PDA

View Full Version : Indictment looms for Bonds



Reds4Life
07-11-2006, 01:49 PM
Sources say it could be within 2 weeks.

Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13816292/


Several baseball sources believe San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds will be indicted in the next two weeks, the New York Daily News reported Tuesday.

The newspaper said that the U.S. Attorney's office in San Francisco is considering whether to seek an indictment against Bonds, possibly next week, for perjury and tax evasion.

A grand jury, which has been hearing evidence, is due to expire within the next two weeks, the Daily News added. Attorneys told the newspaper that generally when a grand jury the end of its term, a prosecutor will seek an indictment.

The grand jury will convene in San Francisco on one of the next upcoming Thursdays and might be asked to consider the evidence against Bonds, the Daily News said. Then, at least 12 of the 23 grand jury members must agree that there is "probable cause" that a crime was committed and that Bonds did it.

The grand jury would indict, or not indict, Bonds, or else the U.S. attorney could decide not to seek an indictment at that point or request from a judge an extension to continue the grand jury, the Daily News said.

The Daily News said that among those testifying to the grand jury have included former Bonds physician Arthur Ting, San Francisco Giants trainer Stan Conte (no relation to BALCO founder Victor Conte), and Bonds' former girlfriend Kimberly Bell.

The Daily News said that Bell reportedly told the grand jury that Bonds gave her about $80,000 and told her he used steroids before meeting BALCO officials.

Bonds told a grand jury in December 2003 that he did not knowingly take performance-enhancing drugs.

Chip R
07-11-2006, 01:50 PM
Big deal. Indictments are easy. Call me when he goes on trial.

westofyou
07-11-2006, 02:10 PM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?

redsmetz
07-11-2006, 02:13 PM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?

To distract people? Isn't that how it's done now?

RFS62
07-11-2006, 02:14 PM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?


'Cause he's Moby Bonds, the greatest trophy on earth.

registerthis
07-11-2006, 02:17 PM
And lo, the SELIG did look down upon the proceedings, and he did witnesseth Bonds getting indicted, and he was very pleased.

"Now, people may finally getteth off my back." sayeth the SELIG.

BCubb2003
07-11-2006, 02:19 PM
Hey now, he hasn't even been charged yet. Should we be publicizing his name like this?

registerthis
07-11-2006, 02:25 PM
Hey now, he hasn't even been charged yet. Should we be publicizing his name like this?

Call him Rafael Palmeiro then. :)

KronoRed
07-11-2006, 03:59 PM
To distract people? Isn't that how it's done now?
Exactly, keep peoples minds off real problems the government can't do anything about ;)

Reds Nd2
07-11-2006, 07:49 PM
The grand jury would indict, or not indict, Bonds, or else the U.S. attorney could decide not to seek an indictment at that point or request from a judge an extension to continue the grand jury, the Daily News said.

If the extension is granted, would Greg Anderson have to remain in prison on the contempt charges?

GAC
07-11-2006, 08:13 PM
He has already been indicted and sentenced in the court of public opinion.

That is all that matters to me.

A talented ballplayer who probably would have been HOF bound regardless. But his ego and greed said it wasn't enough.

CougarQuest
07-11-2006, 10:01 PM
Big deal. Indictments are easy. Call me when he goes on trial.
Hunh?!?

top6
07-11-2006, 10:49 PM
Big deal. Indictments are easy. Call me when he goes on trial.USDAs do not indicte when they can't win. This is a big deal, although there's a ways to go.

I wonder if they'd be willing to drop the charges if he retired. A strange deal, but it would pretty much make everyone happy.

Jpup
07-11-2006, 10:53 PM
USDAs do not indicte when they can't win. This is a big deal, although there's a ways to go.

I wonder if they'd be willing to drop the charges if he retired. A strange deal, but it would pretty much make everyone happy.

many, many indictments are handed down when the government can't win.

gm
07-11-2006, 10:57 PM
'Cause he's Moby Bonds, the greatest trophy on earth.

