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DropDocK
05-27-2006, 11:15 PM
I went to my first game of the year tonight and spent the entire 5th inning waiting in the LaRosas line. Pizza wasn't even on my agenda. It was the only stand I saw in the vicinity selling pretzels, which was the only thing I wanted. All the registers were open and the lines were a decent length, but the slow pace of service was ridiculous. If your big product pizza I'd expect you would have it up and ready to go instead of constantly looking about like you have no clue what you are doing back there.
:thumbdown


LaRosas is one of my favorite restaurants so it's awkward to feel this way towards them but to wait that long.....at least it saved me the trouble of seeing Dunn drop the fly ball.

RedsFan74
05-27-2006, 11:21 PM
It seems like the concession stands/carts that are run by charitable groups (athletic boosters, PTA's, church groups, etc) usually have the slowest service. They obviously do the best they can but those folks usually just aren't experienced enough for that type of setting. That's why I try to look for concessionaires that look like they're "professionals".

Caveat Emperor
05-27-2006, 11:22 PM
Part of the problem with the Reds concessions is that the stands are almost always manned by volunteers from groups looking to raise money for whatever their pet causes are, as opposed to places like, say, the movie theatre, where concessionists more or less do that every night.

As such, it's usually pretty hit or miss as to whether or not you get good service at the ballpark.

For a pretzel, I'd never have waited in a LaRosas line. You'd have been better off just finding a generic hot dog stand and going there to get one. Also, fun tip: If the only thing you want is a soda, the best lines to hit are usually the ice cream lines, as they move the fastest and generally have fewer people compared to other stands.

NastyBoy
05-27-2006, 11:34 PM
Service can be a real problem especially with these concessions manned by charitable groups. I had a similar situation earlier in the season at one of the LaRosas stands. It was a Girl Scouts group... interesting enough, none of the people behind the counter were girls, but parents or family of the girls. Rather than get frustrated, cut them some slack. They do not get paid, they get a percentage of the concessions... for Bengals games I know it is 10%, so I am sure they are doing the best they can. Not sure what it is for the Reds.

DropDocK
05-28-2006, 12:00 AM
Ok that makes me feel a little better. I didn't realize they had charitable groups running some of the food services.

Yachtzee
05-28-2006, 12:17 AM
Service can be a real problem especially with these concessions manned by charitable groups. I had a similar situation earlier in the season at one of the LaRosas stands. It was a Girl Scouts group... interesting enough, none of the people behind the counter were girls, but parents or family of the girls. Rather than get frustrated, cut them some slack. They do not get paid, they get a percentage of the concessions... for Bengals games I know it is 10%, so I am sure they are doing the best they can. Not sure what it is for the Reds.

Just be glad they had parents working behind the counter. I went to a game at the Jake once where they had some cheerleading squad running the only food stand in our section (Mezzanine). They had 8 teenaged girls and one coach. Of course, since everyone wanted beer, it was really 1 woman running around trying to serve 4 lines and 8 girls standing around with nothing to do.

Personally, I think that for the prices people pay at the ballpark, concession stands should be run by trained professionals. If nonprofits want to make some money, give them a table in the concourses to sell candy bars or something. I think it's a little misleading to label some of these groups "charitable" as well. I don't see how Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, cheerleaders, high school marching bands, and college fraternities are "charitable." Sure they may participate in philanthropic causes, but it's not a fundamental reason for their existence. If they were raising money to help find a cure for cancer or support Big Brothers/Big Sisters, I would support that, no problem. But there are other ways for these groups to fund their trip to summer camp, new uniforms, or that trip to the national convention other than running a concession stand.

Caveat Emperor
05-28-2006, 12:27 AM
Just be glad they had parents working behind the counter. I went to a game at the Jake once where they had some cheerleading squad running the only food stand in our section (Mezzanine). They had 8 teenaged girls and one coach. Of course, since everyone wanted beer, it was really 1 woman running around trying to serve 4 lines and 8 girls standing around with nothing to do.

