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View Full Version : Stop them from pressing?



Ltlabner
06-01-2006, 10:24 PM
Once a team starts to struggle, it's only natural that they would try harder at the plate to make up for the slacking offense. As the slump progresses, people try harder and harder to rip the next pitch into the stratosphere. As they get further and further away from their comfort zone, and natural "approach" at the plate they struggle more and more.

From a players perspective, how do they "relax" and just do their thing?

From a coaches perspective, how do they help the players to "relax" and just do their thing?

Do you even believe that "pressing at the plate" exists and is an issue?

VR
06-01-2006, 10:55 PM
Tough one to quantify, but I think it's so much mental preparation goes into hitting, that it's easy to get too many ideas going in your head (Adam Dunn says hello)...and the those with tough mental discipline to go along with the exceptional talent produce your best ballplayers.

You see it all the time in sports, but becomes less and less prevalent as the levels go up. Confidence overcomes a lot of that as players advance, but I think it still exists at the ML level to some extent.

jimbo
06-01-2006, 11:54 PM
Once a team starts to struggle, it's only natural that they would try harder at the plate to make up for the slacking offense. As the slump progresses, people try harder and harder to rip the next pitch into the stratosphere. As they get further and further away from their comfort zone, and natural "approach" at the plate they struggle more and more.

From a players perspective, how do they "relax" and just do their thing?

From a coaches perspective, how do they help the players to "relax" and just do their thing?

Do you even believe that "pressing at the plate" exists and is an issue?

When I was playing, I was always taught that hitting is 80% mental and 20% mechanics, and I firmly believe that. I know a lot of people will say this is cheesey, but I was also taught how to visualize. For example, visualizing your swing and what you want to do with your at-bat while on the on-deck circle. This always helped me in blocking out any struggles that I was having at the plate and focusing entirely on that single at-bat and the situation at hand. You have to be able to go to the plate and forget about what happened yesterday and the day before and just focus.

I think coaches just need to maintain and show confidence in their players. There is only so much a coach can do when it comes to the mental aspect of the game. You have to design your approach to each player on an individual basis and realize that not every player responds in the same way.

I do think that "pressing at the plate" exists with some players. Your great players learn to overcome it.

BCubb2003
06-02-2006, 03:00 AM
"Stop trying harder!"

"I want to see some lollygagging out there!"

GAC
06-02-2006, 11:35 AM
The mental approach is a bigger part of hitting, and is what separates the men from the boys. ;)

What must first come is passion and the will/desire to want to overcome and improve.

I really don't know the habits/routine of any of the current Reds; but I just don't know, after following/studying such former greats as Cobb, Williams, Musial, and growing up idolizing & following players such Rose, Morgan, and others, and what they did to succeed - and more importantly, to get that edge - if I see that same passion in today's ballplayers?

There is no easy why to do it... or some new and improved way?

The methodology is still age-old - hard work and dedication. And I think some of today's players are looking for that easier way/methodoloy to avoid that solid commitment that it takes.

Tony Gywnn was another player that simply amazed me. He could 4-5 the night before, and yet be out there the next day hours before the game studying and constantly trying to improve.

Yes, slumps have to worked through. And one also has to demonstrate patience (especially the manager - if he truly trusts the abilities of his players).

But it's not just simply taking extra batting practice and or looking at some game films. Thse items are important; but if it's still not satisfying/working for you, then you need to make the effort to take it to the next level of research and studying pitchers, defenses, etc.

They adjust, you adjust.

And again, that comes from a passion that I dont see in alot of today's ballplayers.

We say guys like Freel are anomolies because he hustles and gives 110%.

That use to be the definition of your average ballplayer for the most part. ;)

How hungry are today's ballplayers really?