Yessir, Barry's one whale of a slugger.


To distract people? Isn't that how it's done now?

Wag the whale

backbencher
07-11-2006, 11:15 PM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?

Assuming that this isn't some kind of one-off political joke, a DA or US Attorney's office operates like any other business - it has employees who each have areas of responsibility, and each employee (assistant prosecutor) has some discretion to push or not push his or her cases depending on perceived priority/personal interest/managerial input/personal interest/whim/willingness to work overtime. The big dog likely would weigh in on high-profile matters, but whoever is assigned to, say, "tax fraud," can work on whatever tax fraud cases come along. In tax cases in particular, big-name targets often are seen as desirable because the deterrent effect is seen as greater (that is, the average joe does not need to see a murderer go free to stop him becoming a coworker himself, but the average joe may think twice about failing to declare the $100 he picked up at the casino if he sees a "name" going down for undisclosed income).

CougarQuest
07-11-2006, 11:26 PM
many, many indictments are handed down when the government can't win.
I don't know how many cases you've worked and tried getting a federal indictment, but it's far from easy.

backbencher
07-11-2006, 11:32 PM
many, many indictments are handed down when the government can't win.

"can't win" also is different than "don't win"

pedro
07-12-2006, 01:19 AM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?

He burned a flag at a gay mexican wedding.

RedFanAlways1966
07-12-2006, 07:43 AM
Federal grand juries are composed of 16 to 23 individuals selected at random "from a fair cross section of the community" in the district in which the grand jury convenes, according to the Federal Grand Jury Handbook. The names are generally drawn from lists of registered voters.

I guess B*A*R*R*Y cannot "buy" the jury. At least not yet. I guess this goes to show that honesty is always the best policy. Esp. when you are under oath and in a court of law.

Marc D
07-12-2006, 10:58 AM
Contrary to what some seem to think, lying to a federal grand jury under oath is a big deal. They will come after you for it if they can prove you lied.

Chris Webber is the last high profile athlete I can think of that did it and they got him many years after the fact IIRC.

REDREAD
07-12-2006, 11:53 AM
Question:

If the goverment is so concerned about nailing "Liars" how in the world did Barry Bonds jump to the front of the line?

Life isn't necessarily fair. A lot of people that commit purgury get away with it, but that shouldn't stop the government from trying.

Actually, I love it when a high profile person like Martha Stewart gets busted for purgury. It's nice to see purgury get punished instead of rewarded for a change.

Naturally, it won't stop the politicians from purgury, but it's a start.

BoydsOfSummer
07-12-2006, 12:30 PM
Is Barry a liar? Depends on what your definiton of "is" is.

registerthis
07-12-2006, 12:41 PM
He burned a flag at a gay mexican wedding.

I heard he was busy conducting stem cell research at the time. Couldn't have been him.

redsrule2500
07-12-2006, 12:52 PM
haha that would be awesome if he went to jail. But this is only indictment.

RedFanAlways1966
07-12-2006, 01:11 PM
I heard he was busy conducting stem cell research at the time. Couldn't have been him.

I thought it was b/c B*A*R*R*Y was hangin' outside of someone's ranch in the South thinking he was actually making a diffrence while sappin' up all the attention from fellow liars like himself?

:confused:

registerthis
07-12-2006, 02:13 PM
I thought it was b/c B*A*R*R*Y was hangin' outside of someone's ranch in the South thinking he was actually making a diffrence while sappin' up all the attention from fellow liars like himself?

:confused:

No, Barry isn't Karl Rove. ;)

RedFanAlways1966
07-12-2006, 02:43 PM
No, Barry isn't Karl Rove. ;)

:) That was good, register!

registerthis
07-12-2006, 02:45 PM
:) That was good, register!