Personally, I think that for the prices people pay at the ballpark, concession stands should be run by trained professionals. If nonprofits want to make some money, give them a table in the concourses to sell candy bars or something. I think it's a little misleading to label some of these groups "charitable" as well. I don't see how Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, cheerleaders, high school marching bands, and college fraternities are "charitable." Sure they may participate in philanthropic causes, but it's not a fundamental reason for their existence. If they were raising money to help find a cure for cancer or support Big Brothers/Big Sisters, I would support that, no problem. But there are other ways for these groups to fund their trip to summer camp, new uniforms, or that trip to the national convention other than running a concession stand.

The reason why they don't have professional concession staffers working at the games is because you'd have to find a regular staff of people, all over the age of 21 (to avoid the very problem you mentioned), to work the games for an entire summer. That eliminates the main source of cheap summer labor -- high school and college students -- from consideration.

Attracting reliable, +21 workers for minimal pay is probably quite difficult. But, you package the work as "charity work" for an organization, suddenly someone else is suplying the bulk of the workforce for you. They're responsible for getting people to the park to work and the nature of the work (not for their own personal income) means they're not at all likely to complain about poor take home at the end of the night.

NastyBoy
05-28-2006, 12:35 AM
Sportservice Fundraising

Sportservice, the food service provider for the Cincinnati Reds, is proud of the many scholastic, athletic and religious fundraising groups that have made us their choice when raising money for their many worthy causes.

More than 100 organizations have utilized money earned at the concession stands at the ballpark to provide everything from scholarships and band uniforms to new places of worship for their members.

Like any successful Major League team, Sportservice is always on the lookout for new talent and encourages any charitable group looking to do some serious fundraising to contact us.

Key Information:

* All participants must be at least 19 years of age
* All participants must participate in a training session
* Group must commit to working at least 10 games during the season

For more information on fundraising at Great American Ball Park in 2006 contact:

The Group Fundraising Manager @ 513.765.7585 or email: cincygrp@dncinc.com

Yachtzee
05-28-2006, 12:45 AM
The reason why they don't have professional concession staffers working at the games is because you'd have to find a regular staff of people, all over the age of 21 (to avoid the very problem you mentioned), to work the games for an entire summer. That eliminates the main source of cheap summer labor -- high school and college students -- from consideration.

Attracting reliable, +21 workers for minimal pay is probably quite difficult. But, you package the work as "charity work" for an organization, suddenly someone else is suplying the bulk of the workforce for you. They're responsible for getting people to the park to work and the nature of the work (not for their own personal income) means they're not at all likely to complain about poor take home at the end of the night.

Is that really a problem these days? I can remember working my summers in college and afterwards at a summer concert venue. The summer concert schedule was a little more balanced than a ballpark, where you have a week of home games followed by a week of road games, but it was somewhat similar in that it required people to get there 1 1/2 to 2 hours before the show to set up (usually around 5:00 to 5:30 pm). There were plenty of people who worked there who had regular day jobs who would come staight from that job to work the concerts. The pay wasn't great, but it wasn't difficult and you got free passes to come in on off days. You could either catch a show yourself or give them to friends and family. They had no shortage of people 21+ years old looking for these jobs. But hey, this was 15 years ago and times are different I guess.

Wheelhouse
05-28-2006, 01:59 AM
I tell ya, the thing that bugs me at GABP is that they don't give tops with the sodas. If you're buying for a group it makes it very hard to get back to your seat without spilling all over the place, including on your food. Seems like such a cheapo move.

Ltlabner
05-28-2006, 06:17 AM
I wasn't going to gripe about the concessions until I read about the soda lids. That too bugs me. Overall I think the service is fine, people make an effort to be friendly and I like the varrious selections. I don't mind the prices because I usually don't gorge myself on food and know that is what I should expect at a ballpark. If I wanted value priced, good healthy food, I wouldn't go looking for it at GABP.

Anyway, the no lids thing is kinda werid. I don't know if it's an attempt to eliminate additional trash, some sorta cost savings issue or a plain old cost reduction. All I know is that it makes carying them back to the seat a chore. I know it's my job to be carefull but you know what? I'm a clutz and a simple lid would be nice.

MattyHo4Life
05-28-2006, 06:41 AM
It seems like the concession stands/carts that are run by charitable groups (athletic boosters, PTA's, church groups, etc) usually have the slowest service. They obviously do the best they can but those folks usually just aren't experienced enough for that type of setting. That's why I try to look for concessionaires that look like they're "professionals".

