PDA

View Full Version : Any gardeners here?



saboforthird
06-08-2006, 07:48 PM
In the movie "Somersby", Jack (main character) shows the community how to grow tobacco plants for transplanting, by sowing seeds in manure (I'm guessing they used that instead of clayish soil) and covering this with straw. Later they came back and removed the straw to reveal healthy seedings that they then removed to be transplanted into the fields. Just growing seedlings this way (sowing, and immediately mulching) work well?

SeeinRed
06-08-2006, 09:17 PM
The idea behind growing seedlings before planting them in the ground is that they need more nourishment when the growing process first starts, much like a baby. Tobacco fields aren't always the most nurturing envionment for seeds. Growing them in manuer gives them the jumpstart they need to become healthy enough to transplant into the field. The staw is to keep animals from digging them up. Simple ideas, and effective ones. I mean, I'm sure you're familiar with the practice of putting straw over grass seed so birds don't eat the seeds, and tobacco is still put into fields as seedlings.

saboforthird
06-08-2006, 09:44 PM
There are other reasons for growing seedlings before planting, such as to sell them to others for transplant, or.....for me a biggie, to offer some protection from the elements (might not get that out in big fields or large gardens). Have you seen the movie "Somersby"? In it, Jack starts these seedlings from long planters that 4-5' off the ground, and still covers them with straw. So, I think it was for reasons other than protection from animals that might dig up the seedlings. Having said that, I wonder if mulching seedlings (before they ever even sprout) such as tomato or lettuce plants (or even corn) with straw would be as effective. I don't really want to kill my poor little seeds. :D

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 07:32 AM
My grandfather used to cover his tobacco and lettuce beds with a cheesecloth like material until they sprouted up and started growing. Then came the wonderful fun of planting the tobacco plants and all the work that comes with growing a crop of tobacco. Lots and lots of work.

gonelong
06-09-2006, 09:36 AM
My grandfather used to cover his tobacco and lettuce beds with a cheesecloth like material until they sprouted up and started growing. Then came the wonderful fun of planting the tobacco plants and all the work that comes with growing a crop of tobacco. Lots and lots of work.

Whooo boy, now you've done it. ;)

I have always wondered if I would have any luck trying to grow a few plants in Ohio soil. Any idea? And if by chance I could ... would it be something that I could harvest and with a reasonable amount of work ... with then end game being to smoke it in a pipe or roll a cigar with? And if I could get that far ... would I be pretty disapointed with the results or would I have something worthwhile?

Thanks,

GL

dabvu2498
06-09-2006, 10:08 AM
Whooo boy, now you've done it. ;)

I have always wondered if I would have any luck trying to grow a few plants in Ohio soil. Any idea? And if by chance I could ... would it be something that I could harvest and with a reasonable amount of work ... with then end game being to smoke it in a pipe or roll a cigar with? And if I could get that far ... would I be pretty disapointed with the results or would I have something worthwhile?

Thanks,

GL
My grandfather grew some tobacco plants here in SWO. Just to see if they'd actually grow, not for use. He said he kept them in his "hot bed" (mini greenhouse covered by clear plastic tarp0 about two weeks longer than he would have if he was growing in Somerset KY.

To me, they never really got as full or looked as healthy as those you see in the Bluegrass State.

Roy Tucker
06-09-2006, 11:38 AM
Let me get this straight, we are talking tobacco here, right?

:pimp:

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 11:45 AM
Whooo boy, now you've done it. ;)

I have always wondered if I would have any luck trying to grow a few plants in Ohio soil. Any idea? And if by chance I could ... would it be something that I could harvest and with a reasonable amount of work ... with then end game being to smoke it in a pipe or roll a cigar with? And if I could get that far ... would I be pretty disapointed with the results or would I have something worthwhile?

Thanks,

GL

My grandfather grew tobacco, just outside of Huntington, WV in Cabell County for many years, and he grew some wonderful tobacco. I have many memories of working in the stuff. After I was an adult, he would roll up his very best leaves in a "twist" for me to mix in with my "store bought" chew. I still have one of those twists in my humidor. You should have no trouble growing some nice plants in your Ohio soil if it is good soil. Curing it would be the hardest part, unless you know someone who has a nice barn.

dabvu2498
06-09-2006, 12:19 PM
My grandfather grew tobacco, just outside of Huntington, WV in Cabell County for many years, and he grew some wonderful tobacco. I have many memories of working in the stuff.
I notice you didn't say "fond" or "pleasant" when referring to your memories. The worst summers of my life were spent suckering, topping, and hanging. Plus there's nothing like ingesting nicotine through your skin when you're sweating.

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 03:23 PM
It ain't much fun, is it. Before they started bailing it, I can remember tying "hands" of tobacco. There was the red leaf, bright leaf, lugs, trash.........................

dabvu2498
06-09-2006, 03:32 PM
We called it "sticks." My people still don't bail.