:D

Unassisted
07-22-2006, 12:26 AM
The indictment didn't happen.

http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2006/07/21/296166-barry-bonds-relieved-not-to-be-indicted

Barry Bonds Relieved Not to Be Indicted

Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:36 PM EDT

Janie McCauley, AP Sports Writer

Game of Shadows author Lance Williams says if Barry Bonds is indicted, his job is likely safe at home plate with the Giants unless he's found guilty.

SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Bonds expressed "relief" that the federal grand jury considering possible perjury and tax-evasion charges against him expired without an indictment.

The slugger's troublesome right knee feels 100 percent, too. But now the other one is sore.

Bonds left Friday night's game with a bruised left knee following a leadoff single in the third inning, giving way to pinch-runner and defensive replacement Todd Linden. Padres starter Jake Peavy plunked Bonds in the first inning but he initially tried to stay in the game before having a tough time running to first on the base hit.

Bonds, who hit his 722nd career home run Thursday night in a win against the San Diego Padres, declined to talk to reporters Thursday only hours after federal prosecutors decided not to indict him for now, but he made a journal entry on his personal Web site.

"First off, I would like to say that what happened today is not a moment of joy for me, but one of temporary relief," Bonds said in his latest posting on http://www.barrybonds.com. "This has been an issue that has surrounded me for the past three years and I hope that this is the end. ...

"An investigation happened and hopefully it is over. I do want to make it clear that there are no hard feelings for the legal process, but I feel there comes a point where everyone needs to move on."

San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds smiles as he waits to take batting practice before a baseball game against the San Diego Padres on Friday, July 21, 2006 in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Asked later if he wanted to add anything to what he said on his site, Bonds told The Associated Press, "it speaks for itself."

He turns 42 on Monday and his right knee is feeling better than it has for a long time, he said. The Giants star underwent three operations on the knee last year, causing him to miss all but 14 games in 2005.

"I feel great," he said before the Giants played the San Diego Padres on Friday. "My knee feels 100 percent. I'm not lifting heavy like I used to. My body is just sore because I'm older."

Bonds is running well again and has turned some of the extra weight he was carrying around his middle into muscle, though he noted his weight hasn't changed much. He is listed at 228 pounds.

"I haven't lost much weight, but I've lost my belly," he said. "I'm down from six or seven meals a day to three and supplementing with protein shakes."

Stress has affected his appetite, too, he said.

The investigation into Bonds is still ongoing, but it now appears less likely that an indictment would have an impact on him and the Giants this season, which could be his last in San Francisco after 14 years with the club.

In 2003, Bonds testified before the original BALCO grand jury that he thought substances given to him by his personal trainer, Greg Anderson, were arthritis balm and flaxseed oil. Authorities suspect Bonds was lying and that those items were "the clear" and "the cream" — two performance-enhancing drugs tied to the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, the lab exposed as a steroids supplier to top athletes in baseball, track and other sports.

"There are so many people I would like to thank for their support. First and foremost, my family and friends," Bonds wrote on his Web site. "Your support has been constant and unwavering. I would also like to thank my teammates, the fans and all those who have stood behind me throughout all of this. Your support has made a difference for me and allowed me to stay focused on the field."

Bonds is in the final season of a $90 million, five-year contract with the Giants and knows he might be headed to the American League as a designated hitter next year.

The seven-time NL MVP passed Babe Ruth for second place on baseball's career list May 28 and is within 33 home runs of tying Hank Aaron's all-time record of 755 after hitting his 14th homer of the season Thursday — his second home run since the All-Star break.

BrooklynRedz
07-22-2006, 01:32 AM
The investigation into Bonds is still ongoing, but it now appears less likely that an indictment would have an impact on him and the Giants this season, which could be his last in San Francisco after 14 years with the club.

This chapter is far from closed.