The Cardinals do the same thing with having charitable groups run some of their concessions. I actually have had the opposite experiences that you have had though. The charitable groups are the ones that always seem to be on the ball. They are more friendly and much faster. they always seem to be working harder behind the counter. I always thought it was because they believe in their charity, and they are working for something other than just themselves. The "professionals" always seem to be much slower, not as friendly, and they don't really seem to care much about their job. I wouldn't expect much enthusiasm since they are likely minimum wage jobs. I don't see many college students, they usually seem much older than your typical college student. Anyways, I always look for the charities, and go to those lines. Maybe it's different in Cincinnati.

Heath
05-28-2006, 07:51 AM
I'm waiting for "self-service" lines sometime soon.

Cut the non-profits' some slack. I'm in a group that used to do Dragons' games. The money we made funded youth programs and we didn't have to go door to door. What makes it slow is getting people to know what to do.

reds1869
05-28-2006, 09:35 AM
The reason why they don't have professional concession staffers working at the games is because you'd have to find a regular staff of people, all over the age of 21 (to avoid the very problem you mentioned), to work the games for an entire summer.

I believe anyone over the age of 18 may serve alcohol. This used to be the case, but perhaps it has changed. If it hasn't, there sure are a lot of places that break the law.

paintmered
05-28-2006, 10:03 AM
I believe anyone over the age of 18 may serve alcohol. This used to be the case, but perhaps it has changed. If it hasn't, there sure are a lot of places that break the law.

I think the age to serve it is 19.

indyred
05-28-2006, 10:08 AM
The only problem I had at the game I went to, was my little one had to have a hamburger. That was quite a search. Seems only one place had them and it was $8.25 for the burger and fries. I guess I don't mind. I know when I go to the ball park I'm going to get taken for size that day on food, drinks ect....I know it going in, so it shoudn't really surprise any one. I figure I get many hours of enjoyment watching the reds on TV all season for basically free and it's a nice escape from the real world.

TeamBoone
05-28-2006, 10:22 AM
Baseball runs from April through September, tough to get college help in April, May, and September.

What would help, IMHO, is to offer a 30-minute training session to these charitable organizations by a professional (and I assume a professional is somewhere in the picture if you go up the food chain high enough). Heck, I could do it and I'm not a professional; much of it is just plain old common sense that you would apply in just about any trade that serves the public.

In my experience, the most time-consuming task is drawing the drinks... assign one/two people to do only that; it would help a lot (drinks only lines would also be helpful).

It's pretty simple to be organized, even with only a few hands... it's what you do and how you do it with those hands that counts.

RBA
05-28-2006, 10:43 AM
I went to the Sun Bowl in El Paso. I stood in line for almost the entire 2nd quarter. The hold up was the fountain drinks weren't working and the kids behind the counter were filling cups from 2 liter bottles of Pepsi. The bottles were all warm, so you can imagine the time it took them to fill the cups once the warm Pepsi hit the cold ice. Foam City!

Yachtzee
05-28-2006, 10:54 AM
Baseball runs from April through September, tough to get college help in April, May, and September.

What would help, IMHO, is to offer a 30-minute training session to these charitable organizations by a professional (and I assume a professional is somewhere in the picture if you go up the food chain high enough). Heck, I could do it and I'm not a professional; much of it is just plain old common sense that you would apply in just about any trade that serves the public.

In my experience, the most time-consuming task is drawing the drinks... assign one/two people to do only that; it would help a lot (drinks only lines would also be helpful).

It's pretty simple to be organized, even with only a few hands... it's what you do and how you do it with those hands that counts.

The key with hiring the college students is to work the difference in college schedules to your advantage. Up here, schools like Kent State and Akron U. are on semesters and would finish in early May, whereas Ohio State and some other schools were on quarters in the past and would get out in June. So for April and May, you could hire enough local college kids to work in April and May, knowing you're just going to lose some of those who just aren't cut out for it. Then you also hire as many students from the quarter-based schools to make up for the attrition from April and May. When September rolls around, you can usually deal with it better because the staff has enough experience to run things with fewer people. If you need more, you just have a quick hit "job fair" to get a few more to finish the season.