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 03:34 PM
At the time, it wasn't pleasant. Lots of days spent taking in hay, hoeing corn, diggin' taters, and fertilizing (can you say barn waste?) the fields. The pleasant and fond memories are of the times spent with family who are no longer here. Hard work it was.

dabvu2498
06-09-2006, 03:59 PM
Whew... I still bail hay... luckily I'm on the tractor now instead of the wagon. I always enjoyed mending fences as well. Especially at 5:30 in the morning when it was about 10 below.

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 04:03 PM
I've been on that wagon too many times.;) My grandad didn't believe in tractors. We did it all with a team of mules. We even pulled a few tractors out of the creek banks with those animals. Boy, they were amazing? Gee, haw!

gonelong
06-09-2006, 04:11 PM
I loved bailing hay/straw as a kid. It was a way you could make a decent bit of cash and hang out with your buddies at the same time. Many of the farmers in our area would also put out a feast after you were done, and a few of them would bring out a cooler of beer (pretty cool for a 14-18 year old kid. It was as if they were showing that you worked like a man, have a beer. Probably would land 'em all in jail now-a-days). I can remember bailing hay all day and going to play summer league baseball in the evenings.

One of my buddies got the idea a few years ago ... we should get together on his Dad's farm and bail hay like we did when we were kids.

Ha Ha, a bunch of out of shape 32/33 year old guys in 90+ degree heat and Ohio humidity. Its lucky none of us keeled over! I think I slept for about 3 days after that ... but it did help to reinforce that my office job ... in an air controlled climate and a comfy chair ... was a pretty good gig.

GL

RANDY IN INDY
06-09-2006, 04:15 PM
Those feasts were some of the best eatin' anyone could ever have! It's a wonder we all don't have skin cancer from the sun we took on those days.

dabvu2498
06-09-2006, 04:57 PM
Bailing straw was great!!! Bailing hay... not so much...

I have permanent scarring on my under forearms because I refused to wear a long sleeved shirt.

I think I could still do it. Maybe not.

redsfanmia
06-09-2006, 07:32 PM
I grew up on a dairy farm, I spent many a day out baling hay. We never baled unless it was 90+ outside. I hated it when i was doing it as a kid/teenager but looking back I was in such good shape and so thin and strong and most of it had to do with baling hay and all the hard work. I really miss it now, I cant believe I just typed that.

saboforthird
06-09-2006, 11:36 PM
Let me get this straight, we are talking tobacco here, right?

:pimp:

No, no. I used an example of a gardening technique (surely Hollywood wouldn't just make something up, no not them, LOL) that I saw on a movie as part of my question. I'm just frustrated with the quality of the soil I have to work with, and don't want to "cheat" by adding organic (yeah, right) crap bought from Lowes or some commercial greenhouse. And, I swear to God, if I catch another of my ****ing dogs walking in my seed beds, they're going to be wearing my boot in the butt. It pisses me off. Maybe I'm just a wee bit too short-tempered or attached to my seeds.

REDREAD
06-12-2006, 07:58 AM
No, no. I used an example of a gardening technique (surely Hollywood wouldn't just make something up, no not them, LOL) that I saw on a movie as part of my question. I'm just frustrated with the quality of the soil I have to work with, and don't want to "cheat" by adding organic (yeah, right) crap bought from Lowes or some commercial greenhouse. And, I swear to God, if I catch another of my ****ing dogs walking in my seed beds, they're going to be wearing my boot in the butt. It pisses me off. Maybe I'm just a wee bit too short-tempered or attached to my seeds.

I start my own seeds. It's a bit late, but you can still get some now. Get one of those "mini-greenhouses" at Lowes. They are a "flat" that has plastic cells to put a little bit of dirt and a plastic cover over it. Plant the seeds with a good seed starting soil (Miracle grow potting mix is adequate and easy to find, but not really the best).. You want something that is peat moss based. Then poke a couple of small holes in the plastic "lid" that covers the seeds, because you don't want them to get too damp. Put the flat under lights (shoplight flourescent lights are fine for a small amonut).

That's the quick summary. I left out a lot of information, but if you want more info, let me know. I've been doing it for awhile now.. Typically I start my seeds indoors in the basement about 6-10 weeks before last frost (depends on the plant).

saboforthird
06-12-2006, 05:29 PM
REDREAD, is there still a *chance* that I can get tomatoes this year by growing from seed? We bought probably 30 varieties of tomatoes, and I would hate for this to be The Year of No Tomatoes. I mean, what's a garden without tomatoes? :confused:

REDREAD
06-12-2006, 08:28 PM
REDREAD, is there still a *chance* that I can get tomatoes this year by growing from seed? We bought probably 30 varieties of tomatoes, and I would hate for this to be The Year of No Tomatoes. I mean, what's a garden without tomatoes? :confused:

Well, if you started them right now, you'd probably be ok, but they'd be later.
I'd buy a couple plants already grown to hedge your bets though. I really can't say for sure, because I've never started them this late up north.
If you got the seeds, go for it. Water the plants frequently (when they appear), that helps.

A nice variety that grows easy from seed is "Fourth of July".. you get fruit a lot quicker, although they are smaller (not cherry sized, but smaller than normal).