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View Full Version : Homeruns are rally killers.



BigJohn
06-14-2006, 10:40 AM
Anyone else get tired of hearing that line last night?

westofyou
06-14-2006, 10:44 AM
Anyone else get tired of hear that line last night?
After the Reds game I switched to the Twins/Red Sox game, bottom of the 9th tied game Castillo hits a double, the next batter tried to sac him to third, he was nailed.

At that point the announcer said, Tori Hunter was right, this team needs to do the little things and they just didn't.

Apparently Tori said before the game that solo home runs wouldn't get the job done, that the little things need to be done.

In the 12th the Red Sox scored 1 run on a FC.

Down by one the Twins won with a 3 run HR.

Rally Killer and the little things meet and the game is over.

Heath
06-14-2006, 10:45 AM
Harmon Killebrew says hello.

Outs are rally killers.

BRM
06-14-2006, 10:49 AM
Was the Reds booth uttering this line last night or something?

flyer85
06-14-2006, 10:51 AM
productive outs are the key to success.

Once the grasshoppers understand this they will become the masters

BigJohn
06-14-2006, 11:09 AM
It was said on FSN more than once and even in the post game show.

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 11:15 AM
I can remember the final game of the 1967 season between Boston and Minnesota, who were tied for the AL lead. After the game, which the Red Sox won to give Boston the AL flag (thanks also to a loss by the Tigers), Boston manager Dick Williams reportedly apologized to Carl Yastremzski for allowing the Twins Harmon Killebrew to hit a late inning HR that caused Killebrew to tie Yaz for the AL lead in HRs with 44 each. Williams reportedly said he instructed Jim Lonborg to allow Killebrew to hit a HR so as to prevent Killebrew from instead hitting a mere single or double that could have sparked a Twins rally.
I was only age 12 at the time, but I can remember thinking even then how stupid and illogical Williams's reported strategy was. Nearly 40 years later I still have a vivid recollection of that game and his reported comments.

flyer85
06-14-2006, 11:19 AM
Williams reportedly said he instructed Jim Lonborg to allow Killebrew to hit a HR so as to prevent Killebrew from instead hitting a mere single or double that could have sparked a Twins rally.... and Killebrew took the bait, what an idiot. :rolleyes:

traderumor
06-14-2006, 11:36 AM
Yea, I had mentioned last week in the Chris Welsh interview thread that he had apparently retired that puppy. He must have read that and remembered that little gem. Sort of like complaining about a 50 yd bomb because we didn't get to use 17 3-yd running plays to scored a TD.

RedsFan75
06-14-2006, 12:02 PM
My wife heard that and exclaimed "What did he just say", I explained that he said that the homer's killed rallys, and she thought it was the funniest thing she had ever heard!

Smart woman that wife of mine! :D

smith288
06-14-2006, 12:05 PM
I asked in the game thread and ill ask now... what rally was taking place prior to Aurillia's and Dunn's homeruns? I sure didnt see one but one might note that back-to-back jacks could be considered in their own right as a rally...

I guess I dont fully understand the game.

dabvu2498
06-14-2006, 12:08 PM
I agree, the homers kill rallies comment was one of the worst yet and I didn't even hear it. (Scary: I'm taking you guys' word for it.)

BUT... IMO... the truly great teams (and I'm not talking about great offensive teams, I'm talking about teams that win 100+ games a season) can score runs both ways. I'm not sure we can say that this squad can score both ways on a consistent basis.

BigJohn
06-14-2006, 12:15 PM
Well, I thought it was dumb to say but they harped on it. Every time they said homerun, they said, SOLO-homerun. I mean come on. I wish the Reds would score 3 or 4 runs in every inning but back to back homeruns are not a good thing?

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 12:24 PM
... and Killebrew took the bait, what an idiot. :rolleyes:
If Killebrew hadn't been such an idiot, he would have stopped at second base.;)

Joseph
06-14-2006, 12:25 PM
It annoyed me even more that Grande kept calling them Single shots. I've never heard them called single shots before and it honestly sounded like he was searching for the word solo but couldn't come up with it so he said single instead.

Johnny Footstool
06-14-2006, 12:36 PM
They gushed and gushed about the manufactured run last night. How smart it was for Hatteberg to hit a sac fly, etc.

Funny how they didn't chastise him for failing to hit one later in the game with Olmedo on third. They would have blasted Adam Dunn for failing like that.

flyer85
06-14-2006, 12:42 PM
Funny how they didn't chastise him for failing to hit one later in the game with Olmedo on third.He also failed to advance Phillips to 3rd with no outs and nothing was said. I guess he got a "scrappy pass".