However, if the nonprofit route is the way to go, I would think an age requirement and training would have to be a must.

DropDocK
05-28-2006, 11:11 AM
After I think about it, there was signage that should have indicated to me what kind of line I was in. Just one of those little shelves that you slide in the name of the group (in this case some kind of church group) for every game. I presumed they were sponsoring, not actually running the service.

In any case, brief training sessions beforehand wouldn't hurt and maybe it wouldn't seem so overwhelming for the volunteers.

KySteveH
05-28-2006, 12:29 PM
If I'm going to pay the inflated prices for concessions, I would expect a little better service. Now, I'm not saying that the "professional" concession stand workers are any better than the "volunteers". I just think that a little training and supervision would go a long way. Also, it always seems to me like the wrong person has the wrong job. The person with the worst communication skills should not be taking orders, the slow person should not be the "runner", etc. Again, maybe a supervisory person to watch out for bottlenecks would be a good idea.

Newman4
05-28-2006, 04:51 PM
My pet peeve is the uniforms the concession people wear. They should be wearing Reds team colors. That ugly ass yellow and blue sucks.

NastyBoy
05-28-2006, 05:09 PM
The only problem I had at the game I went to, was my little one had to have a hamburger. That was quite a search. Seems only one place had them and it was $8.25 for the burger and fries. I guess I don't mind. I know when I go to the ball park I'm going to get taken for size that day on food, drinks ect....I know it going in, so it shoudn't really surprise any one. I figure I get many hours of enjoyment watching the reds on TV all season for basically free and it's a nice escape from the real world.

You should have gotten the little one a Goetta Burger...:)

savafan
05-28-2006, 05:20 PM
I tell ya, the thing that bugs me at GABP is that they don't give tops with the sodas. If you're buying for a group it makes it very hard to get back to your seat without spilling all over the place, including on your food. Seems like such a cheapo move.

I'll agree with you here. I recently took a mentally handicapped individual in a wheel chair to a Reds game, and he wanted a pepsi. He also has cerebral palsy, and very poor motor functions. A lid and a straw would have worked wonders in keeping him from constantly spilling pepsi all over him. Eventually, after much prodding, he allowed me to hold the cup for him while he drank from it, but I'm sure that had to be pretty embarrassing for him.

Yachtzee
05-28-2006, 05:37 PM
I'll agree with you here. I recently took a mentally handicapped individual in a wheel chair to a Reds game, and he wanted a pepsi. He also has cerebral palsy, and very poor motor functions. A lid and a straw would have worked wonders in keeping him from constantly spilling pepsi all over him. Eventually, after much prodding, he allowed me to hold the cup for him while he drank from it, but I'm sure that had to be pretty embarrassing for him.

I think that's something that you might want to pass on to someone the Reds or whoever their concessionaire may be. It seems silly not to have lids just for such an occassion. In the meantime, are drink bottles allowed into GABP? If you take this person to a game again, maybe bringing a sports bottle might help him out. If they don't allow those types of bottles in, I would add that to the message. I'm sure it's embarrassing for those who have conditions that make it difficult to hold a cup steady to deal with one without a lid.

scounts22
05-28-2006, 05:42 PM
I went to Detroit last week and actually complained about this same thing up there. I stood in line for and inning and a half for food and missed Dunner's homerun, and later Griffey's grand slam. I was not a happy gal. I don't know if the people working there were with a specific organization or employed by the Tigers, but whoever they were, they were slooowww as snails.

Newman4
05-28-2006, 05:44 PM
IIRC, you can bring in unopened bottle with caps like bottled water. I never have seen anyone bring in Pepsi in bottles though. Does anyone know if that's acceptable at GABP?

SandyD
05-28-2006, 06:01 PM
Seems like for folks with special needs, you should be able to bring in an empty cup, and just pour all or part of the drink in it.

Lids and straws would be nice, but I think management fears them flying (being thrown) onto the field.

I did some volunteer time at concession stands when I was in HS, and it was fun.

Caveat Emperor
05-28-2006, 06:10 PM
Lids and straws would be nice, but I think management fears them flying (being thrown) onto the field.

Although, if that was the primary motivation about anything, I imagine they'd stop giving out the tissue paper you get with hot dogs, since those seem to end up on the field constantly as well.

