-2006, 12:35 AM
I guess I must have a trusting insurance agent. I've been with him for years, and he's a good friend.

Thats one of the advantages of living in a small town. Most people have probably never even met their insurance agent and couldn't pick 'em out of a lineup ... you've likely shared a few beers with yours.

GL

oneupper
05-24-2006, 06:36 PM
Thats one of the advantages of living in a small town. Most people have probably never even met their insurance agent and couldn't pick 'em out of a lineup ... you've likely shared a few beers with yours.

GL


My Agent is 5 inches long, green and speaks with a Cockney accent.

TeamSelig
05-26-2006, 05:47 AM
Why not just pay the ticket? There are a bunch of different scenarios of what went wrong, but who really knows? Speeding tickets are a pain though. I got three last April :( I guess I'll never learn. One was on a back road (for some reason it was a 20 MPH zone way out in the country) - 37 in a 20. Normally I'll drive 55-60 on back roads so thats good I guess. I was pretty mad about getting a $100+ ticket for driving 37 mph.. oh well

- You can ask to see the radar all you want, but it isn't a right. Well, in Indiana anyway. Why would the officer have to show you? That never made sense to me. I wouldn't want some creep getting into my vehicle or close to it. Radar units are very expensive, along with all kinds of equipment -- not to mention the firearms that are usually there.

- To clear up the traffic court issue - it is pretty much a myth. There's no 'if the officer doesn't show up then it is dropped' because they always show up. It's apart of their job to show up. And in many instances, they are paid overtime. It might be different with each department, but I know of one that the officer is paid for a certain amount of hours (not quite sure on the amount) no matter how long they are there. However, I am sure there are times when something major happens and they can't attend court, but it is pretty rare (from my understanding).

Also, I'm not sure what the deal is with the officer telling you the speed which forces him to give you a ticket??? I think the officer was joking with JF when he said if he told him he'd have to give him a ticket. I've never heard of that 'rule' and I'm not really sure of the point of it lol..

I was just wanting to clear some things up, hope this helped. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

dabvu2498
05-26-2006, 09:23 AM
My boss could tell you what to do but he'd charge you $1000 for it.

As an aside, we have people pay us $1000 to represent them in traffic court. It's true.

Professional drivers (truck) who feel it is that important to keep their record clean.

savafan
09-05-2006, 01:52 PM
Well, after reading this thread, I guess I'll just go ahead and pay my ticket from this weekend...

Highlifeman21
09-05-2006, 02:28 PM
You need to make nice with someone who's either a law enforcement agent, or knows a law enforcement agent and get yourself some FOP cards.

I work with a guy who's a retired Philly Cop, and as an early birthday gift, he gave me a City of Philly, Commonwealth of PA, and National FOP card, which as some of you know, can be get out of jail free cards for speeding tickets.

He said simply to just give the correct card with your license and registration, and unless you were doing something ridiculous like 25+ over the speed limit, the cop will simply take your FOP card, give you a warning, and then hand back your license and registration.

Best advice I have right now.

registerthis
09-05-2006, 02:45 PM
I avoided a speeding ticket once because, while the cop had me pulled over, another car came racing down the road going considerably faster than I had been going. The cop looked up, looked back at me, said "Slow down in the future, OK?" and then took off back to his cruiser to go after the other car.

Saved by stupidity on the part of the other driver, I guess.

Caseyfan21
09-06-2006, 01:20 AM
You need to make nice with someone who's either a law enforcement agent, or knows a law enforcement agent and get yourself some FOP cards.

I work with a guy who's a retired Philly Cop, and as an early birthday gift, he gave me a City of Philly, Commonwealth of PA, and National FOP card, which as some of you know, can be get out of jail free cards for speeding tickets.

He said simply to just give the correct card with your license and registration, and unless you were doing something ridiculous like 25+ over the speed limit, the cop will simply take your FOP card, give you a warning, and then hand back your license and registration.

Best advice I have right now.

This is usually pretty effective. My girlfriend's dad is a cop so she has a large FOP sticker on the back of her car. She has told me stories in the past where she was speeding and a cop pulled up behind her (like they do before kicking on the flashers) but then (seeing the sticker) backed off and didn't even pull her over.

dman
09-06-2006, 08:57 AM
This is usually pretty effective. My girlfriend's dad is a cop so she has a large FOP sticker on the back of her car. She has told me stories in the past where she was speeding and a cop pulled up behind her (like they do before kicking on the flashers) but then (seeing the sticker) backed off and didn't even pull her over.