BigJohn
06-14-2006, 01:26 PM
:D scrappy pass, now that is damned funny!

traderumor
06-14-2006, 02:14 PM
It annoyed me even more that Grande kept calling them Single shots. I've never heard them called single shots before and it honestly sounded like he was searching for the word solo but couldn't come up with it so he said single instead.Plus, whose to say there was not a second shooter :evil:

Spitball
06-14-2006, 03:21 PM
I can remember the final game of the 1967 season between Boston and Minnesota, who were tied for the AL lead. After the game, which the Red Sox won to give Boston the AL flag (thanks also to a loss by the Tigers), Boston manager Dick Williams reportedly apologized to Carl Yastremzski for allowing the Twins Harmon Killebrew to hit a late inning HR that caused Killebrew to tie Yaz for the AL lead in HRs with 44 each. Williams reportedly said he instructed Jim Lonborg to allow Killebrew to hit a HR so as to prevent Killebrew from instead hitting a mere single or double that could have sparked a Twins rally.
I was only age 12 at the time, but I can remember thinking even then how stupid and illogical Williams's reported strategy was. Nearly 40 years later I still have a vivid recollection of that game and his reported comments.

RedsBaron, Killebrew didn't homer in that last game of the 1967 season.

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/box-scores/boxscore.php?boxid=196710010BOS

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 03:40 PM
RedsBaron, Killebrew didn't homer in that last game of the 1967 season.

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/box-scores/boxscore.php?boxid=196710010BOS
Ah, the danger of relying upon memory. Try 9/30/67, the 161st game of the season. The Red Sox lead 6-2 in the ninth, with Yaz having hit his 44th HR in the 7th inning. In the top of the 9th, with two out, Killebrew hit his 44th HR with one on to bring the Twins to within 2, but they lost 6-4. It was after this game, not the game the following day, that Williams apologized to Yaz for letting Killebrew tie him in HRs.

BigJohn
06-14-2006, 04:40 PM
We need a rallykiller right now!

Spitball
06-14-2006, 04:40 PM
Ah, the danger of relying upon memory. Try 9/30/67, the 161st game of the season. The Red Sox lead 6-2 in the ninth, with Yaz having hit his 44th HR in the 7th inning. In the top of the 9th, with two out, Killebrew hit his 44th HR with one on to bring the Twins to within 2, but they lost 6-4. It was after this game, not the game the following day, that Williams apologized to Yaz for letting Killebrew tie him in HRs.

I remember it well. That was a magical summer to be a fourteen year-old Red Sox fan. Actually, I believe Williams (reportedly) apologized to Yastrzemski for pitching to Killebrew with first base open. Your right, it was 6-2 Boston in the ninth and Twins' Cesar Tovar had just doubled with two outs. With first base open, Williams elected to have Gary Bell pitch to Killebrew, who homered over Yaz's head and the Green Monster on a 2-2 pitch. I believe the entire Northeast was on its feet pacing as Oliva lined out to second baseman Jerry Adair to end the game.

Williams was widely criticized for not walking Killebrew and I believe he may have apologized. Actually, if he did apologize, he also defended the move because he didn't want to walk Killebrew with the tying run in the on deck circle. Angry Yaz fans really made a bigger deal out of the move than anything else. Whew! Memory blasts!

KronoRed
06-14-2006, 04:53 PM
We need a rallykiller right now!
There ya go

BigJohn
06-14-2006, 04:54 PM
:beerme:

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 05:04 PM
I remember it well. That was a magical summer to be a fourteen year-old Red Sox fan. Actually, I believe Williams (reportedly) apologized to Yastrzemski for pitching to Killebrew with first base open. Your right, it was 6-2 Boston in the ninth and Twins' Cesar Tovar had just doubled with two outs. With first base open, Williams elected to have Gary Bell pitch to Killebrew, who homered over Yaz's head and the Green Monster on a 2-2 pitch. I believe the entire Northeast was on its feet pacing as Oliva lined out to second baseman Jerry Adair to end the game.

Williams was widely criticized for not walking Killebrew and I believe he may have apologized. Actually, if he did apologize, he also defended the move because he didn't want to walk Killebrew with the tying run in the on deck circle. Angry Yaz fans really made a bigger deal out of the move than anything else. Whew! Memory blasts!
Like much of the country, I was rooting for the Red Sox during the four team battle for the AL flag between Boston, Minnesota, Detroit and the Chicago White Sox. I can recall watching both of the final games between Boston and Minnesota, and how the Fenway Park crowd mobbed Jim Lonborg after the victory on the final day of the season.
Again relying on memory, and with all due respect for research showing clutch hitting to be largely a myth, I have never seen anyone play at such a high clutch level as Yaz did in the closing days of the 1967 season. He was Roy Hobbs come to life.