Dunner44
05-28-2006, 09:11 PM
One nice thing I can say about concessions is that R.Cast is doing a good job bringing local eateries in. LaRosa's, Skyline, Montgomery Inn... well done.

Caveat Emperor
05-28-2006, 09:29 PM
One nice thing I can say about concessions is that R.Cast is doing a good job bringing local eateries in. LaRosa's, Skyline, Montgomery Inn... well done.

I'd like to see them take Detroit's lead and build a "food court" out along the 1st base line. Big, covered area, lots of concessions around the edges, tables and chairs in the middle. Bring in ALL the local establishments (Montgomery Inn, Skyline, LaRosas, Izzys, Willies, Graeters, etc.) and set up a place for people to come before the game and grab whatever they like to eat.

Open the gates up for BP and let the fans pile in with dollars and empty stomachs. With the new 6:10 start times, the ballpark is just begging to have something like this added.

savafan
05-28-2006, 09:33 PM
are the local establishments reasonably priced, or is it typical ballpark prices?

KronoRed
05-28-2006, 09:36 PM
are the local establishments reasonably priced, or is it typical ballpark prices?
Typical ballpark ripof...I mean Mark-up ;)

TeamBoone
05-28-2006, 09:54 PM
I think Montgomery Inn is reasonable... pulled pork on a Kaiser roll (and a second option that I can't remember) with potato salad (or pasta salad) and a big old deli pickle for $7. To me, it's reasonable considering what $7 can buy at other concessions... and it fills you up too.

I've never bought LaRosa or Skyline at the park so I can't evaluate them.

paintmered
05-28-2006, 09:56 PM
However, if the nonprofit route is the way to go, I would think an age requirement and training would have to be a must.

I did the nonprofit concession thing back in 2001. There is both an age requirement and training that must be completed to work the concession stand.

Now whether or not that training is adequate is another debate altogether....

chiliman
05-28-2006, 10:05 PM
I have worked in a concession at the college level and while there is an orientation required, quality still lacks at most booths due to lack of organization and management.

Prices are set by the stadium usually, the one I worked at supplied product and set prices.

my 2 cent

Dunner44
05-28-2006, 10:31 PM
LaRosas is 4.75 for a slice of pizza, but they are big slices. It's pretty much 2 silces of pizza. Thats not terrible, as it's usually 1.50 to 2 dollars a slice if they are doing a booth at a festival.

George Foster
05-28-2006, 11:19 PM
$4.75 for two slices of Pizza is not bad. $12.25 for a corndog, whaffle fries, and a large coke, should be a felony. I will bring a sandwich next time. They would sell more if they would lower their prices and actually make more profit.
I saw a family of four bring in thier whole dinner. If they could have purchased dinner for $20-25, how many families would buy?

savafan
05-28-2006, 11:20 PM
They let you bring in your food?

George Foster
05-28-2006, 11:21 PM
They let you bring in your food?

All you want!

Chip R
05-28-2006, 11:24 PM
One nice thing I can say about concessions is that R.Cast is doing a good job bringing local eateries in. LaRosa's, Skyline, Montgomery Inn... well done.

Skyline and MI were already there before Bob took over. LaRosas was added this year.

The charitable organizations handling concessions is a bit of a scam for baseball teams. When they build these new stadiums, they say that they will employ so many people and the economy will benefit from it and then they have these charitable organizations do the work instead of hiring trained personnel to do it. Don't get me wrong, I think it is a good deal for the organizations involved but it's also a sweet deal for baseball teams too.

KittyDuran
05-28-2006, 11:40 PM
They let you bring in your food?As long as security can see it and the plastic containers are unopened. I usually go for Subway sub, chips, cookies, and buy bottled water outside for a $1. Before 9/11 they even let you bring in small cans of pringles. I also buy small bags of M&Ms, which are so expensive at the park, and bring them in.

savafan
05-28-2006, 11:42 PM
As long as security can see it and the plastic containers are unopened. I usually go for Subway sub, chips, cookies, and buy bottled water outside for a $1. Before 9/11 they even let you bring in small cans of pringles. I also buy small bags of M&Ms, which are so expensive at the park, and bring them in.

Well, that's awesome. I had no idea.