What state was this in? I know of no instances in Ohio. It's not effective when I'm working. If I give a warning it is all about someone's demeanor towards me rather than being a card carrying member of a certain group. Most people don't realize that these cards are given out by no one affiliated with a police organization. These outfits, such as FOP, and Ohio Troopers Coalition are extensions of police unions.

Ltlabner
09-06-2006, 09:34 AM
He said simply to just give the correct card with your license and registration, and unless you were doing something ridiculous like 25+ over the speed limit, the cop will simply take your FOP card, give you a warning, and then hand back your license and registration.


I know I've been brainwashed by "da man" and "da system" but how about instead of all of the goofyness of carying cards, and getting lawers and fighting the system, you just drive the speed limit?

And when you don't (and we all do it from time to time) and get caught, take your lumps and move on?

I guess I just don't have time in my life for all these gymanstics.

I will now sit back and prepare to be told what a dork I am, how I've been programed by the government (read: WalMart-Halliburton) and that I am a mindless drone! :)

MaineRed
09-06-2006, 10:43 AM
You need to make nice with someone who's either a law enforcement agent, or knows a law enforcement agent and get yourself some FOP cards.

I work with a guy who's a retired Philly Cop, and as an early birthday gift, he gave me a City of Philly, Commonwealth of PA, and National FOP card, which as some of you know, can be get out of jail free cards for speeding tickets.

He said simply to just give the correct card with your license and registration, and unless you were doing something ridiculous like 25+ over the speed limit, the cop will simply take your FOP card, give you a warning, and then hand back your license and registration.

Best advice I have right now.

I have a hard time believing this to be true. Most cops I know would take great offense to someone thinking a card makes it OK for them to break the law.

dman
09-06-2006, 11:46 AM
I have a hard time believing this to be true. Most cops I know would take great offense to someone thinking a card makes it OK for them to break the law.

BINGO, just the same as I do when I ask for someone's driver's license and they hand me their military I.D. instead. If I give you a break it's because I wanted to and not because of who you are or or what letter of the alphabet soup you are a card carrying member of.

registerthis
09-06-2006, 12:15 PM
I know I've been brainwashed by "da man" and "da system" but how about instead of all of the goofyness of carying cards, and getting lawers and fighting the system, you just drive the speed limit?

Because the posted speed limit is frequently mind-numbingly slow. :)

Yachtzee
09-06-2006, 01:53 PM
BINGO, just the same as I do when I ask for someone's driver's license and they hand me their military I.D. instead. If I give you a break it's because I wanted to and not because of who you are or or what letter of the alphabet soup you are a card carrying member of.

I've heard that being polite, contrite and straightforward is more likely to get you a warning than a card from some organization or some lame excuse.

Highlifeman21
09-06-2006, 02:48 PM
I have a hard time believing this to be true. Most cops I know would take great offense to someone thinking a card makes it OK for them to break the law.


Just going by what my co-worker told me. I haven't gotten a speeding ticket since May of 2004, IIRC. When I was 19, I used a FOP card, given to me by the main lawyer of the Cincy branch of the FOP, and I just handed the card to the cop with my license and registration and then he gave me a 15 min lecture on driving the speed limit and things like that, and then took the card and said this was my get out of jail pass.

So I dunno...

Just reporting what I've been told and my experiences.

dabvu2498
09-06-2006, 03:00 PM
I've heard that being polite, contrite and straightforward is more likely to get you a warning than a card from some organization or some lame excuse.

Most street cops won't give "minor" tickets to teachers or nurses, esp. female ones, esp. cute ones, esp. crying ones.

vaticanplum
09-06-2006, 06:44 PM
When I was about 17 I got pulled over for speeding. I had never gotten a ticket and was quite nervous, especially as I saw the cop swagger up to the car -- just struck me as a big dumb lug arrogant type, and sure enough, he walked up to my car, put his hand on the hood, grinned from behind his sunglasses, and said, "I've been waiting all day for you."

Clearly, the door here was wide open, and i bit. I took a deep breath, looked at him, and answered, "Sir, I got here as fast as I could." I was probably shaking, but I got it out.