EX BRAVEDAD
07-22-2006, 10:02 AM
Nothing but a whitch hunt they need to let it go BARRY BONDS 756

Tommyjohn25
07-22-2006, 11:28 AM
Nothing but a whitch hunt they need to let it go BARRY BONDS 756

Orrrr....baseball can get to the heart of the problem, fix it, and clean up the game we all love and preserve the records for the players that deserve them. But that would be my solution, I guess yours works too, ya know, just letting it go and watch the sport continue the downward spiral.

BrooklynRedz
07-22-2006, 11:46 AM
Nothing but a whitch hunt they need to let it go BARRY BONDS 756

Uh huh...witch hunt.

When you give someone large amounts of money and attempt to conceal the true amount by breaking the payments into sums less than $9k in order to avoid the bank's reporting for tax purposes, that's a crime.

When you lie to federal authorities under oath, that's a crime.

When you fail to pay taxes on auxiliary income, that's a crime.

When you consume and participate in the trafficing of federally controlled substances, that's a crime.

If all this was a big witch hunt, why is Greg Anderson willing to sit in jail? Why not just testify? What's he got to hide? And for whom is hiding the info? And how much is he being paid to sit in that jail cell?

RedFanAlways1966
07-22-2006, 01:15 PM
And for those who have not read the latest edition of SI, a former friend is a big player in giving the Feds information. A former friend who B*A*R*R*Y turned on and supposedly made false accusations against while in the middle of a steroid-loaded mind. The former-friend is named Steve Hoskins. B*A*R*R*Y accused Hoskins of signing Barry's autograph on merchandise and selling it for a buck.

A lesson can be learned... if you are evading tax payments and doing illegal drugs, best not to burn people. Those people may know something and/or possess evidence... and the Feds are good at finding these people.

Witch hunt? Please. I guess some people in Chicago felt the same way when The Untouchables went after Capone. Bonds is no Capone (convicted of tax evasion), but it is against the law to lie while under oath, evade tax payments and it is also illegal to take some of the drugs that we have heard about. Law breakers should be pursued in a legal way... and that is the case here. If people need peace-of-mind and do not want their name brought into a Grand Jury, then they should not break the law... simple.

EX BRAVEDAD
07-22-2006, 08:13 PM
Well if they had enough evidence then what are they waiting for? I like Bonds as a player and think he is one of the 2 best players to play this game.

Tommyjohn25
07-22-2006, 08:15 PM
Well if they had enough evidence then what are they waiting for? I like Bonds as a player and think he is one of the 2 best players to play this game.


Do you honestly think that he has not ever taken steroids?

EX BRAVEDAD
07-22-2006, 09:45 PM
I didnt say that

Chip R
07-22-2006, 11:47 PM
This is not a witch hunt. They already found the witch.

Selig and MLB just needs to let the judicial system work because whatever they do or do not do to Bonds, they will still look bad PR wise. If they do nothing people will complain about them protecting Bonds and not doing anything about him taking steroids. If they do something, people will complain they did not do it earlier.

I am no fan of Selig but MLB and the MLBPA has at least attempted to clean up baseball. Penalties for steroid users in baseball are tougher than they are in the NFL, NBA and NHL.

KronoRed
07-22-2006, 11:51 PM
MLB would love nothing more then do sweep this under the rug and trump up Bonds chasing Aaron's record, no witch hunt here.

EX BRAVEDAD
07-23-2006, 08:49 AM
Gee if this isnt a whitch hunt then why is Palmiero not indicted who looks like the bigger liar

Chip R
07-23-2006, 10:42 AM
Gee if this isnt a whitch hunt then why is Palmiero not indicted who looks like the bigger liar

You answered your own question. As I said, they already found their witch and his initials are BB. Palmiero is retired so there is not a whole lot they can do to him. And as for indicting him for lying to Congress, well I guess he is going to have to get in line behind all the tobacco executives who lied to Congress under oath. Perjury is tough to prove. That is why Bonds may skate on that charge. If he does go down, it will more than likely be because of the taxes. Just ask Pete Rose.