Chip R
05-28-2006, 11:47 PM
I also buy small bags of M&Ms, which are so expensive at the park, and bring them in.

Wait a minute. You have M&Ms with you? :eek: Good move on your part by not telling me but you're busted now. :devil:

savafan
05-28-2006, 11:51 PM
So, are you allowed to bring a cooler in?

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 12:06 AM
So, are you allowed to bring a cooler in?Here ya go... from the Reds website:

COOLERS
Guests are welcome to bring SOFT-SIDED coolers into Great American Ball Park provided the coolers' dimensions do not exceed the 16" x 16" x 8" inch Major League Baseball size requirement. HARD-SIDED coolers of any size are prohibited from entering the ballpark. Coolers and all carry-in items are always subject to inspection by Reds personnel prior to entrance to the ballpark or at any time while inside the ballpark.

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 12:08 AM
Wait a minute. You have M&Ms with you? :eek: Good move on your part by not telling me but you're busted now. :devil:No M&Ms today (haven't been on sale). But I'll buy you an extra bag... plain or peanut? :)

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 12:12 AM
So, are you allowed to bring a cooler in?Sava, if you're not really sure (even if the rules are stated on the website) it's always good to ask security at another game - and ask more than one person. I've gotten varying opinions (not bad but vague) on things you can bring in. Now it's been a while since I brought soft drinks in - but I could bring in Sprite, which of course is made by Coca-Cola a competitor of Pepsi, which is sold at the ballpark. IIRC, there was a thread in which concessions were talked about and RBA (?) mentioned going to Safeco and not being allow to do this.

Caveat Emperor
05-29-2006, 12:15 AM
As long as security can see it and the plastic containers are unopened. I usually go for Subway sub, chips, cookies, and buy bottled water outside for a $1. Before 9/11 they even let you bring in small cans of pringles. I also buy small bags of M&Ms, which are so expensive at the park, and bring them in.

My friends and I have a tradition (which we've yet to do this year, due to my Toledo-tastic living arrangements until the bar) where we go to Chipotle before the game and bring burritos into the stadium with us.

Usually the security guards take one look and immediately get jealous. I'm afraid it's going to get confiscated and eaten one of these days.

KronoRed
05-29-2006, 12:26 AM
"Sorry sir you have to hand over the burrito, and we'll uh have to have your drinks as well...security."

Yachtzee
05-29-2006, 12:59 AM
My friends and I have a tradition (which we've yet to do this year, due to my Toledo-tastic living arrangements until the bar) where we go to Chipotle before the game and bring burritos into the stadium with us.

Usually the security guards take one look and immediately get jealous. I'm afraid it's going to get confiscated and eaten one of these days.

"Excuse me? Did you say you got the steak burrito with the hot red chili salsa and extra guacamole? Stay where you are, don't move, and hand over the WMD!"

Caveat Emperor
05-29-2006, 01:03 AM
"Excuse me? Did you say you got the steak burrito with the hot red chili salsa and extra guacamole? Stay where you are, don't move, and hand over the WMD!"

Chicken burrito, black beans, mix of tomato-green chile and red chile salsa, extra cheese, light sour cream.

Sometimes chips -- depending on whether or not I'm feeling particularly hungry.

I might have to grab one of those on my way back to Toledo tomorrow. :D

919191
05-29-2006, 01:57 AM
As long as security can see it and the plastic containers are unopened. I usually go for Subway sub, chips, cookies, and buy bottled water outside for a $1. Before 9/11 they even let you bring in small cans of pringles. I also buy small bags of M&Ms, which are so expensive at the park, and bring them in.


We usually take in a couple cans of Pringles for the kids, and have never been questioned. Are we just getting lucky?

919191
05-29-2006, 01:58 AM
And I remember a few years ago at Cinergy seeing a family in front of me carry in 2 pizzas.

NastyBoy
05-29-2006, 03:39 AM
IIRC, you can bring in unopened bottle with caps like bottled water. I never have seen anyone bring in Pepsi in bottles though. Does anyone know if that's acceptable at GABP?

You can bring any bottled drink as long as it is not alcohol. I ussually bring a bottle of water and a 1 litter of soda. If you go to the concession, they will give you a small cup of ice. They used to let you bring in drinks in a cup, but not anymore. I like stopping at wendys or subway downtown. Subway is the best, because I will get the 12 inch with chips and eat half of it at the start of the game... then eat the second half in the sixth or seventh.