Spitball
06-14-2006, 05:30 PM
Like much of the country, I was rooting for the Red Sox during the four team battle for the AL flag between Boston, Minnesota, Detroit and the Chicago White Sox. I can recall watching both of the final games between Boston and Minnesota, and how the Fenway Park crowd mobbed Jim Lonborg after the victory on the final day of the season.
Again relying on memory, and with all due respect for research showing clutch hitting to be largely a myth, I have never seen anyone play at such a high clutch level as Yaz did in the closing days of the 1967 season. He was Roy Hobbs come to life.

You are so right. Yaz was absolutely superhuman, both hitting and fielding. I truly believe that the 1967 team gave birth to the Northeast's love affair with the Red Sox. Everyone in the area was consumed with the team and Yastrzemski. You would go into a home or store and everyone was talking about the Red Sox. Before that season, you could walk up to the gate and get great box seats. After that and since, forget it. Before that season, Yaz wasn't particularly well received by the fans. After that, for a few years, he was a god. Unfortunately for Yaz, he was never quite that perfect and again and the fans became pretty critical of his game and his salary.

TeamBoone
06-14-2006, 05:53 PM
Well, I thought it was dumb to say but they harped on it. Every time they said homerun, they said, SOLO-homerun. I mean come on. I wish the Reds would score 3 or 4 runs in every inning but back to back homeruns are not a good thing?

Welsh has been saying HRs are rally killers a lot this year; I don't get it either.

It's certainly not the hitter's fault that no one is on base; I guess they should wait to hit one until there's a runner on... in many instances, they'd still be waiting.

I guess those HRs shouldn't count.

TeamBoone
06-14-2006, 05:55 PM
Before that season, Yaz wasn't particularly well received by the fans. After that, for a few years, he was a god. Unfortunately for Yaz, he was never quite that perfect and again and the fans became pretty critical of his game and his salary.

His personality/character wasn't so great either.

I once witnessed him refuse to give an autograph to a kid because he was wearing a Yankee hat. "Too bad kid; I don't sign for Yankee fans". Totally tasteless, and I've never liked him because of that act.

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 06:06 PM
I rooted for Yaz, but I can recall him really acting rather rude in 1989 when he and Johnny Bench made a joint appearance on a TV show as a result of their inductions into the HOF that year, Naturally, the discussion turned to the 1975 World Series both participated in. Yaz was very bitter and essentially claimed that the Reds were lucky and the umpires stole the Series from the Red Sox, finally drawing a mild retort from Bench.
Yaz was also bitter in his autobiography. He claimed that the Red Sox should've won the Series in five games, which was silly. Game five was the one game that the Reds dominated, with Gullett on cruise control and Perez hitting two HRs in a 6-2 win. The Red Sox would never have won the Series in five games; with better luck, perhaps they would've won it in four games, or six games, or seven games, but with better luck the Reds could've won it in five games or six games. Games 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 were one-run battles that could have gone either way. Besides, who made the final out of both the 1975 World Series and the 1978 AL East playoff? Yaz.
I still rooted for him, though, and I do wish the 1978 Red Sox had won it all.

Spitball
06-14-2006, 06:45 PM
Yep, Yaz was a jerk. Back when I was in fourth grade, we went to the Centre Super Market in Topsfield, Massachusetts, because Yaz had promised the manager he'd come sign autographs. He never showed and never offered an apology or even an excuse. The forty or so of us who showed up, waited more than an hour before going home. I'm not sure Yaz ever signed autographs for anyone, Yankee or Red Sox fans. I can't remember ever seeing him sign an autograph.

Remember, his fantastic production in 1967 started after White Sox manager Eddie Stanky stated that Yastrzemski was an all-star from the neck down. Oooohhh, talk about a rally cry! New Englanders had known Stanky's statement to be true for years, but they didn't like it being pointed out by an outsider.

After 1967, owner Tom Yawkey made Yaz the highest paid player in baseball. Fans really expected Yaz to play up to that '67 form and earn the big money. He didn't and coupled with his persona, Yaz was booed so badly by the late sixties and into the seventies that he stopped bringing his family to the games.

Funny how personality flaws are tolerated when reaching superman level production. When Fred Lynn and Jim Ed Rice came along, the focus shifted from Yaz. He seemed to become just a part of the team and not the face of the frustrated franchise.

Heath
06-14-2006, 06:50 PM
I know one person around here who cheered for the Tigers in '67. Thankfully they won in '68, if not, WOY might have ditched baseball for the girl or music.

RedsBaron
06-14-2006, 06:51 PM
I remember reading reports that Yaz wasn't all that supportive of the players union, causing one (unnamed) player to comment that he was surprised to learn that Yaz had children because he didn't think that Yaz cooperated with anybody that long.