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OnBaseMachine
07-02-2006, 02:31 AM
Dunn's monumental blast proves to be historic
By Hal McCoy

Staff Writer

CINCINNATI | General Manager Wayne Krivsky leaped to his feet on contact in his private box in Great American Ball Park and said, "Good thing there was a counter in front of me or I might have flown right out the window."

Then he went home Friday night and was so wired he couldn't sleep until 3:30 and watched the replay, "Four times on TiVo — couldn't get enough of it. I only watched the eighth and ninth innings."

Krivsky was referring to the Reds' incredible 9-8 victory over the Cleveland Indians, attained after they trailed, 7-0, after seven innings, and ended by Adam Dunn's walk-off grand slam home run.

Coming back from seven runs down after seven innings is as rare as it gets. Research done by FoxSports/Ohio revealed that since 1981 there have been 55,587 games played and only 15 teams have come back from seven runs behind going into the eighth.

Dunn was informed Saturday that his grand slam came with historical markers.

"Did you know it was only the second time in Reds history a walk-off grand slam erased a three-run deficit to win a game? The other one was hit by Sammy Byrd on May 23, 1936 against Pittsburgh's Cy Blanton.

Dunn looked perplexed and said with a smile, "If you know that, you're a nerd."

Then he was told that Cleveland pitcher Bob Wickman hadn't given up a home run all season and no grand slams in his 14-year major-league career.

"Really? Wow. Now that one is easy to find and you aren't a nerd if you know that one," Dunn said.

"I do love those situations," Dunn said. "I love the opportunities and it doesn't happen often but sometimes things like that happen."

After the ball cleared the right-field fence, Dunn pumped his arm, something he never does.

"I don't do that, but for to come back and win that game when we had no business winning, that game was special."

The Bowden Bluster

The Washington Jim Bowden continues to be the Cincinnati Bowden — let twisted facts be his guide. It was announced Friday that Bowden will remain general manager of the Nationals under new ownership.

Said Bowden, "We're going to be able to do it right. I've never had the opportunity in my career. I've dreamed about it."

Bowden keeps talking about how he didn't have the payroll in Cincinnati to compete, but here are the facts:

In 1993, Bowden's first year, the Reds had the second-highest payroll in baseball, $42.8 million. In 1994, it was seventh highest, in '95 it was sixth highest, in '96 it was sixth highest and in '97 it was eighth highest.

And what did Bowden do with it? He won the division in 1995, the only time any of his teams made the playoffs.

Castro in the game

Juan Castro was in Saturday's lineup at shortstop, not as a reward for his three-run pinch-hit home run in the eighth inning Friday, but "because I had already told him before Friday's game he would play Saturday," manager Jerry Narron said. "We're just giving Felipe Lopez a day off."

Castro's home run, which brought the Reds from 7-1 down to 7-4, was avalanched by Dunn's ninth-inning grand slam, but without Castro's homer, there would have been no Dunn homer.

"A perfect game for fireworks after the game," said Castro, referring to a postgame fireworks show.

Castro was with the Reds from 2000 to 2004, teams that weren't very good, but he now finds himself on a Reds team in first place.

"This team is more confident than any Reds team I've been on," he said.

"It's a lot of different guys. It's a more relaxed team and everybody gets ready to go out there and have confidence they'll have a good game and win."

Farm report

• When former GM Dan O'Brien acquired pitcher Juan Padilla he called him, "A strike-thrower deluxe," even though he proved he wasn't. But there may be one pitching for the Reds' rookie team in Billings, Mont.

Dane Mason threw 45 pitches in his last start, 37 for strikes, allowing one run (a home run) and five hits over five innings.

• Johnny Cueto, promoted from low Class A Dayton to high Class A Sarasota last week, gave up five runs on three hits in his four-inning Sarasota debut Friday in a 9-8, 11th-inning victory over Dunedin. There was an hour-and-a-half rain delay.

• Injured pitcher Brandon Claussen threw 70 pitches of batting practice Saturday without incident and will throw again somewhere Tuesday while the Reds are in Milwaukee.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/sports/content/sports/reds/daily/070206redsnotesweb.html

redsrule2500
07-02-2006, 02:51 AM
Great article. I really like hearing about how great Bowden did with the Reds and is now doing with the Nationals... :) (Reds with 2nd highest payroll in 1993 @ 40million :eek: - times have sure changed)

Then he went home Friday night and was so wired he couldn't sleep until 3:30 and watched the replay, "Four times on TiVo — couldn't get enough of it. I only watched the eighth and ninth innings."


That's the kind of GM that's great to have :)!

OnBaseMachine
07-02-2006, 06:46 AM
Dunn silencing critics
Half of OF's RBI have come on home runs
BY KEVIN KELLY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

Reds teammates crowded around home plate, anxious to mob Adam Dunn after the left fielder's game-winning grand slam with two outs in the ninth inning Friday at Great American Ball Park.

Dunn recalled Saturday what he was thinking as he approached the group to complete an improbable comeback and 9-8 win.

"I stepped on third (base) and wanted to hurry up because I knew it was 10:20 p.m.," he said. "I wanted to get out of there and watch the concert."

Dunn changed into street clothes and, with center fielder Ken Griffey Jr., hurried over to U.S. Bank Arena where band Nickelback was headlining a concert that also included the band Hoobastank.