NastyBoy
05-29-2006, 03:58 AM
So, are you allowed to bring a cooler in?

Yep small ones... with soft sides. Think lunch cooler... the kind that would hold 6 cans of pop. That is what I have, plus it has compartments for storing extra goodies on top and on the sides. Anything that can hold 12 cans might be too big.

This one is similar to the one I have...
http://www.igloocoolers.com/products/SoftSides/IglooBasics/2320/

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 09:04 AM
We usually take in a couple cans of Pringles for the kids, and have never been questioned. Are we just getting lucky?No, not lucky... that's why it's important to ask different security personnel. Right after 9/11, I brought in a small pringles can to a game but was told by security that they would let it in this time - but probably not the next time. Of course, I never brought in another can for fear of it getting thrown away. :(

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 09:05 AM
Yep small ones... with soft sides. Think lunch cooler... the kind that would hold 6 cans of pop. That is what I have, plus it has compartments for storing extra goodies on top and on the sides. Anything that can hold 12 cans might be too big.

This one is similar to the one I have...
http://www.igloocoolers.com/products/SoftSides/IglooBasics/2320/Just no CANS only plastic...:)

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 09:09 AM
And I remember a few years ago at Cinergy seeing a family in front of me carry in 2 pizzas.Sort of off topic... but most minor league teams (if not all) do not allow concessions being brought in. I remember going to a Dragons game either in 2001 or 2002 and seeing 4 teenagers bring in a sofa and place it down just outside the fence on the First Street side - as they were sitting there watching the game a pizza delivery guy stops on the opposite side (First Street is one way going east bound) runs across the street and delivers 3 pizzas! No one told them to move - I don't think the Dragons own that sidewalk - but I thought it was pretty :cool:!

OldRightHander
05-29-2006, 09:34 AM
I always take my own food in. I'm a peanut guy at ballgames. The Speedway by my house has these little bags of peanuts for about $1.50 or so and I will take my soft sided cooler with a Coke and a couple bottles of water. I used to bring in a bottle of my own filled with water, but about halfway through the 2003 season the security people started making me empty the bottle's contents before I came in because it wasn't an unopened bottle from the store. Sometimes I'll grab something from the food court in the tower or from the Arby's up on 6th St.

Yachtzee
05-29-2006, 10:26 AM
Chicken burrito, black beans, mix of tomato-green chile and red chile salsa, extra cheese, light sour cream.

Sometimes chips -- depending on whether or not I'm feeling particularly hungry.

I might have to grab one of those on my way back to Toledo tomorrow. :D

That sounds good!

Now I think the next Redszone mission is to solicit investors to open a Chipotle across from GABP.

Ltlabner
05-29-2006, 10:45 AM
Maybe it can be incorporated into the "banks" project that will be right next door to GABP. Since BC is in charge of that project maybe we can loby him directly with the Chipotle/Reds tie in?

TeamBoone
05-29-2006, 12:19 PM
You can bring any bottled drink as long as it is not alcohol. I ussually bring a bottle of water and a 1 litter of soda. If you go to the concession, they will give you a small cup of ice. They used to let you bring in drinks in a cup, but not anymore. I like stopping at wendys or subway downtown. Subway is the best, because I will get the 12 inch with chips and eat half of it at the start of the game... then eat the second half in the sixth or seventh.

Have you ever tried the double-deckers at the Red Squirrel on the way to the game? They are HUGE and DELICIOUS! TM and I sometimes take them in and one is ample for the two of us (sometimes too much).

Last year in Sarasota, I tried to take in a frozen bottle of water (it was sealed but I had thrown it in the freezer). They made me chuck it at the gate.... even though I knew darn well it would be thawed in about 30 minutes or less.

I don't know if they would have allowed it if it wasn't frozen; they didn't say and I didn't ask.

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 12:29 PM
Yesterday I took in 2 semi-frozen bottles of water (unsealed) into the game... no problem. :) I would assume that Ed Smith Stadium is considered a minor league facility so outside food and drinks are not allowed. Luckily for those of us who go to the minor league games most of the concessions are lower in price (don't know about beer) than in the majors. Dayton has a very good assortment of food + they sell Coke products...:beerme:

TeamBoone
05-29-2006, 12:38 PM
I prefer Coke too.