I could actually tell he was trying not to laugh. He checked in on my license, gave me a warning, and sent me on my way. It was my finest getting-out-of-trouble moment. Possibly my finest moment, period.

dman
09-06-2006, 10:47 PM
Some police departments really make me wonder. We work in a profession, not just a normal everyday job. It makes me angry when I hear of stories like Vatican Plum's, where the officer says "I've been waiting all day for you" or when an officer says that somebody committed such and such offense on "my roads, my street" etc. I by no means take my job personally, I do however take exception to police officers acting unprofessionally, because at that moment a local police officer was the same as a State Trooper, was the same as a Deputy Sheriff. They represented all of us at that moment, and that gets my goat to hear stories of flat out unprofessionalism.


OK, enough of my rant there, here are some more stories of people doing crazy stuff to get out of tickets. Since being on this job I have seen more parts of the female anatomy than I ever thought I would. I'm a guy, of course I notice it. But it is hilarious when I am up on my first trip and these women are being all flirty and showing flesh to get out of the ticket. I don't even acknowledge that I do see what they are showing, and I inform them that they are going to get a ticket for whatever violation that they committed. On my return trip with their blue copy, 9/10 times their attitude toward me will be 180 degrees the opposite of what it was before, being total female dogs towards me. I love being on camera during these moments.

What you see on these police video shows is nothing. I have over 12 hours of videotape featuring some of society's "finest moments". I love threads like this. It makes me realize what a fun job I do have.

I can spell for those of you who read this before I edited it.

vaticanplum
09-06-2006, 11:07 PM
Some police departments really make me wonder. We work in a profession, not just a normal everyday job. It makes me angry when I here of stories like Vatican Plum's, where the officer says "I've been waiting all day for you" or when an officer says that somebody comitted such and such offense on "my roads, my street" etc. I by no means take my job personally, I do however take exception to police officer's acting unprofessionally, because at that moment a local police officer was the same as a State Trooper, was the same as a Deputy Sheriff. They rpresented all of us at that moment, and that gets my goat to hear stories of flat out unprofessionalism.

Dman, I have great respect for you and your fellow law enforcement officials in theory. But I have to say that my experiences with cops in the past have been almost uniformly bad, all of them, to the point where I felt compelled to write a piece about it a couple of months ago: the times when I've been doing something wrong, the times when I've encountered them randomly, the times when I've been in some sort of trouble and they've been there to "help". and I'm a generally nice person -- not overtly sweet, probably, but as you say, I treat them professionally, and I expect the same in return, and I have almost never gotten it. This is not a knock on you at all, quite the opposite in fact: I'm glad to hear that this is something that is frowned upon by good policemen and women. Of course I know that they are there in the clutch, the September 11 situations and so on, but I do like to see that same level of professionalism in more inconsequential daily situations, and it's good to know that it does still exist.

dabvu2498
09-07-2006, 10:14 AM
What you see on these police video shows is nothing. I have over 12 hours of videotape featuring some of society's "finest moments".

Dman -- I have a "highlight reel" of the best and brightest FST's that I've seen from the past 5 years.

Some of the best include:
1. A man saying to an OSP "I need a hug."

2. A lady saying to a sheriff's deputy "Which is your right and which is your left. Us women don't know these things."

3. A man falling asleep, and remaining standing, during the HGN test.

4. Man, as soon as he pulls over, steps out of the car and puts his hands behind his back.

Of course, alot of them that I laugh like crazy at would not be so funny from your end.

dman
09-07-2006, 11:36 AM
I hope people don't think I'm sadistic for saying this, but some of my favorite videos are people getting hit with the taser.

Also, another one not to take the wrong way, but last week I stopped a girl near Circleville. When she opened her purse to get her license out (a very large purse), a very large "toy" fell from her purse. Once again, to spare her the embarrasment, I turned my head to pretend I didn't see what had happened, but when I turned back around, her face was beet red.

I wanted to drop an add on to this. I, in know way get satisfaction out of other people's embarrasing moments as often times they are just as embarrasing for me. Sometimes on this job you see things that you don't want to see such as fatal crashes, serious injury crashes and the such.
Seeing people make total fools of themselves when they are juiced up on liquid courage gives me a feeling of "restitution" for all of the times I've had to deal with something I would rather have not dealt with.