"We got there on the third song," Dunn said. "So we made it for six or seven (songs)."

Friday evening was as historic as it was entertaining for the 26-year-old slugger.

Dunn became just the second player in Reds history to erase a three-run deficit with a walk-off grand slam. The only other Reds player to do it was Sammy Byrd on May 23, 1936. Byrd hit 38 home runs during a 745-game career in the major leagues.

It also was the first walk-off grand slam of its kind - two outs in the ninth inning or later with the home team losing by three - since Brian Giles did it with the Pirates on July 28, 2001.

Only two other times in franchise history, before Friday, had the Reds overcome a seven-run deficit in the eighth inning or later. It happened against the Mets on May 6, 1995, and against the Boston Braves on June 4, 1951.

"That's stuff that if you know, you're a nerd," Dunn said.

Dunn was back in the starting lineup, batting second for the seventh time this season, before a sellout crowd Saturday at Great American Ball Park.

Reds manager Jerry Narron likes Dunn in the second spot because of his high on-base percentage. Dunn entered Saturday with a .375 on-base percentage.

"It also puts pressure on the opposing pitcher right from the get-go," Narron said. "There's somebody behind Dunner that's a pretty good hitter (Griffey), so they're not exactly going to be able to put (Dunn) on base all the time."

A .182 hitter with runners in scoring position this season (through Friday), Dunn's grand slam was his second game- winning hit with two outs in as many nights.

His stats entering Saturday - .231 batting average, .560 slugging percentage, 26 home runs, 52 RBI - weren't far off what they were through June last season. He carried a .247 average, .350 on-base percentage, .506 slugging percentage, 20 home runs and 40 RBI into July last year.

"I was really happy for Adam last night," Reds infielder Juan Castro said. "People have been saying this and that about him. That's the way it sometimes goes in baseball. But he's proven that he can come back and do things."

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060702/SPT04/607020331/1071/SPT04

NJReds
07-02-2006, 07:36 AM
Then he went home Friday night and was so wired he couldn't sleep until 3:30 and watched the replay, "Four times on TiVo — couldn't get enough of it. I only watched the eighth and ninth innings."


That's the kind of GM that's great to have :)!

Don't be so hard on O'Brien. I'm sure he would've cranked up the Betamax for that one, too. :evil:

Steve4192
07-02-2006, 08:53 AM
Dunn silencing critics

Not me.

Adam Dunn failed to come through in a sac fly situation. He had the perfect opportunity to lift a fly ball into the outfield and score the runner on third, but once again he fails to deliver the sac fly. Instead, he screws up and hits the ball over the fence. He can't make a productive out to save his life.

Can this kid do anything right?

Ltlabner
07-02-2006, 09:43 AM
Nawww...he should have bunted down the third baseline to defeat the shift. :pimp:

OnBaseMachine
07-02-2006, 02:56 PM
Adam Dunn donates grand slam bat to Reds Hall of Fame

Adam Dunn, who achieved one of baseball’s rare milestones Friday night against the Indians, will donate to the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum the bat he used to hit his walk-off grand slam in that 9-8 victory.

He will keep the ball in the family and give it to his mother, Pat.

Ken Griffey Jr. also donated the batting gloves he wore when he hit his 548th home run last week at New York, which gave the Griffey Family 700 career home runs.

Dunn’s grand slam home run in the bottom of the ninth inning against Cleveland that scored the deciding run was only the second-such walk-off grand slam home run in Reds history. The last time it happened was in 1936, when Sammy Byrd brought the Reds back from a 3-0 deficit in the bottom of the ninth.

“It’s only happened twice in 135 years of Major League baseball in Cincinnati,” said Greg Rhodes, Executive Director of the Reds Hall of Fame. “It’s much more likely you would see a triple play or a no-hitter. It’s that rare.”

The home run also capped an historic rally that saw the Reds erase a seven run deficit they faced in the 8th inning. It was only the third time in club history the Reds had rallied to win after being down seven runs in the 8th inning.

“We are very, very appreciative of Adam’s and Junior’s generosity,” said Rhodes. “It will be great to share these items with Reds fans for generations to come.”

http://www.wkrc.com/sports/local/story.aspx?content_id=B89D32E7-ECA5-465A-895D-B44B6ABA468B

KronoRed
07-02-2006, 04:56 PM
Classy :)

Marc D
07-02-2006, 06:12 PM
Injured pitcher Brandon Claussen threw 70 pitches of batting practice Saturday .....


I thought it was Mays?

KittyDuran
07-02-2006, 06:51 PM
I thought it was Mays?
OUCH!!! :laugh:

MWM
07-02-2006, 08:42 PM
I thought it was Mays?

Hilarious!!!!!!


:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

KronoRed
07-02-2006, 10:56 PM
I thought it was Mays?
http://lastperson.suncircle.org/Smileys/default/Guffaw.gif

RFS62
07-03-2006, 07:44 AM
I thought it was Mays?


:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


Ya' know, from a distance, they kinda all look alike.

gm
07-03-2006, 11:59 AM
Castro was with the Reds from 2000 to 2004, teams that weren't very good, but he now finds himself on a Reds team in first place.

"This team is more confident than any Reds team I've been on," he said.

Not when there's a call to the bullpen...