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 12:44 PM
I prefer Coke too.:thumbup: Tho' right now I'm here at work and pretty much everyone else here like Pepsi products, so I'm drinking a Pepsi :p: .

NastyBoy
05-29-2006, 01:47 PM
Have you ever tried the double-deckers at the Red Squirrel on the way to the game? They are HUGE and DELICIOUS! TM and I sometimes take them in and one is ample for the two of us (sometimes too much).

Last year in Sarasota, I tried to take in a frozen bottle of water (it was sealed but I had thrown it in the freezer). They made me chuck it at the gate.... even though I knew darn well it would be thawed in about 30 minutes or less.

I don't know if they would have allowed it if it wasn't frozen; they didn't say and I didn't ask.

Those double deckers sound pretty good, may have to check it out. I have frozen my drinks on a hot day and put them in a plastic bag with my food.

Park for free downtown on the street. Bring your own snacky food. Buy a $5 ticket and you have a cheap day at the ballyard. On weekday games, I will get downtown about 5:45, at 6:00 you are allowed park on the streets. I never pay for parking if I dont have to.

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 01:54 PM
Those double deckers sound pretty good, may have to check it out. I have frozen my drinks on a hot day and put them in a plastic bag with my food.

Park for free downtown on the street. Bring your own snacky food. Buy a $5 ticket and you have a cheap day at the ballyard. On weekday games, I will get downtown about 5:45, at 6:00 you are allowed park on the streets. I never pay for parking if I dont have to.or better yet eat beforehand. Yesterday I had breakfast at Bob Evans and a frappuccino at Starbucks before going to the game with my drinks. For those that live in NKY - went to Crestview Hills Town Center - very nice (went to the Starbucks) - off of I-275. :)

KronoRed
05-29-2006, 02:43 PM
I like sprite...they serve none.

They are then by definition, evil.

Heath
05-29-2006, 02:51 PM
:thumbup: Tho' right now I'm here at work and pretty much everyone else here like Pepsi products, so I'm drinking a Pepsi :p: .

Go home, Kitty, its a holiday :D

KittyDuran
05-29-2006, 03:32 PM
Go home, Kitty, its a holiday :DNot working...:D Just taking advantage of a T1 connection to the Internet... :thumbup:

edabbs44
05-29-2006, 05:30 PM
Just got back from Cincy and I have to say the service was the worst I have ever seen. Charitable contributions or not, when you miss over 2 innings to be on line for a hot dog they have to do something about it.

REDREAD
05-30-2006, 07:24 AM
Attracting reliable, +21 workers for minimal pay is probably quite difficult. But, you package the work as "charity work" for an organization, suddenly someone else is suplying the bulk of the workforce for you. They're responsible for getting people to the park to work and the nature of the work (not for their own personal income) means they're not at all likely to complain about poor take home at the end of the night.

Not only that, but the amount of money the organization gets is usually less than minimum wage when you consider all the time it takes to set up, clean up, etc. Maybe it's different with the Reds, but I ran a concession stand for a charity at a Division 1 football stadium, and our charity's cut was typically about 2.90/hour for each worker we had.

Roy Tucker
05-30-2006, 08:39 AM
My wife and I have worked both the Reds and Bengals games in the food stands. Generally speaking, I thought the groups we've done it with (knothole baseball, soccer, band) have done a darn fine job.

We usually sort out pretty quickly who does what. Having been a grill cook in a previous life, I usually get banished to the back to prepare food. The women usually take orders. We generally get a 5 minute spiel from a food service person as to how the booth works. Mostly, being college graduates and all, we figure it out pretty quickly. And most of us have already worked concession stands as sports or band parents (HS football games are great training grounds).

IMNSHO, I think we do a better job than the "professionals" I see there. Poor service may result when you get a booth where the people have just gotten there and are still sorting it out.

The hardest one was when I manned a beer booth at a September Bengals game where the temps hit 90. We basically had the taps running in a continuous flow from an hour before kickoff till the beer cut-off sometime in the 4th quarter.